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Sample records for core catalytic domain

  1. Crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ helicase catalytic core domain: the interdomain flexibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia Shin; Way, Tzong-Der; Chang, Ming-Chung; Chen, Yeh

    2014-01-01

    RecQ DNA helicases are key enzymes in the maintenance of genome integrity, and they have functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to most RecQs, RecQ from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecQ) possesses an unusual domain architecture that is crucial for its remarkable ability to repair DNA. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the DrRecQ helicase catalytic core and its ADP-bound form, revealing interdomain flexibility in its first RecA-like and winged-helix (WH) domains. Additionally, the WH domain of DrRecQ is positioned in a different orientation from that of the E. coli RecQ (EcRecQ). These results suggest that the orientation of the protein during DNA-binding is significantly different when comparing DrRecQ and EcRecQ.

  2. A core catalytic domain of the TyrA protein family: arogenate dehydrogenase from Synechocystis

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The TyrA protein family includes prephenate dehydrogenases, cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenases and TyrAas (arogenate dehydrogenases). tyrAa from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, encoding a 30 kDa TyrAa protein, was cloned into an overexpression vector in Escherichia coli. TyrAa was then purified to apparent homogeneity and characterized. This protein is a model structure for a catalytic core domain in the TyrA superfamily, uncomplicated by allosteric or fused domains. Competitive inhibitors acting at the catalytic core of TyrA proteins are analogues of any accepted cyclohexadienyl substrate. The homodimeric enzyme was specific for L-arogenate (Km=331 μM) and NADP+ (Km=38 μM), being unable to substitute prephenate or NAD+ respectively. L-Tyrosine was a potent inhibitor of the enzyme (Ki=70 μM). NADPH had no detectable ability to inhibit the reaction. Although the mechanism is probably steady-state random order, properties of 2′,5′-ADP as an inhibitor suggest a high preference for L-arogenate binding first. Comparative enzymology established that both of the arogenate-pathway enzymes, prephenate aminotransferase and TyrAa, were present in many diverse cyanobacteria and in a variety of eukaryotic red and green algae. PMID:15171683

  3. Real-time monitoring of disintegration activity of catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase using molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-wei; Zhao, Ming-ming; He, Hong-qiu; Guo, Shun-xing

    2013-09-15

    HIV-1 integrase, an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, is a validated target for anti-HIV therapy development. The catalytic core domain of integrase (IN-CCD) is capable of catalyzing disintegration reaction. In this work, a hairpin-shaped disintegration substrate was designed and validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; a molecular beacon-based assay was developed for disintegration reaction of IN-CCD. Results showed that the disintegration substrate could be recognized and catalyzed by IN-CCD, and the disintegration reaction can be monitored according to the increase of fluorescent signal. The assay can be applied to real-time detection of disintegration with advantages of simplicity, high sensitivity, and excellent specificity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The N-terminal shuttle domain of Erv1 determines the affinity for Mia40 and mediates electron transfer to the catalytic Erv1 core in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Eirini; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Pozidis, Charalambos; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2010-11-01

    Erv1 and Mia40 constitute the two important components of the disulfide relay system that mediates oxidative protein folding in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Mia40 is the import receptor that recognizes the substrates introducing disulfide bonds while it is reduced. A key function of Erv1 is to recycle Mia40 to its active oxidative state. Our aims here were to dissect the domain of Erv1 that mediates the protein-protein interaction with Mia40 and to investigate the interactions between the shuttle domain of Erv1 and its catalytic core and their relevance for the interaction with Mia40. We purified these domains separately as well as cysteine mutants in the shuttle and the active core domains. The noncovalent interaction of Mia40 with Erv1 was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, whereas their covalent mixed disulfide intermediate was analyzed in reconstitution experiments in vitro and in organello. We established that the N-terminal shuttle domain of Erv1 is necessary and sufficient for interaction to occur. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for the intramolecular electron transfer from the shuttle cysteine pair of Erv1 to the core domain. Finally, we reconstituted the system by adding in trans the N- and C- terminal domains of Erv1 together with its substrate Mia40.

  5. Mutagenic definition of a papain-like catalytic triad, sufficiency of the N-terminal domain for single-site core catalytic enzyme acylation, and C-terminal domain for augmentative metal activation of a eukaryotic phytochelatin synthase.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Nataliya D; Rigden, Daniel J; Vatamaniuk, Olena K; Lang, Albert; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Jez, Joseph M; Rea, Philip A

    2006-07-01

    in the case of AtPCS1, for formation of the biosynthetically competent gamma-Glu-Cys enzyme acyl intermediate, the primary data from experiments directed at determining whether the other two residues, His-162 and Asp-180 of the putative papain-like catalytic triad of AtPCS1, are essential for catalysis have yet to be presented. This shortfall in our basic understanding of AtPCS1 is addressed here by the results of systematic site-directed mutagenesis studies that demonstrate that not only Cys-56 but also His-162 and Asp-180 are indeed required for net PC synthesis. It is therefore established experimentally that AtPCS1 and, by implication, other eukaryotic PC synthases are papain Cys protease superfamily members but ones, unlike their prokaryotic counterparts, which, in addition to having a papain-like N-terminal catalytic domain that undergoes primary gamma-Glu-Cys acylation, contain an auxiliary metal-sensing C-terminal domain that undergoes secondary gamma-Glu-Cys acylation.

  6. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  7. Domain movements during CCA-addition: A new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3′-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3′-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis. PMID:25849199

  8. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  9. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  10. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  11. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  12. Catalytic Core of Human Topoisomerase IIα: Insights into Enzyme–DNA Interactions and Drug Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between the N-terminal gate and the catalytic core of topoisomerase II allows the proper capture, cleavage, and transport of DNA during the catalytic cycle. Because the activities of these domains are tightly linked, it has been difficult to discern their individual contributions to enzyme–DNA interactions and drug mechanism. To further address the roles of these domains, we analyzed the activity of the catalytic core of human topoisomerase IIα. The catalytic core and the wild-type enzyme both maintained higher levels of cleavage with negatively (as compared to positively) supercoiled plasmid, indicating that the ability to distinguish supercoil handedness is embedded within the catalytic core. However, the catalytic core alone displayed little ability to cleave DNA substrates that did not intrinsically provide the enzyme with a transport segment (i.e., substrates that did not contain crossovers). Finally, in contrast to interfacial topoisomerase II poisons, covalent poisons did not enhance DNA cleavage mediated by the catalytic core. This distinction allowed us to further characterize the mechanism of etoposide quinone, a drug metabolite that functions primarily as a covalent poison. Etoposide quinone retained some ability to enhance DNA cleavage mediated by the catalytic core, indicating that it still can function as an interfacial poison. These results further define the distinct contributions of the N-terminal gate and the catalytic core to topoisomerase II function. The catalytic core senses the handedness of DNA supercoils during cleavage, while the N-terminal gate is critical for capturing the transport segment and for the activity of covalent poisons. PMID:25280269

  13. The catalytically active domain in the A subunit of calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Benqiong; Liu, Ping; Jiang, Guohua; Zou, Ke; Yi, Fang; Yang, Shujie; Wei, Qun

    2003-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a heterodimer composed of a catalytic subunit A (CaNA) and a regulatory subunit B (CaNB). We report here an active truncated mutation of the rat CaNAdelta that contains only the catalytic domain (residues 1-347, also known as a/CaNA). The p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity and protein phosphatase activity of a/CaNA were higher than that of CaNA. Both p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity and protein phosphatase activity of a/CaNA were unaffected by CaM and the B-subunit; the B-subunit and CaM have relatively little effect on p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity and a crucial effect on protein phosphatase activity of CaNA. Mn2+ and Ni2+ ions effeciently activated CaNA. The Km of a/CaNA was about 16 mM, and the k(cat) of a/CaNA was 10.03 s(-1) using pNPP as substrate. With RII peptide as a substrate, the Km of a/CaNA was about 21 microM and the k(cat) of a/CaNA was 0.51 s(-1). The optimum reaction temperature was about 45 degrees C, and the optimum reaction pH was about 7.2. Our results indicate that a/CaNA is the catalytic core of CaNA, and CaN and the B-subunit binding domain itself might play roles in the negative regulation of the phosphatase activity of CaN. The results provide the basis for future studies on the catalytic domain of CaN.

  14. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; ...

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  16. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  17. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles.

  18. Phospholipid binding to the FAK catalytic domain impacts function

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in development, in homeostasis and in the progression of human disease. Multiple stimuli activate FAK, which requires a change in structure from an autoinhibited to activated conformation. In the autoinhibited conformation the FERM domain associates with the catalytic domain of FAK and PI(4,5)P2 binding to the FERM domain plays a role in the release of autoinhibition, activating the enzyme. An in silico model of FAK/PI(4,5)P2 interaction suggests that residues on the catalytic domain interact with PI(4,5)P2, in addition to the known FERM domain PI(4,5)P2 binding site. This study was undertaken to test the significance of this in silico observation. Mutations designed to disrupt the putative PI(4,5)P2 binding site were engineered into FAK. These mutants exhibited defects in phosphorylation and failed to completely rescue the phenotype associated with fak -/- phenotype fibroblasts demonstrating the importance of these residues in FAK function. The catalytic domain of FAK exhibited PI(4,5)P2 binding in vitro and binding activity was lost upon mutation of putative PI(4,5)P2 binding site basic residues. However, binding was not selective for PI(4,5)P2, and the catalytic domain bound to several phosphatidylinositol phosphorylation variants. The mutant exhibiting the most severe biological defect was defective for phosphatidylinositol phosphate binding, supporting the model that catalytic domain phospholipid binding is important for biochemical and biological function. PMID:28222177

  19. The structure of FANCL, the catalytic subunit of the Fanconi Anemia core complex

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Ambrose R.; Lewis, Laurence P.C.; Walden, Helen

    2010-01-01

    The Fanconi Anemia pathway is activated in response to DNA damage, leading to monoubiquitination of the substrates FANCI and FANCD2 by the Fanconi Anemia core complex. Here we report the crystal structure of FANCL, the catalytic subunit of the Fanconi Anemia core complex at 3.2 Å. The structure reveals an architecture that is fundamentally different from previous sequence-based predictions. The molecule is composed of an N-terminal E2-like fold, which we term the ELF domain, a novel double-RWD (DRWD) domain, and a C-terminal RING domain predicted to facilitate E2 binding. Binding assays demonstrate that the DRWD domain, but not the ELF domain, is responsible for substrate binding. PMID:20154706

  20. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  1. Regulatory and Catalytic Domain Dynamics of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filaments†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Song, Likai; Salzameda, Bridget; Cremo, Christine R.; Fajer, Piotr G.

    2016-01-01

    Domain dynamics of the chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin catalytic domain (heavy chain Cys-717) and regulatory domain (regulatory light chain Cys-108) were determined in the absence of nucleotides using saturation-transfer electron paramagnetic resonance. In unphosphorylated synthetic filaments, the effective rotational correlation times, τr, were 24 ± 6 μs and 441 ± 79 μs for the catalytic and regulatory domains, respectively. The corresponding amplitudes of motion were 42 ± 4° and 24 ± 9° as determined from steady-state phosphorescence anisotropy. These results suggest that the two domains have independent mobility due to a hinge between the two domains. Although a similar hinge was observed for skeletal myosin (Adhikari and Fajer (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94, 9643–9647. Brown et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 8283–8291), the latter displayed higher regulatory domain mobility, τr = 40 ± 3 μs, suggesting a smooth muscle specific mechanism of constraining regulatory domain dynamics. In the myosin monomers the correlation times for both domains were the same (~4 μs) for both smooth and skeletal myosin, suggesting that the motional difference between the two isoforms in the filaments was not due to intrinsic variation of hinge stiffness. Heavy chain/regulatory light chain chimeras of smooth and skeletal myosin pinpointed the origin of the restriction to the heavy chain and established correlation between the regulatory domain dynamics with the ability of myosin to switch off but not to switch on the ATPase and the actin sliding velocity. Phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin filaments caused a small increase in the amplitude of motion of the regulatory domain (from 24 ± 4° to 36 ± 7°) but did not significantly affect the rotational correlation time of the regulatory domain (441 to 408 μs) or the catalytic domain (24 to 17 μs). These data are not consistent with a stable interaction between the two catalytic domains in

  2. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    SciTech Connect

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  3. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  4. Catalytic Locomotion of Core-Shell Nanowire Motors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bumjin; Wang, Wei; Wiget, Samuel; Petruska, Andrew J; Chen, Xiangzhong; Hu, Chengzhi; Hong, Ayoung; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-11-22

    We report Au/Ru core-shell nanowire motors. These nanowires are fabricated using our previously developed electrodeposition-based technique, and their catalytic locomotion in the presence of H2O2 is investigated. Unlike conventional bimetallic nanowires that are self-electroosmotically propelled, our open-ended Au/Ru core-shell nanowires show both a noticeable decrease in rotational diffusivity and increase in motor speed with increasing nanowire length. Numerical modeling based on self-electroosmosis attributes decreases in rotational diffusivity to the formation of toroidal vortices at the nanowire tail, but fails to explain the speed increase with length. To reconcile this inconsistency, we propose a combined mechanism of self-diffusiophoresis and electroosmosis based on the oxygen gradient produced by catalytic shells. This mechanism successfully explains not only the speed increase of Au/Ru core-shell nanomotors with increasing length, but also the large variation in speed among Au/Ru, Au/Rh, and Rh/Au core-shell nanomotors. The possible contribution of diffusiophoresis to an otherwise well-established electroosmotic mechanism sheds light on future designs of nanomotors, at the same time highlighting the complex nature of nanoscale propulsion.

  5. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter; Enghild, Jan J; Brew, Keith; Wewer, Ulla M; Nagase, Hideaki

    2008-01-15

    Human ADAM12 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) is a multidomain zinc metalloproteinase expressed at high levels during development and in human tumors. ADAM12 exists as two splice variants: a classical type 1 membrane-anchored form (ADAM12-L) and a secreted splice variant (ADAM12-S) consisting of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower affinity (9-44 nM). However, TIMP-1 is a much weaker inhibitor. N-TIMP-3 variants that lack MMP inhibitory activity but retained the ability to inhibit ADAM17/TACE failed to inhibit ADAM12. These results indicate unique enzymatic properties of ADAM12 among the members of the ADAM family of metalloproteinases.

  6. Loss of autoinhibition of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump by substitution of aspartic 170 by asparagin. A ctivation of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 without disruption of the interaction between the catalytic core and the C-terminal regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; Adamo, Hugo P

    2004-10-01

    The plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) actively transports Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the extra cellular space. The C-terminal segment of the PMCA functions as an inhibitory domain by interacting with the catalytic core. Ca(2+)-calmodulin binds to the C-terminal segment and stops inhibition. Here we showed that residue Asp(170), in the putative "A" domain of human PMCA isoform 4xb, plays a critical role in autoinhibition. In the absence of calmodulin a PMCA containing a site-specific mutation of D170N had 80% of the maximum activity of the calmodulin-activated PMCA and a similar high affinity for Ca(2+). The mutation did not change the activation of the PMCA by ATP. Deletion of the C-terminal segment further downstream of the calmodulin-binding site led to an additional increase in the maximal activity of the mutant, which suggests that the mutation did not affect the inhibition because of this portion of the C-terminal segment. The calmodulin-activated PMCA was more sensitive to vanadate inhibition than the autoinhibited enzyme. In contrast, inhibition of the D170N mutant required higher concentrations of vanadate and was not affected by calmodulin. Despite its higher basal activity, the mutant had an apparent affinity for calmodulin similar to that of the wild type enzyme, and its rate of proteolysis at the C-terminal segment was still calmodulin-dependent. Altogether these results suggest that activation by mutation D170N does not involve the displacement of the calmodulin-binding autoinhibitory domain from the catalytic core and may arise directly from changes in the accessibility to the calcium-binding residues of the pump.

  7. Phosphorylation in the Catalytic Cleft Stabilizes and Attracts Domains of a Phosphohexomutase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Lee, Yingying; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation can modulate the activities of enzymes. The phosphoryl donor in the catalytic cleft of α-D-phosphohexomutases is transiently dephosphorylated while the reaction intermediate completes a 180° reorientation within the cleft. The phosphorylated form of 52 kDa bacterial phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase is less accessible to dye or protease, more stable to chemical denaturation, and widely stabilized against NMR-detected hydrogen exchange across the core of domain 3 to juxtaposed domain 4 (each by ≥1.3 kcal/mol) and parts of domains 1 and 2. However, phosphorylation accelerates hydrogen exchange in specific regions of domains 1 and 2, including a metal-binding residue in the active site. Electrostatic field lines reveal attraction across the catalytic cleft between phosphorylated Ser-108 and domain 4, but repulsion when Ser-108 is dephosphorylated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulated the dephosphorylated form to be expanded due to enhanced rotational freedom of domain 4. The contacts and fluctuations of the MD trajectories enabled correct simulation of more than 80% of sites that undergo either protection or deprotection from hydrogen exchange due to phosphorylation. Electrostatic attraction in the phosphorylated enzyme accounts for 1) domain 4 drawing closer to domains 1 and 3; 2) decreased accessibility; and 3) increased stability within these domains. The electrostriction due to phosphorylation may help capture substrate, whereas the opening of the cleft upon transient dephosphorylation allows rotation of the intermediate. The long-range effects of phosphorylation on hydrogen exchange parallel reports on protein kinases, suggesting a conceptual link among these multidomain, phosphoryl transfer enzymes. PMID:25606681

  8. Translocation of the Catalytic Domain of Diphtheria Toxin across Planar Phospholipid Bilayers by Its Own T Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyoung Joon; Senzel, Lisa; Collier, R. John; Finkelstein, Alan

    1999-07-01

    The T domain of diphtheria toxin is known to participate in the pH-dependent translocation of the catalytic C domain of the toxin across the endosomal membrane, but how it does so, and whether cellular proteins are also required for this process, remain unknown. Here, we report results showing that the T domain alone is capable of translocating the entire C domain across model, planar phospholipid bilayers in the absence of other proteins. The T domain therefore contains the entire molecular machinery for mediating transfer of the catalytic domain of diphtheria toxin across membranes.

  9. Structure and Catalytic Regulatory Function of Ubiquitin Specific Protease 11 N-Terminal and Ubiquitin-like Domains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal “domain present in USPs” (DUSP) and “ubiquitin-like” (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys63-, Lys6-, Lys33-, and Lys11-linked chains over Lys27-, Lys29-, and Lys48-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11’s function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation. PMID:24724799

  10. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  11. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John

    2017-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery. PMID:27879387

  12. Stromelysin-1: three-dimensional structure of the inhibited catalytic domain and of the C-truncated proenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, J. W.; Marcy, A. I.; Rokosz, L. L.; Axel, M. G.; Burbaum, J. J.; Fitzgerald, P. M.; Cameron, P. M.; Esser, C. K.; Hagmann, W. K.; Hermes, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme stromelysin-1 is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases and is believed to play a role in pathological conditions such as arthritis and tumor invasion. Stromelysin-1 is synthesized as a pro-enzyme that is activated by removal of an N-terminal prodomain. The active enzyme contains a catalytic domain and a C-terminal hemopexin domain believed to participate in macromolecular substrate recognition. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of both a C-truncated form of the proenzyme and an inhibited complex of the catalytic domain by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic core is very similar in the two forms and is similar to the homologous domain in fibroblast and neutrophil collagenases, as well as to the stromelysin structure determined by NMR. The prodomain is a separate folding unit containing three alpha-helices and an extended peptide that lies in the active site of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the amino-to-carboxyl direction of this peptide chain is opposite to that adopted by the inhibitor and by previously reported inhibitors of collagenase. Comparison of the active site of stromelysin with that of thermolysin reveals that most of the residues proposed to play significant roles in the enzymatic mechanism of thermolysin have equivalents in stromelysin, but that three residues implicated in the catalytic mechanism of thermolysin are not represented in stromelysin. PMID:8535233

  13. Evolutionary cores of domain co-occurrence networks

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Almaas, Eivind

    2005-01-01

    Background The modeling of complex systems, as disparate as the World Wide Web and the cellular metabolism, as networks has recently uncovered a set of generic organizing principles: Most of these systems are scale-free while at the same time modular, resulting in a hierarchical architecture. The structure of the protein domain network, where individual domains correspond to nodes and their co-occurrences in a protein are interpreted as links, also falls into this category, suggesting that domains involved in the maintenance of increasingly developed, multicellular organisms accumulate links. Here, we take the next step by studying link based properties of the protein domain co-occurrence networks of the eukaryotes S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, M. musculus and H. sapiens. Results We construct the protein domain co-occurrence networks from the PFAM database and analyze them by applying a k-core decomposition method that isolates the globally central (highly connected domains in the central cores) from the locally central (highly connected domains in the peripheral cores) protein domains through an iterative peeling process. Furthermore, we compare the subnetworks thus obtained to the physical domain interaction network of S. cerevisiae. We find that the innermost cores of the domain co-occurrence networks gradually grow with increasing degree of evolutionary development in going from single cellular to multicellular eukaryotes. The comparison of the cores across all the organisms under consideration uncovers patterns of domain combinations that are predominately involved in protein functions such as cell-cell contacts and signal transduction. Analyzing a weighted interaction network of PFAM domains of Yeast, we find that domains having only a few partners frequently interact with these, while the converse is true for domains with a multitude of partners. Combining domain co-occurrence and interaction information, we observe that the co-occurrence of

  14. Evolutionary cores of domain co-occurrence networks.

    PubMed

    Wuchty, Stefan; Almaas, Eivind

    2005-03-23

    The modeling of complex systems, as disparate as the World Wide Web and the cellular metabolism, as networks has recently uncovered a set of generic organizing principles: Most of these systems are scale-free while at the same time modular, resulting in a hierarchical architecture. The structure of the protein domain network, where individual domains correspond to nodes and their co-occurrences in a protein are interpreted as links, also falls into this category, suggesting that domains involved in the maintenance of increasingly developed, multicellular organisms accumulate links. Here, we take the next step by studying link based properties of the protein domain co-occurrence networks of the eukaryotes S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, M. musculus and H. sapiens. We construct the protein domain co-occurrence networks from the PFAM database and analyze them by applying a k-core decomposition method that isolates the globally central (highly connected domains in the central cores) from the locally central (highly connected domains in the peripheral cores) protein domains through an iterative peeling process. Furthermore, we compare the subnetworks thus obtained to the physical domain interaction network of S. cerevisiae. We find that the innermost cores of the domain co-occurrence networks gradually grow with increasing degree of evolutionary development in going from single cellular to multicellular eukaryotes. The comparison of the cores across all the organisms under consideration uncovers patterns of domain combinations that are predominately involved in protein functions such as cell-cell contacts and signal transduction. Analyzing a weighted interaction network of PFAM domains of yeast, we find that domains having only a few partners frequently interact with these, while the converse is true for domains with a multitude of partners. Combining domain co-occurrence and interaction information, we observe that the co-occurrence of domains in the

  15. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  16. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the RecQ helicase catalytic core from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia-Shin; Chang, Chi-Huang; Kuan, Shu-Min; Chan, Nei-Li; Chen, Yeh

    2012-10-01

    The RecQ proteins are a highly conserved group of DNA helicases which play crucial roles in the maintenance of genome stability. DrRecQ from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a special member of the RecQ family because it contains three Helicase-and-RNase-D-C-terminal (HRDC) domains at the C-terminus. The helicase catalytic core is essential for ATPase and DNA-unwinding activities. In this work, the helicase catalytic core of DrRecQ was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 84.75, b = 95.61, c = 183.83 Å.

  18. Computational Design of Strain in Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Optimizing Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Philip; Curtin, W A

    2015-06-10

    Surface strains in core-shell nanoparticles modify catalytic activity. Here, a continuum-based strategy enables accurate surface-strain-based screening and design of core-shell systems using minimal input as a means to enhance catalytic activity. The approach is validated here for Pt shells on Cu(x)Pt(1-x) cores and used to interpret experimental results on the oxygen reduction reaction in the same system. The analysis shows that precise control of particle sizes and shell thicknesses is required to achieve peak activity, rationalizing the limited increases in activity observed in experiments. The method is also applied to core-shell nanorods to demonstrate its wide applicability.

  19. Possible role of inter-domain salt bridges in oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma brucei: critical role of Glu172 of non-catalytic β-propeller domain in catalytic activity and Glu490 of catalytic domain in stability of OPB.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Junki; Ismail, Nor Ismaliza Mohd; Kubo, Masaki; Kinoshita, Keita; Inoue, Masahiro; Yuasa, Keizo; Nishimoto, Makoto; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2013-11-01

    Oligopeptidase B (OPB) is a member of the prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) family of serine proteases. OPB in trypanosomes is an important virulence factor and potential pharmaceutical target. Characteristic structural features of POP family members include lack of a propeptide and presence of a β-propeller domain (PD), although the role of the β-PD has yet to be fully understood. In this work, residues Glu(172), Glu(490), Glu(524) and Arg(689) in Trypanosoma brucei OPB (Tb OPB), which are predicted to form inter-domain salt bridges, were substituted for Gln and Ala, respectively. These mutants were evaluated in terms of catalytic properties and stability. A negative effect on kcat/Km was obtained following mutation of Glu(172) or Arg(689). In contrast, the E490Q mutant exhibited markedly decreased thermal stability, although this mutation had less effect on catalytic properties compared to the E172Q and R689A mutants. Trypsin digestion showed that the boundary regions between the β-PD and catalytic domains (CDs) of the E490Q mutant are unfolded with heat treatment. These results indicated that Glu(490) in the CD plays a role in stabilization of Tb OPB, whereas Glu(172) in the β-PD is critical for the catalytic activity of Tb OPB.

  20. Crystal structures of Cg1458 reveal a catalytic lid domain and a common catalytic mechanism for the FAH family.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tingting; Gao, Yanyan; Marsh, May; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Meitian; Mao, Xiang; Xu, Langlai; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2013-01-01

    Cg1458 was recently characterized as a novel soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase. However, sequence alignment identified that Cg1458 has no similarity with other oxaloacetate decarboxylases and instead belongs to the FAH (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase) family. Differences in the function of Cg1458 and other FAH proteins may suggest a different catalytic mechanism. To help elucidate the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458, crystal structures of Cg1458 in both the open and closed conformations have been determined for the first time up to a resolution of 1.9 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) and 2.0 Å respectively. Comparison of both structures and detailed biochemical studies confirmed the presence of a catalytic lid domain which is missing in the native enzyme structure. In this lid domain, a glutamic acid-histidine dyad was found to be critical in mediating enzymatic catalysis. On the basis of structural modelling and comparison, as well as large-scale sequence alignment studies, we further determined that the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458 is actually through a glutamic acid-histidine-water triad, and this catalytic triad is common among FAH family proteins that catalyse the cleavage of the C-C bond of the substrate. Two sequence motifs, HxxE and Hxx…xxE have been identified as the basis for this mechanism.

  1. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  2. Processing of metacaspase into a cytoplasmic catalytic domain mediating cell death in Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zalila, Habib; González, Iveth J; El-Fadili, Amal Kuendig; Delgado, Maria Belen; Desponds, Chantal; Schaff, Cédric; Fasel, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Metacaspases are cysteine peptidases that could play a role similar to caspases in the cell death programme of plants, fungi and protozoa. The human protozoan parasite Leishmania major expresses a single metacaspase (LmjMCA) harbouring a central domain with the catalytic dyad histidine and cysteine as found in caspases. In this study, we investigated the processing sites important for the maturation of LmjMCA catalytic domain, the cellular localization of LmjMCA polypeptides, and the functional role of the catalytic domain in the cell death pathway of Leishmania parasites. Although LmjMCA polypeptide precursor form harbours a functional mitochondrial localization signal (MLS), we determined that LmjMCA polypeptides are mainly localized in the cytoplasm. In stress conditions, LmjMCA precursor forms were extensively processed into soluble forms containing the catalytic domain. This domain was sufficient to enhance sensitivity of parasites to hydrogen peroxide by impairing the mitochondrion. These data provide experimental evidences of the importance of LmjMCA processing into an active catalytic domain and of its role in disrupting mitochondria, which could be relevant in the design of new drugs to fight leishmaniasis and likely other protozoan parasitic diseases.

  3. Inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase by small molecules targeting the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Kramp, Kristopher; Harris, Michael E; van den Akker, Focco

    2016-10-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a crucial role in cyclic nucleotide signaling that regulates numerous important physiological processes. To identify new sGC inhibitors that may prevent the formation of the active catalytic domain conformation, we carried out an in silico docking screen targeting a 'backside pocket' of the inactive sGC catalytic domain structure. Compounds 1 and 2 were discovered to inhibit sGC even at high/saturating nitric oxide concentrations. Both compounds also inhibit the BAY 58-2667-activated sGC as well as BAY 41-2272-stimulated sGC activity. Additional biochemical analyses showed that compound 2 also inhibits the isolated catalytic domain, thus demonstrating functional binding to this domain. Both compounds have micromolar affinity for sGC and are potential leads to develop more potent sGC inhibitors. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. CORAL: aligning conserved core regions across domain families.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jessica H; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2009-08-01

    Homologous protein families share highly conserved sequence and structure regions that are frequent targets for comparative analysis of related proteins and families. Many protein families, such as the curated domain families in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), exhibit similar structural cores. To improve accuracy in aligning such protein families, we propose a profile-profile method CORAL that aligns individual core regions as gap-free units. CORAL computes optimal local alignment of two profiles with heuristics to preserve continuity within core regions. We benchmarked its performance on curated domains in CDD, which have pre-defined core regions, against COMPASS, HHalign and PSI-BLAST, using structure superpositions and comprehensive curator-optimized alignments as standards of truth. CORAL improves alignment accuracy on core regions over general profile methods, returning a balanced score of 0.57 for over 80% of all domain families in CDD, compared with the highest balanced score of 0.45 from other methods. Further, CORAL provides E-values to aid in detecting homologous protein families and, by respecting block boundaries, produces alignments with improved 'readability' that facilitate manual refinement. CORAL will be included in future versions of the NCBI Cn3D/CDTree software, which can be downloaded at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdtree/cdtree.shtml. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. CORAL: aligning conserved core regions across domain families

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jessica H.; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Homologous protein families share highly conserved sequence and structure regions that are frequent targets for comparative analysis of related proteins and families. Many protein families, such as the curated domain families in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), exhibit similar structural cores. To improve accuracy in aligning such protein families, we propose a profile–profile method CORAL that aligns individual core regions as gap-free units. Results: CORAL computes optimal local alignment of two profiles with heuristics to preserve continuity within core regions. We benchmarked its performance on curated domains in CDD, which have pre-defined core regions, against COMPASS, HHalign and PSI-BLAST, using structure superpositions and comprehensive curator-optimized alignments as standards of truth. CORAL improves alignment accuracy on core regions over general profile methods, returning a balanced score of 0.57 for over 80% of all domain families in CDD, compared with the highest balanced score of 0.45 from other methods. Further, CORAL provides E-values to aid in detecting homologous protein families and, by respecting block boundaries, produces alignments with improved ‘readability’ that facilitate manual refinement. Availability: CORAL will be included in future versions of the NCBI Cn3D/CDTree software, which can be downloaded at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdtree/cdtree.shtml. Contact: fongj@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19470584

  6. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Troy A.; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that transitions between an open/disorded conformation to a closed/ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies show that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. In order to more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function we created three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two or three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters by at least 106. Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggest that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact. PMID:23127136

  7. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-11-27

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that undergoes a transition between an open, disorded conformation and a closed, ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies showed that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. To more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function, we introduced three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two, and three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity, resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters of at least 10(6). Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggests that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all the elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact.

  8. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open.

  9. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D.

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  10. Molecular evolution of dinoflagellate luciferases, enzymes with three catalytic domains in a single polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyun; Wilson, Thérèse; Hastings, J. Woodland

    2004-01-01

    Enzymes with multiple catalytic sites are rare, and their evolutionary significance remains to be established. This study of luciferases from seven dinoflagellate species examines the previously undescribed evolution of such proteins. All these enzymes have the same unique structure: three homologous domains, each with catalytic activity, preceded by an N-terminal region of unknown function. Both pairwise comparison and phylogenetic inference indicate that the similarity of the corresponding individual domains between species is greater than that between the three different domains of each polypeptide. Trees constructed from each of the three individual domains are congruent with the tree of the full-length coding sequence. Luciferase and ribosomal DNA trees both indicate that the Lingulodinium polyedrum luciferase diverged early from the other six. In all species, the amino acid sequence in the central regions of the three domains is strongly conserved, suggesting it as the catalytic site. Synonymous substitution rates also are greatly reduced in the central regions of two species but not in the other five. This lineage-specific difference in synonymous substitution rates in the central region of the domains correlates inversely with the content of GC3, which can be accounted for by the biased usage toward C-ending codons at the degenerate sites. RNA modeling of the central region of the L. polyedrum luciferase domain suggests a function of the constrained synonymous substitutions in the circadian-controlled protein synthesis. PMID:15545598

  11. Importance of the lid and cap domains for the catalytic activity of gastric lipases.

    PubMed

    Miled, N; Bussetta, C; De caro, A; Rivière, M; Berti, L; Canaan, S

    2003-09-01

    Human gastric lipase (HGL) is an enzyme secreted by the stomach, which is stable and active despite the highly acidic environment. It has been clearly established that this enzyme is responsible for 30% of the fat digestion processes occurring in human. This globular protein belongs to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold family and its catalytic serine is deeply buried under a domain called the extrusion domain, which is composed of a 'cap' domain and a segment consisting of 58 residues, which can be defined as a lid. The exact roles played by the cap and the lid domains during the catalytic step have not yet been elucidated. We have recently solved the crystal structure of the open form of the dog gastric lipase in complex with a covalent inhibitor. The detergent molecule and the inhibitor were mimicking a triglyceride substrate that would interact with residues belonging to both the cap and the lid domains. In this study, we have investigated the role of the cap and the lid domains, using site-directed mutagenesis procedures. We have produced truncated mutants lacking the lid and the cap. After expressing these mutants and purifying them, their activity was found to have decreased drastically in comparison with the wild type HGL. The lid and the cap domains play an important role in the catalytic reaction mechanism. Based on these results and the structural data (open form of DGL), we have pointed out the cap and the lid residues involved in the binding with the lipidic substrate.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  14. Sequential reactions directed by core/shell catalytic reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanhu; Soh, Siowling; Apodaca, Mario M; Kim, Jiwon; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2010-04-09

    Millimeter-sized reactor particles made of permeable polymer doped with catalysts arranged in a core/shell fashion direct sequences of chemical reactions (e.g., alkyne coupling followed by hydrogenation or hydrosilylation followed by hydrogenation). Spatial compartmentalization of catalysts coupled with the diffusion of substrates controls reaction order and avoids formation of byproducts. The experimentally observed yields of reaction sequences are reproduced by a theoretical model, which accounts for the reaction kinetics and the diffusion of the species involved.

  15. Evolution of Domain Architectures and Catalytic Functions of Enzymes in Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Summit; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Domain architectures and catalytic functions of enzymes constitute the centerpieces of a metabolic network. These types of information are formulated as a two-layered network consisting of domains, proteins, and reactions—a domain–protein–reaction (DPR) network. We propose an algorithm to reconstruct the evolutionary history of DPR networks across multiple species and categorize the mechanisms of metabolic systems evolution in terms of network changes. The reconstructed history reveals distinct patterns of evolutionary mechanisms between prokaryotic and eukaryotic networks. Although the evolutionary mechanisms in early ancestors of prokaryotes and eukaryotes are quite similar, more novel and duplicated domain compositions with identical catalytic functions arise along the eukaryotic lineage. In contrast, prokaryotic enzymes become more versatile by catalyzing multiple reactions with similar chemical operations. Moreover, different metabolic pathways are enriched with distinct network evolution mechanisms. For instance, although the pathways of steroid biosynthesis, protein kinases, and glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis all constitute prominent features of animal-specific physiology, their evolution of domain architectures and catalytic functions follows distinct patterns. Steroid biosynthesis is enriched with reaction creations but retains a relatively conserved repertoire of domain compositions and proteins. Protein kinases retain conserved reactions but possess many novel domains and proteins. In contrast, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis has high rates of reaction/protein creations and domain recruitments. Finally, we elicit and validate two general principles underlying the evolution of DPR networks: 1) duplicated enzyme proteins possess similar catalytic functions and 2) the majority of novel domains arise to catalyze novel reactions. These results shed new lights on the evolution of metabolic systems. PMID:22936075

  16. (Gold core)@(ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Benxia; Gu, Ting; Ming, Tian; Wang, Junxin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures.

  17. Conservation and Covariance in Small Bacterial Phosphoglycosyltransferases Identify the Functional Catalytic Core.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Vinita; Luo, Lingqi; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Allen, Karen N; Imperiali, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Phosphoglycosyltransferases (PGTs) catalyze the transfer of a C1'-phosphosugar from a soluble sugar nucleotide diphosphate to a polyprenol phosphate. These enzymes act at the membrane interface, forming the first membrane-associated intermediates in the biosynthesis of cell-surface glycans and glycoconjugates, including glycoproteins, glycolipids, and the peptidoglycan in bacteria. PGTs vary greatly in both their membrane topologies and their substrate preferences. PGTs, such as MraY and WecA, are polytopic, while other families of uniquely prokaryotic enzymes have only a single predicted transmembrane helix. PglC, a PGT involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins in the enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni, is representative of one of the structurally most simple members of the diverse family of small bacterial PGT enzymes. Herein, we apply bioinformatics and covariance-weighted distance constraints in geometry- and homology-based model building, together with mutational analysis, to investigate monotopic PGTs. The pool of 15000 sequences that are analyzed include the PglC-like enzymes, as well as sequences from two other related PGTs that contain a "PglC-like" domain embedded in their larger structures (namely, the bifunctional PglB family, typified by PglB from Neisseria gonorrheae, and WbaP-like enzymes, typified by WbaP from Salmonella enterica). Including these two subfamilies of PGTs in the analysis highlights key residues conserved across all three families of small bacterial PGTs. Mutagenesis analysis of these conserved residues provides further information about the essentiality of many of these residues in catalysis. Construction of a structural model of the cytosolic globular domain utilizing three-dimensional distance constraints, provided by conservation covariance analysis, provides additional insight into the catalytic core of these families of small bacterial PGT enzymes.

  18. Dealloying-based facile synthesis and highly catalytic properties of Au core/porous shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Ko, Sung Min; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-06-01

    Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts.Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01321j

  19. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  20. Elucidating the domain architecture and functions of non-core RAG1: The capacity of a non-core zinc-binding domain to function in nuclear import and nucleic acid binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The repertoire of the antigen-binding receptors originates from the rearrangement of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genetic loci in a process known as V(D)J recombination. The initial site-specific DNA cleavage steps of this process are catalyzed by the lymphoid specific proteins RAG1 and RAG2. The majority of studies on RAG1 and RAG2 have focused on the minimal, core regions required for catalytic activity. Though not absolutely required, non-core regions of RAG1 and RAG2 have been shown to influence the efficiency and fidelity of the recombination reaction. Results Using a partial proteolysis approach in combination with bioinformatics analyses, we identified the domain boundaries of a structural domain that is present in the 380-residue N-terminal non-core region of RAG1. We term this domain the Central Non-core Domain (CND; residues 87-217). Conclusions We show how the CND alone, and in combination with other regions of non-core RAG1, functions in nuclear localization, zinc coordination, and interactions with nucleic acid. Together, these results demonstrate the multiple roles that the non-core region can play in the function of the full length protein. PMID:21599978

  1. Elucidating the domain architecture and functions of non-core RAG1: the capacity of a non-core zinc-binding domain to function in nuclear import and nucleic acid binding.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Janeen L; Rahman, Negar S; Zhao, Shuying; Rodgers, William; Rodgers, Karla K

    2011-05-20

    The repertoire of the antigen-binding receptors originates from the rearrangement of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genetic loci in a process known as V(D)J recombination. The initial site-specific DNA cleavage steps of this process are catalyzed by the lymphoid specific proteins RAG1 and RAG2. The majority of studies on RAG1 and RAG2 have focused on the minimal, core regions required for catalytic activity. Though not absolutely required, non-core regions of RAG1 and RAG2 have been shown to influence the efficiency and fidelity of the recombination reaction. Using a partial proteolysis approach in combination with bioinformatics analyses, we identified the domain boundaries of a structural domain that is present in the 380-residue N-terminal non-core region of RAG1. We term this domain the Central Non-core Domain (CND; residues 87-217). We show how the CND alone, and in combination with other regions of non-core RAG1, functions in nuclear localization, zinc coordination, and interactions with nucleic acid. Together, these results demonstrate the multiple roles that the non-core region can play in the function of the full length protein.

  2. Core-shell nanospheres Pt@SiO2 for catalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yujuan; Wang, Yuqing; Lu, Zhang-Hui; Chen, Xiangshu; Xiong, Lihua

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafine platinum nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica nanospheres (Pt@SiO2) have been synthesized in a NP-5/cyclohexane reversed-micelle system followed by NaBH4 reduction. The as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopes, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and nitrogen adsorption-desorption investigations. Interestingly, the as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 showed an excellent catalytic performance in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (BH3NH3, AB) at room temperature. Especially, the catalytic performance of the Pt@SiO2 remained almost unchanged after the five recycles and even after the heat treatment (673 K), because the silica shells inhibit aggregation or deformation of the metal cores. Besides, the kinetic studies showed that the catalytic hydrolysis of AB was first order with respect to the catalyst concentration and zero order with respect to the substrate concentration, respectively. The excellent catalytic activity and stability of Pt@SiO2 can make it have a bright future in the practical application.

  3. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  4. The catalytic subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase -- role of the N-terminal domain and of the C-terminal residues in catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Etchebehere, L C; Van Bemmelen, M X; Anjard, C; Traincard, F; Assemat, K; Reymond, C; Véron, M

    1997-09-15

    The C subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is unusually large (73 kDa) due to the presence of 330 amino acids N-terminal to the conserved catalytic core. The sequence following the core, including a C-terminal -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe-COOH motif, is highly conserved. We have characterized the catalytic activity and stability of C subunits mutated in sequences outside the catalytic core and we have analyzed their ability to interact with the R subunit and with the heat-stable protein-kinase inhibitor PKI. Mutants carrying deletions in the N-terminal domain displayed little difference in their kinetic properties and retained their capacity to be inhibited by R subunit and by PKI. In contrast, the mutation of one or both of the phenylalanine residues in the C-terminal motif resulted in a decrease of catalytic activity and stability of the proteins. Inhibition by the R subunit or by PKI were however unaffected. Sequence-comparison analysis of other protein kinases revealed that a -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe- motif is present in many Ser/Thr protein kinases, although its location at the very end of the polypeptide is a particular feature of the PKA family. We propose that the presence of this motif may serve to identify isoforms of protein kinases.

  5. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Structural Analysis of the Catalytic Core of Human Telomerase RNA by FRET and Molecular Modeling†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Gavory, Gérald; Symmons, Martyn F.; Ghosh, Yamuna Krishnan; Klenerman, David; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase involved in the maintenance of the telomeres, the termini of eukaryotic chromosomes. The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) consists of 451 nucleotides with the 5′ half folding into a highly conserved catalytic core comprising the template region and an adjacent pseudoknot domain (nucleotides 1–208). While the secondary structure of hTR is established, there is little understanding of its three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Here, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescently labelled peptide nucleic acids, hybridized to defined single stranded regions of full length hTR, to evaluate long-range distances. Using molecular modeling, the distance constraints derived by FRET were subsequently used, together with the known secondary structure, to generate a 3D model of the catalytic core of hTR. An overlay of a large set of models generated has provided a low-resolution structure (6.5–8.0 Å) that can readily be refined as new structural information becomes available. A notable feature of the modeled structure is the positioning of the template adjacent to the pseudoknot, which brings a number of conserved nucleotides close in space. PMID:17073451

  7. The function of Glu338 in the catalytic triad of the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase amidotransferase domain.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, A; Guy, H I; Chaparian, M; Evans, D R

    1998-11-10

    The synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate by the mammalian multifunctional protein, CAD, involves the concerted action of the 40 kDa amidotransferase domain (GLN), that hydrolyzes glutamine and the 120 kDa synthetase (CPS) domain that uses the ammonia, thus produced, ATP and bicarbonate to make carbamoyl phosphate. The separately cloned GLN domain has very low activity due to a reduction in kcat and an increase in Km but forms a hybrid complex with the isolated Escherichia coli CPS subunit. The hybrid has full glutamine-dependent catalytic activity and a functional interdomain linkage. The mammalian-E. coli hybrid was used to investigate the functional consequence of replacing His336 and Glu338, two residues postulated to participate in catalysis as part of a catalytic triad. The mutant mammalian GLN domains formed stable complexes with the E. coli CPS subunit, but the catalytic activity was severely impaired. While the His336Asn mutant does not form measurable amounts of the gamma-glutamyl thioester, the steady state concentration of the intermediate with the Glu338Gly mutant was comparable to the wild type hybrid because both the rate of formation and breakdown of the thioester are reduced. This result is consistent with the postulated role of Glu338 in maintaining His336 in the optimal orientation for catalysis and suggests a mechanism for the GLN CPS functional linkage.

