Science.gov

Sample records for core catalytic domain

  1. Communications: Electron polarization critically stabilizes the Mg2+ complex in the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunpeng; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z. H.; Zhang, Dawei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed dynamics study of the catalytic core domain (CCD) of HIV-1 integrase using both polarized and nonpolarized force fields. The numerical results reveal the critical role of protein polarization in stabilizing Mg2+ coordination complex in CCD. Specifically, when nonpolarized force field is used, a remarkable drift of the Mg2+ complex away from its equilibrium position is observed, which causes the binding site blocked by the Mg2+ complex. In contrast, when polarized force field is employed in MD simulation, HIV-1 integrase CCD structure is stabilized and both the position of the Mg2+ complex and the binding site are well preserved. The detailed analysis shows the transition of α-helix to 310-helix adjacent to the catalytic loop (residues 139-147), which correlates with the dislocation of the Mg2+ complex. The current study demonstrates the importance of electronic polarization of protein in stabilizing the metal complex in the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase.

  2. Real-time monitoring of disintegration activity of catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase using molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-wei; Zhao, Ming-ming; He, Hong-qiu; Guo, Shun-xing

    2013-09-15

    HIV-1 integrase, an essential enzyme for retroviral replication, is a validated target for anti-HIV therapy development. The catalytic core domain of integrase (IN-CCD) is capable of catalyzing disintegration reaction. In this work, a hairpin-shaped disintegration substrate was designed and validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; a molecular beacon-based assay was developed for disintegration reaction of IN-CCD. Results showed that the disintegration substrate could be recognized and catalyzed by IN-CCD, and the disintegration reaction can be monitored according to the increase of fluorescent signal. The assay can be applied to real-time detection of disintegration with advantages of simplicity, high sensitivity, and excellent specificity.

  3. The N-terminal shuttle domain of Erv1 determines the affinity for Mia40 and mediates electron transfer to the catalytic Erv1 core in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Eirini; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Pozidis, Charalambos; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2010-11-01

    Erv1 and Mia40 constitute the two important components of the disulfide relay system that mediates oxidative protein folding in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Mia40 is the import receptor that recognizes the substrates introducing disulfide bonds while it is reduced. A key function of Erv1 is to recycle Mia40 to its active oxidative state. Our aims here were to dissect the domain of Erv1 that mediates the protein-protein interaction with Mia40 and to investigate the interactions between the shuttle domain of Erv1 and its catalytic core and their relevance for the interaction with Mia40. We purified these domains separately as well as cysteine mutants in the shuttle and the active core domains. The noncovalent interaction of Mia40 with Erv1 was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, whereas their covalent mixed disulfide intermediate was analyzed in reconstitution experiments in vitro and in organello. We established that the N-terminal shuttle domain of Erv1 is necessary and sufficient for interaction to occur. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for the intramolecular electron transfer from the shuttle cysteine pair of Erv1 to the core domain. Finally, we reconstituted the system by adding in trans the N- and C- terminal domains of Erv1 together with its substrate Mia40.

  4. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  5. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  6. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  7. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  8. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  9. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  10. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  11. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  12. Evolving Catalytic Properties of the MLL Family SET Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Mittal, Anshumali; Reid, James; Reich, Stephanie; Gamblin, Steven J.; Wilson, Jon R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methylation of histone H3 lysine-4 is a hallmark of chromatin associated with active gene expression. The activity of H3K4-specific modification enzymes, in higher eukaryotes the MLL (or KMT2) family, is tightly regulated. The MLL family has six members, each with a specialized function. All contain a catalytic SET domain that associates with a core multiprotein complex for activation. These SET domains segregate into three classes that correlate with the arrangement of targeting domains that populate the rest of the protein. Here we show that, unlike MLL1, the MLL4 SET domain retains significant activity without the core complex. We also present the crystal structure of an inactive MLL4-tagged SET domain construct and describe conformational changes that account for MLL4 intrinsic activity. Finally, our structure explains how the MLL SET domains are able to add multiple methyl groups to the target lysine, despite having the sequence characteristics of a classical monomethylase. PMID:26320581

  13. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  14. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  15. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  16. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  17. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles.

  18. Regulatory and Catalytic Domain Dynamics of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filaments†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Song, Likai; Salzameda, Bridget; Cremo, Christine R.; Fajer, Piotr G.

    2016-01-01

    Domain dynamics of the chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin catalytic domain (heavy chain Cys-717) and regulatory domain (regulatory light chain Cys-108) were determined in the absence of nucleotides using saturation-transfer electron paramagnetic resonance. In unphosphorylated synthetic filaments, the effective rotational correlation times, τr, were 24 ± 6 μs and 441 ± 79 μs for the catalytic and regulatory domains, respectively. The corresponding amplitudes of motion were 42 ± 4° and 24 ± 9° as determined from steady-state phosphorescence anisotropy. These results suggest that the two domains have independent mobility due to a hinge between the two domains. Although a similar hinge was observed for skeletal myosin (Adhikari and Fajer (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94, 9643–9647. Brown et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 8283–8291), the latter displayed higher regulatory domain mobility, τr = 40 ± 3 μs, suggesting a smooth muscle specific mechanism of constraining regulatory domain dynamics. In the myosin monomers the correlation times for both domains were the same (~4 μs) for both smooth and skeletal myosin, suggesting that the motional difference between the two isoforms in the filaments was not due to intrinsic variation of hinge stiffness. Heavy chain/regulatory light chain chimeras of smooth and skeletal myosin pinpointed the origin of the restriction to the heavy chain and established correlation between the regulatory domain dynamics with the ability of myosin to switch off but not to switch on the ATPase and the actin sliding velocity. Phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin filaments caused a small increase in the amplitude of motion of the regulatory domain (from 24 ± 4° to 36 ± 7°) but did not significantly affect the rotational correlation time of the regulatory domain (441 to 408 μs) or the catalytic domain (24 to 17 μs). These data are not consistent with a stable interaction between the two catalytic domains in