  8. The Number of Catalytic Elements Is Crucial for the Emergence of Metabolic Cores

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Vadillo, Fernando; Pérez-Pinilla, Martín-Blas; Vera-López, Antonio; Veguillas, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Background Different studies show evidence that several unicellular organisms display a cellular metabolic structure characterized by a set of enzymes which are always in an active state (metabolic core), while the rest of the molecular catalytic reactions exhibit on-off changing states. This self-organized enzymatic configuration seems to be an intrinsic characteristic of metabolism, common to all living cellular organisms. In a recent analysis performed with dissipative metabolic networks (DMNs) we have shown that this global functional structure emerges in metabolic networks with a relatively high number of catalytic elements, under particular conditions of enzymatic covalent regulatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, to investigate the mechanism behind the emergence of this supramolecular organization of enzymes, we have performed extensive DMNs simulations (around 15,210,000 networks) taking into account the proportion of the allosterically regulated enzymes and covalent enzymes present in the networks, the variation in the number of substrate fluxes and regulatory signals per catalytic element, as well as the random selection of the catalytic elements that receive substrate fluxes from the exterior. The numerical approximations obtained show that the percentages of DMNs with metabolic cores grow with the number of catalytic elements, converging to 100% for all cases. Conclusions/Significance The results show evidence that the fundamental factor for the spontaneous emergence of this global self-organized enzymatic structure is the number of catalytic elements in the metabolic networks. Our analysis corroborates and expands on our previous studies illustrating a crucial property of the global structure of the cellular metabolism. These results also offer important insights into the mechanisms which ensure the robustness and stability of living cells. PMID:19888419

  9. K-core decomposition of a protein domain co-occurrence network reveals lower cancer mutation rates for interior cores.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Arnold I; Andrews, Simeon; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Azis, Thasni Ka; Malek, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Network biology currently focuses primarily on metabolic pathways, gene regulatory, and protein-protein interaction networks. While these approaches have yielded critical information, alternative methods to network analysis will offer new perspectives on biological information. A little explored area is the interactions between domains that can be captured using domain co-occurrence networks (DCN). A DCN can be used to study the function and interaction of proteins by representing protein domains and their co-existence in genes and by mapping cancer mutations to the individual protein domains to identify signals. The domain co-occurrence network was constructed for the human proteome based on PFAM domains in proteins. Highly connected domains in the central cores were identified using the k-core decomposition technique. Here we show that these domains were found to be more evolutionarily conserved than the peripheral domains. The somatic mutations for ovarian, breast and prostate cancer diseases were obtained from the TCGA database. We mapped the somatic mutations to the individual protein domains and the local false discovery rate was used to identify significantly mutated domains in each cancer type. Significantly mutated domains were found to be enriched in cancer disease pathways. However, we found that the inner cores of the DCN did not contain any of the significantly mutated domains. We observed that the inner core protein domains are highly conserved and these domains co-exist in large numbers with other protein domains. Mutations and domain co-occurrence networks provide a framework for understanding hierarchal designs in protein function from a network perspective. This study provides evidence that a majority of protein domains in the inner core of the DCN have a lower mutation frequency and that protein domains present in the peripheral regions of the k-core contribute more heavily to the disease. These findings may contribute further to drug development.

  10. The dual role of CHAPS in the crystallization of stromelysin-3 catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Gall, Anne-Laure; Ruff, Marc; Moras, Dino

    2003-03-01

    CHAPS [3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate] is a non-denaturing detergent widely used for protein solubilization and stabilization. CHAPS was used to avoid protein aggregation during concentration of the recombinant stromelysin-3 (ST3) catalytic domain and was required to stabilize the protein, allowing its crystallization. The crystal structure of the complex between the ST3 catalytic domain and a phosphinic inhibitor shows two CHAPS molecules binding to ST3 in two different orientations. One CHAPS molecule is masking a hydrophobic surface of the protein, thus avoiding protein aggregation. This detergent molecule is also involved in packing interactions. The other detergent molecule is located in a pocket formed by the N- and C-terminal parts of the ST3 and stabilizes a loop that normally binds a Ca atom.

  11. Heterologous expression and purification of catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2016-10-20

    Here, heterologous expression of plant cellulose synthase (CESA) and its purification has remained a challenge for decades impeding detailed biophysical, biochemical and structural characterization of this key enzyme. An in-depth knowledge of structure and function of CESA proteins would enable us to better understand the hierarchical structure of the plant cell wall. Here, we report a detailed, and reproducible method of purification of catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis thaliana that was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The method relies on a two stage purification procedure to obtain the catalytic domain in monomer and trimer forms. The biochemical and biophysicalmore » data including low resolution structures of the protein have been published. Currently the crystallization studies of this protein are underway.« less

  12. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    PubMed

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  13. Trapped intermediate state of plant pyruvate phosphate dikinase indicates substeps in catalytic swiveling domain mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minges, Alexander; Höppner, Astrid; Groth, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) is an essential enzyme of both the C4 photosynthetic pathway and cellular energy metabolism of some bacteria and unicellular protists. In C4 plants, it catalyzes the ATP- and Pi -dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) while in bacteria and protozoa the ATP-forming direction is used. PPDK is composed out of three distinct domains and exhibits one of the largest single domain movements known today during its catalytic cycle. However, little information about potential intermediate steps of this movement was available. A recent study resolved a discrete intermediate step of PPDK's swiveling movement, shedding light on the details of this intriguing mechanism. Here we present an additional structural intermediate that possibly represents another crucial step in the catalytic cycle of PPDK, providing means to get a more detailed understanding of PPDK's mode of function. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Complete determination of the Pin1 catalytic domain thermodynamic cycle by NMR lineshape analysis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Alexander I; Rogals, Monique J; De, Soumya; Lu, Kun Ping; Kovrigin, Evgenii L; Nicholson, Linda K

    2011-09-01

    The phosphorylation-specific peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 catalyzes the isomerization of the peptide bond preceding a proline residue between cis and trans isomers. To best understand the mechanisms of Pin1 regulation, rigorous enzymatic assays of isomerization are required. However, most measures of isomerase activity require significant constraints on substrate sequence and only yield rate constants for the cis isomer, [Formula: see text] and apparent Michaelis constants, [Formula: see text]. By contrast, NMR lineshape analysis is a powerful tool for determining microscopic rates and populations of each state in a complex binding scheme. The isolated catalytic domain of Pin1 was employed as a first step towards elucidating the reaction scheme of the full-length enzyme. A 24-residue phosphopeptide derived from the amyloid precurser protein intracellular domain (AICD) phosphorylated at Thr668 served as a biologically-relevant Pin1 substrate. Specific (13)C labeling at the Pin1-targeted proline residue provided multiple reporters sensitive to individual isomer binding and on-enzyme catalysis. We have performed titration experiments and employed lineshape analysis of phosphopeptide (13)C-(1)H constant time HSQC spectra to determine [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] for the catalytic domain of Pin1 acting on this AICD substrate. The on-enzyme equilibrium value of [E·trans]/[E·cis] = 3.9 suggests that the catalytic domain of Pin1 is optimized to operate on this substrate near equilibrium in the cellular context. This highlights the power of lineshape analysis for determining the microscopic parameters of enzyme catalysis, and demonstrates the feasibility of future studies of Pin1-PPIase mutants to gain insights on the catalytic mechanism of this important enzyme.

  15. Structural Stability of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ρ Catalytic Domain: Effect of Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Stefan; Alfano, Ivan; Ardini, Matteo; Stefanini, Simonetta; Chiaraluce, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ) belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ∼4.0 M urea. PMID:22389709

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a trypsin-resistant catalytic domain of human calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Roehrl, Michael H. A.; Xiao, Li; He, Xiuyun; Li, Haibin; Ge, Linhu; Shi, Bingyi

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, plays a key role in a number of cellular pathways, including T-cell activation, and is an important molecular target of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK506. To understand the structural basis underlying the activation of calcineurin by calmodulin, X-ray crystallography was employed to solve the three-dimensional structure of the free calcineurin catalytic domain (residues 20–347 of the A subunit). To accomplish this, a bacterially expressed glutathione S-­transferase (GST) fusion protein of the human calcineurin catalytic domain was first purified by GST-affinity chromatography. After limited digestion by trypsin, the catalytic domain (Cncat) was purified using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystallization of Cncat was achieved by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at pH 6.5 using PEG 6000 as precipitant. The diffraction results showed that the Cncat crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.6, b = 87.4, c = 112.0 Å. There are four Cncat molecules in the asymmetric unit, with 49.5% solvent content. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.87 Å resolution and a clear molecular-replacement solution was obtained. The active site of Cncat is open to the solvent channels in the crystal packing. PMID:22691791

  17. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  18. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the μ-wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN. PMID:22713343

  19. The tandemly repeated domains of a β-propeller phytase act synergistically to increase catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyuan; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Shi, Pengjun; Zhao, Junqi; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    β-Propeller phytases (BPPs) with tandemly repeated domains are abundant in nature. Previous studies have shown that the intact domain is responsible for phytate hydrolysis, but the function of the other domain is relatively unknown. In this study, a new dual-domain BPP (PhyH) from Bacillus sp. HJB17 was identified to contain an incomplete N-terminal BPP domain (PhyH-DI, residues 41-318) and a typical BPP domain (PhyH-DII, residues 319-644) at the C-terminus. Purified recombinant PhyH and PhyH-DII required Ca(2+) for phytase activity, showed activity at low temperatures (0-35 °C) and pH 6.0-8.0, and remained active (at 37 °C) after incubation at 60 °C and pH 6.0-12.0. Compared with PhyH-DII, PhyH is catalytically more active against phytate (catalytic constant 27.72 versus 4.17 s(-1)), which indicates the importance of PhyH-DI in phytate degradation. PhyH-DI was found to hydrolyze phytate intermediate D-Ins(1,4,5,6) P(4), and to act synergistically (a 1.2-2.5-fold increase in phosphate release) with PhyH-DII, other BPPs (PhyP and 168PhyA) and a histidine acid phosphatase. Furthermore, fusion of PhyH-DI with PhyP or 168PhyA significantly enhanced their catalytic efficiencies. This is the first report to elucidate the substrate specificity of the incomplete domain and the functional relationship of tandemly repeated domains in BPPs. We conjecture that dual-domain BPPs have succeeded evolutionarily because they can increase the amount of available phosphate by interacting together. Additionally, fusing PhyH-DI to a single-domain phytase appears to be an efficient way to improve the activity of the latter.

  20. Structure of the Catalytic Domain of EZH2 Reveals Conformational Plasticity in Cofactor and Substrate Binding Sites and Explains Oncogenic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Li, Fengling; He, Hao; Senisterra, Guillermo; Seitova, Alma; Duan, Shili; Brown, Peter J.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is an important regulator of cellular differentiation and cell type identity. Overexpression or activating mutations of EZH2, the catalytic component of the PRC2 complex, are linked to hyper-trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) in many cancers. Potent EZH2 inhibitors that reduce levels of H3K27me3 kill mutant lymphoma cells and are efficacious in a mouse xenograft model of malignant rhabdoid tumors. Unlike most SET domain methyltransferases, EZH2 requires PRC2 components, SUZ12 and EED, for activity, but the mechanism by which catalysis is promoted in the PRC2 complex is unknown. We solved the 2.0 Å crystal structure of the EZH2 methyltransferase domain revealing that most of the canonical structural features of SET domain methyltransferase structures are conserved. The site of methyl transfer is in a catalytically competent state, and the structure clarifies the structural mechanism underlying oncogenic hyper-trimethylation of H3K27 in tumors harboring mutations at Y641 or A677. On the other hand, the I-SET and post-SET domains occupy atypical positions relative to the core SET domain resulting in incomplete formation of the cofactor binding site and occlusion of the substrate binding groove. A novel CXC domain N-terminal to the SET domain may contribute to the apparent inactive conformation. We propose that protein interactions within the PRC2 complex modulate the trajectory of the post-SET and I-SET domains of EZH2 in favor of a catalytically competent conformation. PMID:24367611

  1. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  2. Insertion of endocellulase catalytic domains into thermostable consensus ankyrin scaffolds: effects on stability and cellulolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Eva S; Hatem, Christine L; Barrick, Doug

    2013-11-01

    Degradation of cellulose for biofuels production holds promise in solving important environmental and economic problems. However, the low activities (and thus high enzyme-to-substrate ratios needed) of hydrolytic cellulase enzymes, which convert cellulose into simple sugars, remain a major barrier. As a potential strategy to stabilize cellulases and enhance their activities, we have embedded cellulases of extremophiles into hyperstable α-helical consensus ankyrin domain scaffolds. We found the catalytic domains CelA (CA, GH8; Clostridium thermocellum) and Cel12A (C12A, GH12; Thermotoga maritima) to be stable in the context of the ankyrin scaffold and to be active against both soluble and insoluble substrates. The ankyrin repeats in each fusion are folded, although it appears that for the C12A catalytic domain (CD; where the N and C termini are distant in the crystal structure), the two flanking ankyrin domains are independent, whereas for CA (where termini are close), the flanking ankyrin domains stabilize each other. Although the activity of CA is unchanged in the context of the ankyrin scaffold, the activity of C12A is increased between 2- and 6-fold (for regenerated amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose substrates) at high temperatures. For C12A, activity increases with the number of flanking ankyrin repeats. These results showed ankyrin arrays to be a promising scaffold for constructing designer cellulosomes, preserving or enhancing enzymatic activity and retaining thermostability. This modular architecture will make it possible to arrange multiple cellulase domains at a precise spacing within a single polypeptide, allowing us to search for spacings that may optimize reactivity toward the repetitive cellulose lattice.

  3. Insertion of Endocellulase Catalytic Domains into Thermostable Consensus Ankyrin Scaffolds: Effects on Stability and Cellulolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Eva S.; Hatem, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of cellulose for biofuels production holds promise in solving important environmental and economic problems. However, the low activities (and thus high enzyme-to-substrate ratios needed) of hydrolytic cellulase enzymes, which convert cellulose into simple sugars, remain a major barrier. As a potential strategy to stabilize cellulases and enhance their activities, we have embedded cellulases of extremophiles into hyperstable α-helical consensus ankyrin domain scaffolds. We found the catalytic domains CelA (CA, GH8; Clostridium thermocellum) and Cel12A (C12A, GH12; Thermotoga maritima) to be stable in the context of the ankyrin scaffold and to be active against both soluble and insoluble substrates. The ankyrin repeats in each fusion are folded, although it appears that for the C12A catalytic domain (CD; where the N and C termini are distant in the crystal structure), the two flanking ankyrin domains are independent, whereas for CA (where termini are close), the flanking ankyrin domains stabilize each other. Although the activity of CA is unchanged in the context of the ankyrin scaffold, the activity of C12A is increased between 2- and 6-fold (for regenerated amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose substrates) at high temperatures. For C12A, activity increases with the number of flanking ankyrin repeats. These results showed ankyrin arrays to be a promising scaffold for constructing designer cellulosomes, preserving or enhancing enzymatic activity and retaining thermostability. This modular architecture will make it possible to arrange multiple cellulase domains at a precise spacing within a single polypeptide, allowing us to search for spacings that may optimize reactivity toward the repetitive cellulose lattice. PMID:23974146

  4. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  5. Mapping of the functional phosphate groups in the catalytic core of deoxyribozyme 10-23.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Barbara; Widera, Kinga; Wojcik, Marzena; Rebowska, Beata; Nowak, Genowefa; Stec, Wojciech J

    2007-02-01

    The RNA phosphodiester bond cleavage activity of a series of 16 thio-deoxyribozymes 10-23, containing a P-stereorandom single phosphorothioate linkage in predetermined positions of the catalytic core from P1 to P16, was evaluated under single-turnover conditions in the presence of either 3 mM Mg(2+) or 3 mM Mn(2+). A metal-specificity switch approach permitted the identification of nonbridging phosphate oxygens (proR(P) or proS(P)) located at seven positions of the core (P2, P4 and P9-13) involved in direct coordination with a divalent metal ion(s). By contrast, phosphorothioates at positions P3, P6, P7 and P14-16 displayed no functional relevance in the deoxyribozyme-mediated catalysis. Interestingly, phosphorothioate modifications at positions P1 or P8 enhanced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Among the tested deoxyribozymes, thio-substitution at position P5 had the largest deleterious effect on the catalytic rate in the presence of Mg(2+), and this was reversed in the presence of Mn(2+). Further experiments with thio-deoxyribozymes of stereodefined P-chirality suggested direct involvement of both oxygens of the P5 phosphate and the proR(P) oxygen at P9 in the metal ion coordination. In addition, it was found that the oxygen atom at C6 of G(6) contributes to metal ion binding and that this interaction is essential for 10-23 deoxyribozyme catalytic activity.

  6. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  7. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ. C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ has noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems. PMID:26489410

  8. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application. PMID:27759038

  9. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  10. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-10-19

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  11. Structure of the catalytic domain of the colistin resistance enzyme MCR-1

    DOE PAGES

    Stojanoski, Vlatko; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; ...

    2016-09-21

    Due to the paucity of novel antibiotics, colistin has become a last resort antibiotic for treating multidrug resistant bacteria. Colistin acts by binding the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharides and subsequently disrupting the bacterial membrane. The recently identified plasmid-encoded MCR-1 enzyme is the first transmissible colistin resistance determinant and is a cause for concern for the spread of this resistance trait. MCR-1 is a phosphoethanolamine transferase that catalyzes the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A to decrease colistin affinity. The structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1 at 1.32 Å reveals the active site is similar to that of relatedmore » phosphoethanolamine transferases. The putative nucleophile for catalysis, threonine 285, is phosphorylated in cMCR-1 and a zinc is present at a conserved site in addition to three zincs more peripherally located in the active site. As noted for catalytic domains of other phosphoethanolamine transferases, binding sites for the lipid A and phosphatidylethanolamine substrates are not apparent in the cMCR-1 structure, suggesting that they are present in the membrane domain.« less

  12. Structure of the catalytic domain of the colistin resistance enzyme MCR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoski, Vlatko; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-09-21

    Due to the paucity of novel antibiotics, colistin has become a last resort antibiotic for treating multidrug resistant bacteria. Colistin acts by binding the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharides and subsequently disrupting the bacterial membrane. The recently identified plasmid-encoded MCR-1 enzyme is the first transmissible colistin resistance determinant and is a cause for concern for the spread of this resistance trait. MCR-1 is a phosphoethanolamine transferase that catalyzes the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A to decrease colistin affinity. The structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1 at 1.32 Å reveals the active site is similar to that of related phosphoethanolamine transferases. The putative nucleophile for catalysis, threonine 285, is phosphorylated in cMCR-1 and a zinc is present at a conserved site in addition to three zincs more peripherally located in the active site. As noted for catalytic domains of other phosphoethanolamine transferases, binding sites for the lipid A and phosphatidylethanolamine substrates are not apparent in the cMCR-1 structure, suggesting that they are present in the membrane domain.

  13. Structure of the catalytic domain of the colistin resistance enzyme MCR-1.

    PubMed

    Stojanoski, Vlatko; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-09-21

    Due to the paucity of novel antibiotics, colistin has become a last resort antibiotic for treating multidrug resistant bacteria. Colistin acts by binding the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharides and subsequently disrupting the bacterial membrane. The recently identified plasmid-encoded MCR-1 enzyme is the first transmissible colistin resistance determinant and is a cause for concern for the spread of this resistance trait. MCR-1 is a phosphoethanolamine transferase that catalyzes the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A to decrease colistin affinity. The structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1 at 1.32 Å reveals the active site is similar to that of related phosphoethanolamine transferases. The putative nucleophile for catalysis, threonine 285, is phosphorylated in cMCR-1 and a zinc is present at a conserved site in addition to three zincs more peripherally located in the active site. As noted for catalytic domains of other phosphoethanolamine transferases, binding sites for the lipid A and phosphatidylethanolamine substrates are not apparent in the cMCR-1 structure, suggesting that they are present in the membrane domain.

  14. Kinetic analysis of bypass of abasic site by the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntang; Wang, Rong; Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Zhong, Mengyu; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Huidong

    2015-09-01

    Abasic sites (Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites), produced ∼ 50,000 times/cell/day, are very blocking and miscoding. To better understand miscoding mechanisms of abasic site for yeast DNA polymerase η, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation and LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension product were studied using pol η(core) (catalytic core, residues 1-513), which can completely eliminate the potential effects of the C-terminal C2H2 motif of pol η on dNTP incorporation. The extension beyond the abasic site was very inefficient. Compared with incorporation of dCTP opposite G, the incorporation efficiencies opposite abasic site were greatly reduced according to the order of dGTP > dATP > dCTP and dTTP. Pol η(core) showed no fast burst phase for any incorporation opposite G or abasic site, suggesting that the catalytic step is not faster than the dissociation of polymerase from DNA. LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension products showed that 53% products were dGTP misincorporation, 33% were dATP and 14% were -1 frameshift, indicating that Pol η(core) bypasses abasic site by a combined G-rule, A-rule and -1 frameshift deletions. Compared with full-length pol η, pol η(core) relatively reduced the efficiency of incorporation of dCTP opposite G, increased the efficiencies of dNTP incorporation opposite abasic site and the exclusive incorporation of dGTP opposite abasic site, but inhibited the extension beyond abasic site, and increased the priority in extension of A: abasic site relative to G: abasic site. This study provides further understanding in the mutation mechanism of abasic sites for yeast DNA polymerase η.

  15. Solution structure of the catalytic domain of human stromelysin complexed with a hydrophobic inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, S. R.; Kurochkin, A. V.; Hu, W.; Ye, Q. Z.; Johnson, L. L.; Hupe, D. J.; Zuiderweg, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin, a representative matrix metalloproteinase and target of drug development efforts, plays a prominent role in the pathological proteolysis associated with arthritis and secondarily in that of cancer metastasis and invasion. To provide a structural template to aid the development of therapeutic inhibitors, we have determined a medium-resolution structure of a 20-kDa complex of human stromelysin's catalytic domain with a hydrophobic peptidic inhibitor using multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This domain of this zinc hydrolase contains a mixed beta-sheet comprising one antiparallel strand and four parallel strands, three helices, and a methionine-containing turn near the catalytic center. The ensemble of 20 structures was calculated using, on average, 8 interresidue NOE restraints per residue for the 166-residue protein fragment complexed with a 4-residue substrate analogue. The mean RMS deviation (RMSD) to the average structure for backbone heavy atoms is 0.91 A and for all heavy atoms is 1.42 A. The structure has good stereochemical properties, including its backbone torsion angles. The beta-sheet and alpha-helices of the catalytic domains of human stromelysin (NMR model) and human fibroblast collagenase (X-ray crystallographic model of Lovejoy B et al., 1994b, Biochemistry 33:8207-8217) superimpose well, having a pairwise RMSD for backbone heavy atoms of 2.28 A when three loop segments are disregarded. The hydroxamate-substituted inhibitor binds across the hydrophobic active site of stromelysin in an extended conformation. The first hydrophobic side chain is deeply buried in the principal S'1 subsite, the second hydrophobic side chain is located on the opposite side of the inhibitor backbone in the hydrophobic S'2 surface subsite, and a third hydrophobic side chain (P'3) lies at the surface. PMID:8580839

  16. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the tumor-associated human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Alterio, Vincenzo; Hilvo, Mika; Di Fiore, Anna; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pan, Peiwen; Parkkila, Seppo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pedone, Carlo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Monti, Simona Maria; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2009-09-22

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is a plasma membrane-associated member of the alpha-CA enzyme family, which is involved in solid tumor acidification. It is a marker of tumor hypoxia and a prognostic factor in several human cancers. An aberrant increase in CA IX expression in chronic hypoxia and during development of various carcinomas contributes to tumorigenesis through at least two mechanisms: pH regulation and cell adhesion control. Here we report the X-ray structure of the catalytic domain of CA IX in complex with a classical, clinically used sulfonamide inhibitor, acetazolamide. The structure reveals a typical alpha-CA fold, which significantly differs from the other CA isozymes when the protein quaternary structure is considered. Thus, two catalytic domains of CA IX associate to form a dimer, which is stabilized by the formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond. The active site clefts and the PG domains are located on one face of the dimer, while the C-termini are located on the opposite face to facilitate protein anchoring to the cell membrane. A correlation between the three-dimensional structure and the physiological role of the enzyme is here suggested, based on the measurement of the pH profile of the catalytic activity for the physiological reaction, CO(2) hydration to bicarbonate and protons. On the basis of the structural differences observed between CA IX and the other membrane-associated alpha-CAs, further prospects for the rational drug design of isozyme-specific CA inhibitors are proposed, given that inhibition of this enzyme shows antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Structure of USP7 catalytic domain and three Ubl-domains reveals a connector α-helix with regulatory role.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robbert Q; van Dijk, Willem J; Sixma, Titia K

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitin conjugation is an important signal in cellular pathways, changing the fate of a target protein, by degradation, relocalisation or complex formation. These signals are balanced by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which antagonize ubiquitination of specific protein substrates. Because ubiquitination pathways are critically important, DUB activity is often carefully controlled. USP7 is a highly abundant DUB with numerous targets that plays complex roles in diverse pathways, including DNA regulation, p53 stress response and endosomal protein recycling. Full-length USP7 switches between an inactive and an active state, tuned by the positioning of 5 Ubl folds in the C-terminal HUBL domain. The active state requires interaction between the last two Ubls (USP7(45)) and the catalytic domain (USP7(CD)), and this can be promoted by allosteric interaction from the first 3 Ubl domains of USP7 (USP7(123)) interacting with GMPS. Here we study the transition between USP7 states. We provide a crystal structure of USP7(CD123) and show that CD and Ubl123 are connected via an extended charged alpha helix. Mutational analysis is used to determine whether the charge and rigidity of this 'connector helix' are important for full USP7 activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Salmonella virulence factor SseI.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Shyam S; Stebbins, C Erec

    2012-12-01

    SseI is secreted into host cells by Salmonella and contributes to the establishment of systemic infections. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of SseI has been solved to 1.70 Å resolution, revealing it to be a member of the cysteine protease superfamily with a catalytic triad consisting of Cys178, His216 and Asp231 that is critical to its virulence activities. Structure-based analysis revealed that SseI is likely to possess either acyl hydrolase or acyltransferase activity, placing this virulence factor in the rapidly growing class of enzymes of this family utilized by bacterial pathogens inside eukaryotic cells.

  19. High Resolution Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of ADAMTS-5 (Aggrecanase-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Mathis, Karl J.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Hills, Robert L.; Wiese, Joe F.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kiefer, James R.; Marino, Margaret H.; Carroll, Jeffery N.; Leone, Joseph W.; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Arner, Elizabeth C.; Tortorella, Micky D.; Tomasselli, Alfredo

    2008-06-30

    Aggrecanase-2 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5)), a member of the ADAMTS protein family, is critically involved in arthritic diseases because of its direct role in cleaving the cartilage component aggrecan. The catalytic domain of aggrecanase-2 has been refolded, purified, and crystallized, and its three-dimensional structure determined to 1.4{angstrom} resolution in the presence of an inhibitor. A high resolution structure of an ADAMTS/aggrecanase protein provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics to treat osteoarthritis.

  20. Structure and function of the catalytic domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component in Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-05-30

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s(-1), comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP).

  1. Non-catalytic participation of the Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain in target binding

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Brendan T.; Bailey, Melanie L.; Brandl, Christopher J.; Shilton, Brian H.; Litchfield, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Pin1 is a phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) that has the potential to add an additional level of regulation within protein kinase mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, there is a mounting body of evidence implicating Pin1 in the emergence of pathological phenotypes in neurodegeneration and cancer through the isomerization of a wide variety of substrates at peptidyl-prolyl bonds where the residue preceding proline is a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (i.e., pS/T-P motifs). A key step in this regulatory process is the interaction of Pin-1 with its substrates. This is a complex process since Pin1 is composed of two domains, the catalytic PPIase domain, and a type IV WW domain, both of which recognize pS/T-P motifs. The observation that the WW domain exhibits considerably higher binding affinity for pS/T-P motifs has led to predictions that the two domains may have distinct roles in mediating the actions of Pin1 on its substrates. To evaluate the participation of its individual domains in target binding, we performed GST pulldowns to monitor interactions between various forms of Pin1 and mitotic phospho-proteins that revealed two classes of Pin-1 interacting proteins, differing in their requirement for residues within the PPIase domain. From these observations, we consider models for Pin1-substrate interactions and the potential functions of the different classes of Pin1 interacting proteins. We also compare sequences that are recognized by Pin1 within its individual interaction partners to investigate the underlying basis for its different types of interactions. PMID:23407864

  2. Distribution and prediction of catalytic domains in 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 2-oxoglutarate dependent superfamily is a diverse group of non-haem dioxygenases, and is present in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and archaea. The enzymes differ in substrate preference and reaction chemistry, a factor that precludes their classification by homology studies and electronic annotation schemes alone. In this work, I propose and explore the rationale of using substrates to classify structurally similar alpha-ketoglutarate dependent enzymes. Findings Differential catalysis in phylogenetic clades of 2-OG dependent enzymes, is determined by the interactions of a subset of active-site amino acids. Identifying these with existing computational methods is challenging and not feasible for all proteins. A clustering protocol based on validated mechanisms of catalysis of known molecules, in tandem with group specific hidden markov model profiles is able to differentiate and sequester these enzymes. Access to this repository is by a web server that compares user defined unknown sequences to these pre-defined profiles and outputs a list of predicted catalytic domains. The server is free and is accessible at the following URL ( http://comp-biol.theacms.in/H2OGpred.html). Conclusions The proposed stratification is a novel attempt at classifying and predicting 2-oxoglutarate dependent function. In addition, the server will provide researchers with a tool to compare their data to a comprehensive list of HMM profiles of catalytic domains. This work, will aid efforts by investigators to screen and characterize putative 2-OG dependent sequences. The profile database will be updated at regular intervals. PMID:22862831

  3. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect.

  4. Plasma cholesteryl ester-triglyceride transfer protein. The catalytic domain is a low molecular weight proteolipid.

    PubMed

    Busch, S J; Stuart, W D; Hug, B; Mao, S J; Harmony, J A

    1987-12-25

    The lipid transfer protein complex (LTC) isolated from human plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography transfers cholesteryl esters (CE), triglycerides, and phosphatidylcholine (PC) between lipoproteins in vitro. The molecular weight of this lipid transfer catalyst in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels was 65,000. When resolved on a gel filtration column by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), LTC was composed of fractions of high (greater than 150,000) to low (18,000) molecular weight, although sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of each fraction revealed bands at Mr 65,000 (major) and 52,000 (minor). The CE and triglyceride transfer activity of the low Mr HPLC fraction (1049 nmol of triglyceride/mg/h and 244 nmol of CE/mg/h) was significantly greater than that of the high Mr HPLC fraction (15-27 nmol of triglyceride/mg/h and 20-30 nmol of CE/mg/h). The PC transfer activity of the HPLC fractions was not determined. LTC proteins were separated by dialysis in acidified chloroform:methanol solution into dialysand and dialysate proteins. The dialysate contained a low Mr proteolipid, designated the catalytic domain Cd, which catalyzed CE and triglyceride transfer at equivalent rates (11.0 versus 9.5 mumol/mg/h, respectively). PC transfer activity was approximately 10% of these levels (1.5 mumol/mg/h). The dialysand consisted of a protein, designated the transfer protein TP, which facilitated CE (3.4 mumol/mg/h) preferentially over triglyceride and PC (1.0 mumol/mg/h) transfer, and a catalytically inactive protein, designated the heparin-binding domain Hd. We propose a model of the LTC protein (based on catalytic activities, monoclonal antibody reactivities, and heparin-binding capacities of the isolated proteins) in which both Hd (approximately 13 kDa) and Cd (approximately 3 kDa) originate from a single lipid transfer protein, TP.

  5. Catalytic efficiency of chitinase-D on insoluble chitinous substrates was improved by fusing auxiliary domains.

    PubMed

    Madhuprakash, Jogi; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is an abundant renewable polysaccharide, next only to cellulose. Chitinases are important for effective utilization of this biopolymer. Chitinase D from Serratia proteamaculans (SpChiD) is a single domain chitinase with both hydrolytic and transglycosylation (TG) activities. SpChiD had less of hydrolytic activity on insoluble polymeric chitin substrates due to the absence of auxiliary binding domains. We improved catalytic efficiency of SpChiD in degradation of insoluble chitin substrates by fusing with auxiliary domains like polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domain and chitin binding protein 21 (CBP21). Of the six different SpChiD fusion chimeras, two C-terminal fusions viz. ChiD+PKD and ChiD+CBP resulted in improved hydrolytic activity on α- and β-chitin, respectively. Time-course degradation of colloidal chitin also confirmed that these two C-terminal SpChiD fusion chimeras were more active than other chimeras. More TG products were produced for a longer duration by the fusion chimeras ChiD+PKD and PKD+ChiD+CBP.

  6. Catalytic Efficiency of Chitinase-D on Insoluble Chitinous Substrates Was Improved by Fusing Auxiliary Domains

    PubMed Central

    Madhuprakash, Jogi; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is an abundant renewable polysaccharide, next only to cellulose. Chitinases are important for effective utilization of this biopolymer. Chitinase D from Serratia proteamaculans (SpChiD) is a single domain chitinase with both hydrolytic and transglycosylation (TG) activities. SpChiD had less of hydrolytic activity on insoluble polymeric chitin substrates due to the absence of auxiliary binding domains. We improved catalytic efficiency of SpChiD in degradation of insoluble chitin substrates by fusing with auxiliary domains like polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domain and chitin binding protein 21 (CBP21). Of the six different SpChiD fusion chimeras, two C-terminal fusions viz. ChiD+PKD and ChiD+CBP resulted in improved hydrolytic activity on α- and β-chitin, respectively. Time-course degradation of colloidal chitin also confirmed that these two C-terminal SpChiD fusion chimeras were more active than other chimeras. More TG products were produced for a longer duration by the fusion chimeras ChiD+PKD and PKD+ChiD+CBP. PMID:25615694

  7. Visualizing Dealumination of a Single Zeolite Domain in a Real-Life Catalytic Cracking Particle.

    PubMed

    Kalirai, Sam; Paalanen, Pasi P; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-05

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts play a central role in the chemical conversion of crude oil fractions. Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) we investigate the chemistry of one fresh and two industrially deactivated (ECAT) FCC catalysts at the single zeolite domain level. Spectro-microscopic data at the Fe L3 , La M5 , and Al K X-ray absorption edges reveal differing levels of deposited Fe on the ECAT catalysts corresponding with an overall loss in tetrahedral Al within the zeolite domains. Using La as a localization marker, we have developed a novel methodology to map the changing Al distribution of single zeolite domains within real-life FCC catalysts. It was found that significant changes in the zeolite domain size distributions as well as the loss of Al from the zeolite framework occur. Furthermore, inter- and intraparticle heterogeneities in the dealumination process were observed, revealing the complex interplay between metal-mediated pore accessibility loss and zeolite dealumination.

  8. A Novel Method of Production and Biophysical Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Yeast Oligosaccharyl Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Mohanty, Smita; Banerjee, Monimoy

    2010-01-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase (OT) is a multi-subunit enzyme that catalyzes N-linked glycosylation of nascent polypeptides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, OT is composed of nine integral membrane protein subunits. Defects in N-linked glycosylation cause a series of disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The C-terminal domain of Stt3p subunit has been reported to contain the acceptor protein recognition site and/or catalytic site. We report here the subcloning, overexpression, a robust but novel method of production of pure C-terminal domain of Stt3p at 60∼70 mg/L in E. coli. CD spectra indicate that the C-terminal Stt3p is highly helical and has a stable tertiary structure in SDS micelles. The well dispersed 2D {1H-15N}-HSQC spectrum in SDS micelles indicates that it is feasible to determine the atomic structure by NMR. The effect of the conserved D518E mutation on the conformation of the C-terminal Stt3p is particularly interesting. The comparative analysis of the fluorescence and NMR data of the mutant and the wild-type C-terminal domain of Stt3p revealed that the replacement of the key residue Asp518, which is located within the WWDYG signature motif (residues 516-520), led to a distinct tertiary structure, even though both proteins have similar overall secondary structures. This observation strongly suggests that Asp518, which was previously proposed to primarily function as a catalytic residue, also plays a critical structural role. Moreover, the activity of the protein was confirmed by Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) and NMR titration studies. PMID:20047336

  9. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  10. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: Distinct multiple chemistries catalyzed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M.; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. Here, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalyzed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform delta (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C-O-P) with high catalytic efficiency, while the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C-O-C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolyzing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of PTPRΩ, a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbor a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  11. Cathepsin D propeptide: mechanism and regulation of its interaction with the catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Mása, Martin; Maresová, Lucie; Vondrásek, Jirí; Horn, Martin; Jezek, Jan; Mares, Michael

    2006-12-26

    Propeptide blocks the active site in the inactive zymogen of cathepsin D and is cleaved off during zymogen activation. We have designed a set of peptidic fragments derived from the propeptide structure and evaluated their inhibitory potency against mature cathepsin D using a kinetic assay. Our mapping of the cathepsin D propeptide indicated two domains in the propeptide involved in the inhibitory interaction with the enzyme core: the active site "anchor" domain and the N-terminus of the propeptide. The latter plays a dominant role in propeptide inhibition (nanomolar Ki), and its high-affinity binding was corroborated by fluorescence polarization measurements. In addition to the inhibitory domains of propeptide, a fragment derived from the N-terminus of mature cathepsin D displayed inhibition. This finding supports its proposed regulatory function. The interaction mechanisms of the identified inhibitory domains were characterized by determining their modes of inhibition as well as by spatial modeling of the propeptide in the zymogen molecule. The inhibitory interaction of the N-terminal propeptide domain was abolished in the presence of sulfated polysaccharides, which interact with basic propeptide residues. The inhibitory potency of the active site anchor domain was affected by the Ala38pVal substitution, a propeptide polymorphism reported to be associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. We infer that propeptide is a sensitive tethered ligand that allows for complex modulation of cathepsin D zymogen activation.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhard, Ulrich Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans

    2008-05-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from C. histolyticum was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals were obtained at 290 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data have been collected to 2.75 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%.

  13. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed A; Bakr, Eman A; El-Attar, Heba G

    2018-01-05

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH4) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  15. RipD (Rv1566c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: adaptation of an NlpC/p60 domain to a non-catalytic peptidoglycan-binding function.

    PubMed

    Böth, Dominic; Steiner, Eva Maria; Izumi, Atsushi; Schneider, Gunter; Schnell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes carrying NlpC/p60 domains, for instance RipA and RipB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases that cleave the peptide stems and contribute to cell wall remodelling during cell division. A member of this protein family, RipD (Rv1566c) from M. tuberculosis described in the present study, displays sequence alterations in the NlpC/p60 catalytic triad and carries a pentapeptide repeat at its C-terminus. Bioinformatics analysis revealed RipD-like proteins in eleven mycobacterial genomes, whereas similar pentapeptide repeats occur in cell-wall-localized bacterial proteins and in a mycobacteriophage. In contrast with previously known members of the NlpC/p60 family, RipD does not show peptidoglycan hydrolase activity, which is consistent with the sequence alterations at the catalytic site. A strong interaction of the catalytically inactive core domain with peptidoglycan is however retained, presenting the first example of the NlpC/p60 domains that evolved to a non-catalytic peptidoglycan-binding function. Full-length RipD carrying the C-terminal repeat shows, however, a decrease in binding affinity to peptidoglycan, suggesting that the C-terminal tail modulates the interaction with bacterial cell wall components. The pentapeptide repeat at the C-terminus does not adopt a defined secondary structure in solution which is in accordance with results from the 1.17 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) crystal structure of the protein carrying two repeat units.

  16. Shell-anchor-core structures for enhanced stability and catalytic oxygen reduction activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Caballero, Gustavo E.; Hirunsit, Pussana; Balbuena, Perla B.

    2010-10-01

    Density functional theory is used to evaluate activity and stability properties of shell-anchor-core structures. The structures consist of a Pt surface monolayer and a composite core having an anchor bilayer where C atoms in the interstitial sites lock 3d metals in their locations, thus avoiding their surface segregation and posterior dissolution. The modified subsurface geometry induces less strain on the top surface, thus exerting a favorable effect on the surface catalytic activity where the adsorption strength of the oxygenated species becomes more moderate: weaker than on pure Pt(111) but stronger than on a Pt monolayer having a 3d metal subsurface. Here we analyze the effect of changing the nature of the 3d metal in the subsurface anchor bilayer, and we also test the use of a Pd monolayer instead of Pt on the surface. It is found that a subsurface constituted by two layers with an approximate composition of M2C (M=Fe, Ni, and Co) provides a barrier for the migration of subsurface core metal atoms to the surface. Consequently, an enhanced resistance against dissolution in parallel to improved oxygen reduction activity is expected, as given by the values of adsorption energies of reaction intermediates, delayed onset of water oxidation, and/or low coverage of oxygenated species at surface oxidation potentials.

  17. The OMERACT Core Domain Set for Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Polymyalgia Rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Sarah L; Twohig, Helen; Neill, Lorna M; Harrison, Eileen; Shea, Beverley; Black, Rachel J; Kermani, Tanaz A; Merkel, Peter A; Mallen, Christian D; Buttgereit, Frank; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Simon, Lee S; Hill, Catherine L

    2017-10-01

    To inform development of a core domain set for outcome measures for clinical trials in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), we conducted patient consultations, a systematic review, a Delphi study, and 2 qualitative studies. Domains identified by 70% or more of physicians and/or patients in the Delphi study were selected. The conceptual framework derived from the 2 qualitative research studies helped inform the meaning of each domain and its relationship to the others. The draft core domain set was refined by further discussion with patients and physicians who had participated in the Delphi study. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2016, the domains were discussed and prioritized by 8 breakout groups. Formal voting took place at the end of the workshop and in the final plenary. Ninety-three percent of voters in the final plenary agreed that the inner core of domains considered mandatory for clinical trials of PMR should consist the following: laboratory markers of systemic inflammation, pain, stiffness, and physical function. Patient's global and fatigue were considered important but not mandatory (outer core). The research agenda included psychological impact, weakness, physical activity, participation, sleep, imaging, and health-related quality of life. This core domain set was considered sufficiently well-defined that the next step will be to apply the OMERACT Filter 2.0 Instrument Selection Algorithm to select candidate instruments for a subsequent "deeper dive" into the data. This will allow instruments to be mapped onto each of our core domains to derive a core outcome set for PMR.

  18. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  19. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Alessia; Russo, Luigi; De Simone, Alfonso; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Malgieri, Gaetano; Berisio, Rita; Isernia, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E) and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a “conformational editing” through a disulfide bond formation. PMID:26576056

  20. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain.

    PubMed

    Maione, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Alessia; Russo, Luigi; De Simone, Alfonso; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Malgieri, Gaetano; Berisio, Rita; Isernia, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E) and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a "conformational editing" through a disulfide bond formation.

  1. High resolution crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guixing; Zhu, Yifan; Yu, Zhicheng; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Zhang, Hongmin

    2016-01-01

    The newly identified mobile colistin resistant gene (mcr-1) rapidly spread among different bacterial strains and confers colistin resistance to its host, which has become a global concern. Based on sequence alignment, MCR-1 should be a phosphoethanolamine transferase, members of the YhjW/YjdB/YijP superfamily and catalyze the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A, which needs to be validated experimentally. Here we report the first high-resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of MCR-1 (MCR-1C) in its native state. The active pocket of native MCR-1C depicts unphosphorylated nucleophilic residue Thr285 in coordination with two Zinc ions and water molecules. A flexible adjacent active site loop (aa: Lys348-365) pose an open conformation compared to its structural homologues, suggesting of an open substrate entry channel. Taken together, this structure sets ground for further study of substrate binding and MCR-1 catalytic mechanism in development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:28000749

  2. Prediction of hammerhead ribozyme intracellular activity with the catalytic core fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Gabryelska, Marta Magdalena; Wyszko, Eliza; Szymański, Maciej; Popenda, Mariusz; Barciszewski, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Hammerhead ribozyme is a versatile tool for down-regulation of gene expression in vivo. Owing to its small size and high activity, it is used as a model for RNA structure-function relationship studies. In the present paper we describe a new extended hammerhead ribozyme HH-2 with a tertiary stabilizing motif constructed on the basis of the tetraloop receptor sequence. This ribozyme is very active in living cells, but shows low activity in vitro. To understand it, we analysed tertiary structure models of substrate-ribozyme complexes. We calculated six unique catalytic core geometry parameters as distances and angles between particular atoms that we call the ribozyme fingerprint. A flanking sequence and tertiary motif change the geometry of the general base, general acid, nucleophile and leaving group. We found almost complete correlation between these parameters and the decrease of target gene expression in the cells. The tertiary structure model calculations allow us to predict ribozyme intracellular activity. Our approach could be widely adapted to characterize catalytic properties of other RNAs.

  3. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Salmonella virulence factor SseI

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Shyam S.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2012-01-01

    SseI is secreted into host cells by Salmonella and contributes to the establishment of systemic infections. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of SseI has been solved to 1.70 Å resolution, revealing it to be a member of the cysteine protease superfamily with a catalytic triad consisting of Cys178, His216 and Asp231 that is critical to its virulence activities. Structure-based analysis revealed that SseI is likely to possess either acyl hydrolase or acyltransferase activity, placing this virulence factor in the rapidly growing class of enzymes of this family utilized by bacterial pathogens inside eukaryotic cells. PMID:23151626

  4. Structure of the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase complexed with an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Borkakoti, N; Winkler, F K; Williams, D H; D'Arcy, A; Broadhurst, M J; Brown, P A; Johnson, W H; Murray, E J

    1994-02-01

    In rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, degradation of articular cartilage is mediated by the matrix metalloproteinases collagenase, stromelysin and gelatinase. The key event in this process is the cleavage of triple helical collagen by collagenase. We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human recombinant fibroblast collagenase complexed with a synthetic inhibitor at 2.2 A resolution. The protein fold is similar to the amino termini of the zinc endopeptidases astacin thermolysin and elastase despite a lack of primary sequence homology. The conformation of the bound inhibitor provides a molecular basis for the design of inhibitors of collagenase and other matrix metalloproteinases. Such inhibitors should be useful in the treatment of a variety of diseases including arthritis and cancer.

  5. Engineering the catalytic domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta for structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Pokross, Matthew; Walter, Richard; Mekel, Marlene; Cox, Brooke; Li, Chuiying; Bechard, Randy; Genbauffe, Frank; Andrews, Ryan; Diven, Conrad; Howard, Brian; Rastogi, Vinit; Gray, Jeffrey; Maier, Matthew; Peters, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play roles in many biological processes and are considered to be important targets for drug discovery. As inhibitor development has proven challenging, crystal structure-based design will be very helpful to advance inhibitor potency and selectivity. Successful application of protein crystallography to drug discovery heavily relies on high-quality crystal structures of the protein of interest complexed with pharmaceutically interesting ligands. It is very important to be able to produce protein-ligand crystals rapidly and reproducibly for as many ligands as necessary. This study details our efforts to engineer the catalytic domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (HPTPbeta-CD) with properties suitable for rapid-turnaround crystallography. Structures of apo HPTPbeta-CD and its complexes with several novel small-molecule inhibitors are presented here for the first time.

  6. Human CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase: enzymatic properties and unequal catalytic roles of CTP-binding motifs in two cytidylyltransferase domains.

    PubMed

    Tian, Siqi; Ohtsuka, Jun; Wang, Shipeng; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2014-06-20

    CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (ECT) is a key enzyme in the CDP-ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway, which is the primary pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) synthesis in mammalian cells. Here, the enzymatic properties of recombinant human ECT (hECT) were characterized. The catalytic reaction of hECT obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to both CTP and phosphoethanolamine. hECT is composed of two tandem cytidylyltransferase (CT) domains as ECTs of other organisms. The histidines, especially the first histidine, in the CTP-binding motif HxGH in the N-terminal CT domain were critical for its catalytic activity in vitro, while those in the C-terminal CT domain were not. Overexpression of the wild-type hECT and hECT mutants containing amino acid substitutions in the HxGH motif in the C-terminal CT domain suppressed the growth defect of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant of ECT1 encoding ECT in the absence of a PE supply via the decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine, but overexpression of hECT mutants of the N-terminal CT domain did not. These results suggest that the N-terminal CT domain of hECT contributes to its catalytic reaction, but C-terminal CT domain does not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of cystathionine β-synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ereño-Orbea, June; Majtan, Tomas; Oyenarte, Iker; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS; EC 4.2.1.22) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine and serine to form cystathionine, with the release of water. In humans, deficiency in CBS activity is the most common cause of hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. More than 160 pathogenic mutations in the human CBS gene have been described to date. Here, the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of CBS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCBS) is described which, in contrast to other eukaryotic CBSs, lacks the N-terminal haem-binding domain and is considered to be a useful model for investigation of the pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-mediated reactions of human CBS (hCBS). The purified protein yielded two different crystal forms belonging to space groups P41212 and P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.390, c = 386.794 Å and a = 58.156, b = 89.988, c = 121.687 Å, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data suggests the presence of ScCBS homodimers in both types of crystals. PMID:24598918

  8. Single‐molecule mechanochemical characterization of E. coli pol III core catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Naufer, M. Nabuan; Murison, David A.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Beuning, Penny J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pol III core is the three‐subunit subassembly of the E. coli replicative DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. It contains the catalytic polymerase subunit α, the 3′ → 5′ proofreading exonuclease ε, and a subunit of unknown function, θ. We employ optical tweezers to characterize pol III core activity on a single DNA substrate. We observe polymerization at applied template forces F < 25 pN and exonucleolysis at F > 30 pN. Both polymerization and exonucleolysis occur as a series of short bursts separated by pauses. For polymerization, the initiation rate after pausing is independent of force. In contrast, the exonucleolysis initiation rate depends strongly on force. The measured force and concentration dependence of exonucleolysis initiation fits well to a two‐step reaction scheme in which pol III core binds bimolecularly to the primer‐template junction, then converts at rate k 2 into an exo‐competent conformation. Fits to the force dependence of k init show that exo initiation requires fluctuational opening of two base pairs, in agreement with temperature‐ and mismatch‐dependent bulk biochemical assays. Taken together, our results support a model in which the pol and exo activities of pol III core are effectively independent, and in which recognition of the 3′ end of the primer by either α or ε is governed by the primer stability. Thus, binding to an unstable primer is the primary mechanism for mismatch recognition during proofreading, rather than an alternative model of duplex defect recognition. PMID:28263430

  9. The TriTryp phosphatome: analysis of the protein phosphatase catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Brenchley, Rachel; Tariq, Humera; McElhinney, Helen; Szöor, Balázs; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Stevens, Robert; Matthews, Keith; Tabernero, Lydia

    2007-11-26

    The genomes of the three parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major are the main subject of this study. These parasites are responsible for devastating human diseases known as Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness and cutaneous Leishmaniasis, respectively, that affect millions of people in the developing world. The prevalence of these neglected diseases results from a combination of poverty, inadequate prevention and difficult treatment. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism of controlling the development of these kinetoplastids. With the aim to further our knowledge of the biology of these organisms we present a characterisation of the phosphatase complement (phosphatome) of the three parasites. An ontology-based scan of the three genomes was used to identify 86 phosphatase catalytic domains in T. cruzi, 78 in T. brucei, and 88 in L. major. We found interesting differences with other eukaryotic genomes, such as the low proportion of tyrosine phosphatases and the expansion of the serine/threonine phosphatase family. Additionally, a large number of atypical protein phosphatases were identified in these species, representing more than one third of the total phosphatase complement. Most of the atypical phosphatases belong to the dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) family and show considerable divergence from classic DSPs in both the domain organisation and sequence features. The analysis of the phosphatome of the three kinetoplastids indicates that they possess orthologues to many of the phosphatases reported in other eukaryotes, including humans. However, novel domain architectures and unusual combinations of accessory domains, suggest distinct functional roles for several of the kinetoplastid phosphatases, which await further experimental exploration. These distinct traits may be exploited in the selection of suitable new targets for drug development to prevent transmission and spread of the diseases, taking

  10. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  11. Activation mechanism of the nuclear chaperone nucleoplasmin: role of the core domain.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Hierro, Aitor; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Montoya, Guillermo; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2003-11-28

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) mediates nucleosome assembly by removing basic proteins from sperm chromatin and exchanging them with histones. This function is modulated by phosphorylation of NP at multiple sites. NP is pentameric, each monomer consisting of two domains: a core, which forms a stable ring-like pentamer, and a tail, that holds a polyglutamic tract and the nuclear localization signal. In the present study, we have explored the role of the core domain in the functionality of NP. Despite lacking the poly-Glu region, a putative binding site for basic proteins, the isolated core domain of the hyperphosphorylated protein isolated from eggs of Xenopus laevis is able to bind sperm basic proteins and decondense chromatin, in contrast to the inactive, non-phosphorylated recombinant core. This activity can be reproduced artificially in the recombinant core domain through mutation of putative phosphorylation sites to aspartate, thus mimicking the charge effect of phosphorylation. The mutated residues locate in flexible or loop regions exposed on the "distal face" of the core pentamer, where a short acidic region is also found, indicating that phosphorylation might activate the core domain of NP by generating a strong localized negative potential. Our results show that the phosphorylated core domain of NP is active in chromatin decondensation, thus it could contribute together with the poly-Glu containing tail in displaying a binding surface for sperm basic proteins on the NP pentamer.

  12. Concave Pd-Pt Core-Shell Nanocrystals with Ultrathin Pt Shell Feature and Enhanced Catalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bu, Lingzheng; Jiang, Kezhu; Guo, Shaojun; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-10

    One-pot creation of unique concave Pd-Pt core-shell polyhedra has been developed for the first time using an efficient approach. Due to the concave feature and ultrathin Pt shell, the created Pd-Pt core-shell polyhedra exhibit enhanced catalytic performance in both the electrooxidation of methanol and hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, as compared with commercial Pt black and Pd black catalysts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Expression, purification, and structural analysis of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, J. E.; Carroll, D.; Lawson, J. E.; Ernst, S. R.; Reed, L. J.; Hackert, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    The dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (E2o) component of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the transfer of a succinyl group from the S-succinyldihydrolipoyl moiety to coenzyme A. E2o is normally a 24-mer, but is found as a trimer when E2o is expressed with a C-terminal [His]6 tag. The crystal structure of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain (CD) of the Escherichia coli E2o has been solved to 3.0 A resolution using the Molecular Replacement method. The refined model contains an intact trimer in the asymmetric unit and has an R-factor of 0.257 (Rfree = 0.286) for 18,699 reflections between 10.0 and 3.0 A resolution. The core of tE2oCD (residues 187-396) superimposes onto that of the cubic E2oCD with an RMS difference of 0.4 A for all main-chain atoms. The C-terminal end of tE2oCD (residues 397-404) rotates by an average of 37 degrees compared to cubic E2oCD, disrupting the normal twofold interface. Despite the alteration of quaternary structure, the active site of tE2oCD shows no significant differences from that of the cubic E2oCD, although several side chains in the active site are more ordered in the trimeric form of E2oCD. Analysis of the available sequence data suggests that the majority of E2 components have active sites that resemble that of E. coli E2oCD. The remaining E2 components can be divided into three groups based on active-site sequence similarity. Analysis of the surface properties of both crystal forms of E. coli E2oCD suggests key residues that may be involved in the protein-protein contacts that occur between the catalytic and lipoyl domains of E2o. PMID:10739245

  14. Cu-free cycloaddition for identifying catalytic active adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yekui; Yin, Jun

    2008-10-15

    To engineer the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), we developed a method to display NRPS modules on M13 phages and select catalytically active adenylation (A) domains that would load azide functionalized substrate analogs to the neighboring peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains. Biotin conjugated difluorinated cyclooctyne was used for copper free cycloaddition with an azide substituted substrate attached to PCP. Biotin-labeled phages were selected by binding to streptavidin.

  15. RNA molecules with conserved catalytic cores but variable peripheries fold along unique energetically optimized pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Somdeb; Laederach, Alain; Golden, Barbara L.; Altman, Russ B.; Brenowitz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Functional and kinetic constraints must be efficiently balanced during the folding process of all biopolymers. To understand how homologous RNA molecules with different global architectures fold into a common core structure we determined, under identical conditions, the folding mechanisms of three phylogenetically divergent group I intron ribozymes. These ribozymes share a conserved functional core defined by topologically equivalent tertiary motifs but differ in their primary sequence, size, and structural complexity. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical probing of the backbone solvent accessible surface and catalytic activity measurements integrated with structural-kinetic modeling reveal that each ribozyme adopts a unique strategy to attain the conserved functional fold. The folding rates are not dictated by the size or the overall structural complexity, but rather by the strength of the constituent tertiary motifs which, in turn, govern the structure, stability, and lifetime of the folding intermediates. A fundamental general principle of RNA folding emerges from this study: The dominant folding flux always proceeds through an optimally structured kinetic intermediate that has sufficient stability to act as a nucleating scaffold while retaining enough conformational freedom to avoid kinetic trapping. Our results also suggest a potential role of naturally selected peripheral A-minor interactions in balancing RNA structural stability with folding efficiency. PMID:21712400

  16. Catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction on platinum-based core-shell nanoparticles: all-electron density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Choi, Jung-Hae; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-10-14

    Pt nanoparticles (NPs) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell as a catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) fairly overbind oxygen and/or hydroxyl to their surfaces, causing a large overpotential and thus low catalytic activity. Realizing Pt-based core-shell NPs (CSNPs) is perhaps a workaround for the weak binding of oxygen and/or hydroxyl without a shortage of sufficient oxygen molecule dissociation on the surface. Towards the end, we theoretically examined the catalytic activity of NPs using density functional theory; each NP consists of one of 12 different 3d-5d transition metal cores (groups 8-11) and a Pt shell. The calculation results evidently suggest the enhancement of catalytic activity of CSNPs in particular when 3d transition metal cores are in use. The revealed trends in activity change upon the core metal were discussed with respect to the thermodynamic and electronic structural aspects of the NPs in comparison with the general d-band model. The disparity between the CSNP and the corresponding bilayer catalyst, which is the so-called size effect, was remarkable; therefore, it perhaps opens up the possibility of size-determined catalytic activity. Finally, the overpotential for all CSNPs was evaluated in an attempt to choose promising combinations of CSNP materials.

  17. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size.

  18. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Glucuronoyl Esterase Catalytic Domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was over-expressed, purified, and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. Crystals had space group P212121 and X-ray diffraction data were...

  19. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  20. The DbpA catalytic core unwinds double-helix substrates by directly loading on them.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jared J; Gentry, Riley C; Moore, Anthony F T; Koculi, Eda

    2016-03-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. Similar to all the members of the DEAD-box family, the DbpA protein has two N-terminal RecA-like domains, which perform the RNA unwinding. However, unlike other members of this family, the DbpA protein also possesses a structured C-terminal RNA-binding domain that mediates specific tethering of DbpA to hairpin 92 of the Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using model RNA molecules containing hairpin 92 show that the RNA molecules support the DbpA protein's double-helix unwinding activity, provided that the double helix has a 3' single-stranded region. The 3' single-stranded region was suggested to be the start site of the DbpA protein's catalytic unwinding activity. The data presented here demonstrate that the single-stranded region 3' of the double-helix substrate is not required for the DbpA protein's unwinding activity and the DbpA protein unwinds the double-helix substrates by directly loading on them. © 2016 Childs et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  2. 1.92 Angstrom Zinc-Free APOBEC3F Catalytic Domain Crystal Structure.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Nadine M; Shi, Ke; Li, Ming; Aihara, Hideki; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-06-05

    The APOBEC3 family of DNA cytosine deaminases is capable of restricting the replication of HIV-1 and other pathogens. Here, we report a 1.92 Å resolution crystal structure of the Vif-binding and catalytic domain of APOBEC3F (A3F). This structure is distinct from the previously published APOBEC and phylogenetically related deaminase structures, as it is the first without zinc in the active site. We determined an additional structure containing zinc in the same crystal form that allows direct comparison with the zinc-free structure. In the absence of zinc, the conserved active site residues that normally participate in zinc coordination show unique conformations, including a 90 degree rotation of His249 and disulfide bond formation between Cys280 and Cys283. We found that zinc coordination is influenced by pH, and treating the protein at low pH in crystallization buffer is sufficient to remove zinc. Zinc coordination and catalytic activity are reconstituted with the addition of zinc only in a reduced environment likely due to the two active site cysteines readily forming a disulfide bond when not coordinating zinc. We show that the enzyme is active in the presence of zinc and cobalt but not with other divalent metals. These results unexpectedly demonstrate that zinc is not required for the structural integrity of A3F and suggest that metal coordination may be a strategy for regulating the activity of A3F and related deaminases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K.

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  4. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Drosophila beta1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K

    2010-05-14

    The beta1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 (beta4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the beta4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member beta4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of beta4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 A resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of beta4Gal-T7 and beta4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH(2)OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the beta4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr(177) interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  5. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Julie A; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J Willem M; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  6. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  7. The DExD/H-box ATPase Prp2p destabilizes and proofreads the catalytic RNA core of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Wlodaver, Alissa M.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    After undergoing massive RNA and protein rearrangements during assembly, the spliceosome undergoes a final, more subtle, ATP-dependent rearrangement that is essential for catalysis. This rearrangement requires the DEAH-box protein Prp2p, an RNA-dependent ATPase. Prp2p has been implicated in destabilizing interactions between the spliceosome and the protein complexes SF3 and RES, but a role for Prp2p in destabilizing RNA–RNA interactions has not been explored. Using directed molecular genetics in budding yeast, we have found that a cold-sensitive prp2 mutation is suppressed not only by mutations in SF3 and RES components but also by a range of mutations that disrupt the spliceosomal catalytic core element U2/U6 helix I, which is implicated in juxtaposing the 5′ splice site and branch site and in positioning metal ions for catalysis within the context of a putative catalytic triplex; indeed, mutations in this putative catalytic triplex also suppressed a prp2 mutation. Remarkably, we also found that prp2 mutations rescue lethal mutations in U2/U6 helix I. These data provide evidence that RNA elements that comprise the catalytic core are already formed at the Prp2p stage and that Prp2p destabilizes these elements, directly or indirectly, both to proofread spliceosome activation and to promote reconfiguration of the spliceosome to a fully competent, catalytic conformation. PMID:24442613

  8. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  9. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans. PMID:25939779

  10. Core outcome domains for controlled trials and clinical recordkeeping in eczema: international multiperspective Delphi consensus process.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Langan, Sinéad; Stamm, Tanja; Williams, Hywel C

    2011-03-01

    There is wide variation in the use of outcome measures for eczema. We performed a three-stage web-based international Delphi exercise to develop consensus-based sets of core outcome domains for eczema for "controlled trials" and "clinical recordkeeping". A total of 57 individuals from four stakeholder groups (consumers, clinical experts, regulatory agency representatives, and journal editors) representing 13 countries were asked to rate the importance of 19 outcome domains for eczema and to choose which domains should be included in two core sets of outcomes. Forty-six individuals (81%) participated. Participants received standardized feedback, including the group median, interquartile range, and previous responses, and the assessment was repeated in two subsequent rounds. We defined consensus a priori if at least 60% of the members of at least three stakeholder groups, including consumers, recommended domain inclusion in the core set. Consensus was achieved for inclusion of symptoms, physician-assessed clinical signs, and a measurement for long-term control of flares in the core set of outcome domains for eczema trials. We recommend including these three core outcomes in future eczema trials in order to enhance clinical interpretability and to enable meta-analyses across different studies. For recordkeeping, consensus was reached to regularly monitor eczema symptoms in clinical practice. Future work is needed to select which existing or new scales should be used to measure the domains identified as relevant for the core set.

  11. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-03

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.

  12. Crystal structures of wild-type Trichoderma reesei Cel7A catalytic domain in open and closed states.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Annette M; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-12-01

    Trichoderma reesei Cel7A efficiently hydrolyses cellulose. We report here the crystallographic structures of the wild-type TrCel7A catalytic domain (CD) in an open state and, for the first time, in a closed state. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the loops along the CD tunnel move in concerted motions. Together, the crystallographic and MD data suggest that the CD cycles between the tense and relaxed forms that are characteristic of work producing enzymes. Analysis of the interactions formed by R251 provides a structural rationale for the concurrent decrease in product inhibition and catalytic efficiency measured for product-binding site mutants.

  13. Structure-based engineering of histidine residues in the catalytic domain of α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis for improved protein stability and catalytic efficiency under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-03-10

    This work aims to improve the protein stability and catalytic efficiency of α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis under acidic conditions by site-directed mutagenesis. Based on the analysis of a three dimensional structure model, four basic histidine (His) residues His(222), His(275), His(293), and His(310) in the catalytic domain were selected as the mutation sites and were further replaced with acidic aspartic acid (Asp), respectively, yielding four mutants H222D, H275D, H293D, H310D. The mutant H222D was inactive. Double and triple mutations were further conducted and four mutants H275/293D, H275/310D, H293/310D, and H275/293/310D were obtained. The acidic stability of enzyme was significantly enhanced after mutation, and 45-92% of initial activity of mutants was retained after incubation at pH 4.5 and 25°C for 24h, while that for wild-type was only 39.5%. At pH 4.5, the specific activity of wild-type and mutants H275D, H293D, H310D, H275/293D, H275/310D, H293/310D, and H275/293/310D were 108.2, 131.8, 138.9, 196.6, 156.3, 204.6, and 216.2U/mg, respectively. The catalytic efficiency for each active mutant was much higher than that of wild-type at low pH. The kcat/Km values of the mutants H275D, H293D, H310D, H275/293D, H275/310D, H293/310D, and H275/293/310D at pH 4.5 were 3.3-, 4.3-, 6.5-, 4.5-, 11.0-, 14.5-, and 16.7-fold higher, respectively, than that of the wild-type. As revealed by the structure models of the wild-type and mutant enzymes, the hydrogen bonds and salt bridges were increased after mutation, and an obvious shift of the basic limb toward acidity was observed for mutants. These changes around the catalytic domain contributed to the significantly improved protein stability and catalytic efficiency at low pH. This work provides an effective strategy to improve the catalytic activity and stability of α-amylase under acidic conditions, and the results obtained here may be useful for the improvement of acid-resistant ability of other enzymes.

  14. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  15. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  16. Ligand-induced global transitions in the catalytic domain of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Changbong; Jennings, Patricia A.; Adams, Joseph A.; Onuchic, José N.

    2009-01-01

    Conformational transitions play a central role in the phosphorylation mechanisms of protein kinase. To understand the nature of these transitions, we investigated the dynamics of nucleotide binding to the catalytic domain of PKA, a prototype for the protein kinase enzyme family. The open-to-closed transition in PKA was constructed as a function of ATP association by using available X-ray data and Brownian dynamics. Analyzing the multiple kinetic trajectories at the residue level, we find that the spatial rearrangement of the residues around the nucleotide-binding pocket, along with suppressed local fluctuations, controls the compaction of the entire molecule. In addition, to accommodate the stresses induced by ATP binding at the early transition stage, partial unfoldings (cracking) and reformations of several native contacts occur at the interfaces between the secondary structure motifs enveloping the binding pocket. This suggests that the enzyme experiences local structural deformations while reaching its functional, ATP-bound state. Our dynamical view of the ligand-induced transitions in PKA suggests that the kinetic hierarchy of local and global dynamics, the variable fluctuation of residues and the necessity of partial local unfolding may be fundamental components in other large scale allosteric transitions. PMID:19204278

  17. Structure of the Catalytic Domain of the Class I Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase from Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Wittenborn, Elizabeth C; Jost, Marco; Wei, Yifeng; Stubbe, JoAnne; Drennan, Catherine L

    2016-11-25

    Polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (PhaC) catalyzes the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A as a means of carbon storage in many bacteria. The resulting polymers can be used to make biodegradable materials with properties similar to those of thermoplastics and are an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based plastics. A full biochemical and mechanistic understanding of this process has been hindered in part by a lack of structural information on PhaC. Here we present the first structure of the catalytic domain (residues 201-589) of the class I PhaC from Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) to 1.80 Å resolution. We observe a symmetrical dimeric architecture in which the active site of each monomer is separated from the other by ∼33 Å across an extensive dimer interface, suggesting a mechanism in which polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis occurs at a single active site. The structure additionally highlights key side chain interactions within the active site that play likely roles in facilitating catalysis, leading to the proposal of a modified mechanistic scheme involving two distinct roles for the active site histidine. We also identify putative substrate entrance and product egress routes within the enzyme, which are discussed in the context of previously reported biochemical observations. Our structure lays a foundation for further biochemical and structural characterization of PhaC, which could assist in engineering efforts for the production of eco-friendly materials. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the catalytic domain of sika deer MMP-13.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Jiawen; Liu, Meichen; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is one of three mammalian collagenases that are capable of initiating the degradation of interstitial collagens during wound healing. Herein, we report for the first time the molecular cloning of the catalytic domain (CD) of sika deer MMP-13, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The final yield was approximately 90.4 mg per liter of growth culture with a purity of 91.6%. The mass recovery during the purification and renaturation were 70.2% and 81.5%, respectively. Using gelatin zymography and a degradation assay, we found that the refolded sika deer MMP-13 (CD) could digest gelatin. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme bioactivity was 8.0 and 37 °C, respectively. The Km value for the enzyme-catalyzed digestion of gelatin was 136+/-8 μg/mL, and the Vmax was 4.12 × 10(3) U/μg. sdMMP13 (CD) was able to completely degrade collagen II and gelatin, and partially degrade fibronectin. The sdMMP-13 (CD) activity was significantly inhibited by several chemicals including 1, 10-phenanthroline, EDTA, Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression in Escherichia coli of the catalytic domain of human proline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tallarita, Elena; Pollegioni, Loredano; Servi, Stefano; Molla, Gianluca

    2012-04-01

    The human PRODH gene has been shown to have unique roles in regulating cell survival and apoptotic pathways and it has been related to velocardiofacial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome and increased susceptibility to schizophrenia. It encodes for the flavoprotein proline oxidase (PO), which catalyzes the conversion of l-proline to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. Despite the important physiological and medical interest in human PO, up to now only microbial homologues of PO have been expressed as recombinant protein and fully characterized. By using a bioinformatics analysis aimed at identifying the catalytic domain and the regions with a high intrinsic propensity to structural disorder, we designed deletion variants of human PO that were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble proteins in fairly high amounts (up to 10mg/L of fermentation broth). The His-tagged PO-barrelN protein was isolated as an active (the specific activity is 0.032U/mg protein), dimeric holoenzyme showing the typical spectral properties of FAD-containing flavoprotein oxidases. These results pave the way for elucidating structure-function relationships of this human flavoenzyme and clarifying the effect of the reported polymorphisms associated with disease states.

  20. Unprecedented diversity of catalytic domains in the first four modules of the putative pederin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn; Wen, Gaiping; Platzer, Matthias; Hui, Dequan

    2004-01-03

    Polyketides of the pederin group are highly potent antitumor compounds found in terrestrial beetles and marine sponges. Pederin is used by beetles of the genera Paederus and Paederidus as a chemical defense. We have recently identified a group of putative pederin biosynthesis genes and localized them to the genome of an as yet unculturable Pseudomonas sp. symbiont, the likely true pederin producer. However, this polyketide synthase cluster lacks several genes expected for pederin production. Here we report an additional polyketide synthase encoded on a separate region of the symbiont genome. It contains at least three novel catalytic domains that are predicted to be involved in pederin chain initiation and the formation of an unusual exomethylene bond. The region is bordered by mobility pseudogenes; this suggests that gene transposition led to the disjointed cluster organization. With this work, all putative pederin genes have been identified. Their heterologous expression in a culturable bacterium will provide important insights into how sustainable sources of invertebrate-derived drug candidates can be created.

  1. Crystal Structure of the DNA Deaminase APOBEC3B Catalytic Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A.; Kurahashi, Kayo; Harris, Reuben S.; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Functional and deep sequencing studies have combined to demonstrate the involvement of APOBEC3B in cancer mutagenesis. APOBEC3B is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions normally as a nuclear-localized restriction factor of DNA-based pathogens. However, it is overexpressed in cancer cells and elicits an intrinsic preference for 5′-TC motifs in single-stranded DNA, which is the most frequently mutated dinucleotide in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and several other tumor types. In many cases, APOBEC3B mutagenesis accounts for the majority of both dispersed and clustered (kataegis) cytosine mutations. Here, we report the first structures of the APOBEC3B catalytic domain in multiple crystal forms. These structures reveal a tightly closed active site conformation and suggest that substrate accessibility is regulated by adjacent flexible loops. Residues important for catalysis are identified by mutation analyses, and the results provide insights into the mechanism of target site selection. We also report a nucleotide (dCMP)-bound crystal structure that informs a multistep model for binding single-stranded DNA. Overall, these high resolution crystal structures provide a framework for further mechanistic studies and the development of novel anti-cancer drugs to inhibit this enzyme, dampen tumor evolution, and minimize adverse outcomes such as drug resistance and metastasis. PMID:26416889

  2. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Clostridium novyi Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Christian; Schömig, Kathrin; Hofmann, Fred; Aktories, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin belongs to the family of large clostridial cytotoxins which act on cells through the modification of small GTP-binding proteins. We present here an analysis of the catalytic domain of alpha-toxin. A NH2-terminal 551-amino-acid fragment, α551, was found to contain the full enzyme activity of the holotoxin, whereas a slightly shortened fragment encompassing 509 amino acids showed no detectable enzyme activity. Further characterization of the enzymatically active fragment α551 revealed a substrate specificity for both UDP–N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-glucose. A Michaelis-Menten constant of 17 μM was determined for the substrate UDP–N-acetylglucosamine, while that for UDP-glucose was about 20 times higher, indicating a weaker affinity of the toxin for the latter substrate. Mutation of the aspartic acids of a conserved motif DXD within α551 reduced enzyme activity >700-fold and inhibited cytotoxicity after microinjection in cells. Inhibition of enzyme activity of the DXD mutant could be partially overcome by increased concentrations of manganese ions, suggesting the involvement of these aspartic acids in Mn2+ binding. By construction of chimeras of enzymatically active fragments of C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi alpha-toxin, we located the region involved in nucleotide-sugar specificity to amino acids 133 through 517. PMID:11035748

  3. Characterization of the catalytic domain of Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Busch, C; Schömig, K; Hofmann, F; Aktories, K

    2000-11-01

    Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin belongs to the family of large clostridial cytotoxins which act on cells through the modification of small GTP-binding proteins. We present here an analysis of the catalytic domain of alpha-toxin. A NH(2)-terminal 551-amino-acid fragment, alpha 551, was found to contain the full enzyme activity of the holotoxin, whereas a slightly shortened fragment encompassing 509 amino acids showed no detectable enzyme activity. Further characterization of the enzymatically active fragment alpha 551 revealed a substrate specificity for both UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-glucose. A Michaelis-Menten constant of 17 microM was determined for the substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, while that for UDP-glucose was about 20 times higher, indicating a weaker affinity of the toxin for the latter substrate. Mutation of the aspartic acids of a conserved motif DXD within alpha 551 reduced enzyme activity >700-fold and inhibited cytotoxicity after microinjection in cells. Inhibition of enzyme activity of the DXD mutant could be partially overcome by increased concentrations of manganese ions, suggesting the involvement of these aspartic acids in Mn(2+) binding. By construction of chimeras of enzymatically active fragments of C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi alpha-toxin, we located the region involved in nucleotide-sugar specificity to amino acids 133 through 517.

  4. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  5. Exploring the catalytic core of complex I by Yarrowia lipolytica yeast genetics.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, S; Kashani-Poor, N; Zwicker, K; Zickermann, V; Brandt, U

    2001-06-01

    We have developed Yarrowia lipolytica as a model system to study mitochondrial complex I that combines the application of fast and convenient yeast genetics with efficient structural and functional analysis of its very stable complex I isolated by his-tag affinity purification with high yield. Guided by a structural model based on homologies between complex I and [NiFe] hydrogenases mutational analysis revealed that the 49 kDa subunit plays a central functional role in complex I. We propose that critical parts of the catalytic core of complex I have evolved from the hydrogen reactive site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and that iron-sulfur cluster N2 resides at the interface between the 49 kDa and PSST subunits. These findings are in full agreement with the "semiquinone switch" mechanism according to which coupling of electron and proton transfer in complex I is achieved by a single integrated pump comprising cluster N2, the binding site for substrate ubiquinone, and a tightly bound quinone or quinoid group.

  6. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  7. Core promoter specificities of the Sp1 and VP16 transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Emami, K H; Navarre, W W; Smale, S T

    1995-01-01

    The core promoter compositions of mammalian protein-coding genes are highly variable; some contain TATA boxes, some contain initiator (Inr) elements, and others contain both or neither of these basal elements. The underlying reason for this heterogeneity remains a mystery, as recent studies have suggested that TATA-containing and Inr-containing core promoters direct transcription initiation by similar mechanisms and respond similarly to a wide variety of upstream activators. To analyze in greater detail the influence of core promoter structure on transcriptional activation, we compared activation by GAL4-VP16 and Sp1 through synthetic core promoters containing a TATA box, an Inr, or both TATA and Inr. Striking differences were found between the two activators, most notably in the relative strengths of the TATA/Inr and Inr core promoters: the TATA/Inr promoter was much stronger than the Inr promoter when transcription was activated by GAL4-VP16, but the strengths of the two promoters were more comparable when transcription was activated by Sp1. To define the domains of Sp1 responsible for efficient activation through an Inr, several Sp1 deletion mutants were tested as GAL4 fusion proteins. The results reveal that the glutamine-rich activation domains, which previously were found to interact with Drosophila TAF110, preferentially stimulate Inr-containing core promoters. In contrast, efficient activation through TATA appears to require additional domains of Sp1. These results demonstrate that activation domains differ in their abilities to function with specific core promoters, suggesting that the core promoter structure found in a given gene may reflect a preference of the regulators of that gene. Furthermore, the core promoter preference of an activation domain may be related to a specific mechanism of action, which may provide a functional criterion for grouping activation domains into distinct classes. PMID:7565743

  8. Autoinhibition of the Nuclease ARTEMIS Is Mediated by a Physical Interaction between Its Catalytic and C-terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Niewolik, Doris; Peter, Ingrid; Butscher, Carmen; Schwarz, Klaus

    2017-02-24

    The nuclease ARTEMIS is essential for the development of B and T lymphocytes. It is required for opening DNA hairpins generated during antigen receptor gene assembly from variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) subgenic elements (V(D)J recombination). As a member of the non-homologous end-joining pathway, it is also involved in repairing a subset of pathological DNA double strand breaks. Loss of ARTEMIS function therefore results in radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID). The hairpin opening activity is dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), which can bind to and phosphorylate ARTEMIS. The ARTEMIS C terminus is dispensable for cellular V(D)J recombination and in vitro nuclease assays with C-terminally truncated ARTEMIS showing DNA-PKcs-independent hairpin opening activity. Therefore, it has been postulated that ARTEMIS is regulated via autoinhibition by its C terminus. To obtain evidence for the autoinhibition model, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments with combinations of ARTEMIS mutants. We show that an N-terminal fragment comprising the catalytic domain can interact both with itself and with a C-terminal fragment. Amino acid exchanges N456A+S457A+E458Q in the C terminus of full-length ARTEMIS resulted in unmasking of the N terminus and in increased ARTEMIS activity in cellular V(D)J recombination assays. Mutations in ARTEMIS-deficient patients impaired the interaction with the C terminus and also affected protein stability. The interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains was not DNA-PKcs-dependent, and phosphomimetic mutations in the C-terminal domain did not result in unmasking of the catalytic domain. Our experiments provide strong evidence that a physical interaction between the C-terminal and catalytic domains mediates ARTEMIS autoinhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Domain closure in the catalytic chains of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase influences the kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, B H; Ley, B W; Kantrowitz, E R; O'Leary, M H; Wedler, F C

    1995-06-30

    The closure of the two domains of the catalytic chains of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase, which is critical for completion of the T-->R transition, is stabilized by salt-bridges between Glu-50 and both Arg-167 and Arg-234. Mutation of Glu-50 to Ala shifts the enzyme toward a low activity, low affinity state (Newton, C. J., and Kantrowitz, E. R. (1990) Biochemistry, 29, 1444-1451). Kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics (EIEK) have been used to probe the dynamic properties of the Glu-50-->Ala enzyme. Unlike the behavior of the wild-type enzyme, the observed kinetic isotope effect for 13C versus 12C at the carbonyl group of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) increased upon the binding of ligands which promote the formation of the R-state (Asp, N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), or ATP). The maximum rate for the [14C]Asp<-->Carbamoyl aspartate (CAsp) exchange with the Glu-50-->Ala enzyme was 500-fold slower than for the wild-type enzyme; however, the rate for the [14C]CP<-->CAsp exchange was only 50-fold slower, reversing the relative rates observed with the wild-type enzyme. In addition, upon variation of substrate pairs involving Asp or CAsp, loss of inhibition effects in the CP<-->CAsp exchange indicated that the Glu-50-->Ala substitution caused the kinetic mechanism for the mutant enzyme to shift from ordered to random. Computer simulations of the EIEK data indicate that the Glu-50-->Ala mutation specifically causes strong decreases in the rates of catalysis and association-dissociation for Asp and CAsp, with minimal effects on the CP and Pi on-off rates. With substrates bound, the Glu-50-->Ala enzyme apparently does not attain a full R-state conformation. The PALA-activated Glu-50-->Ala enzyme, however, exhibits substrate affinities comparable to those for the wild-type enzyme, but fails to restore the preferred order substrate binding. Unlike the wild-type enzyme, both the T and R-states of the Glu-50-->Ala enzyme

  10. Functional Role of Histidine in the Conserved His-x-Asp Motif in the Catalytic Core of Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lun; Wang, Jian-Chuan; Hou, Li; Cao, Peng-Rong; Wu, Li; Zhang, Qian-Sen; Yang, Huai-Yu; Zang, Yi; Ding, Jian-Ping; Li, Jia

    2015-05-11

    The His-x-Asp (HxD) motif is one of the most conserved structural components of the catalytic core of protein kinases; however, the functional role of the conserved histidine is unclear. Here we report that replacement of the HxD-histidine with Arginine or Phenylalanine in Aurora A abolishes both the catalytic activity and auto-phosphorylation, whereas the Histidine-to-tyrosine impairs the catalytic activity without affecting its auto-phosphorylation. Comparisons of the crystal structures of wild-type (WT) and mutant Aurora A demonstrate that the impairment of the kinase activity is accounted for by (1) disruption of the regulatory spine in the His-to-Arg mutant, and (2) change in the geometry of backbones of the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif and the DFG-1 residue in the His-to-Tyr mutant. In addition, bioinformatics analyses show that the HxD-histidine is a mutational hotspot in tumor tissues. Moreover, the H174R mutation of the HxD-histidine, in the tumor suppressor LKB1 abrogates the inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of A549 cells by WT LKB1. Based on these data, we propose that the HxD-histidine is involved in a conserved inflexible organization of the catalytic core that is required for the kinase activity. Mutation of the HxD-histidine may also be involved in the pathogenesis of some diseases including cancer.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X.-L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.

    2008-04-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from H. jecorina was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  12. Heterologous expression and purification of catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2016-10-20

    Here, heterologous expression of plant cellulose synthase (CESA) and its purification has remained a challenge for decades impeding detailed biophysical, biochemical and structural characterization of this key enzyme. An in-depth knowledge of structure and function of CESA proteins would enable us to better understand the hierarchical structure of the plant cell wall. Here, we report a detailed, and reproducible method of purification of catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis thaliana that was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The method relies on a two stage purification procedure to obtain the catalytic domain in monomer and trimer forms. The biochemical and biophysical data including low resolution structures of the protein have been published. Currently the crystallization studies of this protein are underway.

  13. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%. PMID:18453715

  15. Single-domain intrabodies against hepatitis C virus core inhibit viral propagation and core-induced NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Kenji; Matsuda, Mami; Sato, Mitsuru; Kanegae, Yumi; Shi, Guoli; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Chiba, Joe; Saito, Izumu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core plays a key role in viral particle formation and is involved in viral pathogenesis. Here, constructs for single-domain intrabodies consisting of variable regions derived from mouse mAbs against HCV core were established. Expressed single-domain intrabodies were shown to bind to HCV core, and inhibit the growth of cell culture-produced HCV derived from JFH-1 (genotype 2a) and a TH (genotype 1b)/JFH-1 chimera. Adenovirus vectors expressing intrabodies were also capable of reducing HCV propagation. Intrabody expression did not affect viral entry or genome replication of single-round infectious trans-complemented HCV particles. However, intrabody expression reduced intracellular and extracellular infectious titres in CD81-defective Huh7-25 cells transfected with the HCV genome, suggesting that these intrabodies impair HCV assembly. Furthermore, intrabody expression suppressed HCV core-induced NFκB promoter activity. These intrabodies may therefore serve as tools for elucidating the role of core in HCV pathogenesis.

  16. Structural and thermodynamic comparison of the catalytic domain of AMSH and AMSH-LP: nearly identical fold but different stability.

    PubMed

    Davies, Christopher W; Paul, Lake N; Kim, Myung-Il; Das, Chittaranjan

    2011-10-21

    AMSH plays a critical role in the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) machinery, which facilitates the down-regulation and degradation of cell-surface receptors. It displays a high level of specificity toward cleavage of Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, the structural basis of which has been understood recently through the crystal structure of a highly related, but ESCRT-independent, protein AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein). We have determined the X-ray structure of two constructs representing the catalytic domain of AMSH: AMSH244, the JAMM (JAB1/MPN/MOV34)-domain-containing polypeptide segment from residues 244 to 424, and AMSH219(E280A), an active-site mutant, Glu280 to Ala, of the segment from 219 to 424. In addition to confirming the expected zinc coordination in the protein, the structures reveal that the catalytic domains of AMSH and AMSH-LP are nearly identical; however, guanidine-hydrochloride-induced unfolding studies show that the catalytic domain of AMSH is thermodynamically less stable than that of AMSH-LP, indicating that the former is perhaps structurally more plastic. Much to our surprise, in the AMSH219(E280A) structure, the catalytic zinc was still held in place, by the compensatory effect of an aspartate from a nearby loop moving into a position where it could coordinate with the zinc, once again suggesting the plasticity of AMSH. Additionally, a model of AMSH244 bound to Lys63-linked diubiquitin reveals a type of interface for the distal ubiquitin significantly different from that seen in AMSH-LP. Altogether, we believe that our data provide important insight into the structural difference between the two proteins that may translate into the difference in their biological function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and Thermodynamic Comparison of the Catalytic Domain of AMSH and AMSH-LP: Nearly Identical Fold but Different Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Christopher W.; Paul, Lake N.; Kim, Myung-Il; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-02-07

    AMSH plays a critical role in the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) machinery, which facilitates the down-regulation and degradation of cell-surface receptors. It displays a high level of specificity toward cleavage of Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, the structural basis of which has been understood recently through the crystal structure of a highly related, but ESCRT-independent, protein AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein). We have determined the X-ray structure of two constructs representing the catalytic domain of AMSH: AMSH244, the JAMM (JAB1/MPN/MOV34)-domain-containing polypeptide segment from residues 244 to 424, and AMSH219{sup E280A}, an active-site mutant, Glu280 to Ala, of the segment from 219 to 424. In addition to confirming the expected zinc coordination in the protein, the structures reveal that the catalytic domains of AMSH and AMSH-LP are nearly identical; however, guanidine-hydrochloride-induced unfolding studies show that the catalytic domain of AMSH is thermodynamically less stable than that of AMSH-LP, indicating that the former is perhaps structurally more plastic. Much to our surprise, in the AMSH219{sup E280A} structure, the catalytic zinc was still held in place, by the compensatory effect of an aspartate from a nearby loop moving into a position where it could coordinate with the zinc, once again suggesting the plasticity of AMSH. Additionally, a model of AMSH244 bound to Lys63-linked diubiquitin reveals a type of interface for the distal ubiquitin significantly different from that seen in AMSH-LP. Altogether, we believe that our data provide important insight into the structural difference between the two proteins that may translate into the difference in their biological function.

  18. Identifying a core set of outcome domains to measure in clinical trials for shoulder disorders: a modified Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    To achieve consensus on the most important outcome domains to measure across all clinical trials for shoulder disorders. We performed an online modified Delphi study with an international, multidisciplinary and multistakeholder panel. A literature review and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to generate a list of potential core domains, which were presented to patients, clinicians and researchers in two Delphi rounds. Participants were asked to judge the importance of each potential core domain and provide a rationale for their response. A core domain was defined a priori as a domain that at least 67% of participants considered core. In both rounds, 335 individuals were invited to participate (268 clinicians/researchers and 67 patients); response rates were 27% (n=91) and 29% (n=96), respectively. From a list of 41 potential core domains, four domains met our criteria for inclusion: 'pain', 'physical functioning', 'global assessment of treatment success' and 'health-related quality of life'. Two additional domains, 'sleep functioning' and 'psychological functioning', met the criteria for inclusion by some, but not all stakeholder groups. There was consensus that 'number of deaths' was not a core domain, but insufficient agreement on whether or not several other domains, including 'range of motion' and 'muscle strength', were core domains. Based on international consensus from patients, clinicians and researchers, 'pain', 'physical functioning', 'global assessment of treatment success' and 'health-related quality of life' were considered core outcome domains for shoulder disorder trials. The value of several other domains needs further consideration.

  19. Homologous catalytic domains in a rumen fungal xylanase: evidence for gene duplication and prokaryotic origin.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, H J; Hazlewood, G P; Laurie, J I; Orpin, C G; Xue, G P

    1992-08-01

    A cDNA (xynA), encoding xylanase A (XYLA), was isolated from a cDNA library, derived from mRNA extracted from the rumen anaerobic fungus, Neocallimastix patriciarum. Recombinant XYLA, purified from Escherichia coli harbouring xynA, had a M(r) of 53,000 and hydrolysed oat-spelt xylan to xylobiose and xylose. The enzyme did not hydrolyse any cellulosic substrates. The nucleotide sequence of xynA revealed a single open reading frame of 1821 bp coding for a protein of M(r) 66,192. The predicted primary structure of XYLA comprised an N-terminal signal peptide followed by a 225-amino-acid repeated sequence, which was separated from a tandem 40-residue C-terminal repeat by a threonine/proline linker sequence. The large N-terminal reiterated regions consisted of distinct catalytic domains which displayed similar substrate specificities to the full-length enzyme. The reiterated structure of XYLA suggests that the enzyme was derived from an ancestral gene which underwent two discrete duplications. Sequence comparison analysis revealed significant homology between XYLA and bacterial xylanases belonging to cellulase/xylanase family G. One of these homologous enzymes is derived from the rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens. The homology observed between XYLA and a rumen prokaryote xylanase could be a consequence of the horizontal transfer of genes between rumen prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes, either when the organisms were resident in the rumen, or prior to their colonization of the ruminant. It should also be noted that Neocallimastix XYLA is the first example of a xylanase which consists of reiterated sequences. It remains to be established whether this is a common phenomenon in other rumen fungal plant cell wall hydrolases.

  20. The toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis encodes novel type I-like polyketide synthases containing discrete catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Emily A; Van Dolah, Frances M

    2008-07-01

    Karenia brevis is the Florida red tide dinoflagellate responsible for detrimental effects on human and environmental health through the production of brevetoxins. Brevetoxins are thought to be synthesized by a polyketide synthase (PKS) complex, but the gene cluster for this PKS has yet to be identified. Here, eight PKS transcripts were identified in K. brevis by high throughput cDNA library screening. Full length sequences were obtained through 3' and 5' RACE, which demonstrated the presence of polyadenylation, 3'-UTRs, and an identical dinoflagellate-specific spliced leader sequence at the 5' end of PKS transcripts. Six transcripts encoded for individual ketosynthase (KS) domains, one ketoreductase (KR), and one transcript encoded both acyl carrier protein (ACP) and KS domains. Transcript lengths ranged from 1875 to 3397 nucleotides, based on sequence analysis, and were confirmed by northern blotting. Baysian phylogenetic analysis of the K. brevis KS domains placed them well within the protist type I PKS clade. Thus although most similar to type I modular PKSs, the presence of individual catalytic domains on separate transcripts suggests a protein structure more similar to type II PKSs, in which each catalytic domain resides on an individual protein. These results identify an unprecedented PKS structure in a toxic dinoflagellate.