  19. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  20. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  1. Catalytic residues are shared between two pseudosubunits of the dehydratase domain of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Saloni; Witkowski, Andrzej; Joshi, Anil K; Smith, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Expression, characterization, and mutagenesis of a series of N-terminal fragments of an animal fatty acid synthase, containing the beta-ketoacyl synthase, acyl transferase, and dehydratase domains, demonstrate that the dehydratase domain consists of two pseudosubunits, derived from contiguous regions of the same polypeptide, in which a single active site is formed by the cooperation of the catalytic histidine 878 residue of the first pseudosubunit with aspartate 1032 of the second pseudosubunit. Mutagenesis and modeling studies revealed an essential role for glutamine 1036 in anchoring the position of the catalytic aspartate. These findings establish that sequence elements previously assigned to a central structural core region of the type I fatty acid synthases and some modular polyketide synthase counterparts play an essential catalytic role as part of the dehydratase domain.

  2. The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Plant Cellulose Synthase and Its Assembly into Dimers[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  3. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  4. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  5. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S; Okafor, C Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-15

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  6. Stromelysin-1: three-dimensional structure of the inhibited catalytic domain and of the C-truncated proenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, J. W.; Marcy, A. I.; Rokosz, L. L.; Axel, M. G.; Burbaum, J. J.; Fitzgerald, P. M.; Cameron, P. M.; Esser, C. K.; Hagmann, W. K.; Hermes, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme stromelysin-1 is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases and is believed to play a role in pathological conditions such as arthritis and tumor invasion. Stromelysin-1 is synthesized as a pro-enzyme that is activated by removal of an N-terminal prodomain. The active enzyme contains a catalytic domain and a C-terminal hemopexin domain believed to participate in macromolecular substrate recognition. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of both a C-truncated form of the proenzyme and an inhibited complex of the catalytic domain by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic core is very similar in the two forms and is similar to the homologous domain in fibroblast and neutrophil collagenases, as well as to the stromelysin structure determined by NMR. The prodomain is a separate folding unit containing three alpha-helices and an extended peptide that lies in the active site of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the amino-to-carboxyl direction of this peptide chain is opposite to that adopted by the inhibitor and by previously reported inhibitors of collagenase. Comparison of the active site of stromelysin with that of thermolysin reveals that most of the residues proposed to play significant roles in the enzymatic mechanism of thermolysin have equivalents in stromelysin, but that three residues implicated in the catalytic mechanism of thermolysin are not represented in stromelysin. PMID:8535233

  7. The catalytic domains of thiamine triphosphatase and CyaB-like adenylyl cyclase define a novel superfamily of domains that bind organic phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2002-01-01

    Background The CyaB protein from Aeromonas hydrophila has been shown to possess adenylyl cyclase activity. While orthologs of this enzyme have been found in some bacteria and archaea, it shows no detectable relationship to the classical nucleotide cyclases. Furthermore, the actual biological functions of these proteins are not clearly understood because they are also present in organisms in which there is no evidence for cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results We show that the CyaB like adenylyl cyclase and the mammalian thiamine triphosphatases define a novel superfamily of catalytic domains called the CYTH domain that is present in all three superkingdoms of life. Using multiple alignments and secondary structure predictions, we define the catalytic core of these enzymes to contain a novel α+β scaffold with 6 conserved acidic residues and 4 basic residues. Using contextual information obtained from the analysis of gene neighborhoods and domain fusions, we predict that members of this superfamily may play a central role in the interface between nucleotide and polyphosphate metabolism. Additionally, based on contextual information, we identify a novel domain (called CHAD) that is predicted to functionally interact with the CYTH domain-containing enzymes in bacteria and archaea. The CHAD is predicted to be an alpha helical domain, and contains conserved histidines that may be critical for its function. Conclusions The phyletic distribution of the CYTH domain suggests that it is an ancient enzymatic domain that was present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor and was involved in nucleotide or organic phosphate metabolism. Based on the conservation of catalytic residues, we predict that CYTH domains are likely to chelate two divalent cations, and exhibit a reaction mechanism that is dependent on two metal ions, analogous to nucleotide cyclases, polymerases and certain phosphoesterases. Our analysis also suggests that the experimentally characterized members of this

  8. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  9. Characterization of hybrid proteins consisting of the catalytic domains of Clostridium and Ruminococcus endoglucanases, fused to Pseudomonas non-catalytic cellulose-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, D M; Durrant, A J; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1991-01-01

    The N-terminal 160 or 267 residues of xylanase A from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, containing a non-catalytic cellulose-binding domain (CBD), were fused to the N-terminus of the catalytic domain of endoglucanase E (EGE') from Clostridium thermocellum. A further hybrid enzyme was constructed consisting of the 347 N-terminal residues of xylanase C (XYLC) from P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, which also constitutes a CBD, fused to the N-terminus of endoglucanase A (EGA) from Ruminococcus albus. The three hybrid enzymes bound to insoluble cellulose, and could be eluted such that cellulose-binding capacity and catalytic activity were retained. The catalytic properties of the fusion enzymes were similar to EGE' and EGA respectively. Residues 37-347 and 34-347 of XYLC were fused to the C-terminus of EGE' and the 10 amino acids encoded by the multiple cloning sequence of pMTL22p respectively. The two hybrid proteins did not bind cellulose, although residues 39-139 of XYLC were shown previously to constitute a functional CBD. The putative role of the P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa CBD in cellulase action is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1953672

  10. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open. PMID:7656014

  11. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D.