  1. Cooperation between catalytic and DNA binding domains enhances thermostability and supports DNA synthesis at higher temperatures by thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Pavlova, Nadejda V; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2012-03-13

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases [Pavlov, A. R., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.99, 13510-13515]. The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various sequence-nonspecific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of Topo V HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105 °C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding of templates to DNA polymerases.

  2. Spliceosomal snRNAs: Mg(2+)-dependent chemistry at the catalytic core?

    PubMed

    Villa, Tommaso; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Guthrie, Christine

    2002-04-19

    Since the discovery of self-splicing RNAs, it has been suspected that the snRNAs are the catalytic components of the spliceosome. Recent evidence supports both the catalytic potential of the spliceosomal snRNAs and their resemblance to elements of group II introns.

  3. Core Domains for Clinical Research in Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: An International Modified Delphi Consensus Study.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alison E; Sepulveda, Kristin A; Dinglas, Victor D; Chessare, Caroline M; Bingham, Clifton O; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    To identify the "core domains" (i.e., patient outcomes, health-related conditions, or aspects of health) that relevant stakeholders agree are essential to assess in all clinical research studies evaluating the outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. A two-round consensus process, using a modified Delphi methodology, with participants from 16 countries, including patient and caregiver representatives. Prior to voting, participants were asked to review 1) results from surveys of clinical researchers, acute respiratory failure survivors, and caregivers that rated the importance of 19 preliminary outcome domains and 2) results from a qualitative study of acute respiratory failure survivors' outcomes after hospital discharge, as related to the 19 preliminary outcome domains. Participants also were asked to suggest any additional potential domains for evaluation in the first Delphi survey. Web-based surveys of participants representing four stakeholder groups relevant to clinical research evaluating postdischarge outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors: clinical researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers, and U.S. federal research funding organizations. None. None. Survey response rates were 97% and 99% in round 1 and round 2, respectively. There were seven domains that met the a priori consensus criteria to be designated as core domains: physical function, cognition, mental health, survival, pulmonary function, pain, and muscle and/or nerve function. This study generated a consensus-based list of core domains that should be assessed in all clinical research studies evaluating acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. Identifying appropriate measurement instruments to assess these core domains is an important next step toward developing a set of core outcome measures for this field of research.

  4. What are the most common domains of the core competencies of disaster nursing? A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Al Thobaity, Abdullelah; Plummer, Virginia; Williams, Brett

    2017-03-01

    Scoping review was conducted to identify the most common domains of the core competencies of disaster nursing. Nurses play an essential role in all phases of disaster management. For nurses to respond competently, they must be equipped with the skills to provide comprehensive and holistic care to the populations affected by or at risk of disasters. A scoping review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. The review used information from six databases: the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Ovid MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, ProQuest, Scopus and the Education Resources Information Center. Keywords and inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified as strategies to use in this review. Twelve studies were eligible for result extraction, as they listed domains of the core competencies. These domains varied among studies. However, the most common domains were related to communication, planning, decontamination and safety, the Incident Command System and ethics. Knowledge of the domains of the core competencies, such as understanding the content and location of the disaster plan, communication during disaster and ethical issues is fundamental for nurses. Including these domains in the planning and provision of training for nurses, such as disaster drills, will strengthen their preparedness to respond competently to disaster cases. Nurses must be involved in future research in this area to explore and describe their fundamental competencies in each domain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-01-15

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  6. Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food

    PubMed Central

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F.; Santos, Laurie R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants’ domains of knowledge. PMID:19409538

  7. Core knowledge and its limits: the domain of food.

    PubMed

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F; Santos, Laurie R; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2009-07-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants' domains of knowledge.

  8. Rift Valley fever phlebovirus NSs protein core domain structure suggests molecular basis for nuclear filaments.

    PubMed

    Barski, Michal; Brennan, Benjamin; Miller, Ona K; Potter, Jane A; Vijayakrishnan, Swetha; Bhella, David; Naismith, James H; Elliott, Richard M; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich

    2017-09-15

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV) is a clinically and economically important pathogen increasingly likely to cause widespread epidemics. RVFV virulence depends on the interferon antagonist non-structural protein (NSs), which remains poorly characterized. We identified a stable core domain of RVFV NSs (residues 83-248), and solved its crystal structure, a novel all-helical fold organized into highly ordered fibrils. A hallmark of RVFV pathology is NSs filament formation in infected cell nuclei. Recombinant virus encoding the NSs core domain induced intranuclear filaments, suggesting it contains all essential determinants for nuclear translocation and filament formation. Mutations of key crystal fibril interface residues in viruses encoding full-length NSs completely abrogated intranuclear filament formation in infected cells. We propose the fibrillar arrangement of the NSs core domain in crystals reveals the molecular basis of assembly of this key virulence factor in cell nuclei. Our findings have important implications for fundamental understanding of RVFV virulence.

  9. The Evolutionarily Conserved Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), Lysin Motif (LysM), Domain Catalytic (TLDc) Domain Is Neuroprotective against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Mattéa J; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Kevin X; Davies, Kay E; Oliver, Peter L

    2016-02-05

    Oxidative stress is a pathological feature of many neurological disorders; therefore, utilizing proteins that are protective against such cellular insults is a potentially valuable therapeutic approach. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) has been shown previously to be critical for oxidative stress resistance in neuronal cells; deletion of this gene causes neurodegeneration in mice, yet conversely, overexpression of OXR1 is protective in cellular and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. OXR1 contains the Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), lysin motif (LysM), domain catalytic (TLDc) domain, a motif present in a family of proteins including TBC1 domain family member 24 (TBC1D24), a protein mutated in a range of disorders characterized by seizures, hearing loss, and neurodegeneration. The TLDc domain is highly conserved across species, although the structure-function relationship is unknown. To understand the role of this domain in the stress response, we carried out systematic analysis of all mammalian TLDc domain-containing proteins, investigating their expression and neuroprotective properties in parallel. In addition, we performed a detailed structural and functional study of this domain in which we identified key residues required for its activity. Finally, we present a new mouse insertional mutant of Oxr1, confirming that specific disruption of the TLDc domain in vivo is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that the integrity of the TLDc domain is essential for conferring neuroprotection, an important step in understanding the functional significance of all TLDc domain-containing proteins in the cellular stress response and disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Evolution of the PPM-family protein phosphatases in Streptomyces: duplication of catalytic domain and lateral recruitment of additional sensory domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Shi, Liang

    2004-12-01

    Originally identified from eukaryotes, the Mg{sup 2+}- or Mn{sup 2+}-dependent protein phosphatases (PPMs) are a diverse group of enzymes whose members include eukaryotic PP2C and some prokaryotic serine/threonine phosphatases. In our previous study, an unexpectedly large number of PPMs were identified in two Streptomyces genomes. In this work, a phylogenetic analysis was performed with all the PPMs available from a wide variety of microbial sources to determine the evolutionary origin of the Streptomyces PPM proteins. Consistent with earlier hypotheses, the results suggested that the microbial PPMs were relatively recent additions from eukaryotic sources. Results also indicated that the Streptomyces PPMs were divided into two major subfamilies at an early stage of their emergence in Streptomyces genomes. The first subfamily, which contains only six Streptomyces PPMs, possesses a catalytic domain whose sequence and architecture are similar to that of eukaryotic PPMs; the second subfamily contains 89 Streptomyces PPMs that lack the 5a and 5b catalytic domain motifs, similar to the PPMs SpoIIE and RsbU of Bacillus subtilis. Significant gene duplication was observed for the PPMs in the second subfamily. In addition, more than half (54 %) of the Streptomyces PPMs from the second subfamily were found to have at least one additional sensory domain, most commonly the PAS or the GAF domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these domains tended to be clustered according to the putative physiological functions rather than taxonomic relationship, implying that they might have arisen as a result of domain recruitment in a late evolutionary stage. This study provides an insight into how Streptomyces spp. may have expanded their PPM-based signal transduction networks to enable them to respond to a greater range of environmental changes.

  11. Enzymatic specificities and modes of action of the two catalytic domains of the XynC xylanase from Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, H; Paradis, F W; Krell, P J; Phillips, J P; Forsberg, C W

    1994-01-01

    The xylanase XynC of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 was recently shown to contain three distinct domains, A, B, and C (F. W. Paradis, H. Zhu, P. J. Krell, J. P. Phillips, and C. W. Forsberg, J. Bacteriol. 175:7666-7672, 1993). Domains A and B each bear an active site capable of hydrolyzing xylan, while domain C has no enzymatic activity. Two truncated proteins, each containing a single catalytic domain, named XynC-A and XynC-B were purified to homogeneity. The catalytic domains A and B had similar pH and temperature parameters of 6.0 and 50 degrees C for maximum hydrolytic activity and extensively degraded birch wood xylan to xylose and xylobiose. The Km and Vmax values, respectively, were 2.0 mg ml-1 and 6.1 U mg-1 for the intact enzyme, 1.83 mg ml-1 and 689 U mg-1 for domain A, and 2.38 mg ml-1 and 91.8 U mg-1 for domain B. Although domain A had a higher specific activity than domain B, domain B exhibited a broader substrate specificity and hydrolyzed rye arabinoxylan to a greater extent than domain A. Furthermore, domain B, but not domain A, was able to release xylose at the initial stage of the hydrolysis. Both catalytic domains cleaved xylotriose, xylotetraose, and xylopentaose but had no activity on xylobiose. Bond cleavage frequencies obtained from hydrolysis of xylo-alditol substrates suggest that while both domains have a strong preference for internal linkages of the xylan backbone, domain B has fewer subsites for substrate binding than domain A and cleaves arabinoxylan more efficiently. Chemical modification with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide methiodide and N-bromosuccinimide inactivated both XynC-A and XynC-B in the absence of xylan, indicating that carboxyl groups and tryptophan residues in the catalytic site of each domain have essential roles. Images PMID:8021170

  12. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  13. Prp2-mediated protein rearrangements at the catalytic core of the spliceosome as revealed by dcFCCS

    PubMed Central

    Ohrt, Thomas; Prior, Mira; Dannenberg, Julia; Odenwälder, Peter; Dybkov, Olexandr; Rasche, Nicolas; Schmitzová, Jana; Gregor, Ingo; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Enderlein, Jörg; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    The compositional and conformational changes during catalytic activation of the spliceosome promoted by the DEAH box ATPase Prp2 are only poorly understood. Here, we show by dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (dcFCCS) that the binding affinity of several proteins is significantly changed during the Prp2-mediated transition of precatalytic Bact spliceosomes to catalytically activated B* spliceosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During this step, several proteins, including the zinc-finger protein Cwc24, are quantitatively displaced from the B* complex. Consistent with this, we show that Cwc24 is required for step 1 but not for catalysis per se. The U2-associated SF3a and SF3b proteins Prp11 and Cus1 remain bound to the B* spliceosome under near-physiological conditions, but their binding is reduced at high salt. Conversely, high-affinity binding sites are created for Yju2 and Cwc25 during catalytic activation, consistent with their requirement for step 1 catalysis. Our results suggest high cooperativity of multiple Prp2-mediated structural rearrangements at the spliceosome's catalytic core. Moreover, dcFCCS represents a powerful tool ideally suited to study quantitatively spliceosomal protein dynamics in equilibrium. PMID:22535589

  14. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  15. Hematite homogeneous core/shell hierarchical spheres: Surfactant-free solvothermal preparation and their improved catalytic property of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Suoyuan; Li Haitao; He Xiaodie; Kang Zhenhui; Liu Yang; Lee, Shuit Tong

    2012-01-15

    Solvothermal synthesis is an efficient synthetic method for preparing nano and micromaterials. Preparation of hematite through alcoholysis of ferric ion under solvothermal condition has been carried out at low concentrations. In this paper, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized via solvothermal treatment of FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and ethanol. The achievements of such structures can be attributed to two important factors: high temperature and high concentration. Besides, the crystal water and reaction time were also important factors to the synthesis of hematite. The prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore size distribution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a satellite peak at 719.8 eV, which is the characteristic peak of Fe(III). The formation mechanism of the spheres and the effects of the reactant concentrations and reaction temperatures have been discussed. Moreover, the enhanced catalytic activity of the spheres has also been investigated through oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high conversion (42%) and selectivity (95%). - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical microspheres were synthesized by solvothermal method. Owing to the special structure, the synthesized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microspheres exhibit a superior catalytic activity in benzyl oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hierarchical Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core/shell microspheres were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microspheres were assembled by {beta}-FeOOH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample exhibits a superior catalytic activity and selectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high activity and selectivity are due to the hierarchical core/shell structure.

  16. Core outcome domains for clinical trials in non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Deyo, Richard A; Terwee, Caroline B; Boers, Maarten; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Corbin, Terry P; Costa, Leonardo O P; Foster, Nadine E; Grotle, Margreth; Koes, Bart W; Kovacs, Francisco M; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Chris G; Pearson, Adam M; Peul, Wilco C; Schoene, Mark L; Turk, Dennis C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2015-06-01

    Inconsistent reporting of outcomes in clinical trials of patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) hinders comparison of findings and the reliability of systematic reviews. A core outcome set (COS) can address this issue as it defines a minimum set of outcomes that should be reported in all clinical trials. In 1998, Deyo et al. recommended a standardized set of outcomes for LBP clinical research. The aim of this study was to update these recommendations by determining which outcome domains should be included in a COS for clinical trials in NSLBP. An International Steering Committee established the methodology to develop this COS. The OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to draw a list of potential core domains that were presented in a Delphi study. Researchers, care providers and patients were invited to participate in three Delphi rounds and were asked to judge which domains were core. A priori criteria for consensus were established before each round and were analysed together with arguments provided by panellists on importance, overlap, aggregation and/or addition of potential core domains. The Steering Committee discussed the final results and made final decisions. A set of 280 experts was invited to participate in the Delphi; response rates in the three rounds were 52, 50 and 45%. Of 41 potential core domains presented in the first round, 13 had sufficient support to be presented for rating in the third round. Overall consensus was reached for the inclusion of three domains in this COS: 'physical functioning', 'pain intensity' and 'health-related quality of life'. Consensus on 'physical functioning' and 'pain intensity' was consistent across all stakeholders, 'health-related quality of life' was not supported by the patients, and all the other domains were not supported by two or more groups of stakeholders. Weighting all possible argumentations, the Steering Committee decided to include in the COS the three domains that reached overall consensus and

  17. N- versus C-domain selectivity of catalytic inactivation of human angiotensin converting enzyme by lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2013-12-27

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic angiotensin I converting enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates was tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of each domain of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and catalytic factors (double-filter effect).

  18. High temperatures enhance cooperative motions between CBM and catalytic domains of a thermostable cellulase: mechanism insights from essential dynamics.

    PubMed

    Batista, Paulo Ricardo; Costa, Mauricio Garcia de Souza; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; de Souza, Wanderley

    2011-08-14

    Cellulases from thermophiles are capable of cleaving sugar chains from cellulose efficiently at high temperatures. The thermo-resistant Cel9A-68 cellulase possesses two important domains: CBM and a catalytic domain connected by a Pro/Ser/Thr rich linker. These domains act cooperatively to allow efficient catalysis. Despite exhaustive efforts to characterize cellulase binding and mechanism of action, a detailed description of the cellulose intrinsic flexibility is still lacking. From computational simulations we studied the temperature influence on the enzyme plasticity, prior to substrate binding. Interestingly, we observed an enhancement of collective motions at high temperatures. These motions are the most representative and describe an intrinsic hinge bending transition. A detailed analysis of these motions revealed an interdomain approximation where D459 and G460, located at the linker region, are the hinge residues. Therefore, we propose a new putative site for mutagenesis targeting the modulation of such conformational transition that may be crucial for activity.

  19. Hetero-oligomerization of C2 domains of phospholipase C-related but catalytically inactive protein and synaptotagmin-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, DaGuang; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Zhao; Hirata, Masato

    2015-01-01

    The C2 domain is a protein module often found in molecules that regulate exocytosis. C2 domains mediate interactions between the parental molecule and Ca(2+), phospholipids, and proteins. Although various molecules have been shown to interact with several C2 domains, no interactions between the C2 domains from different molecules have yet been reported. In the present study, we identified direct interactions between the C2 domain of PRIP (phospholipase C-related but catalytically inactive protein) and the C2 domains of other molecules. Among the C2 domains examined, those of synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1-C2A and Syt1-C2B) and phospholipase C δ-1 bound to the C2 domain of PRIP. We investigated the interactions between the C2 domain of PRIP (PRIP-C2) with Syt1-C2A and Syt1-C2B, and the mode of binding of each was Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent, respectively. We further demonstrated that the Ca(2+) dependence of the interaction between PRIP-C2 and Syt1-C2A was attributed to Ca(2+) binding with Syt1-C2A, but not PRIP-C2, using a series of mutants prepared from both C2 domains. We previously reported that the interaction between PRIP-C2 and the membrane fusion machinery suggested a critical role for PRIP in exocytosis; therefore, the results of the present study further support the importance of PRIP-C2 in the inhibitory function of PRIP in regulating exocytosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A dealloying process of core-shell Au@AuAg nanorods for porous nanorods with enhanced catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xia; Ye, Wei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    One-dimensional porous metallic nanomaterials have attracted much attention due to their unique shape and hollow structure. Herein, the gold nanorods in a porous shell of an AuAg alloy are synthesized via a dealloying process of the core-shell Au@AuAg nanorods at room temperature. The formation of tiny pores in the shell results in the huge red-shift, sharp decrease and drastic broadening of longitudinal surface plasmon resonance absorption. The continuous removal of silver from the porous nanorods leads to the breakage of tiny pores and leaves a rough surface on the nanorods behind. The rough surface gradually becomes smooth in the subsequent dealloying process. The surface structures of these intermediates are correlated with their absorption spectra and catalytic activities for the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol. The porous nanorods show a higher catalytic efficiency than the gold nanorods, the core-shell nanorods and the rough nanorods. The results indicate that the dealloying of anisotropic bimetal nanomaterials not only provides an effective pathway to carve the structures on the nanoscale but also offers numerous opportunities to observe novel optical properties and enhanced catalysis performances.One-dimensional porous metallic nanomaterials have attracted much attention due to their unique shape and hollow structure. Herein, the gold nanorods in a porous shell of an AuAg alloy are synthesized via a dealloying process of the core-shell Au@AuAg nanorods at room temperature. The formation of tiny pores in the shell results in the huge red-shift, sharp decrease and drastic broadening of longitudinal surface plasmon resonance absorption. The continuous removal of silver from the porous nanorods leads to the breakage of tiny pores and leaves a rough surface on the nanorods behind. The rough surface gradually becomes smooth in the subsequent dealloying process. The surface structures of these intermediates are correlated with their absorption spectra and

  1. An antigenic domain within a catalytically active Leishmania infantum nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase 1) is a target of inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Carolina Ribeiro Gomes; Porcino, Gabriane Nascimento; Detoni, Michelle de Lima; Emídio, Nayara Braga; Marconato, Danielle Gomes; Faria-Pinto, Priscila; Fessel, Melissa Regina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Marques, Marcos José; Vasconcelos, Eveline Gomes

    2013-02-01

    We identified a shared B domain within nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) of plants and parasites. Now, an NTPDase activity not affected by inhibitors of adenylate kinase and ATPases was detected in Leishmania infantum promastigotes. By non-denaturing gel electrophoresis of detergent-homogenized promastigote preparation, an active band hydrolyzing nucleosides di- and triphosphate was visualized and, following SDS-PAGE and silver staining was identified as a single polypeptide of 50kDa. By Western blots, it was recognized by immune sera raised against potato apyrase (SA), r-pot B domain (SB), a recombinant polypeptide derived from the potato apyrase, and LbB1LJ (SC) or LbB2LJ (SD), synthetic peptides derived from the Leishmania NTPDase 1, and by serum samples from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis, identifying the antigenic L. infantum NTPDase 1 and, also, its conserved B domain (r83-122). By immunoprecipitation assays and Western blots, immune sera SA and SB identified the catalytically active NTPDase 1 in promastigote preparation. In addition, the immune sera SB (44%) and SC or SD (87-99%) inhibited its activity, suggesting a direct effect on the B domain. By ELISA, 37%, 45% or 50% of 38 infected dogs were seropositive for r-pot B domain, LbB1LJ and LbB2LJ, respectively, confirming the B domain antigenicity.

  2. The catalytic core of an archaeal 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complex is a 42-mer protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J; van den Elsen, Jean M H

    2012-03-01

    The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) enzyme forms the structural and catalytic core of the tripartite 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of the central metabolic pathways. Although this family of multienzyme complexes shares a common architecture, their E2 cores form homo-trimers that, depending on the source, further associate into either octahedral (24-mer) or icosahedral (60-mer) assemblies, as predicted by the principles of quasi-equivalence. In the crystal structure of the E2 core from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a thermophilic archaeon, the homo-trimers assemble into a unique 42-mer oblate spheroid. Analytical equilibrium centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses confirm that this catalytically active 1.08 MDa assembly exists as a single species in solution, forming a hollow spheroid with a maximum diameter of 220 Å. In this paper we show that a monodisperse macromolecular assembly, built from identical subunits in non-identical environments, forms an irregular protein shell via non-equivalent interactions. This unusually irregular protein shell, combining cubic and dodecahedral geometrical elements, expands on the concept of quasi-equivalence as a basis for understanding macromolecular assemblies by showing that cubic point group symmetry is not a physical requirement in multienzyme assembly. These results extend our basic knowledge of protein assembly and greatly expand the number of possibilities to manipulate self-assembling biological complexes to be utilized in innovative nanotechnology applications.

  3. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains

    PubMed Central

    Debowski, Aleksandra W.; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  4. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tiandi; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Haslam, Stuart M; Mulloy, Barbara; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  5. Three-dimensional structure of Saccharomyces invertase: role of a non-catalytic domain in oligomerization and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Polo, M Angela; Ramírez-Escudero, Mercedes; Lafraya, Alvaro; González, Beatriz; Marín-Navarro, Julia; Polaina, Julio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2013-04-05

    Invertase is an enzyme that is widely distributed among plants and microorganisms and that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the disaccharide sucrose into glucose and fructose. Despite the important physiological role of Saccharomyces invertase (SInv) and the historical relevance of this enzyme as a model in early biochemical studies, its structure had not yet been solved. We report here the crystal structure of recombinant SInv at 3.3 Å resolution showing that the enzyme folds into the catalytic β-propeller and β-sandwich domains characteristic of GH32 enzymes. However, SInv displays an unusual quaternary structure. Monomers associate in two different kinds of dimers, which are in turn assembled into an octamer, best described as a tetramer of dimers. Dimerization plays a determinant role in substrate specificity because this assembly sets steric constraints that limit the access to the active site of oligosaccharides of more than four units. Comparative analysis of GH32 enzymes showed that formation of the SInv octamer occurs through a β-sheet extension that seems unique to this enzyme. Interaction between dimers is determined by a short amino acid sequence at the beginning of the β-sandwich domain. Our results highlight the role of the non-catalytic domain in fine-tuning substrate specificity and thus supplement our knowledge of the activity of this important family of enzymes. In turn, this gives a deeper insight into the structural features that rule modularity and protein-carbohydrate recognition.

  6. Preferential interaction of the core histone tail domains with linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D; Vitolo, J M; Mutskov, V; Dimitrov, S; Hayes, J J

    2001-06-05

    Within chromatin, the core histone tail domains play critical roles in regulating the structure and accessibility of nucleosomal DNA within the chromatin fiber. Thus, many nuclear processes are facilitated by concomitant posttranslational modification of these domains. However, elucidation of the mechanisms by which the tails mediate such processes awaits definition of tail interactions within chromatin. In this study we have investigated the primary DNA target of the majority of the tails in mononucleosomes. The results clearly show that the tails bind preferentially to "linker" DNA, outside of the DNA encompassed by the nucleosome core. These results have important implications for models of tail function within the chromatin fiber and for in vitro structural and functional studies using nucleosome core particles.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    SciTech Connect

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  8. Replacement and deletion mutations in the catalytic domain and belt region of Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase to enhance thermostability.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Doleyres, Y; Coutinho, P M; Ford, C; Reilly, P J

    2000-09-01

    Three single-residue mutations, Asp71-->Asn, Gln409-->Pro and Gly447-->Ser, two long-to-short loop replacement mutations, Gly23-Ala24-Asp25-Gly26-Ala27-Trp28- Val29-Ser30-->Asn-Pro-Pro (23-30 replacement) and Asp297-Ser298-Glu299-Ala300-Val301-->Ala-G ly-Ala (297-301 replacement) and one deletion mutation removing Glu439, Thr440 and Ser441 (Delta439-441), all based on amino acid sequence alignments, were made to improve Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase thermostability. The first and second single-residue mutations were designed to introduce a potential N:-glycosylation site and to restrict backbone bond rotation, respectively, and therefore to decrease entropy during protein unfolding. The third single-residue mutation was made to decrease flexibility and increase O:-glycosylation in the already highly O:-glycosylated belt region that extends around the globular catalytic domain. The 23-30 replacement mutation was designed to eliminate a very thermolabile extended loop on the catalytic domain surface and to bring the remainder of this region closer to the rest of the catalytic domain, therefore preventing it from unfolding. The 297-301 replacement mutant GA was made to understand the function of the random coil region between alpha-helices 9 and 10. Delta439-441 was constructed to decrease belt flexibility. All six mutations increased glucoamylase thermostability without significantly changing enzyme kinetic properties, with the 23-30 replacement mutation increasing the activation free energy for thermoinactivation by about 4 kJ/mol, which leads to a 4 degrees C increase in operating temperature at constant thermostability.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina.

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X. -L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Biosciences Division; National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  10. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1−xSix induced by the influence of an “edge” of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion “Σ7” domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  11. A monoclonal antibody inhibits gelatinase B/MMP-9 by selective binding to part of the catalytic domain and not to the fibronectin or zinc binding domains.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik; Leyssen, An; Van Aelst, Ilse; Fiten, Pierre; Piccard, Helene; Hu, Jialiang; Descamps, Francis J; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Riccio, Paolo; Polverini, Eugenia; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2007-02-01

    Gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a multidomain enzyme functioning in acute and chronic inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. It belongs to a family of more than 20 related zinc proteinases. Therefore, the discovery and the definition of the action mechanism of selective MMP inhibitors form the basis for future therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody REGA-3G12 is a most selective inhibitor of human gelatinase B. REGA-3G12 was found to recognize the aminoterminal part and not the carboxyterminal O-glycosylated and hemopexin protein domains. A variant of gelatinase B, lacking the two carboxyterminal domains, was expressed in insect cells and fragmented with purified proteinases. The fragments were probed by one- and two-dimensional Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments with REGA-3G12 to map the interactions between the antibody and the enzyme. The interaction unit was identified by Edman degradation analysis as the glycosylated segment from Trp(116) to Lys(214) of gelatinase B. The sequence of this segment was analysed by hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, accessibility and flexibility profiling. Four hydrophilic peptides were chemically synthesized and used in binding and competition assays. The peptide Gly(171)-Leu(187) in molar excess inhibited partially the binding of MMP-9 to REGA-3G12 and thus refines the structure of the conformational binding site. These results define part of the catalytic domain of gelatinase B/MMP-9, and not the zinc-binding or fibronectin domains, as target for the development of selective inhibitors.

  12. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  13. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  14. Mechanism for activation of the EGF receptor catalytic domain by the juxtamembrane segment

    PubMed Central

    Jura, Natalia; Endres, Nicholas F.; Engel, Kate; Deindl, Sebastian; Das, Rahul; Lamers, Meindert H.; Wemmer, David E.; Zhang, Xuewu; Kuriyan, John

    2009-01-01

    Signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor requires an allosteric interaction between the kinase domains of two receptors, whereby one activates the other. We show that the intracellular juxtamembrane segment of the receptor, known to potentiate kinase activity, is able to dimerize the kinase domains. The C-terminal half of the juxtamembrane segment latches the activated kinase domain to the activator, and the N-terminal half of this segment further potentiates dimerization, most likely by forming an antiparallel helical dimer that engages the transmembrane helices of the activated receptor. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the extracellular domains block the intrinsic ability of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains to dimerize and activate, with ligand binding releasing this block. The formation of the activating juxtamembrane latch is prevented by the C-terminal tails in a new structure of an inactive kinase domain dimer, suggesting how alternative dimers can prevent ligand-independent activation. PMID:19563760

  15. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Ω-loop lid domain in PEPCK impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Troy A.; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies on the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Ω-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. Based upon these structural studies we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid-domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by the introduction of a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Ω-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme’s ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is reduced resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK support our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrate that the shift in the lowest energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic penalty for ordering of the ten-residue

  16. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Omega-loop lid domain in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity .

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-06-29

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Omega-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. On the basis of these structural studies, we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding, resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by introducing a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Omega-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme's ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is weakened, resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid-closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated, resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK supports our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrates that the shift in the lowest-energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic

  17. Identifying a core set of outcome domains to measure in clinical trials for shoulder disorders: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To achieve consensus on the most important outcome domains to measure across all clinical trials for shoulder disorders. Methods We performed an online modified Delphi study with an international, multidisciplinary and multistakeholder panel. A literature review and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to generate a list of potential core domains, which were presented to patients, clinicians and researchers in two Delphi rounds. Participants were asked to judge the importance of each potential core domain and provide a rationale for their response. A core domain was defined a priori as a domain that at least 67% of participants considered core. Results In both rounds, 335 individuals were invited to participate (268 clinicians/researchers and 67 patients); response rates were 27% (n=91) and 29% (n=96), respectively. From a list of 41 potential core domains, four domains met our criteria for inclusion: ‘pain’, ‘physical functioning’, ‘global assessment of treatment success’ and ‘health-related quality of life’. Two additional domains, ‘sleep functioning’ and ‘psychological functioning’, met the criteria for inclusion by some, but not all stakeholder groups. There was consensus that ‘number of deaths’ was not a core domain, but insufficient agreement on whether or not several other domains, including ‘range of motion’ and ‘muscle strength’, were core domains. Conclusions Based on international consensus from patients, clinicians and researchers, ‘pain’, ‘physical functioning’, ‘global assessment of treatment success’ and ‘health-related quality of life’ were considered core outcome domains for shoulder disorder trials. The value of several other domains needs further consideration. PMID:28123775

  18. Constructs of human neuropathy target esterase catalytic domain containing mutations related to motor neuron disease have altered enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Hein, Nichole D; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Rainier, Shirley R; Fink, John K; Richardson, Rudy J

    2010-07-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is a phospholipase/lysophospholipase associated with organophosphorus (OP) compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). Distal degeneration of motor axons occurs in both OPIDN and the hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Recently, mutations within the esterase domain of NTE were identified in patients with a novel type of HSP (SPG39) designated NTE-related motor neuron disease (NTE-MND). Two of these mutations, arginine 890 to histidine (R890H) and methionine 1012 to valine (M1012V), were created in human recombinant NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to measure possible changes in catalytic properties. These mutated enzymes had decreased specific activities for hydrolysis of the artificial substrate, phenyl valerate. In addition, the M1012V mutant exhibited a reduced bimolecular rate constant of inhibition (k(i)) for all three inhibitors tested: mipafox, diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, and chlorpyrifos oxon. Finally, while both mutated enzymes inhibited by OP compounds exhibited altered time-dependent loss of their ability to be reactivated by nucleophiles (aging), more pronounced effects were seen with the M1012V mutant. Taken together, the results from specific activity, inhibition, and aging experiments suggest that the mutations found in association with NTE-MND have functional correlates in altered enzymological properties of NTE.

  19. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2017-01-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA−) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA− was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA− to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules – CadA and CsaA. pkcA− slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA−. PMID:26183108

  20. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-).

  1. Molecular defect in factor IXBm Lake Elsinore. Substitution of Ala390 by Val in the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, S G; Pendurthi, U R; Kasper, C K; Bajaj, S P

    1988-08-05

    Earlier studies with factor IXBm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE), a nonfunctional variant of factor IX, suggested that the defect in this protein may reside in the catalytic domain of the molecule (Usharani, P., Warn-Cramer, B. J., Kasper, C. K., and Bajaj, S. P. (1985) J. Clin. Invest. 75, 76-83). In this report, genomic DNA fragments from normal IX and IXBmLE alleles were cloned into phage lambda EMBL3 and the recombinant phage identified using normal IX cDNA and synthetic oligonucleotides. Exons VI, VII, and VIII of normal IX and IXBmLE gene were also amplified using a newly developed primer-directed polymerase chain reaction method. All eight exons and flanking regions of the normal IX and IXBmLE gene were sequenced by the dideoxy chain termination method. Comparison of the normal IX and IXBmLE sequences revealed a single base substitution (C----T) in the exon VIII of the BmLE variant, which results in the replacement of Ala390 by Val in the variant molecule. Although this mutation is in the catalytic domain of the molecule, purified factor IXaBmLE is indistinguishable from normal IXa in its activity toward a small synthetic substrate, L-tosylarginine methyl ester. These data, coupled with the previous data, identify a region (around residue 390) in the normal factor IXa which appears to play a major role in the extended macromolecular substrate binding site.

  2. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III.

    PubMed

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian; Heinz, Andrea; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated. The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around these typical sites contains comparatively less prolines, of which some have been proven to be only partially hydroxylated. This is of relevance since partial hydroxylation in the vicinity of a potential scissile bond may have a local effect on the conformational thermodynamics with probable consequences on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  4. Conserved Catalytic Residues of the ALDH1L1 Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Domain Control Binding and Discharging of the Coenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (Ct-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP+-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several Ct-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP+, Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP+ but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type Ct-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP+ with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication. PMID:21540484

  5. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  6. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Epitope mapping of four monoclonal antibodies recognizing the hexose core domain of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Luk, J M; Lind, S M; Tsang, R S; Lindberg, A A

    1991-12-05

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies reactive with distinctive regions of the hexose core domain of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were generated and their epitope specificities were delineated. MAST 56 (IgG1) and MAST 50 (IgG3) antibodies elicited by immunizations with Salmonella typhimurium Rb1 and Rb2 mutants, reacted selectively in enzyme immunoassay with the LPS from rough mutants. In contrast, MATy 1 (IgM) and MATy 2 (IgG2b) antibodies raised by an attenuated Salmonella typhi 620 Ty strain were reactive with LPS from both smooth and rough Salmonellae. Immunoblotting analysis showed that MATy 1 distinguished only the bottom bands (naked LPS core) among the heterogeneous LPS populations, whereas MATy 2 gave a ladder pattern (reactive with both naked and O-chain-substituted LPS cores). Differential binding specificities of MATy 1 and MATy 2 antibodies to the naked and capped LPS cores were further analyzed utilizing S. typhimurium polysaccharide fractions with different O-chain:core ratios which were obtained after separation by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Steric effects on the antibody reactivity by the bulky O-polysaccharide chain were detected. The use of chemically defined native and synthetic saccharides as inhibitors, in combination with the conformation of the Salmonella core oligosaccharide, permitted the definition of antigenic determinants carried in the core domain recognized by each antibody: (i) the branches I and VIII are essential for MATy 1 recognition, (ii) the backbone III-IV-V for MATy 2, (iii) the backbone II-III-IV-V for MAST 56, and (iv) the backbone plus the branch III-IV-V-VIII for MAST 50. (formula; see text)

  8. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  9. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Curran, A C; Hwang, I; Corbin, J; Martinez, S; Rayle, D; Sze, H; Harper, J F

    2000-09-29

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  10. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  11. 10-23 DNAzyme modified with (2'R)- and (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methyluridine in the catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Robaldo, Laura; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2010-08-01

    The catalytic core of a 10-23 DNAzyme was modified using (2'R), (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methyluridine and LNA-T. Catalytic activities under pseudo first order conditions were compared at different Mg(2+) concentrations, indicating that certain 2'-C-methyl modified DNAzymes have significant activities. Resistance against MCF-7 cell lysate and endonuclease RQ1 was also measured, showing that the introduction of 2'-C-methyl-2'-deoxynucleosides increased the stability.

  12. Feasibility and Domain Validation of RA Flare Core Domain Set: A Report of the OMERACT 2014 RA Flare Group Plenary

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Susan J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Cooksey, Roxanne; Choy, Ernest H.; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E.; Guillemin, Francis; Halls, Serena; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L.; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Orbai, Ana Maria; Pohl, Christoph; Voshaar, Marieke Scholte; Woodworth, Thasia G.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The OMERACT RA Flare Group was established to develop an approach to identify and measure rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flares. Here, we provide an overview of our OMERACT 2014 plenary. Methods Feasibility and validity of flare domains endorsed at OMERACT 11 (2012) were described based on initial data from three international studies collected using a common set of questions specific to RA flare. Mean flare frequency, severity, and duration data were presented, and domain scores were compared by flare status to examine known-groups validity. Breakout groups provided input for stiffness, self-management, contextual factors, and measurement considerations. Results Flare data from 501 patients in a observational study indicated 39% were in a flare, with mean (SD) severity of 6.0 (2.6) and 55% lasting > 14 days. Pain, physical function, fatigue, participation and stiffness scores averaged ≥ 2 times higher (2 of 11 points) in flaring individuals. Correlations between flare domains and corresponding legacy instruments were r’s from 0.46 to 0.93. A combined definition (patient-report of flare and DAS28 increase) was evaluated in two other trials with similar results. Breakout groups debated specific measurement issues. Conclusion These data contribute initial evidence of feasibility and content validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set. Our research agenda for OMERACT 2016 includes establishing duration/intensity criteria and developing criteria to identify RA flares using existing disease activity measures. Ongoing work will also address discordance between patients and physician ratings, facilitate applications to clinical care, elucidate the role of self-management and help finalize recommendations for RA flare measurement. PMID:25684764

  13. Re-refinement of the spliceosomal U4 snRNP core-domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Jade; Leung, Adelaine K; Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The core domain of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), comprised of a ring of seven paralogous proteins bound around a single-stranded RNA sequence, functions as the assembly nucleus in the maturation of U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal snRNPs. The structure of the human U4 snRNP core domain was initially solved at 3.6 Å resolution by experimental phasing using data with tetartohedral twinning. Molecular replacement from this model followed by density modification using untwinned data recently led to a structure of the minimal U1 snRNP at 3.3 Å resolution. With the latter structure providing a search model for molecular replacement, the U4 core-domain structure has now been re-refined. The U4 Sm site-sequence AAUUUUU has been shown to bind to the seven Sm proteins SmF-SmE-SmG-SmD3-SmB-SmD1-SmD2 in an identical manner as the U1 Sm-site sequence AAUUUGU, except in SmD1 where the bound U replaces G. The progression from the initial to the re-refined structure exemplifies a tortuous route to accuracy: where well diffracting crystals of complex assemblies are initially unavailable, the early model errors are rectified by exploiting preliminary interpretations in further experiments involving homologous structures. New insights are obtained from the more accurate model.

  14. Re-refinement of the spliceosomal U4 snRNP core-domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jade; Leung, Adelaine K.; Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The core domain of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), comprised of a ring of seven paralogous proteins bound around a single-stranded RNA sequence, functions as the assembly nucleus in the maturation of U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal snRNPs. The structure of the human U4 snRNP core domain was initially solved at 3.6 Å resolution by experimental phasing using data with tetartohedral twinning. Molecular replacement from this model followed by density modification using untwinned data recently led to a structure of the minimal U1 snRNP at 3.3 Å resolution. With the latter structure providing a search model for molecular replacement, the U4 core-domain structure has now been re-refined. The U4 Sm site-sequence AAUUUUU has been shown to bind to the seven Sm proteins SmF–SmE–SmG–SmD3–SmB–SmD1–SmD2 in an identical manner as the U1 Sm-site sequence AAUUUGU, except in SmD1 where the bound U replaces G. The progression from the initial to the re-refined structure exemplifies a tortuous route to accuracy: where well diffracting crystals of complex assemblies are initially unavailable, the early model errors are rectified by exploiting preliminary interpretations in further experiments involving homologous structures. New insights are obtained from the more accurate model. PMID:26894541

  15. Water's potential role: Insights from studies of the p53 core domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Ma, Z; Wang, X; Xiao, Z T; Li, Y; Xue, Z H; Wang, Y H

    2012-02-01

    Soluble proteins with amyloidogenic propensity such as the tumor suppressor protein p53 have high proportion of incompletely desolvated backbone H bonds (HB). Such bonds are vulnerable to water attack, thus potentially leading to the misfolding of these proteins. However, it is still not clear how the surrounding solvent influences the protein native states. To address this, systematic surveys by molecular dynamics simulations and entropy analysis were performed on the p53 core domain in this work. We examined seven wild/mutant X-ray structures and observed two types of water-network hydration in three "hot hydration centers" (DNA- or small molecule- binding surfaces of the p53 core domain). The "tight" water, resulting from the local collective hydrogen-bond interactions, is probably fundamental to the protein structural stability. The second type of water is highly "dynamical" and exchanges very fast within the bulk solution, which is unambiguously assisted by the local protein motions. An entropy mapping of the solvent around the protein and a temperature perturbation analysis further present the main features of the p53 hydration network. The particular environment created by different water molecules around the p53 core domain also partly explains the structural vulnerabilities of this protein.

  16. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-21

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  17. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  18. Molecular dissection of the domain architecture and catalytic activities of human PrimPol

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Benjamin A.; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Bailey, Laura J.; Bianchi, Julie; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2014-01-01

    PrimPol is a primase–polymerase involved in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Although PrimPol is predicted to possess an archaeo-eukaryotic primase and a UL52-like zinc finger domain, the role of these domains has not been established. Here, we report that the proposed zinc finger domain of human PrimPol binds zinc ions and is essential for maintaining primase activity. Although apparently dispensable for its polymerase activity, the zinc finger also regulates the processivity and fidelity of PrimPol's extension activities. When the zinc finger is disrupted, PrimPol becomes more promutagenic, has an altered translesion synthesis spectrum and is capable of faithfully bypassing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolesions. PrimPol's polymerase domain binds to both single- and double-stranded DNA, whilst the zinc finger domain binds only to single-stranded DNA. We additionally report that although PrimPol's primase activity is required to restore wild-type replication fork rates in irradiated PrimPol−/− cells, polymerase activity is sufficient to maintain regular replisome progression in unperturbed cells. Together, these findings provide the first analysis of the molecular architecture of PrimPol, describing the activities associated with, and interplay between, its functional domains and defining the requirement for its primase and polymerase activities during nuclear DNA replication. PMID:24682820

  19. The properties of catalytically-inactivated Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: Role of the cellulose binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Donner, T.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1993-12-31

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was purified from a crude cellulase by preparative isoelectric focusing. Treatment of CBH I with 1-ethyl-3-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in its catalytic inactivation but did not abolish its ability to be absorbed to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). CBH I thus modified possessed a pI of between 8.5 and 9.3 and decreased tryptophan fluorescence compared to native CBH I. A comparison of the effect of native and modified CBH I on the morphology of crystalline cotton cellulose fibers was made using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Allosteric communication in the KIX domain proceeds through dynamic repacking of the hydrophobic core.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    2013-07-19

    The KIX domain of the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) co-operatively mediates interactions between transcription factors. Binding of the transcription factor mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) induces the formation of a low-populated conformer of KIX that resembles the conformation of the KIX domain in the presence of a second transcription factor molecule. NMR spin relaxation studies have previously shown that allosteric coupling proceeds through a network of hydrophobic core residues that bridge the two binding sites. Here we describe high-resolution NMR solution structures of the binary complex of KIX with MLL and the ternary complex of KIX formed with MLL and phosphorylated kinase inducible domain of CREB (pKID) as a second ligand. We show that binding of pKID to the binary complex of KIX with MLL is accompanied by a defined repacking of the allosteric network in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Rotamer populations derived from methyl group (13)C chemical shifts reveal a dynamic contribution to the repacking process that is not captured by the structural coordinates and exemplify the dynamic nature of allosteric communication in the KIX domain.

  1. Allosteric Communication in the KIX Domain Proceeds through Dynamic Repacking of the Hydrophobic Core

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The KIX domain of the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) co-operatively mediates interactions between transcription factors. Binding of the transcription factor mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) induces the formation of a low-populated conformer of KIX that resembles the conformation of the KIX domain in the presence of a second transcription factor molecule. NMR spin relaxation studies have previously shown that allosteric coupling proceeds through a network of hydrophobic core residues that bridge the two binding sites. Here we describe high-resolution NMR solution structures of the binary complex of KIX with MLL and the ternary complex of KIX formed with MLL and phosphorylated kinase inducible domain of CREB (pKID) as a second ligand. We show that binding of pKID to the binary complex of KIX with MLL is accompanied by a defined repacking of the allosteric network in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Rotamer populations derived from methyl group 13C chemical shifts reveal a dynamic contribution to the repacking process that is not captured by the structural coordinates and exemplify the dynamic nature of allosteric communication in the KIX domain. PMID:23651431

  2. The core domain as the force sensor of the yeast mechanosensitive TRP channel

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenwei; Anishkin, Andriy; Kung, Ching

    2011-01-01

    Stretch-activated conductances are commonly encountered in careful electric recordings. Those of known proteins (TRP, MscL, MscS, K2p, Kv, etc.) all share a core, which houses the ion pathway and the gate, but no recognizable force-sensing domain. Like animal TRPs, the yeast TRPY1 is polymodal, activated by stretch force, Ca2+, etc. To test whether its S5–S6 core senses the stretch force, we tried to uncouple it from the peripheral domains by strategic peptide insertions to block the covalent core–periphery interactions. Insertion of long unstructured peptides should distort, if not disrupt, protein structures that transmit force. Such insertions between S6 and the C-terminal tail largely removed Ca2+ activation, showing their effectiveness. However, such insertions as well as those between S5 and the N-terminal region, which includes S1–S4, did not significantly alter mechanosensitivity. Even insertions at both locations flanking the S5–S6 core did not much alter mechanosensitivity. Tryptophan scanning mutations in S5 were also constructed to perturb possible noncovalent core–periphery contacts. The testable tryptophan mutations also have little or no effects on mechanosensitivity. Boltzmann fits of the wild-type force–response curves agree with a structural homology model for a stretch-induced core expansion of ∼2 nm2 upon opening. We hypothesize that membrane tension pulls on S5–S6, expanding the core and opening the TRPY1 gate. The core being the major force sensor offers the simplest, though not the only, explanation of why so many channels of disparate designs are mechanically sensitive. Compared with the bacterial MscL, TRPY1 is much less sensitive to force, befitting a polymodal channel that relies on multiple stimuli. PMID:22124118

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on the catalytic domain of the chick retinal neurite-inhibitory factor CRYP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Girish, T. S.; Gopal, B.