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  13. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  14. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  15. (Gold core)@(ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Benxia; Gu, Ting; Ming, Tian; Wang, Junxin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures.

  16. The MLLE Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase UBR5 Binds to Its Catalytic Domain to Regulate Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. PMID:26224628

  17. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  18. Dealloying-based facile synthesis and highly catalytic properties of Au core/porous shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Ko, Sung Min; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-06-01

    Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts.Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01321j

  19. Characterization of some molecular mechanisms governing autoactivation of the catalytic domain of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Tartari, Carmen J; Gunby, Rosalind H; Coluccia, Addolorata M L; Sottocornola, Roberta; Cimbro, Barbara; Scapozza, Leonardo; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2008-02-15

    NPM/ALK is an oncogenic fusion protein expressed in approximately 50% of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases. It derives from the t(2;5)(p23;q35) chromosomal translocation that fuses the catalytic domain of the tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), with the dimerization domain of the ubiquitously expressed nucleophosmin (NPM) protein. Dimerization of the ALK kinase domain leads to its autophosphorylation and constitutive activation. Activated NPM/ALK stimulates downstream survival and proliferation signaling pathways leading to malignant transformation. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of autoactivation of the catalytic domain of ALK. Because kinases are typically regulated by autophosphorylation of their activation loops, we systematically mutated (Tyr --> Phe) three potential autophosphorylation sites contained in the "YXXXYY" motif of the ALK activation loop, and determined the effect of these mutations on the catalytic activity and biological function of NPM/ALK. We observed that mutation of both the second and third tyrosine residues (YFF mutant) did not affect the kinase activity or transforming ability of NPM/ALK. In contrast, mutation of the first and second (FFY), first and third (FYF), or all three (FFF) tyrosine residues impaired both kinase activity and transforming ability of NPM/ALK. Furthermore, a DFF mutant, in which the aspartic residue introduces a negative charge similar to a phosphorylated tyrosine, possessed catalytic activity similar to the YFF mutant. Together, our findings indicate that phosphorylation of the first tyrosine of the YXXXYY motif is necessary for the autoactivation of the ALK kinase domain and the transforming activity of NPM/ALK. PMID:18070884

  20. Core-shell nanospheres Pt@SiO2 for catalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yujuan; Wang, Yuqing; Lu, Zhang-Hui; Chen, Xiangshu; Xiong, Lihua

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafine platinum nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica nanospheres (Pt@SiO2) have been synthesized in a NP-5/cyclohexane reversed-micelle system followed by NaBH4 reduction. The as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopes, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and nitrogen adsorption-desorption investigations. Interestingly, the as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 showed an excellent catalytic performance in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (BH3NH3, AB) at room temperature. Especially, the catalytic performance of the Pt@SiO2 remained almost unchanged after the five recycles and even after the heat treatment (673 K), because the silica shells inhibit aggregation or deformation of the metal cores. Besides, the kinetic studies showed that the catalytic hydrolysis of AB was first order with respect to the catalyst concentration and zero order with respect to the substrate concentration, respectively. The excellent catalytic activity and stability of Pt@SiO2 can make it have a bright future in the practical application.

  1. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  2. IRBIT Interacts with the Catalytic Core of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase Type Iα and IIα through Conserved Catalytic Aspartate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hideaki; Hirose, Matsumi; Gainche, Laura; Kawaai, Katsuhiro; Bonneau, Benjamin; Ijuin, Takeshi; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs) are lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), a critical lipid signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular functions, including the activities of membrane channels and transporters. IRBIT (IP3R-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) is a multifunctional protein that regulates diverse target proteins. Here, we report that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with members of the PIPK family. IRBIT bound to all PIPK isoforms in heterologous expression systems and specifically interacted with PIPK type Iα (PIPKIα) and type IIα (PIPKIIα) in mouse cerebellum. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that two conserved catalytic aspartate residues of PIPKIα and PIPKIIα are involved in the interaction with IRBIT. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, Mg2+, and/or ATP interfered with the interaction, suggesting that IRBIT interacts with catalytic cores of PIPKs. Mutations of phosphorylation sites in the serine-rich region of IRBIT affected the selectivity of its interaction with PIPKIα and PIPKIIα. The structural flexibility of the serine-rich region, located in the intrinsically disordered protein region, is assumed to underlie the mechanism of this interaction. Furthermore, in vitro binding experiments and immunocytochemistry suggest that IRBIT and PIPKIα interact with the Na+/HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1-B. These results suggest that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with PIPKIα and NBCe1-B, whose activity is regulated by PI(4,5)P2. PMID:26509711

  3. Functional analyses of the chitin-binding domains and the catalytic domain of Brassica juncea chitinase BjCHI1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ce Mun; Chye, Mee-Len; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar; Ouyang, Shi-Wen; Zhao, Kai-Jun; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Mowbray, Sherry L

    2004-09-01

    We previously isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA encoding BjCHI1, a novel chitinase with two chitin-binding domains. Synthesis of its mRNA is induced by wounding, methyl jasmonate treatment, Aspergillus niger infection and caterpillar (Pieris rapae) feeding, suggesting that the protein has a role in defense. In that it possesses two chitin-binding domains, BjCHI1 resembles the precursor of Urtica dioica agglutinin but unlike that protein, BjCHI1 retains its chitinase catalytic domain after post-translational processing. To explore the properties of multi-domain BjCHI1, we have expressed recombinant BjCHI1 and two derivatives, which lack one (BjCHI2) or both (BjCHI3) chitin-binding domains, as secreted proteins in Pichia pastoris. Recombinant BjCHI1 and BjCHI2, showed apparent molecular masses on SDS-PAGE larger than calculated, and could be deglycosylated using alpha-mannosidase. Recombinant BjCHI3, without the proline/threonine-rich linker region containing predicted O-glycosylation sites, did not appear to be processed by alpha-mannosidase. BjCHI1's ability to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes is unique among known chitinases. Both chitin-binding domains are essential for agglutination; this property is absent in recombinant BjCHI2 and BjCHI3. To identify potential catalytic residues, we generated site-directed mutations in recombinant BjCHI3. Mutation E212A showed the largest effect, exhibiting 0% of wild-type specific activity. H211N and R361A resulted in considerable (>91%) activity loss, implying these charged residues are also important in catalysis. E234A showed 36% retention of activity and substitution Y269D, 50%. The least affected mutants were E349A and D360A, with 73% and 68% retention, respectively. Like Y269, E349 and D360 are possibly involved in substrate binding rather than catalysis. PMID:15604744

  4. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  5. [Molecular engineering of cellulase catalytic domain based on glycoside hydrolase family].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Dandan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Guanjun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular engineering of cellulases can improve enzymatic activity and efficiency. Recently, the Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes Database (CAZy), including glycoside hydrolase (GH) families, has been established with the development of Omics and structural measurement technologies. Molecular engineering based on GH families can obviously decrease the probing space of target sequences and structures, and increase the odds of experimental success. Besides, the study of cellulase active-site architecture paves the way toward the explanation of catalytic mechanism. This review focuses on the main GH families and the latest progresses in molecular engineering of catalytic domain. Based on the combination of analysis of a large amount of data in the same GH family and their conservative active-site architecture information, rational design will be an important direction for molecular engineering and promote the rapid development of the conversion of biomass. PMID:23894816

  6. The catalytic domain of endoglucanase A from Clostridium cellulolyticum: effects of arginine 79 and histidine 122 mutations on catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, A; Fierobe, H P; Baty, D; Busetta, B; Bagnara-Tardif, C; Gaudin, C; Belaich, J P

    1992-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the endoglucanase EGCCA of Clostridium cellulolyticum indicates the existence of two domains: a catalytic domain extending from residue 1 to residue 376 and a reiterated domain running from residue 390 to 450. A small deletion in the C terminal end of the catalytic domain inactivated the protein. From the analysis of the sequences of 26 endoglucanases belonging to family A, we focused on seven amino acids which were totally conserved in all the catalytic domains compared. The roles of two of these, Arg-79 and His-122, were studied and defined on the basis of the mutants obtained by introducing various substitutions. Our findings suggest that Arg-79 is involved in the structural organization of the protein; the His-122 residue seems to be more essential for catalysis. The role of His-123, which is conserved only in subfamily A4, was also investigated. PMID:1624455

  7. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  8. The pro-enzyme C-terminal processing domain of Pholiota nameko tyrosinase is responsible for folding of the N-terminal catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Moe, Lai Lai; Maekawa, Saya; Kawamura-Konishi, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Pholiota nameko (Pholiota microspore) tyrosinase is expressed as a latent 67-kDa pro-tyrosinase, comprising a 42-kDa N-terminal catalytic domain with a binuclear copper centre and a 25-kDa C-terminal domain and is activated by proteolytic digestion of the C-terminal domain. To investigate the role of the C-terminal processing domain of pro-tyrosinase, we constructed a recombinant tyrosinase lacking the C-terminal domain and four recombinant pro-tyrosinase mutants (F515G, H539N, L540G and Y543G) carrying substituted amino acid residues on the C-terminal domain. The recombinant tyrosinase lacking the C-terminal domain had no catalytic activity; whereas the mutant L540G was copper depleted, the other mutants had copper contents similar to that of the wild-type pro-tyrosinase. Proteolytic digestion activated the mutants H539N and Y543G following release of the C-terminal domain, and the resulting tyrosinases had higher K m values for t-butyl catechol than the wild-type pro-tyrosinase. The mutants F515G and L540G were degraded by proteolytic digestion and yielded smaller proteins with no activity. These data suggest that the C-terminal processing domain of P. nameko pro-tyrosinase is essential for correct folding of the N-terminal catalytic domain and acts as an intramolecular chaperone during assembly of the active-site conformation.