    2005-04-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase CRYP-2 has been shown to be an inhibitory factor for the growth of retinal axons in the chick. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 are reported here. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase CRYP-2 has been shown to be an inhibitory factor for the growth of retinal axons in the chick. The extracellular receptor domain of CRYP-2 contains eight fibronectin repeats and studies using the extracellular domain alone demonstrated the chemorepulsive effect on retinal neurons. The precise role of the intracellular catalytic domain and the mechanism by which its activity is regulated is not known. Determination of the structure of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 was proposed in an effort to understand the downstream signal transduction mechanism in this system. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic domain of CRYP-2 are now reported. Preliminary crystallographic studies were performed on the diamond-shaped crystals, which grew under oil using the microbatch method at 298 K. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution on a home source. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.26, c = 244.95 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules per asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value was 2.7 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 54.8%.

  4. Redirection of the immune response to the functional catalytic domain of the cystein proteinase cruzipain improves protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Silvia I; Frank, Fernanda M; Becker, Pablo D; Arnaiz, María; Mirkin, Gerardo A; Corral, Ricardo S; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2010-07-01

    Despite the strong immune responses elicited after natural infection with Trypanosoma cruzi or vaccination against it, parasite survival suggests that these responses are insufficient or inherently inadequate. T. cruzi contains a major cystein proteinase, cruzipain, which has a catalytic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal extension. Immunizations that employed recombinant cruzipain or its N- and C-terminal domains allowed evaluation of the ability of cruzipain to circumvent responses against the catalytic domain. This phenomenon is not a property of the parasite but of cruzipain itself, because recombinant cruzipain triggers a response similar to that of cruzipain during natural or experimental infection. Cruzipain is not the only antigen with a highly immunogenic region of unknown function that somehow protects an essential domain for parasite survival. However, our studies show that this can be reverted by using the N-terminal domain as a tailored immunogen able to redirect host responses to provide enhanced protection.

  5. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide that supports catalytic activity in the hammerhead ribozyme domain.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, P; Harvey, S C; Ferbeyre, G; Usman, N; Cedergren, R

    1995-10-25

    A study of the activity of deoxyribonucleotide-substituted analogs of the hammerhead domain of RNA catalysis has led to the design of a 14mer oligomer composed entirely of deoxyribonucleotides that promotes the cleavage of an RNA substrate. Characterization of this reaction with sequence variants and mixed DNA/RNA oligomers shows that, although the all-deoxyribonucleotide oligomer is less efficient in catalysis, the DNA/substrate complex shares many of the properties of the all-RNA hammerhead domain such as multiple turnover kinetics and dependence on Mg2+ concentration. On the other hand, the values of kinetic parameters distinguish the DNA oligomer from the all-RNA oligomer. In addition, an analog of the oligomer having a single ribonucleotide in a strongly conserved position of the hammerhead domain is associated with more efficient catalysis than the all-RNA oligomer.

  6. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide that supports catalytic activity in the hammerhead ribozyme domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, P; Harvey, S C; Ferbeyre, G; Usman, N; Cedergren, R

    1995-01-01

    A study of the activity of deoxyribonucleotide-substituted analogs of the hammerhead domain of RNA catalysis has led to the design of a 14mer oligomer composed entirely of deoxyribonucleotides that promotes the cleavage of an RNA substrate. Characterization of this reaction with sequence variants and mixed DNA/RNA oligomers shows that, although the all-deoxyribonucleotide oligomer is less efficient in catalysis, the DNA/substrate complex shares many of the properties of the all-RNA hammerhead domain such as multiple turnover kinetics and dependence on Mg2+ concentration. On the other hand, the values of kinetic parameters distinguish the DNA oligomer from the all-RNA oligomer. In addition, an analog of the oligomer having a single ribonucleotide in a strongly conserved position of the hammerhead domain is associated with more efficient catalysis than the all-RNA oligomer. Images PMID:7479070

  7. When core competence is not enough: functional interplay of the DEAD-box helicase core with ancillary domains and auxiliary factors in RNA binding and unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Markus G; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    DEAD-box helicases catalyze RNA duplex unwinding in an ATP-dependent reaction. Members of the DEAD-box helicase family consist of a common helicase core formed by two RecA-like domains. According to the current mechanistic model for DEAD-box mediated RNA unwinding, binding of RNA and ATP triggers a conformational change of the helicase core, and leads to formation of a compact, closed state. In the closed conformation, the two parts of the active site for ATP hydrolysis and of the RNA binding site, residing on the two RecA domains, become aligned. Closing of the helicase core is coupled to a deformation of the RNA backbone and destabilization of the RNA duplex, allowing for dissociation of one of the strands. The second strand remains bound to the helicase core until ATP hydrolysis and product release lead to re-opening of the core. The concomitant disruption of the RNA binding site causes dissociation of the second strand. The activity of the helicase core can be modulated by interaction partners, and by flanking N- and C-terminal domains. A number of C-terminal flanking regions have been implicated in RNA binding: RNA recognition motifs (RRM) typically mediate sequence-specific RNA binding, whereas positively charged, unstructured regions provide binding sites for structured RNA, without sequence-specificity. Interaction partners modulate RNA binding to the core, or bind to RNA regions emanating from the core. The functional interplay of the helicase core and ancillary domains or interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding is not entirely understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge on RNA binding to the DEAD-box helicase core and the roles of ancillary domains and interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding by DEAD-box proteins.

  8. Deciphering the catalytic domain of colicin M, a peptidoglycan lipid II-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Barreteau, Hélène; Bouhss, Ahmed; Gérard, Fabien; Duché, Denis; Boussaid, Boubekeur; Blanot, Didier; Lloubès, Roland; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Touzé, Thierry

    2010-04-16

    Colicin M inhibits Escherichia coli peptidoglycan synthesis through cleavage of its lipid-linked precursors. It has a compact structure, whereas other related toxins are organized in three independent domains, each devoted to a particular function: translocation through the outer membrane, receptor binding, and toxicity, from the N to the C termini, respectively. To establish whether colicin M displays such an organization despite its structural characteristics, protein dissection experiments were performed, which allowed us to delineate an independent toxicity domain encompassing exactly the C-terminal region conserved among colicin M-like proteins and covering about half of colicin M (residues 124-271). Surprisingly, the in vitro activity of the isolated domain was 45-fold higher than that of the full-length protein, suggesting a mechanism by which the toxicity of this domain is revealed following primary protein maturation. In vivo, the isolated toxicity domain appeared as toxic as the full-length protein under conditions where the reception and translocation steps were by-passed. Contrary to the full-length colicin M, the isolated domain did not require the presence of the periplasmic FkpA protein to be toxic under these conditions, demonstrating that FkpA is involved in the maturation process. Mutational analysis further identified five residues that are essential for cytotoxicity as well as in vitro lipid II-degrading activity: Asp-229, His-235, Asp-226, Tyr-228, and Arg-236. Most of these residues are surface-exposed and located relatively close to each other, hence suggesting they belong to the colicin M active site.

  9. Accessing Elaborated 2,1-Borazaronaphthalene Cores Using Photoredox/Nickel Dual-Catalytic Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Davies, Geraint H M; Molander, Gary A

    2016-04-01

    A highly effective method for derivatizing 2,1-borazaronaphthalene cores using ammonium alkylbis(catecholato)silicates via photoredox/nickel dual catalysis is reported. By forging C(sp)(3)-C(sp)(2) bonds via this approach, alkyl fragments with various functional groups can be introduced to the azaborine core, affording previously inaccessible heterocyclic isosteres in good to excellent yields. The base-free, room-temperature conditions outlined allow sensitive functional group tolerance, even permitting the cross-coupling of unprotected primary and secondary amines.

  10. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  11. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  12. Structural and functional analyses of catalytic domain of GH10 xylanase from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Gao, Jian; Shang, Na; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Chan, Hsiu-Chien; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Zhu, Zhen; Wiegel, Juergen; Luo, Wenhua; Guo, Rey-Ting; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-07-01

    Xylanases are capable of decomposing xylans, the major components in plant cell wall, and releasing the constituent sugars for further applications. Because xylanase is widely used in various manufacturing processes, high specific activity, and thermostability are desirable. Here, the wild-type and mutant (E146A and E251A) catalytic domain of xylanase from Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485 (TsXylA) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified subsequently. The recombinant protein showed optimal temperature and pH of 75°C and 6.5, respectively, and it remained fully active even after heat treatment at 75°C for 1 h. Furthermore, the crystal structures of apo-form wild-type TsXylA and the xylobiose-, xylotriose-, and xylotetraose-bound E146A and E251A mutants were solved by X-ray diffraction to high resolution (1.32-1.66 Å). The protein forms a classic (β/α)8 folding of typical GH10 xylanases. The ligands in substrate-binding groove as well as the interactions between sugars and active-site residues were clearly elucidated by analyzing the complex structures. According to the structural analyses, TsXylA utilizes a double displacement catalytic machinery to carry out the enzymatic reactions. In conclusion, TsXylA is effective under industrially favored conditions, and our findings provide fundamental knowledge which may contribute to further enhancement of the enzyme performance through molecular engineering.

  13. Unraveling Surface Plasmon Decay in Core-Shell Nanostructures toward Broadband Light-Driven Catalytic Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Zhiheng; Long, Ran; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Yue; Wei, Kecheng; Wang, Chengming; Chen, Lu; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-06-01

    Harnessing surface plasmon of metal nanostructures to promote catalytic organic synthesis holds great promise in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. High conversion efficiency relies not only on broadening the absorption spectrum but on coupling the harvested energy into chemical reactions. Such coupling undergoes hot-electron transfer and photothermal conversion during the decay of surface plasmon; however, the two plasmonic effects are unfortunately entangled, making their individual roles still under debate. Here, we report that in a model system of bimetallic Au-Pd core-shell nanostructures the two effects can be disentangled through tailoring the shell thickness at atomic-level precision. As demonstrated by our ultrafast absorption spectroscopy characterizations, the achieved tunability of the two effects in a model reaction of Pd-catalyzed organic hydrogenation offers a knob for enhancing energy coupling. In addition, the two intrinsic plasmonic modes at 400-700 and 700-1000 nm in the bar-shaped nanostructures allow for utilizing photons to a large extent in full solar spectrum. This work establishes a paradigmatic guidance toward designing plasmonic-catalytic nanomaterials for enhanced solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

  14. The contribution of adenines in the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme improved by the 6-amino group modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yang; He, Junlin

    2016-09-15

    In the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme, its five adenine residues are moderate conservative, but with highly conserved functional groups like 6-amino group and 7-nitrogen atom. It is this critical conservation that these two groups could be modified for better contribution. With 2'-deoxyadenosine analogues, several functional groups were introduced at the 6-amino group of the five adenine residues. 3-Aminopropyl substituent at 6-amino group of A15 resulted in a five-fold increase of kobs. More efficient DNAzymes are expected by delicate design of the linkage and the external functional groups for this 6-amino group of A15. With this modification approach, other functional groups or residues could be optimized for 10-23 DNAzyme.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of the catalytic domain of major extracellular endoglucanase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Rosseto, Flávio R.; Puhl, Ana C.; Andrade, Maxuel O.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Cellulases, such as endoglucanases, exoglucanases and β-glucosidases, are important enzymes used in the process of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass. The bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris expresses a large number of hydrolases and the major endoglucanase (XccEG), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5), is the most strongly secreted extracellularly. In this work, the native XccEG was purified from the extracellular extract and crystallization assays were performed on its catalytic domain. A complete data set was collected on an in-house X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 174.66, b = 141.53, c = 108.00 Å, β = 110.49°. The Matthews coefficient suggests a solvent content of 70.1% and the presence of four protein subunits in the asymmetric unit. PMID:23385754

  16. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  17. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of the catalytic domain of major extracellular endoglucanase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Rosseto, Flávio R; Puhl, Ana C; Andrade, Maxuel O; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-02-01

    Cellulases, such as endoglucanases, exoglucanases and β-glucosidases, are important enzymes used in the process of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass. The bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris expresses a large number of hydrolases and the major endoglucanase (XccEG), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5), is the most strongly secreted extracellularly. In this work, the native XccEG was purified from the extracellular extract and crystallization assays were performed on its catalytic domain. A complete data set was collected on an in-house X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 174.66, b = 141.53, c = 108.00 Å, β = 110.49°. The Matthews coefficient suggests a solvent content of 70.1% and the presence of four protein subunits in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Characterization of Solanum tuberosum multicystatin and the significance of core domains.

    PubMed

    Green, Abigail R; Nissen, Mark S; Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, N Richard; Kang, Chulhee

    2013-12-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) multicystatin (PMC) is a unique cystatin composed of eight repeating units, each capable of inhibiting cysteine proteases. PMC is a composite of several cystatins linked by trypsin-sensitive (serine protease) domains and undergoes transitions between soluble and crystalline forms. However, the significance and the regulatory mechanism or mechanisms governing these transitions are not clearly established. Here, we report the 2.2-Å crystal structure of the trypsin-resistant PMC core consisting of the fifth, sixth, and seventh domains. The observed interdomain interaction explains PMC's resistance to trypsin and pH-dependent solubility/aggregation. Under acidic pH, weakening of the interdomain interactions exposes individual domains, resulting in not only depolymerization of the crystalline form but also exposure of cystatin domains for inhibition of cysteine proteases. This in turn allows serine protease-mediated fragmentation of PMC, producing ∼ 10-kD domains with intact inhibitory capacity and faster diffusion, thus enhancing PMC's inhibitory ability toward cysteine proteases. The crystal structure, light-scattering experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the critical role of pH and N-terminal residues in these dynamic transitions between monomer/polymer of PMC. Our data support a notion that the pH-dependent structural regulation of PMC has defense-related implications in tuber physiology via its ability to regulate protein catabolism.

  20. Characterization of Solanum tuberosum Multicystatin and the Significance of Core Domains[C

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abigail R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Kumar, G.N. Mohan; Knowles, N. Richard; Kang, ChulHee

    2013-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) multicystatin (PMC) is a unique cystatin composed of eight repeating units, each capable of inhibiting cysteine proteases. PMC is a composite of several cystatins linked by trypsin-sensitive (serine protease) domains and undergoes transitions between soluble and crystalline forms. However, the significance and the regulatory mechanism or mechanisms governing these transitions are not clearly established. Here, we report the 2.2-Å crystal structure of the trypsin-resistant PMC core consisting of the fifth, sixth, and seventh domains. The observed interdomain interaction explains PMC’s resistance to trypsin and pH-dependent solubility/aggregation. Under acidic pH, weakening of the interdomain interactions exposes individual domains, resulting in not only depolymerization of the crystalline form but also exposure of cystatin domains for inhibition of cysteine proteases. This in turn allows serine protease–mediated fragmentation of PMC, producing ∼10-kD domains with intact inhibitory capacity and faster diffusion, thus enhancing PMC’s inhibitory ability toward cysteine proteases. The crystal structure, light-scattering experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the critical role of pH and N-terminal residues in these dynamic transitions between monomer/polymer of PMC. Our data support a notion that the pH-dependent structural regulation of PMC has defense-related implications in tuber physiology via its ability to regulate protein catabolism. PMID:24363310

  1. A facile synthetic route for the preparation of gold nanostars with magnetic cores and their reusable nanohybrid catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiumin; Wang, Tingting; Chai, Fang; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Chungang; Sun, Wendong

    2011-03-01

    A facile synthetic route under mild conditions to the preparation of gold nanostars (GNSs) with Fe3O4 cores (Fe3O4@GNSs), possessing magnetization and tunable optical properties from the visible to near-infrared (NIR) region, was developed. Additionally, the resulting Fe3O4@GNSs described here show good catalytic activity for the reduction of potassium ferricyanide as a model reaction. Importantly, the catalyst, Fe3O4@GNSs, can be easily recycled with an external magnet and exhibits long-life, good reusability and stability. We also anticipated that Fe3O4@GNSs may provide a platform for broad potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications due to its magnetization and tunable optical properties from the visible to NIR region.A facile synthetic route under mild conditions to the preparation of gold nanostars (GNSs) with Fe3O4 cores (Fe3O4@GNSs), possessing magnetization and tunable optical properties from the visible to near-infrared (NIR) region, was developed. Additionally, the resulting Fe3O4@GNSs described here show good catalytic activity for the reduction of potassium ferricyanide as a model reaction. Importantly, the catalyst, Fe3O4@GNSs, can be easily recycled with an external magnet and exhibits long-life, good reusability and stability. We also anticipated that Fe3O4@GNSs may provide a platform for broad potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications due to its magnetization and tunable optical properties from the visible to NIR region. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM image of Fe3O4@GNSs after running for 6 times by magnetic separation. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00704h

  2. Solubility of the catalytic domains of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins known to humans. There are seven serotypes of the BoNTs (A-G), among which serotypes A, B, E and F are known to cause natural human intoxication. To date, eleven subtypes of LC/E, termed E1∼E11, have been identified. The LCs of BoNT/E were insoluble, prohibiting studies towards understanding the mechanisms of toxin action and substrate recognition. In this work, the molecular basis of insolubility of the recombinant LCs of two representative subtypes of BoNT/E, E1(Beluga) and E3 (Alaska), was determined. Hydrophobicity profile and structural modeling predicted a C-terminal candidate region responsible for the insolubility of LC/Es. Deletion of C-terminal 19 residues of LC/E(1-400) resulted in enhanced solubility, from 2 to ∼50% for LC/EAlaska and from 16 to ∼95% for LC/EBeluga. In addition, resides 230-236 were found to contribute to a different solubility level of LC/EAlaska when compared to LC/EBeluga. Substituting residues (230)TCI(232) in LC/EAlaska to the corresponding residues of (230)KYT(232) in LC/EBeluga enhanced the solubility of LC/EAlaska to a level approaching that of LC/EBeluga. Among these LC/Es and their derivatives, LC/EBeluga 1-400 was the most soluble and stable protein. Each LC/E derivative possessed similar catalytic activity, suggesting that the C-terminal region of LC/Es contributed to protein solubility, but not catalytic activity. In conclusion, this study generated a soluble and stable recombinant LC/E and provided insight into the structural components that govern the solubility and stability of the LCs of other BoNT serotypes and Tetanus toxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Smith, Jeremy C.; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose synthesis complex with a “rosette” shape is responsible for synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. This work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. The conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. This study strongly supports the “hexamer of trimers” model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product. PMID:26556795

  4. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    DOE PAGES

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; ...

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer inmore » solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.« less

  5. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Meiler, Jens; O’Neill, Hugh

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  6. Identification of a region that assists membrane insertion and translocation of the catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis CyaA toxin.

    PubMed

    Karst, Johanna C; Barker, Robert; Devi, Usha; Swann, Marcus J; Davi, Marilyne; Roser, Stephen J; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2012-03-16

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, one of the virulence factors secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, plays a critical role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by this bacterium. The CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its N-terminal catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cells, where, activated by endogenous calmodulin, it produces supraphysiological levels of cAMP. How the catalytic domain is transferred from the hydrophilic extracellular medium into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane and then to the cell cytoplasm remains an unsolved question. In this report, we have characterized the membrane-interacting properties of the CyaA catalytic domain. We showed that a protein covering the catalytic domain (AC384, encompassing residues 1-384 of CyaA) displayed no membrane association propensity. However, a longer polypeptide (AC489), encompassing residues 1-489 of CyaA, exhibited the intrinsic property to bind to membranes and to induce lipid bilayer destabilization. We further showed that deletion of residues 375-485 within CyaA totally abrogated the toxin's ability to increase intracellular cAMP in target cells. These results indicate that, whereas the calmodulin dependent enzymatic domain is restricted to the amino-terminal residues 1-384 of CyaA, the membrane-interacting, translocation-competent domain extends up to residue 489. This thus suggests an important role of the region adjacent to the catalytic domain of CyaA in promoting its interaction with and its translocation across the plasma membrane of target cells.

  7. Identification of a Region That Assists Membrane Insertion and Translocation of the Catalytic Domain of Bordetella pertussis CyaA Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Johanna C.; Barker, Robert; Devi, Usha; Swann, Marcus J.; Davi, Marilyne; Roser, Stephen J.; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, one of the virulence factors secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, plays a critical role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by this bacterium. The CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its N-terminal catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cells, where, activated by endogenous calmodulin, it produces supraphysiological levels of cAMP. How the catalytic domain is transferred from the hydrophilic extracellular medium into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane and then to the cell cytoplasm remains an unsolved question. In this report, we have characterized the membrane-interacting properties of the CyaA catalytic domain. We showed that a protein covering the catalytic domain (AC384, encompassing residues 1–384 of CyaA) displayed no membrane association propensity. However, a longer polypeptide (AC489), encompassing residues 1–489 of CyaA, exhibited the intrinsic property to bind to membranes and to induce lipid bilayer destabilization. We further showed that deletion of residues 375–485 within CyaA totally abrogated the toxin's ability to increase intracellular cAMP in target cells. These results indicate that, whereas the calmodulin dependent enzymatic domain is restricted to the amino-terminal residues 1–384 of CyaA, the membrane-interacting, translocation-competent domain extends up to residue 489. This thus suggests an important role of the region adjacent to the catalytic domain of CyaA in promoting its interaction with and its translocation across the plasma membrane of target cells. PMID:22241477

  8. Patient-reported outcomes in core domain sets for rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Boers, Maarten

    2015-12-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are abundant in rheumatology and their numbers continue to increase. But which of the available measures are most important? Core outcome sets-including groups of domains and instruments for measuring them-have been defined for many rheumatic diseases, with the aim that all these outcomes should be measured in every clinical trial. The subgroup of PROs included in these core sets is, therefore, undoubtedly important. This Review summarizes the PROs included in core outcome sets developed for use in clinical trials across a wide range of rheumatic diseases. Three PROs are commonly utilized across the majority of rheumatic conditions: pain, physical functioning and the patient global assessment of disease activity. However, additional research is needed to fully understand the role of the patient global assessment of disease activity, to distinguish specific domains within the broad concept of health-related quality of life, and to work towards consensus on the choice between generic and disease-specific instruments in various contexts.

  9. Domain dislocation: a change of core structure in periplasmic binding proteins in their evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Tateno, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1999-02-12

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) serve as receptors for various water-soluble ligands in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport systems, and form one of the largest protein families in eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. They are considered to be derived from a common ancestor, judging from their similarities of three-dimensional structure, their mechanism of ligand binding and the operon structure of their genes. Nevertheless, there are two types of topological arrangements of the central beta-sheets in their core structures. It follows that there must have been differentiation in the core structure, which we call "domain dislocation", in the course of evolution of the PBP family. To find a clue as to when the domain dislocation occurred, we constructed phylogenetic trees for PBPs based on their amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures, respectively. The trees show that the proteins of each type clearly cluster together, strongly indicating that the change in the core structure occurred only once in the evolution of PBPs. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ABC proteins that are encoded by the same operon of their partner PBP, and obtained the same result. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and comparison of the topological arrangements of PBPs, we obtained a reasonable genealogical chart of structural changes in the PBP family. The present analysis shows that the unidirectional change of protein evolution is clearly deduced at the level of protein three-dimensional structure rather than the level of amino acid sequence.

  10. Incorporation of the catalytic domain of a hammerhead ribozyme into antisense RNA enhances its inhibitory effect on the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Homann, M; Tzortzakaki, S; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G; Tabler, M

    1993-01-01

    The catalytic domain of a hammerhead ribozyme was incorporated into a 413 nucleotides long antisense RNA directed against the 5'-leader/gag region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (pos. +222 to +634). The resulting catalytic antisense RNA was shown to cleave its target RNA in vitro specifically at physiological ion strength and temperature. We compared the antiviral effectiveness of this catalytic antisense RNA with that of the corresponding unmodified antisense RNA and with a mutated catalytic antisense RNA, which did not cleave the substrate RNA in vitro. Each of these RNAs was co-transfected into human SW480 cells together with infectious complete proviral HIV-1 DNA, followed by analysis of HIV-1 replication. The presence of the catalytically active domain resulted in 4 to 7 fold stronger inhibition of HIV-1 replication as compared to the parental antisense RNA and the inactive mutant. Kinetic and structural studies performed in vitro indicated that the ability for double strand formation was not changed in catalytic antisense RNA versus parental antisense RNA. Together, these data suggest that the ability to cleave target RNA is a crucial prerequisite for the observed increase of inhibition of the replication of HIV-1. Images PMID:8332489

  11. Atomic Interaction Networks in the Core of Protein Domains and Their Native Folds

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S.; Sasisekharan, V.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Vastly divergent sequences populate a majority of protein folds. In the quest to identify features that are conserved within protein domains belonging to the same fold, we set out to examine the entire protein universe on a fold-by-fold basis. We report that the atomic interaction network in the solvent-unexposed core of protein domains are fold-conserved, extraordinary sequence divergence notwithstanding. Further, we find that this feature, termed protein core atomic interaction network (or PCAIN) is significantly distinguishable across different folds, thus appearing to be “signature” of a domain's native fold. As part of this study, we computed the PCAINs for 8698 representative protein domains from families across the 1018 known protein folds to construct our seed database and an automated framework was developed for PCAIN-based characterization of the protein fold universe. A test set of randomly selected domains that are not in the seed database was classified with over 97% accuracy, independent of sequence divergence. As an application of this novel fold signature, a PCAIN-based scoring scheme was developed for comparative (homology-based) structure prediction, with 1–2 angstroms (mean 1.61A) Cα RMSD generally observed between computed structures and reference crystal structures. Our results are consistent across the full spectrum of test domains including those from recent CASP experiments and most notably in the ‘twilight’ and ‘midnight’ zones wherein <30% and <10% target-template sequence identity prevails (mean twilight RMSD of 1.69A). We further demonstrate the utility of the PCAIN protocol to derive biological insight into protein structure-function relationships, by modeling the structure of the YopM effector novel E3 ligase (NEL) domain from plague-causative bacterium Yersinia Pestis and discussing its implications for host adaptive and innate immune modulation by the pathogen. Considering the several high-throughput, sequence

  12. Predicting different losses of photonic crystal fibers in material and hetero-core domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dimpi; Biswas, Rajib; Bhattacharyya, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In order to develop the effective transmission in photonic crystal fiber (PCF), the (realizable fiber i.e.,) losses arising from bending as well as splicing are very vital issues. We report here macrobending loss of PCFs in different material composites. Further, we make comprehensive numerical analysis related to splice loss issues arising from joining PCF with PCF and single mode fiber as well. We additionally investigate dependence of all these losses with respect to structural parameters of PCF. Hetero core systems are found to yield lower losses as compared to their identical counterpart. The numerical estimates reported here will provide a base for engineering effective communication guides in the context of material and hybrid core domain.

  13. High-performance ZnCo₂O₄@CeO2₂₄ core@shell microspheres for catalytic CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Dapeng; Zhen, Jiangman; Li, Junqi; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Hongjie

    2014-12-24

    In this paper, we report a self-assembly method to synthesize high-quality ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres with tunable CeO2 thickness. ZnCo2O4 spheres were first synthesized as the core, followed by a controlled CeO2 shell coating process. The thickness of CeO2 shell could be easily tuned by varying the feeding molar ratio of Ce/Co. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) image have identified the core@shell structure of these samples. In CO oxidation tests these ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres exhibited promising catalytic performance, and the catalytic activity of the best sample is even close to the traditional noble metal-CeO2 system, attaining 100% CO conversion at a relatively low temperature of 200 °C. Cycling tests confirm their good stability of these core@shell microspheres besides activity. Their high catalytic performance should be attributed to the core@shell structure formation, and moreover further H2-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results revealed the possible synergistic effects between the two components of ZnCo2O4 and CeO2.

  14. The multifunctional peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase gene: exon/intron organization of catalytic, processing, and routing domains.

    PubMed

    Ouafik, L H; Stoffers, D A; Campbell, T A; Johnson, R C; Bloomquist, B T; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1992-10-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) is a multifunctional protein containing two enzymes that act sequentially to catalyze the alpha-amidation of neuroendocrine peptides. Peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the first step of the reaction and is dependent on copper, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen. Peptidyl-alpha-hydroxyglycine alpha-amidating lyase (PAL) catalyzes the second step of the reaction. Previous studies demonstrated that alternative splicing results in the production of bifunctional PAM proteins that are integral membrane or soluble proteins as well as soluble monofunctional PHM proteins. Rat PAM is encoded by a complex single copy gene that consists of 27 exons and encompasses more than 160 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The 12 exons comprising PHM are distributed over at least 76 kb genomic DNA and range in size from 49-185 base pairs; four of the introns within the PHM domain are over 10 kb in length. Alternative splicing in the PHM region can result in a truncated, inactive PHM protein (rPAM-5), or a soluble, monofunctional PHM protein (rPAM-4) instead of a bifunctional protein. The eight exons comprising PAL are distributed over at least 19 kb genomic DNA. The exons encoding PAL range in size from 54-209 base pairs and have not been found to undergo alternative splicing. The PHM and PAL domains are separated by a single alternatively spliced exon surrounded by lengthy introns; inclusion of this exon results in the production of a form of PAM (rPAM-1) in which endoproteolytic cleavage at a paired basic site can separate the two catalytic domains. The exon following the PAL domain encodes the trans-membrane domain of PAM; alternative splicing at this site produces integral membrane or soluble PAM proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of PAM is comprised of a short exon subject to alternative splicing and a long exon encoding the final 68 amino acids present in all bifunctional PAM proteins along

  15. Core domains of shared decision-making during psychiatric visits: Scientific and preference-based discussions

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Sadaaki; Matthias, Marianne S.; Salyers, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is imperative to person-centered care, yet little is known about what aspects of SDM are targeted during psychiatric visits. This secondary data analysis (191 psychiatric visits with 11 providers, coded with a validated SDM coding system) revealed two factors (scientific and preference-based discussions) underlying SDM communication. Preference-based discussion occurred less. Both provider and consumer initiation of SDM elements and decision complexity were associated with greater discussions in both factors, but were more strongly associated with scientific discussion. Longer visit length correlated with only scientific discussion. Providers’ understanding of core domains could facilitate engaging consumers in SDM. PMID:24500023

  16. A novel structural Fenton-like nanocatalyst with highly improved catalytic performance for generalized preparation of iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanghui; Peng, Xiaomen; Li, Hongping; Wang, Jianzhi; Zhou, Lincheng; Zhao, Tianqi; Huang, Zhihao; Jiang, Haifei

    2015-05-01

    FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles with a soap-bubble-like shell have been synthesized, and the materials exhibit excellent Fenton catalytic performance. More importantly, FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles as catalysts and precursors could catalyze organic dye molecules to form iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres.

  17. Temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics gives insights into globular conformations sampled in the free state of the AC catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Selwa, Edithe; Huynh, Tru; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Maragliano, Luca; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-10-01

    The catalytic domain of the adenyl cyclase (AC) toxin from Bordetella pertussis is activated by interaction with calmodulin (CaM), resulting in cAMP overproduction in the infected cell. In the X-ray crystallographic structure of the complex between AC and the C terminal lobe of CaM, the toxin displays a markedly elongated shape. As for the structure of the isolated protein, experimental results support the hypothesis that more globular conformations are sampled, but information at atomic resolution is still lacking. Here, we use temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics (TAMD) simulations to generate putative all-atom models of globular conformations sampled by CaM-free AC. As collective variables, we use centers of mass coordinates of groups of residues selected from the analysis of standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Results show that TAMD allows extended conformational sampling and generates AC conformations that are more globular than in the complexed state. These structures are then refined via energy minimization and further unrestrained MD simulations to optimize inter-domain packing interactions, thus resulting in the identification of a set of hydrogen bonds present in the globular conformations.

  18. Four Inserts within the Catalytic Domain Confer Extra Stability and Activity to Hyperthermostable Pyrolysin from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zeng, Jing; Yi, Huawei; Zhang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyrolysin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is the prototype of the pyrolysin family of the subtilisin-like serine protease superfamily (subtilases). It contains four inserts (IS147, IS29, IS27, and IS8) of unknown function in the catalytic domain. We performed domain deletions and showed that three inserts are either essential (IS147 and IS27) or important (IS8) for efficient maturation of pyrolysin at high temperatures, whereas IS29 is dispensable. The large insert IS147 contains Ca3 and Ca4, two calcium-binding Dx[DN]xDG motifs that are conserved in many pyrolysin-like proteases. Mutagenesis revealed that the Ca3 site contributes to enzyme thermostability and the Ca4 site is necessary for pyrolysin to fold into a maturation-competent conformation. Mature insert-deletion variants were characterized and showed that IS29 and IS8 contribute to enzyme activity and stability, respectively. In the presence of NaCl, pyrolysin undergoes autocleavage at two sites: one within IS29 and the other in IS27. Disrupting the ion pairs in IS27 and IS8 induces autocleavage in the absence of salts. Interestingly, autocleavage products combine noncovalently to form an active, nicked enzyme that is resistant to SDS and urea denaturation. Additionally, a single mutation in IS29 increases resistance to salt-induced autocleavage and further increases enzyme thermostability. Our results suggest that these extra structural elements play a crucial role in adapting pyrolysin to hyperthermal environments. IMPORTANCE Pyrolysin-like proteases belong to the subtilase superfamily and are characterized by large inserts and long C-terminal extensions; however, the role of the inserts in enzyme function is unclear. Our results demonstrate that four inserts in the catalytic domain of hyperthermostable pyrolysin contribute to the folding, maturation, stability, and activity of the enzyme at high temperatures. The modification of extra structural elements in pyrolysin

  19. Configuration of the catalytic GIY-YIG domain of intron endonuclease I-TevI: coincidence of computational and molecular findings.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, J C; Belfort, M; Stapleton, M A; Holpert, M; Dansereau, J T; Pietrokovski, S; Baxter, S M; Derbyshire, V

    1999-05-15

    I-TevI is a member of the GIY-YIG family of homing endonucleases. It is folded into two structural and functional domains, an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain, separated by a flexible linker. In this study we have used genetic analyses, computational sequence analysis andNMR spectroscopy to define the configuration of theN-terminal domain and its relationship to the flexible linker. The catalytic domain is an alpha/beta structure contained within the first 92 amino acids of the 245-amino acid protein followed by an unstructured linker. Remarkably, this structured domain corresponds precisely to the GIY-YIG module defined by sequence comparisons of 57 proteins including more than 30 newly reported members of the family. Although much of the unstructured linker is not essential for activity, residues 93-116 are required, raising the possibility that this region may adopt an alternate conformation upon DNA binding. Two invariant residues of the GIY-YIG module, Arg27 and Glu75, located in alpha-helices, have properties of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the GIY-YIG sequence elements for which the module is named form part of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet that is important for I-TevI structure and function.

  20. Mechanism of Diphtheria Toxin Catalytic Domain Delivery to the Eukaryotic Cell Cytosol and the Cellular Factors that Directly Participate in the Process

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Research on diphtheria and anthrax toxins over the past three decades has culminated in a detailed understanding of their structure function relationships (e.g., catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R) domains), as well as the identification of their eukaryotic cell surface receptor, an understanding of the molecular events leading to the receptor-mediated internalization of the toxin into an endosomal compartment, and the pH triggered conformational changes required for pore formation in the vesicle membrane. Recently, a major research effort has been focused on the development of a detailed understanding of the molecular interactions between each of these toxins and eukaryotic cell factors that play an essential role in the efficient translocation of their respective catalytic domains through the trans-endosomal vesicle membrane pore and delivery into the cell cytosol. In this review, I shall focus on recent findings that have led to a more detailed understanding of the mechanism by which the diphtheria toxin catalytic domain is delivered to the eukaryotic cell cytosol. While much work remains, it is becoming increasingly clear that the entry process is facilitated by specific interactions with a number of cellular factors in an ordered sequential fashion. In addition, since diphtheria, anthrax lethal factor and anthrax edema factor all carry multiple coatomer I complex binding motifs and COPI complex has been shown to play an essential role in entry process, it is likely that the initial steps in catalytic domain entry of these divergent toxins follow a common mechanism. PMID:22069710

  1. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; ...

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  2. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P; Pai, Emil F; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y

    2014-10-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  3. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors. PMID:25286857

  4. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  5. The structure of the catalytic domain of Tannerella forsythia karilysin reveals it is a bacterial xenolog of animal matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Guevara, Tibisay; Karim, Abdulkarim Y.; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Arolas, Joan L.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Metallopeptidases (MPs) are among virulence factors secreted by pathogenic bacteria at the site of infection. One such pathogen is Tannerella forsythia, a member of the microbial consortium that causes peridontitis, arguably the most prevalent infective chronic inflammatory disease known to mankind. The only reported MP secreted by T. forsythia is karilysin, a 52-kDa multidomain protein comprising a central 18-kDa catalytic domain (CD), termed Kly18, flanked by domains unrelated to any known protein. We analyzed the 3D structure of Kly18 in the absence and presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+, which are required for function and stability, and found that it evidences most of the structural features characteristic of the CDs of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Unexpectedly, a peptide was bound to the active-site cleft of Kly18 mimicking a left-behind cleavage product, which revealed that the specificity pocket accommodates bulky hydrophobic side chains of substrates as in mammalian MMPs. In addition, Kly18 displayed a unique Mg2+ or Ca2+ binding site and two flexible segments that could play a role in substrate binding. Phylogenetic and sequence similarity studies revealed that Kly18 is evolutionarily much closer to winged-insect and mammalian MMPs than to potential bacterial counterparts found by genomic sequencing projects. Therefore, we conclude that this first structurally-characterized non-mammalian MMP is a xenolog co-opted through horizontal gene transfer during the intimate coexistence between T. forsythia and humans or other animals, in a very rare case of gene shuffling from eukaryotes to prokaryotes. Subsequently, this protein would have evolved in a bacterial environment to give rise to full-length karilysin that is furnished with unique flanking domains that do not conform to the general multidomain architecture of animal MMPs. PMID:21166898

  6. The structure of the catalytic domain of Tannerella forsythia karilysin reveals it is a bacterial xenologue of animal matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Guevara, Tibisay; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Arolas, Joan L; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Metallopeptidases (MPs) are among virulence factors secreted by pathogenic bacteria at the site of infection. One such pathogen is Tannerella forsythia, a member of the microbial consortium that causes peridontitis, arguably the most prevalent infective chronic inflammatory disease known to mankind. The only reported MP secreted by T. forsythia is karilysin, a 52 kDa multidomain protein comprising a central 18 kDa catalytic domain (CD), termed Kly18, flanked by domains unrelated to any known protein. We analysed the 3D structure of Kly18 in the absence and presence of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) , which are required for function and stability, and found that it evidences most of the structural features characteristic of the CDs of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Unexpectedly, a peptide was bound to the active-site cleft of Kly18 mimicking a left-behind cleavage product, which revealed that the specificity pocket accommodates bulky hydrophobic side-chains of substrates as in mammalian MMPs. In addition, Kly18 displayed a unique Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) binding site and two flexible segments that could play a role in substrate binding. Phylogenetic and sequence similarity studies revealed that Kly18 is evolutionarily much closer to winged-insect and mammalian MMPs than to potential bacterial counterparts found by genomic sequencing projects. Therefore, we conclude that this first structurally characterized non-mammalian MMP is a xenologue co-opted through horizontal gene transfer during the intimate coexistence between T. forsythia and humans or other animals, in a very rare case of gene shuffling from eukaryotes to prokaryotes. Subsequently, this protein would have evolved in a bacterial environment to give rise to full-length karilysin that is furnished with unique flanking domains that do not conform to the general multidomain architecture of animal MMPs.

  7. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metallo­proteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule. PMID:23695557

  8. Influence of lysophospholipid hydrolysis by the catalytic domain of neuropathy target esterase on the fluidity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Aaron J; Richardson, Rudy J; Worden, R Mark; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2010-08-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. Irreversible inhibition of NTE by certain organophosphorus compounds produces a paralysis known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neuropathy. In vitro, NTE has phospholipase/lysophospholipase activity that hydrolyses exogenously added single-chain lysophospholipids in preference to dual-chain phospholipids, and NTE mutations have been associated with motor neuron disease. NTE's physiological role is not well understood, although recent studies suggest that it may control the cytotoxic accumulation of lysophospholipids in membranes. We used the NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to hydrolyze palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (p-lysoPC) to palmitic acid in bilayer membranes comprising 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the fluorophore 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC). Translational diffusion coefficients (D(L)) in supported bilayer membranes were measured by fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching (FRAPP). The average D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes without NEST was 2.44 microm(2)s(-1)+/-0.09; the D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes containing NEST and diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, an inhibitor, was nearly identical at 2.45+/-0.08. By contrast, the D(L) for membranes comprising NEST, DOPC, and p-lysoPC was 2.28+/-0.07, significantly different from the system with inhibited NEST, due to NEST hydrolysis. Likewise, a system without NEST containing the amount of palmitic acid that would have been produced by NEST hydrolysis of p-lysoPC was identical at 2.26+/-0.06. These results indicate that NTE's catalytic activity can alter membrane fluidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metalloproteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule.

  10. The C Terminus of the Catalytic Domain of Type A Botulinum Neurotoxin May Facilitate Product Release from the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Mizanur, Rahman M.; Frasca, Verna; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Bavari, Sina; Webb, Robert; Smith, Leonard A.; Ahmed, S. Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most toxic of all compounds. The toxicity is related to a poor zinc endopeptidase activity located in a 50-kDa domain known as light chain (Lc) of the toxin. The C-terminal tail of Lc is not visible in any of the currently available x-ray structures, and it has no known function but undergoes autocatalytic truncations during purification and storage. By synthesizing C-terminal peptides of various lengths, in this study, we have shown that these peptides competitively inhibit the normal catalytic activity of Lc of serotype A (LcA) and have defined the length of the mature LcA to consist of the first 444 residues. Two catalytically inactive mutants also inhibited LcA activity. Our results suggested that the C terminus of LcA might interact at or near its own active site. By using synthetic C-terminal peptides from LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcF and their respective substrate peptides, we have shown that the inhibition of activity is specific only for LcA. Although a potent inhibitor with a Ki of 4.5 μm, the largest of our LcA C-terminal peptides stimulated LcA activity when added at near-stoichiometric concentration to three versions of LcA differing in their C-terminal lengths. The result suggested a product removal role of the LcA C terminus. This suggestion is supported by a weak but specific interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry between an LcA C-terminal peptide and N-terminal product from a peptide substrate of LcA. Our results also underscore the importance of using a mature LcA as an inhibitor screening target. PMID:23779108

  11. Elucidation of eukaryotic elongation factor-2 contact sites within the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Susan P; Merrill, Allan R

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces the virulence factor, ETA (exotoxin A), which catalyses an ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction of its target protein, eEF2 (eukaryotic elongation factor-2). Currently, this protein-protein interaction is poorly characterized and this study was aimed at identifying the contact sites between eEF2 and the catalytic domain of ETA (PE24H, an ETA from P. aeruginosa, a 24 kDa C-terminal fragment containing a His6 tag). Single-cysteine residues were introduced into the toxin at 21 defined surface-exposed sites and labelled with the fluorophore, IAEDANS [5-(2-iodoacetylaminoethylamino)-1-napthalenesulphonic acid]. Fluorescence quenching studies using acrylamide, and fluorescence lifetime and wavelength emission maxima analyses were conducted in the presence and absence of eEF2. Large changes in the microenvironment of the AEDANS [5-(2-aminoethylamino)-1-naphthalenesulphonic acid] probe after eEF2 binding were not observed as dictated by both fluorescence lifetime and wavelength emission maxima values. This supported the proposed minimal contact model, which suggests that only small, discrete contacts occur between these proteins. As dictated by the bimolecular quenching constant (k(q)) for acrylamide, binding of eEF2 with toxin caused the greatest change in acrylamide accessibility (>50%) when the fluorescence label was near the active site or was located within a known catalytic loop. All mutant proteins showed a decrease in accessibility to acrylamide once eEF2 bound, although the relative change varied for each labelled protein. From these data, a low-resolution model of the toxin-eEF2 complex was constructed based on the minimal contact model with the intention of enhancing our knowledge on the mode of inactivation of the ribosome translocase by the Pseudomonas toxin. PMID:14733615

  12. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  13. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    PubMed Central

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  14. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus.