  9. Solution structure of the catalytic domain of human stromelysin complexed with a hydrophobic inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, S. R.; Kurochkin, A. V.; Hu, W.; Ye, Q. Z.; Johnson, L. L.; Hupe, D. J.; Zuiderweg, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin, a representative matrix metalloproteinase and target of drug development efforts, plays a prominent role in the pathological proteolysis associated with arthritis and secondarily in that of cancer metastasis and invasion. To provide a structural template to aid the development of therapeutic inhibitors, we have determined a medium-resolution structure of a 20-kDa complex of human stromelysin's catalytic domain with a hydrophobic peptidic inhibitor using multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This domain of this zinc hydrolase contains a mixed beta-sheet comprising one antiparallel strand and four parallel strands, three helices, and a methionine-containing turn near the catalytic center. The ensemble of 20 structures was calculated using, on average, 8 interresidue NOE restraints per residue for the 166-residue protein fragment complexed with a 4-residue substrate analogue. The mean RMS deviation (RMSD) to the average structure for backbone heavy atoms is 0.91 A and for all heavy atoms is 1.42 A. The structure has good stereochemical properties, including its backbone torsion angles. The beta-sheet and alpha-helices of the catalytic domains of human stromelysin (NMR model) and human fibroblast collagenase (X-ray crystallographic model of Lovejoy B et al., 1994b, Biochemistry 33:8207-8217) superimpose well, having a pairwise RMSD for backbone heavy atoms of 2.28 A when three loop segments are disregarded. The hydroxamate-substituted inhibitor binds across the hydrophobic active site of stromelysin in an extended conformation. The first hydrophobic side chain is deeply buried in the principal S'1 subsite, the second hydrophobic side chain is located on the opposite side of the inhibitor backbone in the hydrophobic S'2 surface subsite, and a third hydrophobic side chain (P'3) lies at the surface. PMID:8580839

  10. Structure and function of the catalytic domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component in Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-05-30

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s(-1), comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP). PMID:24742683

  11. High Resolution Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of ADAMTS-5 (Aggrecanase-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Mathis, Karl J.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Hills, Robert L.; Wiese, Joe F.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kiefer, James R.; Marino, Margaret H.; Carroll, Jeffery N.; Leone, Joseph W.; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Arner, Elizabeth C.; Tortorella, Micky D.; Tomasselli, Alfredo

    2008-06-30

    Aggrecanase-2 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5)), a member of the ADAMTS protein family, is critically involved in arthritic diseases because of its direct role in cleaving the cartilage component aggrecan. The catalytic domain of aggrecanase-2 has been refolded, purified, and crystallized, and its three-dimensional structure determined to 1.4{angstrom} resolution in the presence of an inhibitor. A high resolution structure of an ADAMTS/aggrecanase protein provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics to treat osteoarthritis.

  12. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Salmonella virulence factor SseI.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Shyam S; Stebbins, C Erec

    2012-12-01

    SseI is secreted into host cells by Salmonella and contributes to the establishment of systemic infections. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of SseI has been solved to 1.70 Å resolution, revealing it to be a member of the cysteine protease superfamily with a catalytic triad consisting of Cys178, His216 and Asp231 that is critical to its virulence activities. Structure-based analysis revealed that SseI is likely to possess either acyl hydrolase or acyltransferase activity, placing this virulence factor in the rapidly growing class of enzymes of this family utilized by bacterial pathogens inside eukaryotic cells.

  13. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application. PMID:27759038

  14. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. PMID:26587907

  15. A Novel Catalytic Function of Synthetic IgG-Binding Domain (Z Domain) from Staphylococcal Protein A: Light Emission with Coelenterazine.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic IgG-binding domain (Z domain) of staphylococcal protein A catalyzes the oxidation of coelenterazine to emit light like a coelenterazine-utilizing luciferase. The Z domain derivatives (ZZ-gCys, Z-gCys and Z-domain) were purified and the luminescence properties were characterized by comparing with coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases, including Renilla luciferase, Gaussia luciferase and the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. Three Z domain derivatives showed luminescence activity with coelenterazine and the order of the initial maximum intensity of luminescence was ZZ-gCys (100%) > Z-gCys (36.8%) > Z-domain (1.1%) > bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.9%) > staphylococcal protein A (0.1%) and the background value of coelenterazine (0.1%) in our conditions. The luminescence properties of ZZ-gCys showed the similarity to that of Gaussia luciferase, including the luminescence pattern, the emission spectrum, the stimulation by halogen ions and nonionic detergents and the substrate specificity for coelenterazine analogues. In contrast, the luminescence properties of Z-gCys were close to the catalytic 19 kDa protein of Oplophorus luciferase. The catalytic region of the Z domain for the luminescence reaction might be different from the IgG-binding region of the Z domain. PMID:24138575

  16. Visualizing Dealumination of a Single Zeolite Domain in a Real-Life Catalytic Cracking Particle.

    PubMed

    Kalirai, Sam; Paalanen, Pasi P; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts play a central role in the chemical conversion of crude oil fractions. Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) we investigate the chemistry of one fresh and two industrially deactivated (ECAT) FCC catalysts at the single zeolite domain level. Spectro-microscopic data at the Fe L3 , La M5 , and Al K X-ray absorption edges reveal differing levels of deposited Fe on the ECAT catalysts corresponding with an overall loss in tetrahedral Al within the zeolite domains. Using La as a localization marker, we have developed a novel methodology to map the changing Al distribution of single zeolite domains within real-life FCC catalysts. It was found that significant changes in the zeolite domain size distributions as well as the loss of Al from the zeolite framework occur. Furthermore, inter- and intraparticle heterogeneities in the dealumination process were observed, revealing the complex interplay between metal-mediated pore accessibility loss and zeolite dealumination.

  17. A Novel Method of Production and Biophysical Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Yeast Oligosaccharyl Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Mohanty, Smita; Banerjee, Monimoy

    2010-01-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase (OT) is a multi-subunit enzyme that catalyzes N-linked glycosylation of nascent polypeptides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, OT is composed of nine integral membrane protein subunits. Defects in N-linked glycosylation cause a series of disorders known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The C-terminal domain of Stt3p subunit has been reported to contain the acceptor protein recognition site and/or catalytic site. We report here the subcloning, overexpression, a robust but novel method of production of pure C-terminal domain of Stt3p at 60∼70 mg/L in E. coli. CD spectra indicate that the C-terminal Stt3p is highly helical and has a stable tertiary structure in SDS micelles. The well dispersed 2D {1H-15N}-HSQC spectrum in SDS micelles indicates that it is feasible to determine the atomic structure by NMR. The effect of the conserved D518E mutation on the conformation of the C-terminal Stt3p is particularly interesting. The comparative analysis of the fluorescence and NMR data of the mutant and the wild-type C-terminal domain of Stt3p revealed that the replacement of the key residue Asp518, which is located within the WWDYG signature motif (residues 516-520), led to a distinct tertiary structure, even though both proteins have similar overall secondary structures. This observation strongly suggests that Asp518, which was previously proposed to primarily function as a catalytic residue, also plays a critical structural role. Moreover, the activity of the protein was confirmed by Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) and NMR titration studies. PMID:20047336

  18. Crystal Structures of the Catalytic Domain of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Allerston, Charles K.; von Delft, Frank; Gileadi, Opher

    2013-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) catalyses the synthesis of cyclic GMP in response to nitric oxide. The enzyme is a heterodimer of homologous α and β subunits, each of which is composed of multiple domains. We present here crystal structures of a heterodimer of the catalytic domains of the α and β subunits, as well as an inactive homodimer of β subunits. This first structure of a metazoan, heteromeric cyclase provides several observations. First, the structures resemble known structures of adenylate cyclases and other guanylate cyclases in overall fold and in the arrangement of conserved active-site residues, which are contributed by both subunits at the interface. Second, the subunit interaction surface is promiscuous, allowing both homodimeric and heteromeric association; the preference of the full-length enzyme for heterodimer formation must derive from the combined contribution of other interaction interfaces. Third, the heterodimeric structure is in an inactive conformation, but can be superposed onto an active conformation of adenylate cyclase by a structural transition involving a 26° rigid-body rotation of the α subunit. In the modelled active conformation, most active site residues in the subunit interface are precisely aligned with those of adenylate cyclase. Finally, the modelled active conformation also reveals a cavity related to the active site by pseudo-symmetry. The pseudosymmetric site lacks key active site residues, but may bind allosteric regulators in a manner analogous to the binding of forskolin to adenylate cyclase. This indicates the possibility of developing a new class of small-molecule modulators of guanylate cyclase activity targeting the catalytic domain. PMID:23505436

  19. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Sunita, S; Zhenxing, H; Swaathi, J; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Sivaraman, J

    2006-06-16

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine (Psi) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF at 2.6A resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of Psi-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  20. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  1. Phylogenetic analyses of the core antenna domain: investigating the origin of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Mix, Lucas J; Haig, David; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2005-02-01

    Phototrophy, the conversion of light to biochemical energy, occurs throughout the Bacteria and plants, however, debate continues over how different phototrophic mechanisms and the bacteria that contain them are related. There are two types of phototrophic mechanisms in the Bacteria: reaction center type 1 (RC1) has core and core antenna domains that are parts of a single polypeptide, whereas reaction center type 2 (RC2) is composed of short core proteins without antenna domains. In cyanobacteria, RC2 is associated with separate core antenna proteins that are homologous to the core antenna domains of RC1. We reconstructed evolutionary relationships among phototrophic mechanisms based on a phylogeny of core antenna domains/proteins. Core antenna domains of 46 polypeptides were aligned, including the RC1 core proteins of heliobacteria, green sulfur bacteria, and photosystem I (PSI) of cyanobacteria and plastids, plus core antenna proteins of photosystem II (PSII) from cyanobacteria and plastids. Maximum likelihood, parsimony, and neighbor joining methods all supported a single phylogeny in which PSII core antenna proteins (PsbC, PsbB) arose within the cyanobacteria from duplications of the RC1-associated core antenna domains and accessory antenna proteins (IsiA, PcbA, PcbC) arose from duplications of PsbB. The data indicate an evolutionary history of RC1 in which an initially homodimeric reaction center was vertically transmitted to green sulfur bacteria, heliobacteria, and an ancestor of cyanobacteria. A heterodimeric RC1 (=PSI) then arose within the cyanobacterial lineage. In this scenario, the current diversity of core antenna domains/proteins is explained without a need to invoke horizontal transfer.

  2. In Situ Synthesis of Catalytic Active Au Nanoparticles onto Gibbsite-Polydopamine Core-Shell Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Mei, Shilin; Jia, He; Ott, Andreas; Ballauff, Matthias; Lu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize anisotropic platelike gibbsite-polymer core-shell particles. Dopamine is self-polymerized on the surface of gibbsite nanoplates and forms a homogeneous layer on it. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the resulting latexes demonstrates the formation of well-defined platelike core-shell particles. Reaction time and ultrasonification are found to be important factors to control the thickness of the polymer shell and avoid aggregation. Good control over the platelike morphology and 100% encapsulation efficiency have been achieved via this novel route. The resulting well-defined gibbsite-polydamine (G-PDA) core-shell nanoplates show excellent colloidal stability and can form opal-like columnar crystal with iridescent Bragg reflection after modest centrifugation. In addition, G-PDA core-shell nanoplates can serve both as reductant and stabilizer for the generation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in situ. Au NPs with tunable size have been formed on the G-PDA particle surface, which show efficient catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of borohydride. Such nanocatalysts can be easily deposited on silicon substrate by spin-coating due to the large contact area of platelike G-PDA particles and the strong adhesive behavior of the PDA layer. The substrate-deposited nanocatalyst can be easily recycled which show excellent reusability for the reduction of RhB. PMID:26266398