  15. Structure of the catalytic domain of human polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Michael; Kohls, Darcy; Low, Simon; Coli, Rocco; Cheng, Alan C; Jacques, Suzanne L; Johnson, Theresa L; Lewis, Cristina; Loh, Christine; Nonomiya, Jim; Sheils, Alissa L; Verdries, Kimberly A; Wynn, Thomas A; Kuhn, Cyrille; Ding, Yuan-Hua

    2007-05-22

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is an attractive target for the development of anticancer agents due to its importance in regulating cell-cycle progression. Overexpression of Plk1 has been detected in a variety of cancers, and expression levels often correlate with poor prognosis. Despite high interest in Plk1-targeted therapeutics, there is currently no structure publicly available to guide structure-based drug design of specific inhibitors. We determined the crystal structures of the T210V mutant of the kinase domain of human Plk1 complexed with the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) or the pyrrolo-pyrazole inhibitor PHA-680626 at 2.4 and 2.1 A resolution, respectively. Plk1 adopts the typical kinase domain fold and crystallized in a conformation resembling the active state of other kinases. Comparison of the kinetic parameters determined for the (unphosphorylated) wild-type enzyme, as well as the T210V and T210D mutants, shows that the mutations primarily affect the kcat of the reaction, with little change in the apparent Km for the protein or nucleotide substrates (kcat = 0.0094, 0.0376, and 0.0049 s-1 and Km(ATP) = 3.2, 4.0, and 3.0 microM for WT, T210D, and T210V, respectively). The structure highlights features of the active site that can be exploited to obtain Plk1-specific inhibitors with selectivity over other kinases and Plk isoforms. These include the presence of a phenylalanine at the bottom of the ATP pocket, combined with a cysteine (as opposed to the more commonly found leucine) in the roof of the binding site, a pocket created by Leu132 in the hinge region, and a cluster of positively charged residues in the solvent-exposed area outside of the adenine pocket adjacent to the hinge region.

  16. TREatment of ATopic eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce: protocol for an international Delphi exercise to identify a core set of domains and domain items for national atopic eczema registries.

    PubMed

    Gerbens, Louise A A; Boyce, Aaron E; Wall, Dmitri; Barbarot, Sebastien; de Booij, Richard J; Deleuran, Mette; Middelkamp-Hup, Maritza A; Roberts, Amanda; Vestergaard, Christian; Weidinger, Stephan; Apfelbacher, Christian J; Irvine, Alan D; Schmitt, Jochen; Williamson, Paula R; Spuls, Phyllis I; Flohr, Carsten

    2017-02-27

    Patients with moderate-to-severe atopic eczema (AE) often require photo- or systemic immunomodulatory therapies to induce disease remission and maintain long-term control. The current evidence to guide clinical management is small, despite the frequent and often off-label use of these treatments. Registries of patients on photo- and systemic immunomodulatory therapies could fill this gap, and the collection of a core set concerning these therapies in AE will allow direct comparisons across registries as well as data sharing and pooling. Using an eDelphi approach, the international TREatment of ATopic eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce aims to seek consensus between key stakeholders internationally on a core set of domains and domain items for AE patient registries with a research focus that collect data of children and adults on photo- and systemic immunomodulatory therapies. Participants from six stakeholder groups will be invited: doctors, nurses, non-clinical researchers, patients, as well as industry and regulatory body representatives. The eDelphi will comprise three sequential online rounds, requesting participants to rate the importance of each proposed domain and domain items. Participants will be able to add domains and domain items to the proposed list in round 1. A final consensus meeting will be held with representatives of each stakeholder group. Identifying a uniform core set of domains and domain items to be captured by AE patient registries will increase the utility of individual registries, and provide greater insight into the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of photo- and systemic immunomodulatory therapies to guide clinical management across dermatology centres and country borders. Not applicable. This eDelphi study was registered in the Core Outcome Measures for Effectiveness Trials (COMET) database.

  17. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  18. Highly catalytic hollow palladium nanoparticles derived from silver@silver-palladium core-shell nanostructures for the oxidation of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Hollow Palladium (hPd) nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared via a simple and mild successive method. Firstly, core-shell NPs with silver (Ag) cores and silver-palladium (Ag-Pd) alloy shells are synthesized in aqueous phase by galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) between Ag NPs and Pd2+ ion precursors. Saturated aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was then employed to remove the Ag component from the core and shell regions of core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs, resulting in the formation of hPd NPs with shrunk sizes in comparison with their core-shell parents. Specifically, the hPd NPs exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability for catalyzing the oxidation of formic acid, compared with the Pd NPs reduced by NaBH4 in aqueous solution and commercial Pd/C catalyst from Johnson Matthey, mainly due to the large electrochemically active surface areas of the hollow particles. In addition, The Ag component in core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs has an unfavorable influence on catalytic activity of NPs for formic acid oxidation. However, the durability could be improved due to the electron donating effect from Ag to Pd atoms in the core-shell NPs.

  19. Intracellular catalytic domain of symbiosis receptor kinase hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-12-01

    Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of the Nod factor signaling pathway, is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonization of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here, we show that the intracellular kinase domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd) but not its inactive or full-length version leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in the absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6-fold higher than rhizobia-induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in the presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In the presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonization of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand-independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia, but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonization.

  20. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  1. Proteolysis of the proofreading subunit controls the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Cianchetta, Stefano; Reggiani, Luca; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2009-11-01

    The C-terminal region of the proofreading subunit (epsilon) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is shown here to be labile and to contain the residues (identified between F187 and R213) responsible for association with the polymerase subunit (alpha). We also identify two alpha-helices of the polymerase subunit (comprising the residues E311-M335 and G339-D353, respectively) as the determinants of binding to epsilon. The C-terminal region of epsilon is degraded by the ClpP protease assisted by the GroL molecular chaperone, while other factors control the overall concentration in vivo of epsilon. Among these factors, the chaperone DnaK is of primary importance for preserving the integrity of epsilon. Remarkably, inactivation of DnaK confers to Escherichia coli inviable phenotype at 42 degrees C, and viability can be restored over-expressing epsilon. Altogether, our observations indicate that the association between epsilon and alpha subunits of DNA polymerase III depends on small portions of both proteins, the association of which is controlled by proteolysis of epsilon. Accordingly, the factors catalysing (ClpP, GroL) or preventing (DnaK) this proteolysis exert a crucial checkpoint of the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III core.

  2. Crystal structures of wild-type Trichoderma reesei Cel7A catalytic domain in open and closed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, Annette M.; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-11-07

    Trichoderma reesei Cel7A efficiently hydrolyses cellulose. We report here the crystallographic structures of the wild-type TrCel7A catalytic domain (CD) in an open state and, for the first time, in a closed state. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the loops along the CD tunnel move in concerted motions. Together, the crystallographic and MD data suggest that the CD cycles between the tense and relaxed forms that are characteristic of work producing enzymes. Analysis of the interactions formed by R251 provides a structural rationale for the concurrent decrease in product inhibition and catalytic efficiency measured for product-binding site mutants.

  3. Purification and catalytic activities of the two domains of the allene oxide synthase-lipoxygenase fusion protein of the coral Plexaura homomalla.

    PubMed

    Boutaud, O; Brash, A R

    1999-11-19

    The conversion of fatty acid hydroperoxides to allene epoxides is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 in plants and, in coral, by a 43-kDa catalase-related hemoprotein fused to the lipoxygenase that synthesizes the 8R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (8R-HPETE) substrate. We have expressed the separate lipoxygenase and allene oxide synthase (AOS) domains of the coral protein in Escherichia coli (BL21 cells) and purified the proteins; this system gives high expression (1.5 and 0.3 micromol/liter, respectively) of catalytically active enzymes. Both domains show fast reaction kinetics. Catalytic activity of the lipoxygenase domain is stimulated 5-fold by high concentrations of monovalent cations (500 mM Na(+), Li(+), or K(+)), and an additional 5-fold by 10 mM Ca(2+). The resulting rates of reaction are approximately 300 turnovers/s, 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than mammalian lipoxygenases. This makes the coral lipoxygenase well suited for partnership with the AOS domain, which shows maximum rates of approximately 1400 turnovers/s in the conversion of 8R-HPETE to the allene oxide. Some unusual catalytic activities of the two domains are described. The lipoxygenase domain converts 20.3omega6 partly to the bis-allylic hydroperoxide (10-hydroperoxyeicosa-8,11,14-trienoic acid). Metabolism of the preferred substrate of the AOS domain, 8R-HPETE, is inhibited by the enantiomer 8S-HPETE. Although the AOS domain has homology to catalase in primary structure, it is completely lacking in catalatic action on H(2)O(2); catalase itself, as expected from its preference for small hydroperoxides, is ineffective in allene oxide synthesis from 8R-HPETE.

  4. Functional analysis of TMLH variants and definition of domains required for catalytic activity and mitochondrial targeting.

    PubMed

    Monfregola, Jlenia; Cevenini, Armando; Terracciano, Antonio; van Vlies, Naomi; Arbucci, Salvatore; Wanders, Ronald J A; D'Urso, Michele; Vaz, Frédéric M; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2005-09-01

    epsilon-N-Trimethyllysine hydroxylase (TMLH) (EC 1.14.11.8) is a non-heme-ferrous iron hydroxylase, Fe(++) and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent, catalyzing the first of four enzymatic reactions of the highly conserved carnitine biosynthetic pathway. Otherwise from all the other enzymes of carnitine biosynthesis, TMLH was found to be associated to the mitochondrial fraction. We here report molecular cloning of two alternative spliced forms of TMLH, which appear ubiquitously expressed in human adult and fetal tissues. The deduced proteins are designated TMLH-a and TMLH-b, and contain 421 and 399 amino acids, respectively. They share the first N-terminal 332 amino acids, including a mitochondrial targeting signal, but diverge at the C-terminal end. TMLH-a and TMLH-b exogenous expression in COS-1 cells shows that the first 15 amino acids are necessary and sufficient for mitochondrial import. Furthermore, comparative evolutionary analysis of the C-terminal portion of TMLH-a identifies a conserved domain characterized by a key triad of residues, His242-Glu244-His389 predicted to bind 2OG end. This sequence is conserved in the TMLH enzyme from all species but is partially substituted by a unique sequence in the TMLH-b variant. Indeed, TMLH-b is not functional by itself as well as a TMLH-H389L mutant produced by site directed mutagenesis. As great interest, we found that TMLH-b and TMLH-H389L, individually co-expressed with TMLH-a in COS-1 cells, negatively affect TMLH activity. Therefore, our studies on the TMLH alternative form provide relevant novel information, first that the C-terminal region of TMLH contains the main determinants for its enzymatic activity including a key H389 residue, and second that TMLH-b could act as a crucial physiological negative regulator of TMLH. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Polycomb inhibits histone acetylation by CBP by binding directly to its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Feng; Banerjee, Rakhee; Fu, Chen; Stratton, Carl A.; Fang, Ming; Harte, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila Polycomb (PC), a subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), is well known for its role in maintaining repression of the homeotic genes and many others and for its binding to trimethylated histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27me3) via its chromodomain. Here, we identify a novel activity of PC: inhibition of the histone acetylation activity of CREB-binding protein (CBP). We show that PC and its mammalian CBX orthologs interact directly with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of CBP, binding to the previously identified autoregulatory loop, whose autoacetylation greatly enhances HAT activity. We identify a conserved PC motif adjacent to the chromodomain required for CBP binding and show that PC binding inhibits acetylation of histone H3. CBP autoacetylation impairs PC binding in vitro, and PC is preferentially associated with unacetylated CBP in vivo. PC knockdown elevates the acetylated H3K27 (H3K27ac) level globally and at promoter regions of some genes that are bound by both PC and CBP. Conversely, PC overexpression decreases the H3K27ac level in vivo and also suppresses CBP-dependent Polycomb phenotypes caused by overexpression of Trithorax, an antagonist of Polycomb silencing. We find that PC is physically associated with the initiating form of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and that many promoters co-occupied by PC and CBP are associated with paused Pol II, suggesting that PC may play a role in Pol II pausing. These results suggest that PC/PRC1 inhibition of CBP HAT activity plays a role in regulating transcription of both repressed and active PC-regulated genes. PMID:26802126

  6. Rescue of HIV-1 Release by Targeting Widely Divergent NEDD4-Type Ubiquitin Ligases and Isolated Catalytic HECT Domains to Gag

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eric R.; Popova, Elena; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Kim, Hyung Cheol; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L) domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release. PMID:20862313

  7. Rescue of HIV-1 release by targeting widely divergent NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases and isolated catalytic HECT domains to Gag.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Eric R; Popova, Elena; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Kim, Hyung Cheol; Huibregtse, Jon M; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2010-09-16

    Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L) domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release.

  8. Structure-Guided Systems-Level Engineering of Oxidation-Prone Methionine Residues in Catalytic Domain of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica for Significant Improvement of Both Oxidative Stability and Catalytic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    High oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency are required for the alkaline α-amylases to keep the enzymatic performance under the harsh conditions in detergent industries. In this work, we attempted to significantly improve both the oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica by engineering the five oxidation-prone methionine residues around the catalytic domain via a systematic approach. Specifically, based on the tertiary structure analysis, five methionines (Met 145, Met 214, Met 229, Met 247 and Met 317) were individually substituted with oxidation-resistant threonine, isoleucine and alaline, respectively. Among the created 15 mutants, 7 mutants M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T and M317I showed significantly enhanced oxidative stability or catalytic efficiency. In previous work, we found that the replacement of M247 with leucine could significantly improve the oxidative stability. Thus, these 8 positive mutants (M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T, M247L and M317I) were used to conduct the second round of combinational mutations. Among the constructed 85 mutants (25 two-point mutants, 36 three-point mutants, 16 four-point mutants and 8 five-point mutants), the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I showed a 5.4-fold increase in oxidative stability and a 3.0-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Interestingly, the specific activity, alkaline stability and thermal stability of this mutant were also increased. The increase of salt bridge and hydrogen bonds around the catalytic domain contributed to the significantly improved catalytic efficiency and stability, as revealed by the three-dimensional structure model of wild-type alkaline α-amylase and its mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I. With the significantly improved oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency, the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I has a great potential as a detergent additive, and this structure-guided systems engineering

  9. Structure-guided systems-level engineering of oxidation-prone methionine residues in catalytic domain of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica for significant improvement of both oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    High oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency are required for the alkaline α-amylases to keep the enzymatic performance under the harsh conditions in detergent industries. In this work, we attempted to significantly improve both the oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica by engineering the five oxidation-prone methionine residues around the catalytic domain via a systematic approach. Specifically, based on the tertiary structure analysis, five methionines (Met 145, Met 214, Met 229, Met 247 and Met 317) were individually substituted with oxidation-resistant threonine, isoleucine and alaline, respectively. Among the created 15 mutants, 7 mutants M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T and M317I showed significantly enhanced oxidative stability or catalytic efficiency. In previous work, we found that the replacement of M247 with leucine could significantly improve the oxidative stability. Thus, these 8 positive mutants (M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T, M247L and M317I) were used to conduct the second round of combinational mutations. Among the constructed 85 mutants (25 two-point mutants, 36 three-point mutants, 16 four-point mutants and 8 five-point mutants), the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I showed a 5.4-fold increase in oxidative stability and a 3.0-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Interestingly, the specific activity, alkaline stability and thermal stability of this mutant were also increased. The increase of salt bridge and hydrogen bonds around the catalytic domain contributed to the significantly improved catalytic efficiency and stability, as revealed by the three-dimensional structure model of wild-type alkaline α-amylase and its mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I. With the significantly improved oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency, the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I has a great potential as a detergent additive, and this structure-guided systems engineering

  10. Structure of Trypanosoma brucei glutathione synthetase: Domain and loop alterations in the catalytic cycle of a highly conserved enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase catalyses the synthesis of the low molecular mass thiol glutathione from l-γ-glutamyl-l-cysteine and glycine. We report the crystal structure of the dimeric enzyme from Trypanosoma brucei in complex with the product glutathione. The enzyme belongs to the ATP-grasp family, a group of enzymes known to undergo conformational changes upon ligand binding. The T. brucei enzyme crystal structure presents two dimers in the asymmetric unit. The structure reveals variability in the order and position of a small domain, which forms a lid for the active site and serves to capture conformations likely to exist during the catalytic cycle. Comparisons with orthologous enzymes, in particular from Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisae, indicate a high degree of sequence and structure conservation in part of the active site. Structural differences that are observed between the orthologous enzymes are assigned to different ligand binding states since key residues are conserved. This suggests that the molecular determinants of ligand recognition and reactivity are highly conserved across species. We conclude that it would be difficult to target the parasite enzyme in preference to the host enzyme and therefore glutathione synthetase may not be a suitable target for antiparasitic drug discovery. PMID:20045436

  11. Prediction of a common beta-propeller catalytic domain for fructosyltransferases of different origin and substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pons, T.; Hernández, L.; Batista, F. R.; Chinea, G.

    2000-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of fructan biosynthetic enzymes is still unknown. Here, we have explored folding similarities between reported microbial and plant enzymes that catalyze transfructosylation reactions. A sequence-structure compatibility search using TOPITS, SDP, 3D-PSSM, and SAM-T98 programs identified a beta-propeller fold with scores above the confidence threshold that indicate a structurally conserved catalytic domain in fructosyltransferases (FTFs) of diverse origin and substrate specificity. The predicted fold appeared related to that of neuraminidase and sialidase, of glycoside hydrolase families 33 and 34, respectively. The most reliable structural model was obtained using the crystal structure of neuraminidase (Protein Data Bank file: 5nn9) as template, and it is consistent with the location of previously identified functional residues of bacterial levansucrases (Batista et al., 1999; Song & Jacques, 1999). The sequence-sequence analysis presented here reinforces the recent inclusion of fungal and plant FTFs into glycoside hydrolase family 32, and suggests a modified sequence pattern H-x (2)-[PTV]-x (4)-[LIVMA]-[NSCAYG]-[DE]-P-[NDSC][GA]3 for this family. PMID:11305239

  12. Prediction of a common beta-propeller catalytic domain for fructosyltransferases of different origin and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pons, T; Hernández, L; Batista, F R; Chinea, G

    2000-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of fructan biosynthetic enzymes is still unknown. Here, we have explored folding similarities between reported microbial and plant enzymes that catalyze transfructosylation reactions. A sequence-structure compatibility search using TOPITS, SDP, 3D-PSSM, and SAM-T98 programs identified a beta-propeller fold with scores above the confidence threshold that indicate a structurally conserved catalytic domain in fructosyltransferases (FTFs) of diverse origin and substrate specificity. The predicted fold appeared related to that of neuraminidase and sialidase, of glycoside hydrolase families 33 and 34, respectively. The most reliable structural model was obtained using the crystal structure of neuraminidase (Protein Data Bank file: 5nn9) as template, and it is consistent with the location of previously identified functional residues of bacterial levansucrases (Batista et al., 1999; Song & Jacques, 1999). The sequence-sequence analysis presented here reinforces the recent inclusion of fungal and plant FTFs into glycoside hydrolase family 32, and suggests a modified sequence pattern H-x (2)-[PTV]-x (4)-[LIVMA]-[NSCAYG]-[DE]-P-[NDSC][GA]3 for this family.

  13. Secretory production of antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli using the catalytic domain of a cellulase as fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huili; Li, Haoran; Gao, Dongfang; Gao, Cuijuan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-11-20

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules which serve as essential components of the innate immune system in various organisms. AMPs possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. However, the scaled production of such peptides in Escherichia coli faces many difficulties because of their small size and toxicity to the host. Here, we described a new fusion strategy to extracellularly produce significant amounts of these antimicrobial peptides in recombinant E. coli at significant amount. Employing the catalytic domain of a cellulase (Cel-CD) from Bacillus subtilis KSM-64 as the fusion partner, five recombinant antimicrobial peptides were confirmed to accumulate in the culture medium at concentrations ranging from 184 mg/L to 297 mg/L. The radical diffusion experiment demonstrated that the released model antimicrobial peptide, bombinin, had antibacterial activities against both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This strategy will be suitable for the production of antimicrobial peptides and other toxicity proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple isoforms of Arabidopsis casein kinase I combine conserved catalytic domains with variable carboxyl-terminal extensions.

    PubMed Central

    Klimczak, L J; Farini, D; Lin, C; Ponti, D; Cashmore, A R; Giuliano, G

    1995-01-01

    Three cDNA clones encoding isoforms of casein kinase I (CKI) were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. One full-length clone, designated CKI1, contained an open reading frame of 1371 bp encoding a protein of 51,949 D with an isoelectric point of 9.7. In addition to the highly conserved catalytic domain (of about 300 amino acids), the Arabidopsis CKI isoforms contain 150 to 180 amino acid carboxyl-terminal extensions, which show among themselves a lower level of sequence conservation. These extensions do not show any sequence similarity to nonplant CKI isoforms, such as rat testis CKI delta, which is their closest isolated homolog, or to yeast CKI isoforms. Three additional isoforms of Arabidopsis CKI were found in the data bases of expressed sequence tags and/or were isolated serendipitously in nonspecific screening procedures by others. One of them also shows a carboxyl-terminal extension, but of only 80 amino acids. Casein kinase activity was detected in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli strains expressing the CKI1 protein. This activity showed the crucial properties of CKI, including the ability to phosphorylate the D4 peptide, a specific substrate of CKI, and inhibition by N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific CKI inhibitor. Like several recombinant CKI isoforms from yeast, CKI1 was able to phosphorylate tyrosine-containing acidic polymers. PMID:7480353

  15. Factor IX Amagasaki: A new mutation in the catalytic domain resulting in the loss of both coagulant and esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki ); Sakai, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazukuni; Yoshioka, Akira; Fukui, Hiromu ); Mitsui, Kotoko; Kamiya, Kensyu; Umeyama, Hideaki )

    1991-11-26

    Factor IX Amagasaki (AMG) is a naturally occurring mutant of factor IX having essentially no coagulant activity, even though normal levels of antigen are detected in plasma. Factor IX AMG was purified from the patient's plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography with an anti-factor IX monoclonal antibody column. Factor IX AMG was cleaved normally by factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, yielding a two-chain factor IXa. Amino acid composition and sequence analysis of one of the tryptic peptides isolated from factor IX AMG revealed that Gly-311 had been replaced by Glu. The authors identified a one-base substitution of guanine to adenine in exon VIII by amplifying exon VIII using the polymerase chain reaction method and sequencing the product. This base mutation also supported the replacement of Gly-311 by Glu. In the purified system, factor IXa AMG did not activate for factor X in the presence of factor VIII, phospholipids, and Ca{sup 2+}, and no esterase activity toward Z-Arg-p-nitrobenzyl ester was observed. The model building of the serine protease domain of factor IXa suggests that the Gly-311 {yields} Glu exchange would disrupt the specific conformational state in the active site environment, resulting in the substrate binding site not forming properly. This is the first report to show the experimental evidence for importance of a highly conserved Gly-142 (chymotrypsinogen numbering) located in the catalytic site of mammalian serine proteases so far known.

  16. Non-catalytic motor domains enable processive movement and functional diversification of the kinesin-14 Kar3

    PubMed Central

    Mieck, Christine; Molodtsov, Maxim I; Drzewicka, Katarzyna; van der Vaart, Babet; Litos, Gabriele; Schmauss, Gerald; Vaziri, Alipasha; Westermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Motor proteins of the conserved kinesin-14 family have important roles in mitotic spindle organization and chromosome segregation. Previous studies have indicated that kinesin-14 motors are non-processive enzymes, working in the context of multi-motor ensembles that collectively organize microtubule networks. In this study, we show that the yeast kinesin-14 Kar3 generates processive movement as a heterodimer with the non-motor proteins Cik1 or Vik1. By analyzing the single-molecule properties of engineered motors, we demonstrate that the non-catalytic domain has a key role in the motility mechanism by acting as a ‘foothold’ that allows Kar3 to bias translocation towards the minus end. This mechanism rivals the speed and run length of conventional motors, can support transport of the Ndc80 complex in vitro and is critical for Kar3 function in vivo. Our findings provide an example for a non-conventional translocation mechanism and can explain how Kar3 substitutes for key functions of Dynein in the yeast nucleus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04489.001 PMID:25626168

  17. Facile synthesis of Mn2O3 hollow and core-shell cube-like nanostructures and their catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Ruiyu; Liu, Jianzhou

    2014-08-01

    Manganese carbonate (MnCO3) hollow cube-like nanostructures were synthesized via a facile polyol process and then thermal converted to phase-pure manganese oxide (Mn2O3). Based on the structural analysis of MnCO3 precursor obtained at different reaction times, a mechanism of inside-out Ostwald ripening was proposed to account for the formation of the hollow nanostructures. An annealing treatment at 500 °C with a ramping rate of 3 °C min-1 was utilized to convert the MnCO3 precursor into Mn2O3. The manganese oxide powder products possessed mesoporosity and essentially preserved the pristine morphology of the MnCO3 precursor. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), Thermal gravimetric analyze (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). Furthermore, relative to Mn2O3 core-shell cube-like microstructures, the mesoporous hollow cubes exhibited a higher catalytic activity towards CO oxidation.

  18. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of RluD, the only rRNA pseudouridine synthase required for normal growth of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    DEL CAMPO, MARK; OFENGAND, JAMES; MALHOTRA, ARUN

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase RluD makes pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the loop of helix 69 in 23S RNA. These are the most highly conserved ribosomal pseudouridines known. Of 11 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli, only cells lacking RluD have severe growth defects and abnormal ribosomes. We have determined the 2.0 Å structure of the catalytic domain of RluD (residues 77–326), the first structure of an RluA family member. The catalytic domain folds into a mainly antiparallel β-sheet flanked by several loops and helices. A positively charged cleft that presumably binds RNA leads to the conserved Asp 139. The RluD N-terminal S4 domain, connected by a flexible linker, is disordered in our structure. RluD is very similar in both catalytic domain structure and active site arrangement to the pseudouridine synthases RsuA, TruB, and TruA. We identify five sequence motifs, two of which are novel, in the RluA, RsuA, TruB, and TruA families, uniting them as one superfamily. These results strongly suggest that four of the five families of pseudouridine synthases arose by divergent evolution. The RluD structure also provides insight into its multisite specificity. PMID:14730022

  19. Stability of the domain interface contributes towards the catalytic function at the H-site of class alpha glutathione transferase A1-1.

    PubMed

    Balchin, David; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Adamson, Roslin J; Burke, Jonathan; Fernandes, Manuel; Gildenhuys, Samantha; Dirr, Heini W

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes in aerobes. Each subunit has two distinct domains and an active site consisting of a G-site for binding GSH and an H-site for an electrophilic substrate. While the active site is located at the domain interface, the role of the stability of this interface in the catalytic function of GSTs is poorly understood. Domain 1 of class alpha GSTs has a conserved tryptophan (Trp21) in helix 1 that forms a major interdomain contact with helices 6 and 8 in domain 2. Replacing Trp21 with an alanine is structurally non-disruptive but creates a cavity between helices 1, 6 and 8 thus reducing the packing density and van der Waals contacts at the domain interface. This results in destabilization of the protein and a marked reduction in catalytic activity. While functionality at the G-site is not adversely affected by the W21A mutation, the H-site becomes more accessible to solvent and less favorable for the electrophilic substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Not only does the mutation result in a reduction in the energy for stabilizing the transition state formed in the S(N)Ar reaction between the substrates GSH and CDNB, it also compromises the ability of the enzyme to form and stabilize a transition state analogue (Meisenheimer complex) formed between GSH and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB). The study demonstrates that the stability of the domain-domain interface plays a role in mediating the catalytic functionality of the active site, particularly the H-site, of class alpha GSTs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cholinesterase-like domains in enzymes and structural proteins: functional and evolutionary relationships and identification of a catalytically essential aspartic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, E; Duval, N; Chatonnet, A; Vincens, P; Massoulié, J

    1991-01-01

    Primary sequences of cholinesterases and related proteins have been systematically compared. The cholinesterase-like domain of these proteins, about 500 amino acids, may fulfill a catalytic and a structural function. We identified an aspartic acid residue that is conserved among esterases and lipases (Asp-397 in Torpedo acetylcholinesterase) but that had not been considered to be involved in the catalytic mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that this residue is necessary for activity. Analysis of evolutionary relationships shows that the noncatalytic members of the family do not constitute a separate subgroup, suggesting that loss of catalytic activity occurred independently on several occasions, probably from bifunctional molecules. Cholinesterases may thus be involved in cell-cell interactions in addition to the hydrolysis of acetylcholine. This would explain their specific expression in well-defined territories during embryogenesis before the formation of cholinergic synapses and their presence in noncholinergic tissues. Images PMID:1862088

  1. Solution NMR structure of the NlpC/P60 domain of lipoprotein Spr from Escherichia coli: structural evidence for a novel cysteine peptidase catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Mei; Maglaqui, Melissa; Xiao, Rong; Locke, Jessica; Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-09-16

    Escherichia coli Spr is a membrane-anchored cell wall hydrolase. The solution NMR structure of the C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain of E. coli Spr described here reveals that the protein adopts a papain-like alpha+beta fold and identifies a substrate-binding cleft featuring several highly conserved residues. The active site features a novel Cys-His-His catalytic triad that appears to be a unique structural signature of this cysteine peptidase family. Moreover, the relative orientation of these catalytic residues is similar to that observed in the analogous Ser-His-His triad, a variant of the classic Ser-His-Asp charge relay system, suggesting the convergent evolution of a catalytic mechanism in quite distinct peptidase families.

  2. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Grauffel, Cédric; Abboud, Angèle; Liszczak, Glen; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas; Reuter, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p). To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG), hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE). Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic), hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic), hNaa30p (basic) and hNaa50p (hydrophobic). We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide-enzyme interactions

  3. Probing the function of nucleotides in the catalytic cores of the 8-17 and 10-23 DNAzymes by abasic nucleotide and C3 spacer substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Cao, Liqiang; Chiuman, William; Li, Yingfu; Xi, Zhen

    2010-09-07

    8-17 and 10-23 are the two most comprehensively studied RNA-cleaving DNAzymes to date and have the ability to carry out sequence-specific cleavage of both all-RNA or chimeric RNA/DNA substrates. Mutagenesis studies of 8-17 and 10-23 DNAzymes using alternative natural nucleotides to substitute a given nucleotide in the DNAzyme sequence have found that both DNAzymes are able to tolerate a variety of alterations at many sequence locations. Chemical modification studies employing nucleotides containing nonnatural nucleobases have led to findings that some specific entities of selected nucleobases are irreplaceable by other functional groups. In this work, we set out to carry out a mutagenesis study on both 8-17 and 10-23 by substituting individual nucleotides in their catalytic cores with a baseless (abasic) nucleotide or a baseless/sugarless nucleotide containing only acyclic C3 spacer. We observed that the substitution with an abasic nucleotide or C3 spacer at many locations within the catalytic core of both 8-17 and 10-23 was still able to support a significant level of catalytic activity of each DNAzyme, suggesting that both DNAzymes have considerable structural plasticity to maintain their catalytic functions. We also observed that almost all nucleobases in the catalytic core of each DNAzyme appeared to make either an absolutely essential contribution to the function of each DNAzyme or exhibit a "chaperone-like" activity that is important for the optimal function of each DNAzyme; in contrast, only one sugar ring in 8-17 and four in 10-23 were inferred to make some contribution to the optimal function of the relevant DNAzyme. Finally, our study also raised a possibility that the 10-23 DNAzyme might be a special structural variant of the larger 8-17 DNAzyme family.

  4. Generation of a Maize B Centromere Minimal Map Containing the Central Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nathanael A.; Douglas, Ryan N.; Jackson, Caroline E.; Birchler, James A.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The maize B centromere has been used as a model for centromere epigenetics and as the basis for building artificial chromosomes. However, there are no sequence resources for this important centromere. Here we used transposon display for the centromere-specific retroelement CRM2 to identify a collection of 40 sequence tags that flank CRM2 insertion points on the B chromosome. These were confirmed to lie within the centromere by assaying deletion breakpoints from centromere misdivision derivatives (intracentromere breakages caused by centromere fission). Markers were grouped together on the basis of their association with other markers in the misdivision series and assembled into a pseudocontig containing 10.1 kb of sequence. To identify sequences that interact directly with centromere proteins, we carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to centromeric histone H3 (CENH3), a defining feature of functional centromeric sequences. The CENH3 chromatin immunoprecipitation map was interpreted relative to the known transmission rates of centromere misdivision derivatives to identify a centromere core domain spanning 33 markers. A subset of seven markers was mapped in additional B centromere misdivision derivatives with the use of unique primer pairs. A derivative previously shown to have no canonical centromere sequences (Telo3-3) lacks these core markers. Our results provide a molecular map of the B chromosome centromere and identify key sequences within the map that interact directly with centromeric histone H3. PMID:26511496

  5. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  6. Systematic Domain Swaps of Iterative, Nonreducing Polyketide Synthases Provide a Mechanistic Understanding and Rationale For Catalytic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iterative, nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are multidomain enzymes responsible for the construction of the core architecture of aromatic polyketide natural products in fungi. Engineering these enzymes for the production of non-native metabolites has been a long-standing goal. We conducted a systematic survey of in vitro “domain swapped” NR-PKSs using an enzyme deconstruction approach. The NR-PKSs were dissected into mono- to multidomain fragments and recombined as noncognate pairs in vitro, reconstituting enzymatic activity. The enzymes used in this study produce aromatic polyketides that are representative of the four main chemical features set by the individual NR-PKS: starter unit selection, chain-length control, cyclization register control, and product release mechanism. We found that boundary conditions limit successful chemistry, which are dependent on a set of underlying enzymatic mechanisms. Crucial for successful redirection of catalysis, the rate of productive chemistry must outpace the rate of spontaneous derailment and thioesterase-mediated editing. Additionally, all of the domains in a noncognate system must interact efficiently if chemical redirection is to proceed. These observations refine and further substantiate current understanding of the mechanisms governing NR-PKS catalysis. PMID:24815013

  7. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase possesses two functional catalytic domains and is inhibited by a CDP-choline analog selected from a virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Contet, Alicia; Pihan, Emilie; Lavigne, Marina; Wengelnik, Kai; Maheshwari, Sweta; Vial, Henri; Douguet, Dominique; Cerdan, Rachel

    2015-04-13

    Phosphatidylcholine is the major lipid component of the malaria parasite membranes and is required for parasite multiplication in human erythrocytes. Plasmodium falciparum CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PfCCT) is the rate-limiting enzyme of the phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis pathway and thus considered as a potential antimalarial target. In contrast to its mammalian orthologs, PfCCT contains a duplicated catalytic domain. Here, we show that both domains are catalytically active with similar kinetic parameters. A virtual screening strategy allowed the identification of a drug-size molecule competitively inhibiting the enzyme. This compound also prevented phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in parasites and exerted an antimalarial effect. This study constitutes the first step towards a rationalized design of future new antimalarial agents targeting PfCCT.

  8. A core outcome set for clinical trials on non-specific low back pain: study protocol for the development of a core domain set.

    PubMed

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Terwee, Caroline B; Deyo, Richard A; Boers, Maarten; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Corbin, Terry P; Costa, Leonardo O P; Foster, Nadine E; Grotle, Margreth; Koes, Bart W; Kovacs, Francisco M; Maher, Chris G; Pearson, Adam M; Peul, Wilco C; Schoene, Mark L; Turk, Dennis C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2014-12-26

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most disabling and costly disorders affecting modern society, and approximately 90% of patients are labelled as having non-specific LBP (NSLBP). Several interventions for patients with NSLBP have been assessed in clinical trials, but heterogeneous reporting of outcomes in these trials has hindered comparison of results and performance of meta-analyses. Moreover, there is a risk of selective outcome reporting bias. To address these issues, the development of a core outcome set (COS) that should be measured in all clinical trials for a specific health condition has been recommended. A standardized set of outcomes for LBP was proposed in 1998, however, with evolution in COS development methodology, new instruments, interventions, and understanding of measurement properties, it is appropriate to update that proposal. This protocol describes the methods used in the initial step in developing a COS for NSLBP, namely, establishing a core domain set that should be measured in all clinical trials. An International Steering Committee including researchers, clinicians, and patient representatives from four continents was formed to guide the development of this COS. The approach of initiatives like Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) and Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) was followed. Participants were invited to participate in a Delphi study aimed at generating a consensus-based core domain set for NSLBP. A list of potential core domains was drafted and presented to the Delphi participants who were asked to judge which domains were core. Participant suggestions about overlap, aggregation, or addition of potential core domains were addressed during the study. The patients' responses were isolated to assess whether there was substantial disagreement with the rest of the Delphi panel. A priori thresholds for consensus were established before each Delphi round. All participants' responses were analysed from a

  9. Synthesis Dependent Core Level Binding Energy Shift in the Oxidation State of Platinum Coated on Ceria–Titania and its Effect on Catalytic Decomposition of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, A. S.; King, Jessica; Vincent, Abhilash; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-11-20

    Synergistic interaction of catalyst and support has attracted the interest of the catalytic community for several decades. The decomposition/oxidation of alcohols for the production of hydrogen as a source of fuel requires such support catalyst interaction. Recent studies have suggested the active role of oxide based supports on the catalytic ability of noble metals such as gold, platinum and palladium. Herein, we report the effect of synthesis technique on the catalytic activity of platinum coated on mixed ceria-titania support system. Wet impregnation technique followed by calcination was compared with the chemical reduction of platinum during the coating over oxide support. Methanol decomposition studied using an in-house built catalytic reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer showed that catalyst prepared by thermal reduction of platinum demonstrated better catalytic ability than the catalyst prepared by chemical reduction of platinum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the size of both platinum and ceria-titania particles remained unchanged, while the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the oxidation state of platinum was modified by different coating procedures. A shift in the core level binding energy of the Pt 4f towards lower binding energy was observed with chemical reduction. Based on the XPS data it was found that platinum (on ceria-titania supports) in mixed oxidation state outperformed the Pt in reduced metallic state. Results from catalysis and in situ Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  10. RAG2's non-core domain contributes to the ordered regulation of V(D)J recombination

    PubMed Central

    Curry, John D.; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Variable (diversity) joining [V(D)J] recombination of immune gene loci proceeds in an ordered manner with D to J portions recombining first and then an upstream V joins that recombinant. We present evidence that the non-core domain of recombination activating gene (RAG) protein 2 is involved in the regulation of recombinatorial order. In mice lacking the non-core domain of RAG2 the ordered rearrangement is disturbed and direct V to D rearrangements are 10- to 1000-times increased in tri-partite immune gene loci. Some forms of inter-chromosomal translocations between TCRβ and TCRδ D gene segments are also increased in the core RAG2 animals as compared with their wild-type (WT) counterparts. In addition, the concise use of proper recombination signal sequences (RSSs) appears to be disturbed in the core RAG2 mice as compared with WT RAG2 animals. PMID:18776220

  11. RAG2's non-core domain contributes to the ordered regulation of V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Curry, John D; Schlissel, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    Variable (diversity) joining [V(D)J] recombination of immune gene loci proceeds in an ordered manner with D to J portions recombining first and then an upstream V joins that recombinant. We present evidence that the non-core domain of recombination activating gene (RAG) protein 2 is involved in the regulation of recombinatorial order. In mice lacking the non-core domain of RAG2 the ordered rearrangement is disturbed and direct V to D rearrangements are 10- to 1000-times increased in tri-partite immune gene loci. Some forms of inter-chromosomal translocations between TCRbeta and TCRdelta D gene segments are also increased in the core RAG2 animals as compared with their wild-type (WT) counterparts. In addition, the concise use of proper recombination signal sequences (RSSs) appears to be disturbed in the core RAG2 mice as compared with WT RAG2 animals.

  12. PRIP (Phospholipase C-related but Catalytically Inactive Protein) Inhibits Exocytosis by Direct Interactions with Syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25 through Its C2 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Gao, Jing; Wang, DaGuang; James, Declan J.; Martin, Thomas F. J.; Hirata, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion for exocytosis is mediated by SNAREs, forming trans-ternary complexes to bridge vesicle and target membranes. There is an array of accessory proteins that directly interact with and regulate SNARE proteins. PRIP (phospholipase C-related but catalytically inactive protein) is likely one of these proteins; PRIP, consisting of multiple functional modules including pleckstrin homology and C2 domains, inhibited exocytosis, probably via the binding to membrane phosphoinositides through the pleckstrin homology domain. However, the roles of the C2 domain have not yet been investigated. In this study, we found that the C2 domain of PRIP directly interacts with syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25 but not with VAMP2. The C2 domain promoted PRIP to co-localize with syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25 in PC12 cells. The binding profile of the C2 domain to SNAP-25 was comparable with that of synaptotagmin I, and PRIP inhibited synaptotagmin I in binding to SNAP-25 and syntaxin 1. It was also shown that the C2 domain was required for PRIP to suppress SDS-resistant ternary SNARE complex formation and inhibit high K+-induced noradrenalin release from PC12 cells. These results suggest that PRIP inhibits regulated exocytosis through the interaction of its C2 domain with syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25, potentially competing with other SNARE-binding, C2 domain-containing accessory proteins such as synaptotagmin I and by directly inhibiting trans-SNARE complex formation. PMID:23341457

  13. Modeling of absorption and scattering properties of core -shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in optical domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jutika; Saikia, Rashmi; Datta, Pranayee

    2016-10-01

    The present paper describes the study of core-shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in the optical domain. To obtain the absorption and extinction efficiencies as well as the angular distribution of the far field radiation pattern and the resonance wavelengths for these metal-dielectric, dielectric-metal and metal-metal core-shell nanoparticles in optical domain, we have used Finite Element Method based COMSOL Multiphysics Software and Mie Theory. From the comparative study of the extinction efficiencies of core-shell nanoparticles of different materials, it is found that for silica - gold core - shell nanoparticles, the resonant wavelength is greater than that of the gold - silver, silver-gold and gold-silica core - shell nanoparticles and also the radiation pattern of the silica-gold core-shell nanoparticle is the most suitable one from the point of view of directivity. The dielectric functions of the core and shell material as well as of the embedded matrix are extremely important and plays a very major role to tune the directivity and resonance wavelength. Such highly controllable parameters of the dielectric - metal core - shell nanoparticles make them suitable for efficient coupling of optical radiation into nanoscale structures for a broad range of applications in the field of communications.

  14. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd2+. The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.

  15. Predicted unfolding order of the 13 alpha-helices in the catalytic domain of glucoamylase from Aspergillus awamori var. X100 by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Wen-Chi

    2003-01-01

    The unfolding mechanism of the 13 alpha-helices in the catalytic domain of Aspergillus awamori var. X100 glucoamylase was investigated by 200 ps molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water with temperature jump technique. Rather than a simultaneous event, the unfolding of these 13 alpha-helices followed a random ordered mechanism as alpha8-->alpha1-->alpha11-->alpha7-->alpha10-->alpha3-->alpha12-->alpha13-->alpha4-->alpha5-->alpha9-->alpha6-->alpha2. No significant relationships were found between the unfolding order and the length and the hydrophobicity of the helix. alpha-Helix 8 located in the inner region of the catalytic domain was predicted to be the first helix to unfold, indicating that the destruction of the secondary structure motif was initiated from the inner region of the catalytic domain. The dynamic behavior of these alpha-helices induced by increased kinetic energy during the unfolding process is considered to be similar to the expansion and compression of a series of springs under the influence of mechanical stress.

  16. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic efficiency to synthetic substrate AAPF, with the V355 variant having the highest kcat /Km value of 143.6 s−1 mM−1. The truncation of keratinase had little effect on alkaline stability but obviously decreased collagenase activity, developing its potential application in leather treatment. The variants V380, V370, and V355 were thermophilic, with a 1.7-fold enhancement of keratinlytic activity at 60 °C when compared to the wild type. The entire truncation of PPC domain obtained the variant V355 with improved tolerance to alkalinity, salt, chaotropic agents, and detergents. The V355 variant showed more than a 40% improvement in activity under 15% (w/v) NaCl or 4% (w/v) SDS solution, showing excellent stability under harsh washing and unhairing conditions. Our work investigated how protein engineering affects the function of PPC domain of KerSMD. PMID:27298079

  17. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  18. Three Cdk1 sites in the kinesin-5 Cin8 catalytic domain coordinate motor localization and activity during anaphase.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alina; Siegler, Nurit; Goldman, Darya; Judah, Haim; Valk, Ervin; Kõivomägi, Mardo; Loog, Mart; Gheber, Larisa

    2017-09-01

    The bipolar kinesin-5 motors perform essential functions in mitotic spindle dynamics. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of at least one of the Cdk1 sites in the catalytic domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 (S277, T285, S493) regulates its localization to the anaphase spindle. The contribution of these three sites to phospho-regulation of Cin8, as well as the timing of such contributions, remains unknown. Here, we examined the function and spindle localization of phospho-deficient (serine/threonine to alanine) and phospho-mimic (serine/threonine to aspartic acid) Cin8 mutants. In vitro, the three Cdk1 sites undergo phosphorylation by Clb2-Cdk1. In cells, phosphorylation of Cin8 affects two aspects of its localization to the anaphase spindle, translocation from the spindle-pole bodies (SPBs) region to spindle microtubules (MTs) and the midzone, and detachment from the mitotic spindle. We found that phosphorylation of S277 is essential for the translocation of Cin8 from SPBs to spindle MTs and the subsequent detachment from the spindle. Phosphorylation of T285 mainly affects the detachment of Cin8 from spindle MTs during anaphase, while phosphorylation at S493 affects both the translocation of Cin8 from SPBs to the spindle and detachment from the spindle. Only S493 phosphorylation affected the anaphase spindle elongation rate. We conclude that each phosphorylation site plays a unique role in regulating Cin8 functions and postulate a model in which the timing and extent of phosphorylation of the three sites orchestrates the anaphase function of Cin8.