  3. Improving the catalytic activity of semiconductor nanocrystals through selective domain etching.

    PubMed

    Khon, Elena; Lambright, Kelly; Khnayzer, Rony S; Moroz, Pavel; Perera, Dimuthu; Butaeva, Evgeniia; Lambright, Scott; Castellano, Felix N; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    Colloidal chemistry offers an assortment of synthetic tools for tuning the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals. While many nanocrystal architectures can be obtained directly via colloidal growth, other nanoparticle morphologies require alternative processing strategies. Here, we show that chemical etching of colloidal nanoparticles can facilitate the realization of nanocrystal shapes that are topologically inaccessible by hot-injection techniques alone. The present methodology is demonstrated by synthesizing a two-component CdSe/CdS nanoparticle dimer, constructed in a way that both CdSe and CdS semiconductor domains are exposed to the external environment. This structural morphology is highly desirable for catalytic applications as it enables both reductive and oxidative reactions to occur simultaneously on dissimilar nanoparticle surfaces. Hydrogen production tests confirmed the improved catalytic activity of CdSe/CdS dimers, which was enhanced 3-4 times upon etching treatment. We expect that the demonstrated application of etching to shaping of colloidal heteronanocrystals can become a common methodology in the synthesis of charge-separating nanocrystals, leading to advanced nanoparticles architectures for applications in areas of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and light detection.

  4. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulase CelT.

    PubMed

    Kesavulu, Muppuru M; Tsai, Jia Yin; Lee, Hsiao Lin; Liang, Po Huang; Hsiao, Chwan Deng

    2012-03-01

    Cellulases hydrolyze cellulose, a major component of plant cell walls, to oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. Several Clostridium species secrete multi-enzyme complexes (cellulosomes) containing cellulases. C. thermocellum CelT, a family 9 cellulase, lacks the accessory module(s) necessary for activity, unlike most other family 9 cellulases. Therefore, characterization of the CelT structure is essential in order to understand its catalytic mechanism. Here, the crystal structure of free CelTΔdoc, the catalytic domain of CelT, is reported at 2.1 Å resolution. Its structure differs in several aspects from those of other family 9 cellulases. CelTΔdoc contains an additional α-helix, α-helices of increased length and two additional surface-exposed β-strands. It also contains three calcium ions instead of one as found in C. cellulolyticum Cel9M. CelTΔdoc also has two flexible loops at the open end of its active-site cleft. Movement of these loops probably allows the substrate to access the active site. CelT is stable over a wide range of pH and temperature conditions, suggesting that CelT could be used to convert cellulose biomass into biofuel.

  5. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  6. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Alessia; Russo, Luigi; De Simone, Alfonso; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Malgieri, Gaetano; Berisio, Rita; Isernia, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E) and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a “conformational editing” through a disulfide bond formation. PMID:26576056

  7. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  8. Expression, purification, and structural analysis of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, J. E.; Carroll, D.; Lawson, J. E.; Ernst, S. R.; Reed, L. J.; Hackert, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    The dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (E2o) component of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the transfer of a succinyl group from the S-succinyldihydrolipoyl moiety to coenzyme A. E2o is normally a 24-mer, but is found as a trimer when E2o is expressed with a C-terminal [His]6 tag. The crystal structure of the trimeric form of the catalytic domain (CD) of the Escherichia coli E2o has been solved to 3.0 A resolution using the Molecular Replacement method. The refined model contains an intact trimer in the asymmetric unit and has an R-factor of 0.257 (Rfree = 0.286) for 18,699 reflections between 10.0 and 3.0 A resolution. The core of tE2oCD (residues 187-396) superimposes onto that of the cubic E2oCD with an RMS difference of 0.4 A for all main-chain atoms. The C-terminal end of tE2oCD (residues 397-404) rotates by an average of 37 degrees compared to cubic E2oCD, disrupting the normal twofold interface. Despite the alteration of quaternary structure, the active site of tE2oCD shows no significant differences from that of the cubic E2oCD, although several side chains in the active site are more ordered in the trimeric form of E2oCD. Analysis of the available sequence data suggests that the majority of E2 components have active sites that resemble that of E. coli E2oCD. The remaining E2 components can be divided into three groups based on active-site sequence similarity. Analysis of the surface properties of both crystal forms of E. coli E2oCD suggests key residues that may be involved in the protein-protein contacts that occur between the catalytic and lipoyl domains of E2o. PMID:10739245

  9. Diversity between mammalian tolloid proteinases: Oligomerisation and non-catalytic domains influence activity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Christopher P.; Ruiz Nivia, Hilda D.; Dajani, Rana; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Collins, Richard F.; Rada, Heather; Bird, Louise E.; Baldock, Clair

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian tolloid family of metalloproteinases is essential for tissue patterning and extracellular matrix assembly. The four members of the family: bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1), mammalian tolloid (mTLD), tolloid-like (TLL)-1 and TLL-2 differ in their substrate specificity and activity levels, despite sharing similar domain organization. We have previously described a model of substrate exclusion by dimerisation to explain differences in the activities of monomeric BMP-1 and dimers of mTLD and TLL-1. Here we show that TLL-2, the least active member of the tolloid family, is predominantly monomeric in solution, therefore it appears unlikely that substrate exclusion via dimerisation is a mechanism for regulating TLL-2 activity. X-ray scattering and electron microscopy structural and biophysical analyses reveal an elongated shape for the monomer and flexibility in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, we show that TLL-2 can cleave chordin in vitro, similar to other mammalian tolloids, but truncated forms of TLL-2 mimicking BMP-1 are unable to cleave chordin. However, both the N- and C-terminal non-catalytic domains from all mammalian tolloids bind chordin with high affinity. The mechanisms underlying substrate specificity and activity in the tolloid family are complex with variation between family members and depend on both multimerisation and substrate interaction. PMID:26902455