  19. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  20. Mutational analysis of highly conserved aspartate residues essential to the catalytic core of the piggyBac transposase

    PubMed Central

    Keith, James H; Schaeper, Cheryl A; Fraser, Tresa S; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    Background The piggyBac mobile element is quickly gaining popularity as a tool for the transgenesis of many eukaryotic organisms. By studying the transposase which catalyzes the movement of piggyBac, we may be able to modify this vector system to make it a more effective transgenesis tool. In a previous publication, Sarkar A, Sim C, Hong YS, Hogan JR, Fraser MJ, Robertson HM, and Collins FH have proposed the presence of the widespread 'DDE/DDD' motif for piggyBac at amino acid positions D268, D346, and D447. Results This study utilizes directed mutagenesis and plasmid-based mobility assays to assess the importance of these residues as the catalytic core of the piggyBac transposase. We have functionally analyzed individual point-mutations with respect to charge and physical size in all three proposed residues of the 'DDD' motif as well as another nearby, highly conserved aspartate at D450. All of our mutations had a significant effect on excision frequency in S2 cell cultures. We have also aligned the piggyBac transposase to other close family members, both functional and non-functional, in an attempt to identify the most highly conserved regions and position a number of interesting features. Conclusion We found all the designated DDD aspartates reside in clusters of amino acids that conserved among piggyBac family transposase members. Our results indicate that all four aspartates are necessary, to one degree or another, for excision to occur in a cellular environment, but D450 seems to have a tolerance for a glutamate substitution. All mutants tested significantly decreased excision frequency in cell cultures when compared with the wild-type transposase. PMID:18694512

  1. Cooperation between Catalytic and DNA-binding Domains Enhances Thermostability and Supports DNA Synthesis at Higher Temperatures by Thermostable DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Andrey R.; Pavlova, Nadejda V.; Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases (Pavlov et. al., (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13510–13515). The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various non-specific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting Helix-hairpin-Helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species, but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of TopoV HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105°C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We also found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding templates to DNA polymerases. PMID:22320201

  2. Homologous xylanases from Clostridium thermocellum: evidence for bi-functional activity, synergism between xylanase catalytic modules and the presence of xylan-binding domains in enzyme complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, A C; Fontes, C M; Gilbert, H J; Hazlewood, G P; Fernandes, T H; Ferreira, L M

    1999-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum produces a consortium of plant-cell-wall hydrolases that form a cell-bound multi-enzyme complex called the cellulosome. In the present study two similar xylanase genes, xynU and xynV, were cloned from C. thermocellum strain YS and sequenced. The deduced primary structures of both xylanases, xylanase U (XylU) and xylanase V (XylV), were homologous with the previously characterized xylanases from C. thermocellum strain F1. Truncated derivatives of XylV were produced and their biochemical properties were characterized. The xylanases were shown to be remarkably thermostable and resistant to proteolytic inactivation. The catalytic domains hydrolysed xylan by a typical endo-mode of action. The type VI cellulose-binding domain (CBD) homologue of XylV bound xylan and, to a smaller extent, Avicel and acid-swollen cellulose. Deletion of the CBD from XylV abolished the capacity of the enzymes to bind polysaccharides. The polysaccharide-binding domain was shown to have a key role in the hydrolysis of insoluble substrates by XylV. The C-terminal domain of XylV, which is absent from XylU, removed acetyl groups from acetylated xylan and acted in synergy with the glycosyl hydrolase catalytic domain of the enzyme to elicit the hydrolysis of acetylated xylan. PMID:10432306

  3. Crystal Structures of YkuI and Its Complex with Second Messenger Cyclic Di-GMP Suggest Catalytic Mechanism of Phosphodiester Bond Cleavage by EAL Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Minasov, George; Padavattan, Sivaraman; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Miller, Darcie J.; Baslé, Arnaud; Massa, Claudia; Collart, Frank R.; Schirmer, Tilman; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that is involved in the regulation of cell surface-associated traits and the persistence of infections. Omnipresent GGDEF and EAL domains, which occur in various combinations with regulatory domains, catalyze c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length YkuI from Bacillus subtilis, composed of an EAL domain and a C-terminal PAS-like domain, has been determined in its native form and in complex with c-di-GMP and Ca2+. The EAL domain exhibits a triose-phosphate isomerase-barrel fold with one antiparallel β-strand. The complex with c-di-GMP-Ca2+ defines the active site of the putative phosphodiesterase located at the C-terminal end of the β-barrel. The EAL motif is part of the active site with Glu-33 of the motif being involved in cation coordination. The structure of the complex allows the proposal of a phosphodiesterase mechanism, in which the divalent cation and the general base Glu-209 activate a catalytic water molecule for nucleophilic in-line attack on the phosphorus. The C-terminal domain closely resembles the PAS-fold. Its pocket-like structure could accommodate a yet unknown ligand. YkuI forms a tight dimer via EAL-EAL and trans EAL-PAS-like domain association. The possible regulatory significance of the EAL-EAL interface and a mechanism for signal transduction between sensory and catalytic domains of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases are discussed. PMID:19244251

  4. The adenylation domain of tyrocidine synthetase 1--structural and functional role of the interdomain linker region and the (S/T)GT(T/S)GXPKG core sequence.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, R; Pavela-Vrancic, M; Pfeifer, E; von Döhren, H; Kleinkauf, H

    1997-08-01

    Sequence analysis of peptide synthetases revealed extensive structure similarity with firefly luciferase, whose crystal structure has recently become available, providing evidence for the localization of the active site at the interface between two subdomains separated by a distorted linker region [Conti, E., Franks, N. P. & Brick, P. (1996) Structure 4, 287-298]. The functional importance of two flexible loops, corresponding to the linker region of firefly luciferase and the highly conserved (S/T)GT(T/S)GXPKG core sequence, has been studied in view of the proposed conformational changes by the use of mutant analysis, limited proteolysis and chemical modification of tyrocidine synthetase 1. Substitution of the highly conserved Arg416, residing in the loop separating the subdomains of the adenylation domain, resulted in profound loss of activity. Limited proteolysis of the mutant suggested significant structural changes as manifested by lack of protection to degradation in the presence of substrates, revealing a probable disturbance of the induced-fit mechanism regulating the transformation from an open to a closed conformation. Mutants, obtained by replacement of the conserved Lys186 from the (S/T)GT(T/S)GXPKG core sequence, displayed only minor differences in substrate-binding affinity despite significant reduction of catalytic efficiency. Residue Lys186 appears to play an important role in either stabilization of the bound substrate through charge-charge-interactions, and/or fixing of the loop for maintainance of the active-site conformation.

  5. Mutations in salt-bridging residues at the interface of the core and lid domains of epoxide hydrolase StEH1 affect regioselectivity, protein stability and hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Diana; Ahmad, Shabbir; Widersten, Mikael

    2010-03-15

    Epoxide hydrolase, StEH1, shows hysteretic behavior in the catalyzed hydrolysis of trans-2-methylstyrene oxide (2-MeSO)(1). Linkage between protein structure dynamics and catalytic function was probed in mutant enzymes in which surface-located salt-bridging residues were substituted. Salt-bridges at the interface of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold core and lid domains, as well as between residues in the lid domain, between Lys(179)-Asp(202), Glu(215)-Arg(41) and Arg(236)-Glu(165) were disrupted by mutations, K179Q, E215Q, R236K and R236Q. All mutants displayed enzyme activity with styrene oxide (SO) and 2-MeSO when assayed at 30 degrees C. Disruption of salt-bridges altered the rates for isomerization between distinct Michaelis complexes, with (1R,2R)-2-MeSO as substrate, presumably as a result of increased dynamics of involved protein segments. Another indication of increased flexibility was a lowered thermostability in all mutants. We propose that the alterations to regioselectivity in these mutants derive from an increased mobility in protein segments otherwise stabilized by salt bridging interactions.

  6. Reversible Aggregation Plays a Crucial Role on the Folding Landscape of p53 Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Lima, Luis M. T. R.; Maia, Lenize F.; Lopez, Priscila M.; Ano Bom, Ana P.; Valente, Ana P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2004-01-01

    The role of tumor suppressor protein p53 in cell cycle control depends on its flexible and partially unstructured conformation, which makes it crucial to understand its folding landscape. Here we report an intermediate structure of the core domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 (p53C) during equilibrium and kinetic folding/unfolding transitions induced by guanidinium chloride. This partially folded structure was undetectable when investigated by intrinsic fluorescence. Indeed, the fluorescence data showed a simple two-state transition. On the other hand, analysis of far ultraviolet circular dichroism in 1.0 M guanidinium chloride demonstrated a high content of secondary structure, and the use of an extrinsic fluorescent probe, 4,4′-dianilino-1,1′ binaphthyl-5,5′-disulfonic acid, indicated an increase in exposure of the hydrophobic core at 1 M guanidinium chloride. This partially folded conformation of p53C was plagued by aggregation, as suggested by one-dimensional NMR and demonstrated by light-scattering and gel-filtration chromatography. Dissociation by high pressure of these aggregates reveals the reversibility of the process and that the aggregates have water-excluded cavities. Kinetic measurements show that the intermediate formed in a parallel reaction between unfolded and folded structures and that it is under fine energetic control. They are not only crucial to the folding pathway of p53C but may explain as well the vulnerability of p53C to undergo departure of the native to an inactive state, which makes the cell susceptible to malignant transformation. PMID:15298872

  7. Functional analysis of the catalytic subunit of Dictyostelium PKA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dammann, H; Traincard, F; Anjard, C; van Bemmelen, M X; Reymond, C; Véron, M

    1998-03-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) from Dictyostelium discoideum contains several domains, including an unusually long N-terminal extension preceding a highly conserved catalytic core. We transformed the aggregationless PkaC-null strain with several deletion constructs of both domains. Strains transformed with genes expressing catalytically-inactive polypeptides could not rescue development. Cotransformation with constructs encoding the N-terminal extension and the catalytic core, both unable to rescue development by themselves, yielded transformants able to proceed to late development. A 27-amino acid long hydrophobic region, immediately upstream of the catalytic core, was found indispensable for PKA function. A putative role of this sequence in the acquisition of the active conformation of the protein is discussed.

  8. Secretin receptor oligomers form intracellularly during maturation through receptor core domains.

    PubMed

    Lisenbee, Cayle S; Miller, Laurence J

    2006-07-11

    Oligomerization of numerous G protein-coupled receptors has been documented, including the prototypic family B secretin receptor. The clinical significance of oligomerization of this receptor became clear with the recent observation that a misspliced form present in pancreatic cancer could associate with the wild-type receptor and act as a dominant negative inhibitor of its normal growth inhibitory function. Our goal was to explore the molecular mechanism of this interaction using bioluminescence (BRET) and fluorescence (FRET) resonance energy transfer and fluorescence microscopy with a variety of receptor constructs tagged with luciferase or cyan or yellow fluorescent proteins. BRET signals comparable to those obtained from cells coexpressing differentially tagged wild-type receptors were observed for similarly tagged secretin receptors in which all or part of the amino-terminal domain was deleted. As expected, neither of these constructs bound secretin, and only the partially truncated construct sorted to the plasma membrane. Receptors lacking the majority of the carboxyl-terminal domain, including that important for phosphorylation-mediated desensitization, also produced BRET signals above background. These findings suggested that the receptor's membrane-spanning core is responsible for secretin receptor oligomerization. Interestingly, alanine substitutions for a -GxxxG- helix interaction motif in transmembrane segment 7 created nonfunctional receptors that were capable of forming oligomers. Furthermore, treatment of receptor-expressing cells with brefeldin A did not eliminate the BRET signals, and morphologic FRET experiments confirmed the expected subcellular localizations of receptor oligomers. We conclude that secretin receptor oligomerization occurs through -GxxxG- motif-independent interactions of transmembrane segments during the maturation of nascent molecules.

  9. Precisely Controllable Core-Shell Ag@Carbon Dots Nanoparticles: Application to in Situ Super-Sensitive Monitoring of Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Zhao, Hongyue; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Yue; Li, Junbo; Song, Wei; Yang, Bai; Zhao, Bing

    2016-10-10

    Carbon dots (CDs) have attracted extensive interest owing to their unparalleled physical and chemical characteristics. CDs based nanocomposites have also drawn increasing attention because the combination of different characteristics could offer additional brilliant properties (such as photocatalysis and Raman scattering). In this work, we developed a fast, facile, and controllable method for fabricating core-shell Ag@CDs nanoparticles (NPs) based on the ability of CDs to directly reduce Ag(+) to Ag NPs without an external photoirradiation process or additional reductants. The as-prepared Ag@CDs NPs caused efficient CDs fluorescence quenching, and the typical bands of carbon species were obtained in the Raman spectrum of CDs. In addition, we found that the Ag@CDs NPs could be utilized as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, showing a discernible detection concentration as low as 10(-8) M by using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) as the probe molecules. The as-prepared Ag@CDs NPs used as the SERS substrate also exhibited excellent peroxidase-like catalytic activity for in situ super-sensitive monitoring of the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2, a plasmon-enhanced driven photocatalytic reaction of p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) dimerizing into 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene, and catalytic driven reduction of PNTP to PATP in the presence of NaBH4 in real time. Moreover, the determination of H2O2 with a significantly lower discernible detection concentration was obtained. This work demonstrated that the hybrid nanostructures not only exhibited unique SERS properties but also showed excellent catalytic activities, especially as an ultrasensitive SERS substrate for monitoring heterogeneous catalytic reactions in real time. This would make it possible to not only obtain the information about catalytic molecular changes but also conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis, and widen the application of CDs in SERS and catalytic reactions.

  10. CORE Knowledge Domain C.4 Employment and Career Development: Application for Rehabilitation Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire-Kuletz, Maureen; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) CORE revised the standards for rehabilitation counseling master's degree program accreditation in 2004. These standards seek to promote effective rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in both private and public programs (CORE, 2008). This article focuses on the new CORE standard…

  11. Highly retentive core domains in K-feldspar preserve argon ages from high temperature stages of granite exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Lister, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Retentive core domains are characterized by diffusion parameters that imply K-feldspar should be able to retain argon even at temperatures near or above the granite solidus. In this case it should be possible to date granite emplacement using argon geochronology, and the same answer should be obtained as by using other methods. We present one case study where this is the case, from the elevated Capoas granite stock on Palawan, in the Philippines, and another where it is not, from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, on Ios, Greece. We attempt to determine the factors such as the role of fluid ingress in triggering the in situ recrystallization that can eliminate and/or modify the core domains, leading to relatively youthful ages. Thermochronology is still possible, because less retentive diffusion domains exist, but different methods need to be applied to interpret the data. The work also demonstrates that K-feldspar can be sufficiently retentive as to allow direct dating of processes that reduce the dimensions of diffusion domains, e.g., cataclased and/or recrystallized K-feldspar in fault rock and/or mylonite. These are important developments in the methodology of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but to further advance we need to clarify the nature of these highly retentive core domains. In particular, we need better understand how they are modified by microstructural processes during deformation and metamorphism. We need also to assess the role of any crystal structural changes during step-heating in vacuo.

  12. Preparation and reactivity of a tetranuclear Fe(II) core in the metallothionein α-domain.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yohei; Onoda, Akira; Sakurai, Rie; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins which exhibit high affinities for various metal ions and play roles in storage of essential metals and detoxification of toxic metals. Studies on the redox properties of MTs have been quite limited. Recently, we focused on the α-domain of MT (MTα) as a protein matrix and incorporated a tetranuclear metal cluster as a reductant. UV-visible, CD and MS data indicate the formation of the stable tetranuclear metal-cysteine cluster in the MTα matrix with Fe(II)(4)-MTα and Co(II)(4)-MTα species existing in water. Furthermore, the Fe(II)(4)-MTα species was found to promote the reduction of met-myoglobin and azobenzene derivatives under mild conditions. Particularly, the stoichiometric reduction of methyl red with Fe(II)(4)-MTα (1:1) was found to proceed with a conversion of 98% over a period of 6h at 25°C. This indicates that all of the four Fe(II) cores contribute to the reduction. In this paper, we describe the preparation and reactivity of the tetranuclear iron cluster in the protein matrix.

  13. The prolyl isomerase domain of PpiD from Escherichia coli shows a parvulin fold but is devoid of catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Weininger, Ulrich; Jakob, Roman P; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Schmid, Franz X

    2010-01-01

    PpiD is a periplasmic folding helper protein of Escherichia coli. It consists of an N-terminal helix that anchors PpiD in the inner membrane near the SecYEG translocon, followed by three periplasmic domains. The second domain (residues 264–357) shows homology to parvulin-like prolyl isomerases. This domain is a well folded, stable protein and follows a simple two-state folding mechanism. In its solution structure, as determined by NMR spectroscopy, it resembles most closely the first parvulin domain of the SurA protein, which resides in the periplasm of E. coli as well. A previously reported prolyl isomerase activity of PpiD could not be reproduced when using improved protease-free peptide assays or assays with refolding proteins as substrates. The parvulin domain of PpiD interacts, however, with a proline-containing tetrapeptide, and the binding site, as identified by NMR resonance shift analysis, colocalized with the catalytic sites of other parvulins. In its structure, the parvulin domain of PpiD resembles most closely the inactive first parvulin domain of SurA, which is part of the chaperone unit of this protein and presumably involved in substrate recognition. PMID:19866485

  14. Studies on the photo-catalytic activity of semiconductor nanostructures and their gold core-shell on the photodegradation of malathion.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Dina Mamdouh; Mohamed, Mona Bakr

    2011-11-11

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of different semiconductor nanoparticles and their metal core-shell nanocomposites such as TiO2, Au/TiO2, ZnO, and Au/ZnO. The morphology and crystal structures of the developed nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). These materials were used as catalysts for the photodegradation of malathion, which is one of the most commonly used pesticides in developing countries. The degradation of 10 ppm malathion under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light in the presence of different synthesized nanocomposites was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-visible spectra. A comprehensive study was carried out for the catalytic efficiency of the prepared nanoparticles. Moreover, the effects of different factors that could influence catalytic photodegradation, such as different light sources, surface coverage and the nature of the organic contaminants, were investigated. The results indicate that the core-shell nanocomposite of semiconductor-gold serves as a better catalytic system than the semiconductor nanoparticles themselves.

  15. Studies on the photo-catalytic activity of semiconductor nanostructures and their gold core-shell on the photodegradation of malathion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamdouh Fouad, Dina; Bakr Mohamed, Mona

    2011-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of different semiconductor nanoparticles and their metal core-shell nanocomposites such as TiO2, Au/TiO2, ZnO, and Au/ZnO. The morphology and crystal structures of the developed nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). These materials were used as catalysts for the photodegradation of malathion, which is one of the most commonly used pesticides in developing countries. The degradation of 10 ppm malathion under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light in the presence of different synthesized nanocomposites was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-visible spectra. A comprehensive study was carried out for the catalytic efficiency of the prepared nanoparticles. Moreover, the effects of different factors that could influence catalytic photodegradation, such as different light sources, surface coverage and the nature of the organic contaminants, were investigated. The results indicate that the core-shell nanocomposite of semiconductor-gold serves as a better catalytic system than the semiconductor nanoparticles themselves.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Multimetallic Pd@PtM (M = Ni, Rh, Ru) Core-Shell Nanoplates Realized by in Situ-Produced CO from Interfacial Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yucong; Shan, Hao; Li, Ge; Xiao, Fan; Jiang, Yingying; Yan, Youyi; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Jianbo; Yang, Deren

    2016-12-14

    Pt-based multimetallic core-shell nanoplates have received great attention as advanced catalysts, but the synthesis is still challenging. Here we report the synthesis of multimetallic Pd@PtM (M = Ni, Rh, Ru) nanoplates including Pd@Pt nanoplates, in which Pt or Pt alloy shells with controlled thickness epitaxially grow on plate-like Pd seeds. The key to achieve high-quality Pt-based multimetallic nanoplates is in situ generation of CO through interfacial catalytic reactions associated with Pd nanoplates and benzyl alcohol. In addition, the accurate control in a trace amount of CO is also of great importance for conformal growth of multimetallic core-shell nanoplates. The Pd@PtNi nanoplates exhibit substantially improved activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared to the Pd@Pt nanoplates and commercial Pt catalysts due to the advantages arising from plate-like, core-shell, and alloy structures.

  17. Conserved Glycine 33 Residue in Flexible Domain I of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Is Critical for Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Allan G. N.; Loquet, Antoine; Stack, Séamus J.; Dalrymple, David; Gatherer, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus core protein forms the viral nucleocapsid and plays a critical role in the formation of infectious particles. In this study, we demonstrate that the highly conserved residue G33, located within domain 1 of the core protein, is important for the production of cell culture-infectious virus (HCVcc). Alanine substitution at this position in the JFH1 genome did not alter viral RNA replication but reduced infectivity by ∼2 logs. Virus production by this core mutant could be rescued by compensatory mutations located immediately upstream and downstream of the original G33A mutation. The examination of the helix-loop-helix motif observed in the core protein structure (residues 15 to 41; Protein Data Bank entry 1CWX) indicated that the residues G33 and F24 are in close contact with each other, and that the G33A mutation induces a steric clash with F24. Molecular simulations revealed that the compensatory mutations increase the helix-loop-helix flexibility, allowing rescue of the core active conformation required for efficient virus production. Taken together, these data highlight the plasticity of core domain 1 conformation and illustrate the relationship between its structural tolerance to mutations and virus infectivity. PMID:22072760

  18. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Stura, Enrico A.; Visse, Robert; Cuniasse, Philippe; Dive, Vincent; Nagase, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is one of the mammalian collagenases that play key roles in tissue remodelling and repair and in progression of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm. For collagenase to cleave triple helical collagens, the triple helical structure has to be locally unwound before hydrolysis, but this process is not well understood. We report crystal structures of catalytically inactive full-length human MMP-13(E223A) in complex with peptides of 14–26 aa derived from the cleaved prodomain during activation. Peptides are bound to the active site of the enzyme by forming an extended β-strand with Glu40 or Tyr46 inserted into the S1′ specificity pocket. The structure of the N-terminal part of the peptides is variable and interacts with different parts of the catalytic domain. Those areas are designated substrate-dependent exosites, in that they accommodate different peptide structures, whereas the precise positioning of the substrate backbone is maintained in the active site. These modes of peptide-MMP-13 interactions have led us to propose how triple helical collagen strands fit into the active site cleft of the collagenase.—Stura, E. A., Visse, R., Cuniasse, P., Dive, V., Nagase, H. Crystal structure of full-length human collagenase 3 (MMP-13) with peptides in the active site defines exosites in the catalytic domain. PMID:23913860

  19. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-08-13

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases.

  20. Role of the two catalytic domains of DSR-E dextransucrase and their involvement in the formation of highly alpha-1,2 branched dextran.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Emeline; Bozonnet, Sophie; Arcache, Audrey; Willemot, René-Marc; Vignon, Michel; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali

    2005-01-01

    The dsrE gene from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1299 was shown to encode a very large protein with two potentially active catalytic domains (CD1 and CD2) separated by a glucan binding domain (GBD). From sequence analysis, DSR-E was classified in glucoside hydrolase family 70, where it is the only enzyme to have two catalytic domains. The recombinant protein DSR-E synthesizes both alpha-1,6 and alpha-1,2 glucosidic linkages in transglucosylation reactions using sucrose as the donor and maltose as the acceptor. To investigate the specific roles of CD1 and CD2 in the catalytic mechanism, truncated forms of dsrE were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Gene products were then small-scale purified to isolate the various corresponding enzymes. Dextran and oligosaccharide syntheses were performed. Structural characterization by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and/or high-performance liquid chromatography showed that enzymes devoid of CD2 synthesized products containing only alpha-1,6 linkages. On the other hand, enzymes devoid of CD1 modified alpha-1,6 linear oligosaccharides and dextran acceptors through the formation of alpha-1,2 linkages. Therefore, each domain is highly regiospecific, CD1 being specific for the synthesis of alpha-1,6 glucosidic bonds and CD2 only catalyzing the formation of alpha-1,2 linkages. This finding permitted us to elucidate the mechanism of alpha-1,2 branching formation and to engineer a novel transglucosidase specific for the formation of alpha-1,2 linkages. This enzyme will be very useful to control the rate of alpha-1,2 linkage synthesis in dextran or oligosaccharide production.

  1. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B.; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. PMID:23904483

  2. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials.

  3. A 2.2 Å resolution structure of the USP7 catalytic domain in a new space group elaborates upon structural rearrangements resulting from ubiquitin binding.

    PubMed

    Molland, Katrina; Zhou, Qing; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2014-03-01

    A sparse-matrix screen for new crystallization conditions for the USP7 catalytic domain (USP7CD) led to the identification of a condition in which crystals grow reproducibly in 24-48 h. Variation of the halide metal, growth temperature and seed-stock concentration resulted in a shift in space group from P21 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit to C2 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Representative structures from each space group were determined to 2.2 Å resolution and these structures support previous findings that the catalytic triad and switching loop are likely to be in unproductive conformations in the absence of ubiquitin (Ub). Importantly, the new structures reveal previously unobserved electron density for blocking loop 1 (BL1) residues 410-419. The new structures indicate a distinct rearrangement of the USP7 BL1 compared with its position in the presence of bound Ub.

  4. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  5. Crystallization and atomic resolution X-ray diffraction of the catalytic domain of the large sialidase, nanI, from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Chien, Chin Hsiang; Taylor, Margaret; Taylor, Garry

    2004-11-01

    Sialidases catalyse the removal of terminal sialic acids from a range of glycoproteins, glycolipids and oligosaccharides. They have been found in bacteria, viruses and parasites, where they play important roles in pathogenesis and/or microbial nutrition, and in mammalian cells, where they modulate cell-surface glycosylation associated with a range of cellular activities. Clostridium perfringens, a causative agent of gas gangrene and peritonitis in humans, possesses three sialidases: nanH, nanI and nanJ, with molecular weights of 42, 77 and 129 kDa, respectively. The two larger enzymes are secreted by the bacterium and are involved in the pathogenesis and nutrition of Clostridium. As part of a study to examine the structures of all three enzymes, crystallization of the 77 kDa nanI isoenzyme was attempted. The expressed full-length protein was found to degrade easily; a stable 50 kDa catalytic domain was therefore subcloned. This domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and produced crystals belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 96.98, b = 69.41, c = 72.69 A and one monomer per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to at least 0.92 A. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained using the catalytic domain of the sialidase from the leech Macrobdella decora.

  6. Autoinhibitory Interdomain Interactions and Subfamily-specific Extensions Redefine the Catalytic Core of the Human DEAD-box Protein DDX3.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Condon, Kendall J; Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-29

    DEAD-box proteins utilize ATP to bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes. All DEAD-box proteins share a conserved core that consists of two RecA-like domains. The core is flanked by subfamily-specific extensions of idiosyncratic function. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins is of particular interest as members function during protein translation, are essential for viability, and are frequently altered in human malignancies. Here, we define the function of the subfamily-specific extensions of the human DEAD-box protein DDX3. We describe the crystal structure of the subfamily-specific core of wild-type DDX3 at 2.2 Å resolution, alone and in the presence of AMP or nonhydrolyzable ATP. These structures illustrate a unique interdomain interaction between the two ATPase domains in which the C-terminal domain clashes with the RNA-binding surface. Destabilizing this interaction accelerates RNA duplex unwinding, suggesting that it is present in solution and inhibitory for catalysis. We use this core fragment of DDX3 to test the function of two recurrent medulloblastoma variants of DDX3 and find that both inactivate the protein in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results redefine the structural and functional core of the DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins.

  7. Autoinhibitory Interdomain Interactions and Subfamily-specific Extensions Redefine the Catalytic Core of the Human DEAD-box Protein DDX3*

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Condon, Kendall J.; Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins utilize ATP to bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes. All DEAD-box proteins share a conserved core that consists of two RecA-like domains. The core is flanked by subfamily-specific extensions of idiosyncratic function. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins is of particular interest as members function during protein translation, are essential for viability, and are frequently altered in human malignancies. Here, we define the function of the subfamily-specific extensions of the human DEAD-box protein DDX3. We describe the crystal structure of the subfamily-specific core of wild-type DDX3 at 2.2 Å resolution, alone and in the presence of AMP or nonhydrolyzable ATP. These structures illustrate a unique interdomain interaction between the two ATPase domains in which the C-terminal domain clashes with the RNA-binding surface. Destabilizing this interaction accelerates RNA duplex unwinding, suggesting that it is present in solution and inhibitory for catalysis. We use this core fragment of DDX3 to test the function of two recurrent medulloblastoma variants of DDX3 and find that both inactivate the protein in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results redefine the structural and functional core of the DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins. PMID:26598523

  8. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  9. Oxidative Unfolding of the Rubredoxin Domain and the Natively Disordered N-terminal Region Regulate the Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase G.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Matthias; Luo, Qi; Kaila, Ville R I; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-12-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes killing in human macrophages by secreting protein kinase G (PknG). PknG intercepts host signaling to prevent fusion of the phagosome engulfing the mycobacteria with the lysosome and, thus, their degradation. The N-terminal NORS (no regulatory secondary structure) region of PknG (approximately residues 1-75) has been shown to play a role in PknG regulation by (auto)phosphorylation, whereas the following rubredoxin-like metal-binding motif (RD, residues ∼74-147) has been shown to interact tightly with the subsequent catalytic domain (approximately residues 148-420) to mediate its redox regulation. Deletions or mutations in NORS or the redox-sensitive RD significantly decrease PknG survival function. Based on combined NMR spectroscopy, in vitro kinase assay, and molecular dynamics simulation data, we provide novel insights into the regulatory roles of the N-terminal regions. The NORS region is indeed natively disordered and rather dynamic. Consistent with most earlier data, autophosphorylation occurs in our assays only when the NORS region is present and, thus, in the NORS region. Phosphorylation of it results only in local conformational changes and does not induce interactions with the subsequent RD. Although the reduced, metal-bound RD makes tight interactions with the following catalytic domain in the published crystal structures, it can also fold in its absence. Our data further suggest that oxidation-induced unfolding of the RD regulates substrate access to the catalytic domain and, thereby, PknG function under different redox conditions, e.g. when exposed to increased levels of reactive oxidative species in host macrophages.

  10. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  11. Chronic pain after surgery: time for standardization? A framework to establish core risk factor and outcome domains for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Peters, Madelon L; Bruce, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported putative factors for the development of chronic pain after surgery. However, advances in knowledge about the etiology and prognosis of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) could be gained by improving methodology within studies of surgical pain. The purpose of this study was to review predictive factors and to propose core risk factor and outcome domains for inclusion in future epidemiological studies investigating CPSP. Using the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials as a framework we reviewed risk factor and outcome domains, methodological issues and standardized measurement tools based on findings from narrative and systematic reviews, primary clinical and epidemiological studies and published guidelines for chronic pain clinical trials. Five "core" risk factor domains (demographic, pain, clinical, surgery-related, and psychological) and 4 outcome domains (pain, physical functioning, psychological functioning, and global ratings of outcome) were identified. Important methodological issues, related to the definition and timing of follow-up to assess transition from acute to chronic pain are discussed. We also propose the use of validated, standardized measurement tools to capture risk factor and outcome domains at multiple time points. There is potential to advance the field of CPSP research by striving for consensus among pain experts; this would advance current evidence by improving our ability to compare findings from different studies and would facilitate the aggregation of surgical cohort datasets to allow international comparisons. We propose these findings as a starting point to build a comprehensive framework for epidemiological studies investigating chronic pain after surgery.

  12. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignment for the 40.5 kDa catalytic domain of Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7).

    PubMed

    Di Lello, Paola; Rougé, Lionel; Pan, Borlan; Maurer, Till

    2016-10-01

    The deubiquitinase Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7) is part of the regulatory cascade of proteins that modulates the activity of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Deubiquitination of its target Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) leads to increased proteosomal degradation of p53. Consequently, USP7 has emerged as an attractive oncology target because its inhibition stabilizes p53, thereby promoting p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Here we report the backbone resonance assignment for the 40.5 kDa catalytic domain of USP7.

  13. Do patient preferences for core outcome domains for chronic gout studies support the validity of composite response criteria?

    PubMed

    Taylor, William J; Brown, Melanie; Aati, Opetaia; Weatherall, Mark; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2013-08-01

    To determine patient-derived weights or prioritization for core outcome domains in chronic gout clinical studies. Three patient groups participated in a conjoint decision-making exercise using 1000Minds software, which asked participants to make repeated judgments regarding which of 2 hypothetical patients with gout represented the best response to treatment. Each scenario compared 2 patients on the basis of change in 2 of 5 core outcome domains at a time. Agreement of 80% of the group was required to answer each scenario. Re-voting was performed once after discussion in instances of disagreement. The relative importance accorded to each outcome domain was different across the 3 groups of patients. There was some consistency that tophi was the least or second to least important outcome domain for every group and pain between attacks was ranked in the bottom third of priority for all groups. Gout attacks were ranked as the second or third most important domain in each group. However, the relative importance of serum urate (SUA) and activity limitations was quite different among the 3 groups, with 1 group ranking SUA as the most important outcome and 1 group ranking it as the second to least important outcome. Despite some consistency in the relative value of some outcome domains for chronic gout studies, there is sufficient disagreement in the relative importance of other domains of outcome to challenge the validity of constructing a composite index of response that would be applicable to most gout patients. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-Terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Close, D.; Robinson, H.; Johnson, S. J.; Sdano, M. A.; McDonald, S. M.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2011-05-13

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  15. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    D Close; S Johnson; M Sdano; S McDonald; H Robinson; T Formosa; C Hill

    2011-12-31

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  16. Distortion of the catalytic domain of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 coincides with the formation of stable serpin-proteinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Perron, Michel J; Blouse, Grant E; Shore, Joseph D

    2003-11-28

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a typical member of the serpin family that kinetically traps its target proteinase as a covalent complex by distortion of the proteinase domain. Incorporation of the fluorescently silent 4-fluorotryptophan analog into PAI-1 permitted us to observe changes in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the proteinase domain of tPA during the inhibition reaction. We demonstrated three distinct conformational changes of the proteinase that occur during complex formation and distortion. A conformational change occurred during the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex followed by a large conformational change associated with the distortion of the proteinase catalytic domain that occurs concurrently with the formation of stable proteinase-inhibitor complexes. Following distortion, a very slow structural change occurs that may be involved in the stabilization or regulation of the trapped complex. Furthermore, by comparing the inhibition rates of two-chain tPA and the proteinase domain of tPA by PAI-1, we demonstrate that the accessory domains of tPA play a prominent role in the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex.

  17. Insights into the Mechanistic Basis of Plasmid-Mediated Colistin Resistance from Crystal Structures of the Catalytic Domain of MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Yang, Qiu E.; Portal, Edward; Young, Tom; Li, Hui; Tooke, Catherine L.; Carvalho, Maria J.; Paterson, Neil G.; Brem, Jürgen; Niumsup, Pannika R.; Tansawai, Uttapoln; Lei, Lei; Li, Mei; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Schofield, Christopher J.; Mulholland, Adrian J; Shen, Jianzhong; Fey, Natalie; Walsh, Timothy R.; Spencer, James

    2017-01-01

    The polymixin colistin is a “last line” antibiotic against extensively-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, the mcr-1 gene was identified as a plasmid-mediated resistance mechanism in human and animal Enterobacteriaceae, with a wide geographical distribution and many producer strains resistant to multiple other antibiotics. mcr-1 encodes a membrane-bound enzyme catalysing phosphoethanolamine transfer onto bacterial lipid A. Here we present crystal structures revealing the MCR-1 periplasmic, catalytic domain to be a zinc metalloprotein with an alkaline phosphatase/sulphatase fold containing three disulphide bonds. One structure captures a phosphorylated form representing the first intermediate in the transfer reaction. Mutation of residues implicated in zinc or phosphoethanolamine binding, or catalytic activity, restores colistin susceptibility of recombinant E. coli. Zinc deprivation reduces colistin MICs in MCR-1-producing laboratory, environmental, animal and human E. coli. Conversely, over-expression of the disulphide isomerase DsbA increases the colistin MIC of laboratory E. coli. Preliminary density functional theory calculations on cluster models suggest a single zinc ion may be sufficient to support phosphoethanolamine transfer. These data demonstrate the importance of zinc and disulphide bonds to MCR-1 activity, suggest that assays under zinc-limiting conditions represent a route to phenotypic identification of MCR-1 producing E. coli, and identify key features of the likely catalytic mechanism. PMID:28059088

  18. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase in complex with a non-carbohydrate-based inhibitor, 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Kang, Jung Youn; Ryu, Young Bae; Jin, Mi Sun; Park, Ki Hun; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2017-03-16

    Anti-bacterial and anti-viral neuraminidase agents inhibit neuraminidase activity catalyzing the hydrolysis of terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from glycoconjugates and help to prevent the host pathogenesis that lead to fatal infectious diseases including influenza, bacteremia, sepsis, and cholera. Emerging antibiotic and drug resistances to commonly used anti-neuraminidase agents such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) have highlighted the need to develop new anti-neuraminidase drugs. We obtained a serendipitous complex crystal of the catalytic domain of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase (CpNanICD) with 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid (CHES) as a buffer. Here, we report the crystal structure of CpNanICD in complex with CHES at 1.24 Å resolution. Amphipathic CHES binds to the catalytic site of CpNanICD similar to the substrate (Neu5Ac) binding site. The 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid moiety and cyclohexyl groups of CHES interact with the cluster of three arginine residues and with the hydrophobic pocket of the CpNanICD catalytic site. In addition, a structural comparison with other bacterial and human neuraminidases suggests that CHES could serve as a scaffold for the development of new anti-neuraminidase agents targeting CpNanI.

  19. Three dimensional model of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase ATPase catalytic domain and molecular design of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Marcin; Eitner, Krystian; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Rychlewski, Leszek; Banachowicz, Ewa; Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Szkoda, Tomasz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2006-05-01

    The modeling of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase ATPase catalytic domain was performed using the protein structure prediction Meta Server and the 3D Jury method for model selection, which resulted in the identification of 1JPR, 1UAA and 1W36 PDB structures as suitable templates for creating a full atom 3D model. This model was further utilized to design small molecules that are expected to block an ATPase catalytic pocket thus inhibit the enzymatic activity. Binding sites for various functional groups were identified in a series of molecular dynamics calculation. Their positions in the catalytic pocket were used as constraints in the Cambridge structural database search for molecules having the pharmacophores that interacted most strongly with the enzyme in a desired position. The subsequent MD simulations followed by calculations of binding energies of the designed molecules were compared to ATP identifying the most successful candidates, for likely inhibitors—molecules possessing two phosphonic acid moieties at distal ends of the molecule.

  20. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  1. Characterisation of functional domains in fission yeast Ams2 that are required for core histone gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Yuko; Shirai, Masaki; Masuda, Fumie

    2016-01-01

    Histone gene expression is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with a peak at S phase, which is crucial for cell division and genome integrity. However, the detailed mechanisms by which expression of histone genes are tightly regulated remain largely unknown. Fission yeast Ams2, a GATA-type zinc finger motif-containing factor, is required for activation of S phase-specific core histone gene transcription. Here we report the molecular characterisation of Ams2. We show that the zinc finger motif in Ams2 is necessary to bind the histone gene promoter region and to activate histone gene transcription. An N-terminal region of Ams2 acts as a self-interaction domain. Intriguingly, N-terminally truncated Ams2 binds to the histone gene promoters, but does not fully activate histone gene transcription. These observations imply that Ams2 self-interactions are required for efficient core histone gene transcription. Moreover, we show that Ams2 interacts with Teb1, which itself binds to the core histone gene promoters. We discuss the relationships between Ams2 domains and efficient transcription of the core histone genes in fission yeast. PMID:27901072

  2. An automated approach for defining core atoms and domains in an ensemble of NMR-derived protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kelley, L A; Gardner, S P; Sutcliffe, M J

    1997-06-01

    A single NMR-derived protein structure is usually deposited as an ensemble containing many structures, each consistent with the restraint set used. The number of NMR-derived structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is increasing rapidly. In addition, many of the structures deposited in an ensemble exhibit variation in only some regions of the structure, often with the majority of the structure remaining largely invariant across the family of structures. Therefore it is useful to determine the set of atoms whose positions are 'well defined' across an ensemble (also known as the 'core' atoms). We have developed a computer program, NMRCORE, which automatically defines (i) the core atoms, and (ii) the rigid body(ies), or domain(s), in which they occur. The program uses a sorted list of the variances in individual dihedral angles across the ensemble to define the core, followed by the automatic clustering of the variances in pairwise inter-atom distances across the ensemble to define the rigid body(ies) which comprise the core. The program is freely available via the World Wide Web (http://neon.chem.le.ac.uk/nmrcore/).

  3. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors.

  4. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  5. Structure of the Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Catalytic Domain in Complex With An Extended Inhibitor Targeting the Adaptive Pocket of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Hanan, E.J.; Barr, K.J.; Zhu, J.; Paulvannan, K.; Yang, W.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of the Polo-like kinase family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. The catalytic domain of this enzyme shares significant primary amino-acid homology and structural similarity with another mitotic kinase, Aurora A. While screening an Aurora A library of ATP-competitive compounds, a urea-containing inhibitor with low affinity for mouse Aurora A but with submicromolar potency for human and zebrafish Plk1 (hPlk1 and zPlk1, respectively) was identified. A crystal structure of the zebrafish Plk1 kinase domain-inhibitor complex reveals that the small molecule occupies the purine pocket and extends past the catalytic lysine into the adaptive region of the active site. Analysis of the structures of this protein-inhibitor complex and of similar small molecules cocrystallized with other kinases facilitates understanding of the specificity of the inhibitor for Plk1 and documents for the first time that Plk1 can accommodate extended ATP-competitive compounds that project toward the adaptive pocket and help the enzyme order its activation segment.

  6. Homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies of the catalytic domain of chitin deacetylase from Cryptococcus laurentii strain RY1.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Soumyadev; Gupta, Suchetana; Chakraborty, Writachit; Senapati, Sanjib; Gachhui, Ratan

    2017-03-15

    This study provides structural insights into chitin deacetylase, over-expressing under nitrogen limiting condition in Cryptococcus laurentii strain RY1. The enzyme converts chitin, the second most abundant natural biopolymer, to chitosan, which offers tremendous applications in diverse fields. To elucidate the structure-function relationship of this biologically and industrially important enzyme, a homology model of the catalytic domain was constructed. The stability of the structure was assessed by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Tryptophan 151 of the domain was identified to form hydrogen bond and stacking interaction with chitin upon docking. In Silico substitution of Tryptophan (W) to Alanine (A), Phenylalanine (F) and Aspartate (D) corroborated the importance of the Tryptophan residue in interaction with the substrate. This is the first report of unravelling the structural characteristics of chitin deacetylase from Cryptococcus and understanding the approach of the enzyme towards its substrate. Our results would be helpful to perform experimental validations and apply quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques to determine the detailed catalytic mechanism and enhance the industrial potency of the enzyme.

  7. Solution structure of the parvulin-type PPIase domain of Staphylococcus aureus PrsA – Implications for the catalytic mechanism of parvulins

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Outi; Seppala, Raili; Tossavainen, Helena; Heikkinen, Sami; Koskela, Harri; Permi, Perttu; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium causing many kinds of infections from mild respiratory tract infections to life-threatening states as sepsis. Recent emergence of S. aureus strains resistant to numerous antibiotics has created a need for new antimicrobial agents and novel drug targets. S. aureus PrsA is a membrane associated extra-cytoplasmic lipoprotein which contains a parvulin-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain. PrsA is known to act as an essential folding factor for secreted proteins in Gram-positive bacteria and thus it is a potential target for antimicrobial drugs against S. aureus. Results We have solved a high-resolution solution structure of the parvulin-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain of S. aureus PrsA (PrsA-PPIase). The results of substrate peptide titrations pinpoint the active site and demonstrate the substrate preference of the enzyme. With detailed NMR spectroscopic investigation of the orientation and tautomeric state of the active site histidines we are able to give further insight into the structure of the catalytic site. NMR relaxation analysis gives information on the dynamic behaviour of PrsA-PPIase. Conclusion Detailed structural description of the S. aureus PrsA-PPIase lays the foundation for structure-based design of enzyme inhibitors. The structure resembles hPin1-type parvulins both structurally and regarding substrate preference. Even though a wealth of structural data is available on parvulins, the catalytic mechanism has yet to be resolved. The structure of S. aureus PrsA-PPIase and our findings on the role of the conserved active site histidines help in designing further experiments to solve the detailed catalytic mechanism. PMID:19309529

  8. Regulation of Multiple Stages of Hepadnavirus Replication by the Carboxyl-Terminal Domain of Viral Core Protein in trans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kuancheng; Ludgate, Laurie; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutational analyses have indicated that the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of hepadnavirus core protein and its state of phosphorylation are critical for multiple steps in viral replication. Also, CTD interacts with host proteins in a phosphorylation state-dependent manner. To ascertain the role of CTD in viral replication without perturbing its sequence and the role of CTD-host interactions, CTD of the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) or duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core protein, either the wild type (WT) or with alanine or glutamic acid/aspartic acid substitutions at the phosphorylation sites, was expressed in cells replicating DHBV with the WT core protein. A dramatic decrease in phosphorylation of the DHBV core protein (DHBc) was observed when the WT and most HBV core protein CTD (HCTD) variants were coexpressed in trans, which was accompanied by a profound reduction of viral core DNA and, in particular, the double-stranded DNA. One HCTD variant that failed to change DHBc phosphorylation also had no effect on DHBV core DNA. All WT and variant HCTDs and DHBc CTDs (DCTDs) decreased the DHBV covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA. Identification of CTD-host interactions indicated that CDK2 binding by CTD may mediate its inhibitory effect on DHBc phosphorylation and reverse transcription via competition with DHBc for the host kinase, whereas importin α binding by CTD may contribute to inhibition of CCC DNA production by competitively blocking the nuclear import of viral nucleocapsids. These results suggest the possibility of blocking multiple steps of viral replication, especially CCC DNA formation, via inhibition of CTD functions. IMPORTANCE Mutational analyses have suggested that the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of hepadnavirus core protein is critical for viral replication. However, results from mutational analyses are open to alternative interpretations. Also, how CTD affects virus replication remains unclear. In this study, we took an alternative

  9. One-step synthesis of metal@titania core-shell materials for visible-light photocatalysis and catalytic reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhigang; Zhang, Luhong; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2014-11-03

    Metal@TiO2 composites with a core-shell structure possess multifunctional properties. The demonstrated protocols for synthesizing such materials involve multiple steps, requiring precise control over the particle uniformity of the core and shell thickness, as well as complex surface modification. A simple approach to synthesizing metal@TiO2 hybrid nanostructures remains a great challenge. Herein, we report on a one-step method for the preparation of metal@TiO2 core-shell nanospheres, which exhibited excellent performance in photocatalytic degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants under visible light irradiation, and in catalytic reduction of nitrophenol in water. The simple method described here represents a sustainable approach to preparing core-shell materials at low cost, involving fewer chemicals, and requiring less energy, which will make a significant contribution toward large-scale synthesis of high-performance hybrid materials for photocatalytic applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Novel stand-alone RAM domain protein-mediated catalytic control of anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase in tryptophan biosynthesis in Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Matsushita, Hajime; Tomita, Takeo; Kosono, Saori; Yoshida, Minoru; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of amino acid metabolism (RAM) domains are widely distributed among prokaryotes. In most cases, a RAM domain fuses with a DNA-binding domain to act as a transcriptional regulator. The extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus, only carries a single gene encoding a RAM domain-containing protein on its genome. This protein is a stand-alone RAM domain protein (SraA) lacking a DNA-binding domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that SraA, which senses amino acids through its RAM domain, may interact with other proteins to modify its functions. In the present study, we identified anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (AnPRT), the second enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway, as a partner protein that interacted with SraA in T. thermophilus. In the presence of tryptophan, SraA was assembled to a decamer and exhibited the ability to form a stable hetero-complex with AnPRT. An enzyme assay revealed that AnPRT was only inhibited by tryptophan in the presence of SraA. This result suggests a novel feedback control mechanism for tryptophan biosynthesis through an inter-RAM domain interaction in bacteria.

  11. Structures of the compact helical core domains of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins.

    PubMed

    Leen, Eoin N; Kwok, K Y Rex; Birtley, James R; Simpson, Peter J; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; Prater, Sean N; Tong, Michael; Young, Joanna C; Chung, Liliane M W; Marchant, Jan; Roberts, Lisa O; Kao, C Cheng; Matthews, Stephen; Goodfellow, Ian G; Curry, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    We report the solution structures of the VPg proteins from feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV), which have been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In both cases, the core of the protein adopts a compact helical structure flanked by flexible N and C termini. Remarkably, while the core of FCV VPg contains a well-defined three-helix bundle, the MNV VPg core has just the first two of these secondary structure elements. In both cases, the VPg cores are stabilized by networks of hydrophobic and salt bridge interactions. The Tyr residue in VPg that is nucleotidylated by the viral NS7 polymerase (Y24 in FCV, Y26 in MNV) occurs in a conserved position within the first helix of the core. Intriguingly, given its structure, VPg would appear to be unable to bind to the viral polymerase so as to place this Tyr in the active site without a major conformation change to VPg or the polymerase. However, mutations that destabilized the VPg core either had no effect on or reduced both the ability of the protein to be nucleotidylated and virus infectivity and did not reveal a clear structure-activity relationship. The precise role of the calicivirus VPg core in virus replication remains to be determined, but knowledge of its structure will facilitate future investigations.

  12. A domain-specific validation of the core self-evaluations scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K; Nicols, Kay M

    2011-10-01

    Core self-evaluations have been recently proposed as indicating positive self-concept and as being predictive of various forms of subjective wellbeing. In an effort to further validate the Core Self-Evaluations Scale (CSES), structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in three independent samples of university students to examine the extent to which scores on the Core Self-Evaluations Scale predicted two measures of university satisfaction. Good fit was found for models that also controlled for status in college, student major, class satisfaction, life satisfaction, college grade point average, and overall grade fairness. Statistically significant relationships corrected for attenuation by SEM between scores on the Core Self-Evaluations Scale and university satisfaction range from .24 to .37.

  13. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1WD40). To understand how Apc1WD40 contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1WD40 deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1WD40 abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C–Cdh1 complex with Apc1WD40 deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1WD40 is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C. PMID:27601667

  14. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C.-Y.; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  16. Feasibility and Domain Validation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Core Domain Set: Report of the OMERACT 2014 RA Flare Group Plenary.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Susan J; Bykerk, Vivian P; Cooksey, Roxanne; Choy, Ernest H; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Guillemin, Francis; Halls, Serena; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Orbai, Ana Maria; Pohl, Christoph; Voshaar, Marieke Scholte; Woodworth, Thasia G; Bingham, Clifton O

    2015-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group was established to develop an approach to identify and measure RA flares. An overview of our OMERACT 2014 plenary is provided. Feasibility and validity of flare domains endorsed at OMERACT 11 (2012) were described based on initial data from 3 international studies collected using a common set of questions specific to RA flare. Mean flare frequency, severity, and duration data were presented, and domain scores were compared by flare status to examine known-groups validity. Breakout groups provided input for stiffness, self-management, contextual factors, and measurement considerations. Flare data from 501 patients in an observational study indicated 39% were in flare, with mean (SD) severity of 6.0 (2.6) and 55% lasting > 14 days. Pain, physical function, fatigue, participation, and stiffness scores averaged ≥ 2 times higher (2 of 11 points) in flaring individuals. Correlations between flare domains and corresponding legacy instruments were obtained: r = 0.46 to 0.93. A combined definition (patient report of flare and 28-joint Disease Activity Score increase) was evaluated in 2 other trials, with similar results. Breakout groups debated specific measurement issues. These data contribute initial evidence of feasibility and content validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set. Our research agenda for OMERACT 2016 includes establishing duration/intensity criteria and developing criteria to identify RA flares using existing disease activity measures. Ongoing work will also address discordance between patient and physician ratings, facilitate application of flare criteria to clinical care, elucidate the role of self-management, and finalize recommendations for RA flare measurement.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-05

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  19. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  20. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase. PMID:28253342

  1. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  2. A 3′-5′ exonuclease activity embedded in the helicase core domain of Candida albicans Pif1 helicase

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Bo; Bazeille, Nicolas; Yu, Ying; Liu, Na-Nv; René, Brigitte; Mauffret, Olivier; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-01-01

    3′-5′ exonucleases are frequently found to be associated to polymerases or helicases domains in the same enzyme or could function as autonomous entities. Here we uncovered that Candida albicans Pif1 (CaPif1) displays a 3′-5′ exonuclease activity besides its main helicase activity. These two latter activities appear to reside on the same polypeptide and the new exonuclease activity could be mapped to the helicase core domain. We clearly show that CaPif1 displays exclusively exonuclease activity and unambiguously establish the directionality of the exonuclease activity as the 3′-to-5′ polarity. The enzyme appears to follow the two-metal-ion driven hydrolyzing activity exhibited by most of the nucleases, as shown by its dependence of magnesium and also by the identification of aspartic residues. Interestingly, an excellent correlation could be found between the presence of the conserved residues and the exonuclease activity when testing activities on Pif1 enzymes from eight fungal organisms. In contrast to others proteins endowed with the double helicase/exonuclease functionality, CaPif1 differs in the fact that the two activities are embedded in the same helicase domain and not located on separated domains. Our findings may suggest a biochemical basis for mechanistic studies of Pif1 family helicases. PMID:28216645

  3. Factor Analysis of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire: Identifying Core Domains.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Furst, Jacob; Cid, Marjoe; Farietta, Jillianna; Kot, Bobby; Bloomer, Craig; Nicholson, Laura; Williams, Yolonda; Jantke, Rachel; Newton, Julia L; Strand, Elin Bolle

    2015-09-01

    The present study attempted to identify critical symptom domains of individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Using patient and control samples collected in the United States, Great Britain, and Norway, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to establish the underlying factor structure of ME and CFS symptoms. The EFA suggested a four-factor solution: post-exertional malaise, cognitive dysfunction, sleep difficulties, and a combined factor consisting of neuroendocrine, autonomic, and immune dysfunction symptoms. The use of empirical methods could help better understand the fundamental symptom domains of this illness.

  4. Factor Analysis of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire: Identifying Core Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Furst, Jacob; Cid, Marjoe; Farietta, Jillianna; Kot, Bobby; Bloomer, Craig; Nicholson, Laura; Williams, Yolonda; Jantke, Rachel; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle

    2015-01-01

    The present study attempted to identify critical symptom domains of individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Using patient and control samples collected in the United States, Great Britain, and Norway, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to establish the underlying factor structure of ME and CFS symptoms. The EFA suggested a four-factor solution: post-exertional malaise, cognitive dysfunction, sleep difficulties, and a combined factor consisting of neuroendocrine, autonomic, and immune dysfunction symptoms. The use of empirical methods could help better understand the fundamental symptom domains of this illness. PMID:27088131

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of the optical absorption and catalytic efficiency of BiVO₄ photoanodes decorated with Ag@SiO₂ core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Fatwa F; Dabirian, Ali; Dam, Bernard; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-08-07

    Recent progress in the development of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanodes has firmly established it as a promising material for solar water splitting applications. Performance limitations due to intrinsically poor catalytic activity and slow electron transport have been successfully addressed through the application of water oxidation co-catalysts and novel doping strategies. The next bottleneck to tackle is the modest optical absorption in BiVO4, particularly close to its absorption edge of 2.4 eV. Here, we explore the modification of the BiVO4 surface with Ag@SiO2 core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles. A photocurrent enhancement by a factor of ~2.5 is found under 1 sun illumination (AM1.5). We show that this enhancement consists of two contributions: optical absorption and catalysis. The optical absorption enhancement is induced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances in the Ag nanoparticles, and agrees well with our full-field electromagnetic simulations. Far-field effects (scattering) are found to be dominant, with a smaller contribution from near-field plasmonic enhancement. In addition, a significant catalytic enhancement is observed, which is tentatively attributed to the electrocatalytic activity of the Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles.

  6. Unraveling the molecular structure of the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in complex with a triple-helical peptide by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas; Valdés, Haydeé

    2013-11-26

    Herein, we present the results of a computational study that employed various simulation methodologies to build and validate a series of molecular models of a synthetic triple-helical peptide (fTHP-5) both in its native state and in a prereactive complex with the catalytic domain of the MMP-2 enzyme. First, the structure and dynamical properties of the fTHP-5 substrate are investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Then, the propensity of each of the three peptide chains in fTHP-5 to be distorted around the scissile peptide bond is assessed by carrying out potential of mean force calculations. Subsequently, the distorted geometries of fTHP-5 are docked within the MMP-2 active site following a semirigid protocol, and the most stable docked structures are fully relaxed and characterized by extensive MD simulations in explicit solvent. Following a similar approach, we also investigate a hypothetical ternary complex formed between two MMP-2 catalytic units and a single fTHP-5 molecule. Overall, our models for the MMP-2/fTHP-5 complexes unveil the extent to which the triple helix is distorted to allow the accommodation of an individual peptide chain within the MMP active site.

  7. Green synthesis of core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals dispersed on graphene with enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; Li, Shan-Shan; Ma, Xiaohong; Chen, Fang-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Well-defined core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals (AuPd@Pd) are facilely prepared by a simple and green wet-chemical method at 25 °C. A Good's buffer, 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), is used as a reducing agent and a shape-directing agent, while there is no template, seed, organic solvent, or surfactant involved. The AuPd@Pd nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on graphene nanosheets by ultrasonication, resulting in the formation of graphene supported AuPd@Pd (G-AuPd@Pd). The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit the improved catalytic activity, good tolerance, and better stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline media, compared with the G-Pd and commercial Pd black catalysts. The as-developed method may provide a promising pathway for large-scale fabrication of AuPd-based catalysts.

  8. Critical Role of a Loop at C-Terminal Domain on the Conformational Stability and Catalytic Efficiency of Chondroitinase ABC I.

    PubMed

    Akram Shirdel, S; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Golestani, Abolfazl; Ranjbar, Bijan; Khajeh, Khosro

    2015-08-01

    We used a combination of protein engineering and spectroscopic methods to investigate the effect of a long length loop on the conformational stability and activity of chondroitinase ABC I. This study involves manipulation of interactions around Asp(689) as a key residue in the central region of the loop containing residues 681-695 located at C-terminal domain of the enzyme. According to the equilibrium unfolding experiments and considering thermodynamic m value and ΔG(H2O), we found that the folded state of H700N, L701T, and H700N/L701T are more compact relative to the folded state of wild-type protein and they become stabilized upon mutation. However, the compactness and stability of other variants are less than those of wild-type protein. According to enzyme activity measurements, we found that the catalytic efficiency of structurally stabilized variants is decreased, while that of destabilized mutants is improved.

  9. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  10. Human cap methyltransferase (RNMT) N-terminal non-catalytic domain mediates recruitment to transcription initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is dependent on the mRNA methyl cap which mediates mRNA processing and translation initiation. Synthesis of the methyl cap initiates with the addition of 7-methylguanosine to the initiating nucleotide of RNA pol II (polymerase II) transcripts, which occurs predominantly during transcription and in mammals is catalysed by RNGTT (RNA guanylyltransferase and 5′ phosphatase) and RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase). RNMT has a methyltransferase domain and an N-terminal domain whose function is unclear; it is conserved in mammals, but not required for cap methyltransferase activity. In the present study we report that the N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for RNMT recruitment to transcription initiation sites and that recruitment occurs in a DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole)-dependent manner. The RNMT-activating subunit, RAM (RNMT-activating miniprotein), is also recruited to transcription initiation sites via an interaction with RNMT. The RNMT N-terminal domain is required for transcript expression, translation and cell proliferation. PMID:23863084

  11. Structure of the catalytic, inorganic core of oxygen-evolving photosystem II at 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Keisuke; Umena, Yasufumi; Kamiya, Nobuo; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic center for photosynthetic water-splitting consists of 4 Mn atoms and 1 Ca atom and is located near the lumenal surface of photosystem II. So far the structure of the Mn(4)Ca-cluster has been studied by a variety of techniques including X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction, and various structural models have been proposed. However, its exact structure is still unknown due to the limited resolution of crystal structures of PSII achieved so far, as well as possible radiation damages that might have occurred. Very recently, we have succeeded in solving the structure of photosystem II at 1.9 Å, which yielded a detailed picture of the Mn(4)CaO(5)-cluster for the first time. In the high resolution structure, the Mn(4)CaO(5)-cluster is arranged in a distorted chair form, with a cubane-like structure formed by 3 Mn and 1 Ca, 4 oxygen atoms as the distorted base of the chair, and 1 Mn and 1 oxygen atom outside of the cubane as the back of the chair. In addition, four water molecules were associated with the cluster, among which, two are associated with the terminal Mn atom and two are associated with the Ca atom. Some of these water molecules may therefore serve as the substrates for water-splitting. The high resolution structure of the catalytic center provided a solid basis for elucidation of the mechanism of photosynthetic water splitting. We review here the structural features of the Mn(4)CaO(5)-cluster analyzed at 1.9 Å resolution, and compare them with the structures reported previously.

  12. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PigE: a transaminase involved in the biosynthesis of 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole (MAP) from Serratia sp. FS14.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiangdi; Ran, Tingting; Han, Ning; Gao, Yanyan; He, Jianhua; Tang, Lin; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2014-04-25

    Prodigiosin, a tripyrrole red pigment synthesized by Serratia and some other microbes through a bifurcated biosynthesis pathway, MBC (4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carbaldehyde) and MAP (2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole) are synthesized separately and then condensed by PigC to form prodigiosin. MAP is synthesized sequentially by PigD, PigE and PigB. PigE catalyzes the transamination of an amino group to the aldehyde group of 3-acetyloctanal, resulting in an aminoketone, which spontaneously cyclizes to form H2MAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PigE which involved in the biosynthesis of prodigiosin precursor MAP for the first time to a resolution of 2.3Å with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The monomer of PigE catalytic domain is composed of three domains with PLP as cofactor: a small N-terminal domain connecting the catalytic domain with the front part of PigE, a large PLP-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. The residues from both monomers build the PLP binding site at the interface of the dimer which resembles the other PLP-dependent enzymes. Structural comparison of PigE with Thermus thermophilus AcOAT showed a higher hydrophobic and smaller active site of PigE, these differences may be the reason for substrate specificity.

  13. N-Terminal Domain of Nuclear IL-1α Shows Structural Similarity to the C-Terminal Domain of Snf1 and Binds to the HAT/Core Module of the SAGA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zamostna, Blanka; Novak, Josef; Vopalensky, Vaclav; Masek, Tomas; Burysek, Ladislav; Pospisek, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-1α (IL-1α) is a proinflammatory cytokine and a key player in host immune responses in higher eukaryotes. IL-1α has pleiotropic effects on a wide range of cell types, and it has been extensively studied for its ability to contribute to various autoimmune and inflammation-linked disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, systemic sclerosis and cardiovascular disorders. Interestingly, a significant proportion of IL-1α is translocated to the cell nucleus, in which it interacts with histone acetyltransferase complexes. Despite the importance of IL-1α, little is known regarding its binding targets and functions in the nucleus. We took advantage of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes being evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans and the yeast SAGA complex serving as an epitome of the eukaryotic HAT complexes. Using gene knock-out technique and co-immunoprecipitation of the IL-1α precursor with TAP-tagged subunits of the yeast HAT complexes, we mapped the IL-1α-binding site to the HAT/Core module of the SAGA complex. We also predicted the 3-D structure of the IL-1α N-terminal domain, and by employing structure similarity searches, we found a similar structure in the C-terminal regulatory region of the catalytic subunit of the AMP-activated/Snf1 protein kinases, which interact with HAT complexes both in mammals and yeast, respectively. This finding is further supported with the ability of the IL-1α precursor to partially rescue growth defects of snf1Δ yeast strains on media containing 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT), a competitive inhibitor of His3. Finally, the careful evaluation of our data together with other published data in the field allows us to hypothesize a new function for the ADA complex in SAGA complex assembly. PMID:22879895

  14. High-resolution structure of an α-spectrin SH3-domain mutant with a redesigned hydrophobic core

    PubMed Central

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Andújar-Sánchez, Monserrat; Ortiz-Salmerón, Emilia; Cuadri, Celia; Cobos, Eva S.; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The α-spectrin SH3 domain (Spc-SH3) is a small modular domain which has been broadly used as a model protein in folding studies and these studies have sometimes been supported by structural information obtained from the coordinates of Spc-SH3 mutants. The structure of B5/D48G, a multiple mutant designed to improve the hydrophobic core and as a consequence the protein stability, has been solved at 1 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 24.79, b = 37.23, c = 62.95 Å. This mutant also bears a D48G substitution in the distal loop and this mutation has also been reported to increase the stability of the protein by itself. The structure of the B5/D48G mutant shows a highly packed hydrophobic core and a more ordered distal loop compared with previous Spc-SH3 structures. PMID:20823517

  15. Patient Simulation to Demonstrate Students’ Competency in Core Domain Abilities Prior to Beginning Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bhutada, Nilesh S.; Feng, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To implement a simulation-based introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) and determine its effectiveness in assessing pharmacy students’ core domain abilities prior to beginning advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Design. A 60-hour IPPE that used simulation-based techniques to provide clinical experiences was implemented. Twenty-eight students were enrolled in this simulation IPPE, while 60 were enrolled in hospital and specialty IPPEs within the region. Assessment. The IPPE assessed 10 out of 11 of the pre-APPE core domain abilities, and on the practical examination, 67% of students passed compared to 52% of students in the control group. Students performed better on all 6 knowledge quizzes after completing the simulation IPPE. Based on scores on the Perception of Preparedness to Perform (PREP) survey, students felt more prepared regarding “technical” aspects after completing the simulation experience (p<0.001). Ninety-six percent of the respondents agreed with the statement “I am more aware of medication errors after this IPPE.” Conclusion. Simulation is an effective method for assessing the pre-APPE abilities of pharmacy students, preparing them for real clinical encounters, and for making them more aware of medication errors and other patient safety issues. PMID:23193340

  16. Development of a Draft Core Set of Domains for Measuring Shared Decision Making in Osteoarthritis: An OMERACT Working Group on Shared Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Toupin-April, Karine; Barton, Jennifer; Fraenkel, Liana; Li, Linda; Grandpierre, Viviane; Guillemin, Francis; Rader, Tamara; Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Jull, Janet; Petkovic, Jennifer; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Welch, Vivian; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Cathie; De Wit, Maarten; March, Lyn; Meade, Tanya; Christensen, Robin; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Boonen, Annelies; Pohl, Christoph; Martin, Richard; Tugwell, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of shared decision making for delivering patient-centered care in rheumatology, there is no consensus on how to measure its process and outcomes. The aim of this Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) working group is to determine the core set of domains for measuring shared decision making in intervention studies in adults with osteoarthritis (OA), from the perspectives of patients, health professionals, and researchers. We followed the OMERACT Filter 2.0 method to develop a draft core domain set by (1) forming an OMERACT working group; (2) conducting a review of domains of shared decision making; and (3) obtaining opinions of all those involved using a modified nominal group process held at a session activity at the OMERACT 12 meeting. In all, 26 people from Europe, North America, and Australia, including 5 patient research partners, participated in the session activity. Participants identified the following domains for measuring shared decision making to be included as part of the draft core set: (1) identifying the decision, (2) exchanging information, (3) clarifying views, (4) deliberating, (5) making the decision, (6) putting the decision into practice, and (7) assessing the effect of the decision. Contextual factors were also suggested. We proposed a draft core set of shared decision-making domains for OA intervention research studies. Next steps include a workshop at OMERACT 13 to reach consensus on these proposed domains in the wider OMERACT group, as well as to detail subdomains and assess instruments to develop a core outcome measurement set.

  17. Comparison of diagnostic classification systems for delirium with new research criteria that incorporate the three core domains.

    PubMed

    Trzepacz, Paula T; Meagher, David J; Franco, José G

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic classification systems do not incorporate phenomenological research findings about the three core symptom domains of delirium (Attentional/Cognitive, Circadian, Higher Level Thinking). We evaluated classification performances of novel Trzepacz, Meagher, and Franco research diagnostic criteria (TMF) that incorporate those domains and ICD-10, DSM-III-R, DSM-IV, and DSM-5. Primary data analysis of 641 patients with mixed neuropsychiatric profiles. Delirium (n=429) and nondelirium (n=212) reference standard groups were identified using cluster analysis of symptoms assessed using the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), and likelihood ratios (LR+, LR-) are reported. TMF criteria had high sensitivity and specificity (87.4% and 89.2%), more balanced than DSM-III-R (100% and 31.6%), DSM-IV (97.7% and 74.1%), DSM-5 (97.7% and 72.6%), and ICD-10 (66.2% and 100%). PPV of DSM-III-R, DSM-IV, and DSM-5 were <90.0%, while PPV for ICD-10 and TMF were >90%. ICD-10 had the lowest NPV (59.4%). TMF had the highest LR+ (8.06) and DSM-III-R the lowest LR- (0.0). Overall, values for DSM-IV and DSM-5 were similar, whereas for ICD-10 and DSM-III-R were inverse of each other. In the pre-existing cognitive impairment/dementia subsample (n=128), TMF retained its highest LR+ though specificity (58.3%) became less well balanced with sensitivity (87.9%), which still exceeded that of DSM. TMF research diagnostic criteria performed well, with more balanced sensitivity and specificity and the highest likelihood ratio for delirium identification. Reflecting the three core domains of delirium, TMF criteria may have advantages in biological research where delineation of this syndrome is important. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  19. Expression divergence of the AGL6 MADS domain transcription factor lineage after a core eudicot duplication suggests functional diversification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of their known role as transcriptional regulators of key plant developmental processes, the diversification of MADS-box gene function is thought to be a major driving force in the developmental evolution of plants. Yet the function of some MADS-box gene subfamilies has remained elusive thus far. One such lineage, AGL6, has now been functionally characterized in three angiosperm species, but a phylogenetic framework for comparison of AGL6 gene function is currently missing. Results Based on phylogenetic analyses of newly isolated and EST-based sequences, we describe the duplication history of the AGL6 subfamily in angiosperms. Our analyses provide support for four ancient duplications in the evolution of the AGL6 lineage: one at the base of core eudicots resulting in euAGL6 and AGL6-like gene clades, one during basal angiosperm diversification and two in monocot evolution. To investigate whether the spatial domains in which AGL6 genes function have diverged after duplication, we use quantitative Real Time PCR. We show that the core eudicot AGL6-like clade acquired expression in vegetative tissues, while its paralog euAGL6 remains predominantly confined to reproductive tissues. Conclusions These and previous data lead us to propose that the AGL6 lineage in core eudicots, in addition to functions related to the expression in reproductive structures, may have acquired a function in developmental transitions of vegetative shoots. PMID:20633275

  20. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  1. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  2. Purification and crystallization of the catalytic PRONE domain of RopGEF8 and its complex with Rop4 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christoph; Weyand, Michael; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2006-06-01

    Crystals of the catalytic PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 and its complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 from A. thaliana were obtained that diffract to 2.2 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. The PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 (PRONE8) was purified and crystallized free and in complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. PRONE8 crystals were obtained using NaCl as precipitating agent and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22. Native and anomalous data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation at 100 K to 2.2 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. Crystals of the Rop4–PRONE8 complex belonging to space group P6{sub 3} were obtained using Tacsimate and PEG 3350 as precipitating agents and diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution.

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 β-Fructosidase: Evidence for an Open Funnel-Like Channel Through the Catalytic Domain with Importance for the Substrate Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Llerenas, Edgar Omar; Pérez, David Javier; Gómez-Sandoval, Zeferino; Escalante-Minakata, Pilar; Ibarra-Junquera, Vrani; Razo-Hernández, Rodrigo Said; Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Spano, Giuseppe; Fiocco, Daniela; Osuna-Castro, Juan Alberto; Moreno, Abel

    2016-11-01

    β-Fructosidase, a glycoside hydrolase of a biotechnologically important strain, was studied for its biochemical, physicochemical, and three-dimensional structure characteristics. This enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal His-tagged protein (SacB). β-Fructosidase catalyzes the cleavage of glycoside bonds toward certain carbohydrates with β-fructofuranosyl linkages; however, SacB exhibited selectivity toward sucrose and an optimum activity at pH 6.0-6.5 and 37 °C. In such optimum enzymatic activity conditions, the SacB was commonly observed as a monodisperse protein by dynamic light scattering (DLS). As β-fructosidase belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 32 (GH32), a β-sandwich and a five-bladed β-propeller domain are typical predicted folds in its structure. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations revealed for the first time a funnel-like channel perfectly exposed in the β-propeller domain of the Lactobacillus plantarum β-fructosidase (this allows the interaction between its entire catalytic triad and substrates that are larger than sucrose). In contrast, SacB showed a closed central tunnel collaterally induced by its His-tag.

  4. RNA structure analysis of human spliceosomes reveals a compact 3D arrangement of snRNAs at the catalytic core

    PubMed Central

    Anokhina, Maria; Bessonov, Sergey; Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric; Hartmuth, Klaus; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Although U snRNAs play essential roles in splicing, little is known about the 3D arrangement of U2, U6, and U5 snRNAs and the pre-mRNA in active spliceosomes. To elucidate their relative spatial organization and dynamic rearrangement, we examined the RNA structure of affinity-purified, human spliceosomes before and after catalytic step 1 by chemical RNA structure probing. We found a stable 3-way junction of the U2/U6 snRNA duplex in active spliceosomes that persists minimally through step 1. Moreover, the formation of alternating, mutually exclusive, U2 snRNA conformations, as observed in yeast, was not detected in different assembly stages of human spliceosomal complexes (that is, B, Bact, or C complexes). Psoralen crosslinking revealed an interaction during/after step 1 between internal loop 1 of the U5 snRNA, and intron nucleotides immediately downstream of the branchpoint. Using the experimentally derived structural constraints, we generated a model of the RNA network of the step 1 spliceosome, based on the crystal structure of a group II intron through homology modelling. The model is topologically consistent with current genetic, biochemical, and structural data. PMID:24002212

  5. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

    PubMed

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  6. Substructure of skeletal myosin subfragment 1. Preferential destabilization of a domain by methanol and its effect on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Burke, M; Sivaramakrishnan, M

    1986-09-15

    Evidence is presented that in increasing concentrations of methanol the structure of the subfragment 1 is perturbed in such a way that the Mr = 50,000 central portion of the associated heavy chain is preferentially unfolded. This unfolding is accompanied by the loss in ATPase function where the rate of inactivation can be correlated with the loss in the amount of the Mr = 50,000 fragment generated under standard tryptic digestion conditions. The residual protein appears to be a soluble aggregate of a complex of the Mr = 27,000, 21,000, and light chain with no intact Mr = 50,000 fragment. Tryptic digestions in the presence of MgATP are restricted to the usual linker regions and the Mr = 50,000 fragment is completely protected from attack. Binding of actin to subfragment 1 also results in the protection of the Mr = 50,000 segment and of the Mr = 50,000/21,000 junction from tryptic attack. The data suggest that, in terms of methanolic perturbation, the subfragment 1 appears to be comprised of two domains with differential stability. One domain appears to be the central Mr = 50,000 segment of the heavy chain which is preferentially unfolded by methanol and requires the presence of MgATP or of actin for stabilization. The other domain is more stable and appears to consist of the interacting Mr = 27,000, 21,000, and light chain. The results also suggest that the integrity of the Mr = 50,000 segment is essential for the ATPase function of the protein.

  7. Expression and purification of a soluble ESX-binding core domain of SUR2.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    For HER2 overexpression, the ESX transcription factor must interact with both the HER2 promoter and Sur2, a subunit of human mediator complex, using its Ets domain and transactivation domain, respectively. HER2 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis in various types of cancers. Thus, interfering with the ESX-Sur2 interaction has been suggested as a novel strategy for the treatment of HER2 positive cancers. To design small molecule inhibitors against the ESX-Sur2 interaction, it is necessary to identify the structure of the interface of ESX-Sur2 binding. Therefore, in this study, we determined the optimal conditions for the overexpression and purification of a new version of Sur2, Sur2391-582, which was able to bind to ESX. To stabilize (His)6-Sur2391-582, various different buffered conditions over a wide range of pH and ionic strengths were examined. The molecular mass of (His)6-Sur2391-582 was determined using mass spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The purified (His)6-Sur2391-582 protein displayed the same biological properties as that of the Sur2 full-length protein.

  8. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of an HD-Domain Phosphohydrolase: The 5;#8242;-Deoxyribonucleotidase YfbR from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Proudfoot, Michael; Yakunin, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2011-08-16

    HD-domain phosphohydrolases have nucleotidase and phosphodiesterase activities and play important roles in the metabolism of nucleotides and in signaling. We present three 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structures (one in the free state and two complexed with natural substrates) of an HD-domain phosphohydrolase, the Escherichia coli 5'-nucleotidase YfbR. The free-state structure of YfbR contains a large cavity accommodating the metal-coordinating HD motif (H33, H68, D69, and D137) and other conserved residues (R18, E72, and D77). Alanine scanning mutagenesis confirms that these residues are important for activity. Two structures of the catalytically inactive mutant E72A complexed with Co{sup 2+} and either thymidine-5'-monophosphate or 2'-deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate disclose the novel binding mode of deoxyribonucleotides in the active site. Residue R18 stabilizes the phosphate on the Co{sup 2+}, and residue D77 forms a strong hydrogen bond critical for binding the ribose. The indole side chain of W19 is located close to the 2'-carbon atom of the deoxyribose moiety and is proposed to act as the selectivity switch for deoxyribonucleotide, which is supported by comparison to YfdR, another 5'-nucleotidase in E. coli. The nucleotide bases of both deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate and thymidine-5'-monophosphate make no specific hydrogen bonds with the protein, explaining the lack of nucleotide base selectivity. The YfbR E72A substrate complex structures also suggest a plausible single-step nucleophilic substitution mechanism. This is the first proposed molecular mechanism for an HD-domain phosphohydrolase based directly on substrate-bound crystal structures.

  9. The catalytic domains of Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and related large clostridial glucosylating toxins specifically recognize the negatively charged phospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Hoos, Sylviane; Haustant, Georges Michel; Chenal, Alexandre; England, Patrick; Blondel, Arnaud; Pauillac, Serge; Lacy, D Borden; Popoff, Michel Robert

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a potent virulence factor belonging to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin family. TcsL enters target cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal catalytic domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol upon an autoproteolytic process. TcsL-cat inactivates small GTPases including Rac and Ras by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as cofactor leading to drastic changes in cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to lipid membrane. We here report binding affinity measurements of TcsL-cat for brain PS-containing membranes by surface plasmon resonance and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, TcsL-cat bound to phosphatidic acid (PA) and, to a lesser extent, to other anionic lipids, but not to neutral lipids, sphingolipids or sterol. We further show that the lipid unsaturation status influenced TcsL-cat binding to phospholipids, PS with unsaturated acyl chains and PA with saturated acyl chains being the preferred bindingsubstrates. Phospholipid binding site is localized at the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1-93 domain). However, TcsL-1-93 bound to a broad range of substrates, whereas TcsL-cat, which is the active domain physiologically delivered into the cytosol, selectively bound to PS and PA. Similar findings were observed with the other large clostridial glucosylating toxins from C. difficile, C. novyi and C. perfringens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Communication between catalytic and regulatory subunits in Ni(II)- and Co(II)-aspartate transcarbamoylase. Ligand-promoted structural alterations at the intersubunit bonding domains.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R S; Schachman, H K

    1983-03-25

    The cooperativity with respect to substrates exhibited by allosteric enzymes as well as their inhibition and activation by effectors is mediated through the propagation of conformational changes from the site of ligand binding on one polypeptide chain to other, unliganded chains. This "communication" between subunits in the enzyme is achieved in part by changes at the intersubunit bonding domains as the oligomeric enzymes are converted from the low affinity state to a conformation of high affinity. Structural alterations at the bonding domains between the catalytic and regulatory subunits of aspartate transcarbamoylase from Escherichia coli were detected in derivatives containing either nickel or cobalt in place of the endogenous zinc ion bound to each of the six regulatory chains. These metal-substituted derivatives exhibited physical-chemical and allosteric properties identical to those of the native enzyme. Spectral analyses indicated that both nickel and cobalt are bound to the enzyme in a distorted tetrahedral environment. With the nickel ions serving as spectral probes for structural alterations at the intersubunit bonding domains, it was observed that the substrate, carbamoyl phosphate, and the bisubstrate ligand, N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate caused different changes. The substrate analog, succinate, alone had no effect. However, the combination of both carbamoyl phosphate and succinate produced the same spectral change as that caused by the bisubstrate analog. Circular dichroism measurements on the nickel derivative showed that the perturbation at 360 nm was directly proportional to the extent of occupancy of the six active sites by the bisubstrate ligand. In contrast, the changes at 406 and 460 nm coincided with the gross conformational change measured by the decrease in the sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme. These latter changes in the circular dichroism and the alterations in the absorption spectrum were complete even though about one-third of

  11. Modularized functions of the Fanconi anemia core complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaling; Leung, Justin W C; Lowery, Megan; Matsushita, Nobuko; Wang, Yucai; Shen, Xi; Huong, Do; Takata, Minoru; Chen, Junjie; Li, Lei

    2014-06-26

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex provides the essential E3 ligase function for spatially defined FANCD2 ubiquitination and FA pathway activation. Of the seven FA gene products forming the core complex, FANCL possesses a RING domain with demonstrated E3 ligase activity. The other six components do not have clearly defined roles. Through epistasis analyses, we identify three functional modules in the FA core complex: a catalytic module consisting of FANCL, FANCB, and FAAP100 is absolutely required for the E3 ligase function, and the FANCA-FANCG-FAAP20 and the FANCC-FANCE-FANCF modules provide nonredundant and ancillary functions that help the catalytic module bind chromatin or sites of DNA damage. Disruption of the catalytic module causes complete loss of the core complex function, whereas loss of any ancillary module component does not. Our work reveals the roles of several FA gene products with previously undefined functions and a modularized assembly of the FA core complex.

  12. Parasite-specific inserts in the bifunctional S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase of Plasmodium falciparum modulate catalytic activities and domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Wrenger, Carsten; Joubert, Fourie; Wells, Gordon A; Walter, Rolf D; Louw, Abraham I

    2004-01-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is regulated by a single, hinge-linked bifunctional PfAdoMetDC/ODC [ P. falciparum AdoMetDC (S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase)/ODC (ornithine decarboxylase)] with a molecular mass of 330 kDa. The bifunctional nature of AdoMetDC/ODC is unique to Plasmodia and is shared by at least three species. The PfAdoMetDC/ODC contains four parasite-specific regions ranging in size from 39 to 274 residues. The significance of the parasite-specific inserts for activity and protein-protein interactions of the bifunctional protein was investigated by a single- and multiple-deletion strategy. Deletion of these inserts in the bifunctional protein diminished the corresponding enzyme activity and in some instances also decreased the activity of the neighbouring, non-mutated domain. Intermolecular interactions between AdoMetDC and ODC appear to be vital for optimal ODC activity. Similar results have been reported for the bifunctional P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase [Yuvaniyama, Chitnumsub, Kamchonwongpaisan, Vanichtanankul, Sirawaraporn, Taylor, Walkinshaw and Yuthavong (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 357-365]. Co-incubation of the monofunctional, heterotetrameric approximately 150 kDa AdoMetDC domain with the monofunctional, homodimeric ODC domain (approximately 180 kDa) produced an active hybrid complex of 330 kDa. The hinge region is required for bifunctional complex formation and only indirectly for enzyme activities. Deletion of the smallest, most structured and conserved insert in the ODC domain had the biggest impact on the activities of both decarboxylases, homodimeric ODC arrangement and hybrid complex formation. The remaining large inserts are predicted to be non-globular regions located on the surface of these proteins. The large insert in AdoMetDC in contrast is not implicated in hybrid complex formation even though distinct interactions between this insert and the two domains

  13. Direct real-time detection of the actin-activated power stroke within the myosin catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Muretta, Joseph M; Petersen, Karl J; Thomas, David D

    2013-04-30

    We have used transient kinetics, nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and kinetics simulations to resolve a structural transition in the Dictyostelium myosin II relay helix during the actin-activated power stroke. The relay helix plays a critical role in force generation in myosin, coupling biochemical changes in the ATPase site with the force-transducing rotation of the myosin light-chain domain. Previous research in the absence of actin showed that ATP binding to myosin induces a dynamic equilibrium between a bent prepower stroke state of the relay helix and a straight postpower stroke state, which dominates in the absence of ATP or when ADP is bound. We now ask whether actin binding reverses this transition and if so, how this reversal is coordinated with actin-activated phosphate release. We labeled a Cys-lite Dictyostelium myosin II motor domain with donor and acceptor probes at two engineered Cys residues designed to detect relay helix bending. We then performed transient time-resolved FRET following stopped-flow mixing of actin with labeled myosin, preincubated with ATP. We determined the kinetics of actin-activated phosphate release, using fluorescent phosphate-binding protein. The results show that actin binding to the myosin.ADP.P complex straightens the relay helix before phosphate dissociation. This actin-activated relay helix straightening is reversible, but phosphate irreversibly dissociates from the postpower stroke state, preventing reversal of the power stroke. Thus, relay helix straightening gates phosphate dissociation, whereas phosphate dissociation provides the thermodynamic driving force underlying force production.

  14. In silico rational design and systems engineering of disulfide bridges in the catalytic domain of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica to improve thermostability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Deng, Zhuangmei; Yang, Haiquan; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2014-02-01

    High thermostability is required for alkaline α-amylases to maintain high catalytic activity under the harsh conditions used in textile production. In this study, we attempted to improve the thermostability of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica through in silico rational design and systems engineering of disulfide bridges in the catalytic domain. Specifically, 7 residue pairs (P35-G426, Q107-G167, G116-Q120, A147-W160, G233-V265, A332-G370, and R436-M480) were chosen as engineering targets for disulfide bridge formation, and the respective residues were replaced with cysteines. Three single disulfide bridge mutants-P35C-G426C, G116C-Q120C, and R436C-M480C-of the 7 showed significantly enhanced thermostability. Combinational mutations were subsequently assessed, and the triple mutant P35C-G426C/G116C-Q120C/R436C-M480C showed a 6-fold increase in half-life at 60°C and a 5.2°C increase in melting temperature compared with the wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, other biochemical properties of this mutant also improved: the optimum temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, the optimum pH shifted from 9.5 to 10.0, the stable pH range extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 6.0 to 12.0, and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) increased from 1.8 × 10(4) to 2.4 × 10(4) liters/g · min. The possible mechanism responsible for these improvements was explored through comparative analysis of the model structures of wild-type and mutant enzymes. The disulfide bridge engineering strategy used in this work may be applied to improve the thermostability of other industrial enzymes.

  15. In Silico Rational Design and Systems Engineering of Disulfide Bridges in the Catalytic Domain of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica To Improve Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Deng, Zhuangmei; Yang, Haiquan; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.

    2014-01-01

    High thermostability is required for alkaline α-amylases to maintain high catalytic activity under the harsh conditions used in textile production. In this study, we attempted to improve the thermostability of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica through in silico rational design and systems engineering of disulfide bridges in the catalytic domain. Specifically, 7 residue pairs (P35-G426, Q107-G167, G116-Q120, A147-W160, G233-V265, A332-G370, and R436-M480) were chosen as engineering targets for disulfide bridge formation, and the respective residues were replaced with cysteines. Three single disulfide bridge mutants—P35C-G426C, G116C-Q120C, and R436C-M480C—of the 7 showed significantly enhanced thermostability. Combinational mutations were subsequently assessed, and the triple mutant P35C-G426C/G116C-Q120C/R436C-M480C showed a 6-fold increase in half-life at 60°C and a 5.2°C increase in melting temperature compared with the wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, other biochemical properties of this mutant also improved: the optimum temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, the optimum pH shifted from 9.5 to 10.0, the stable pH range extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 6.0 to 12.0, and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) increased from 1.8 × 104 to 2.4 × 104 liters/g · min. The possible mechanism responsible for these improvements was explored through comparative analysis of the model structures of wild-type and mutant enzymes. The disulfide bridge engineering strategy used in this work may be applied to improve the thermostability of other industrial enzymes. PMID:24212581

  16. Evidence for Updating the Core Domain Set of Outcome Measures for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Report from a Special Interest Group at OMERACT 2016.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Esi M; Riebschleger, Meredith P; Horonjeff, Jennifer; Consolaro, Alessandro; Munro, Jane E; Thornhill, Susan; Beukelman, Timothy; Brunner, Hermine I; Creek, Emily L; Harris, Julia G; Horton, Daniel B; Lovell, Daniel J; Mannion, Melissa L; Olson, Judyann C; Rahimi, Homaira; Gallo, Maria Chiara; Calandra, Serena; Ravelli, Angelo; Ringold, Sarah; Shenoi, Susan; Stinson, Jennifer; Toupin-April, Karine; Strand, Vibeke; Bingham, Clifton O

    2017-08-15

    The current Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Core Set was developed in 1997 to identify the outcome measures to be used in JIA clinical trials using statistical and consensus-based techniques, but without patient involvement. The importance of patient/parent input into the research process has increasingly been recognized over the years. An Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) JIA Core Set Working Group was formed to determine whether the outcome domains of the current core set are relevant to those involved or whether the core set domains should be revised. Twenty-four people from the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe, including patient partners, formed the working group. Guided by the OMERACT Filter 2.0 process, we performed (1) a systematic literature review of outcome domains, (2) a Web-based survey (142 patients, 343 parents), (3) an idea-generation study (120 parents), (4) 4 online discussion boards (24 patients, 20 parents), and (5) a Special Interest Group (SIG) activity at the OMERACT 13 (2016) meeting. A MEDLINE search of outcome domains used in studies of JIA yielded 5956 citations, of which 729 citations underwent full-text review, and identified additional domains to those included in the current JIA Core Set. Qualitative studies on the effect of JIA identified multiple additional domains, including pain and participation. Twenty-one participants in the SIG achieved consensus on the need to revise the entire JIA Core Set. The results of qualitative studies and literature review support the need to expand the JIA Core Set, considering, among other things, additional patient/parent-centered outcomes, clinical data, and imaging data.

  17. BcsA and BcsB form the catalytically active core of bacterial cellulose synthase sufficient for in vitro cellulose synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Omadjela, Okako; Narahari, Adishesh; Strumillo, Joanna; Mélida, Hugo; Mazur, Olga; Bulone, Vincent; Zimmer, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is a linear extracellular polysaccharide. It is synthesized by membrane-embedded glycosyltransferases that processively polymerize UDP-activated glucose. Polymer synthesis is coupled to membrane translocation through a channel formed by the cellulose synthase. Although eukaryotic cellulose synthases function in macromolecular complexes containing several different enzyme isoforms, prokaryotic synthases associate with additional subunits to bridge the periplasm and the outer membrane. In bacteria, cellulose synthesis and translocation is catalyzed by the inner membrane-associated bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs)A and BcsB subunits. Similar to alginate and poly-β-1,6 N-acetylglucosamine, bacterial cellulose is implicated in the formation of sessile bacterial communities, termed biofilms, and its synthesis is likewise stimulated by cyclic-di-GMP. Biochemical studies of exopolysaccharide synthesis are hampered by difficulties in purifying and reconstituting functional enzymes. We demonstrate robust in vitro cellulose synthesis reconstituted from purified BcsA and BcsB proteins from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Although BcsA is the catalytically active subunit, the membrane-anchored BcsB subunit is essential for catalysis. The purified BcsA-B complex produces cellulose chains of a degree of polymerization in the range 200–300. Catalytic activity critically depends on the presence of the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, but is independent of lipid-linked reactants. Our data reveal feedback inhibition of cellulose synthase by UDP but not by the accumulating cellulose polymer and highlight the strict substrate specificity of cellulose synthase for UDP-glucose. A truncation analysis of BcsB localizes the region required for activity of BcsA within its C-terminal membrane-associated domain. The reconstituted reaction provides a foundation for the synthesis of biofilm exopolysaccharides, as well as its activation by cyclic-di-GMP. PMID:24127606