  10. Explorations of Catalytic Domains in Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase Enzymology

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gene H.; Vickery, Christopher R.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Many pharmaceuticals on the market today belong to a large class of natural products called nonribosomal peptides (NRPs). Originating from bacteria and fungi, these peptide-based natural products consist not only of the 20 canonical L-amino acids, but also non-proteinogenic amino acids, heterocyclic rings, sugars, and fatty acids, generating tremendous chemical diversity. As a result, these secondary metabolites exhibit a broad array of bioactivity ranging from antimicrobial to anticancer. The biosynthesis of these complex compounds is carried out by large multimodular megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Each module is responsible for incorporation of a monomeric unit into the natural product peptide and is composed of individual domains that perform different catalytic reactions. Biochemical and bioinformatic investigations of these enzymes have uncovered the key principles of NRP synthesis, expanding the pharmaceutical potential of their enzymatic processes. Progress has been made in the manipulation of this biosynthetic machinery to develop new chemoenzymatic approaches for synthesizing novel pharmaceutical agents with increased potency. This review focuses on the recent discoveries and breakthroughs in the structural elucidation, molecular mechanism, and chemical biology underlying the discrete domains within NRPSs. PMID:22802156

  11. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein-DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting.

  12. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  13. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Glucuronoyl Esterase Catalytic Domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was over-expressed, purified, and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. Crystals had space group P212121 and X-ray diffraction data were...

  14. The evolutionarily conserved core design of the catalytic activation step of the yeast spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Patrizia; Dannenberg, Julia; Dube, Prakash; Kastner, Berthold; Stark, Holger; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2009-11-25

    Metazoan spliceosomes exhibit an elaborate protein composition required for canonical and alternative splicing. Thus, the minimal set of proteins essential for activation and catalysis remains elusive. We therefore purified in vitro assembled, precatalytic spliceosomal complex B, activated B(act), and step 1 complex C from the simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry revealed that yeast spliceosomes contain fewer proteins than metazoans and that each functional stage is very homogeneous. Dramatic compositional changes convert B to B(act), which is composed of approximately 40 evolutionarily conserved proteins that organize the catalytic core. Additional remodeling occurs concomitant with step 1, during which nine proteins are recruited to form complex C. The moderate number of proteins recruited to complex C will allow investigations of the chemical reactions in a fully defined system. Electron microscopy reveals high-quality images of yeast spliceosomes at defined functional stages, indicating that they are well-suited for three-dimensional structure analyses.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of cystathionine β-synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ereño-Orbea, June; Majtan, Tomas; Oyenarte, Iker; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS; EC 4.2.1.22) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine and serine to form cystathionine, with the release of water. In humans, deficiency in CBS activity is the most common cause of hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. More than 160 pathogenic mutations in the human CBS gene have been described to date. Here, the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of CBS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCBS) is described which, in contrast to other eukaryotic CBSs, lacks the N-terminal haem-binding domain and is considered to be a useful model for investigation of the pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-mediated reactions of human CBS (hCBS). The purified protein yielded two different crystal forms belonging to space groups P41212 and P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.390, c = 386.794 Å and a = 58.156, b = 89.988, c = 121.687 Å, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data suggests the presence of ScCBS homodimers in both types of crystals. PMID:24598918

  16. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K.

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  18. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  19. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Peregrina, Jesús M; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-05

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  20. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12095.001 PMID:26725083

  1. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. PMID:26725083

  2. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-03

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.

  3. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  4. Synthesis of triple-layered Ag@Co@Ni core-shell nanoparticles for the catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fangyuan; Liu, Guang; Li, Li; Wang, Ying; Xu, Changchang; An, Cuihua; Chen, Chengcheng; Xu, Yanan; Huang, Yanan; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-01-01

    Triple-layered Ag@Co@Ni core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) containing a silver core, a cobalt inner shell, and a nickel outer shell were formed by an in situ chemical reduction method. The thickness of the double shells varied with different cobalt and nickel contents. Ag0.04 @Co0.48 @Ni0.48 showed the most distinct core-shell structure. Compared with its bimetallic core-shell counterparts, this catalyst showed higher catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of NH3 BH3 (AB). The synergetic interaction between Co and Ni in Ag0.04 @Co0.48 @Ni0.48 NPs may play a critical role in the enhanced catalytic activity. Furthermore, cobalt-nickel double shells surrounding the silver core in the special triple-layered core-shell structure provided increasing amounts of active sites on the surface to facilitate the catalytic reaction. These promising catalysts may lead to applications for AB in the field of fuel cells. PMID:24302541

  5. Deletion of the regulatory domain of protein kinase C alpha exposes regions in the hinge and catalytic domains that mediate nuclear targeting.

    PubMed

    James, G; Olson, E

    1992-02-01

    Members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family are characterized by an NH2-terminal regulatory domain containing binding sites for calcium, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol (or tumor-promoting phorbol esters), a small central hinge region and a COOH-terminal catalytic domain. We have constructed fusion proteins in which the regulatory domain of PKC alpha was removed and replaced by a 19-amino acid leader sequence containing a myristoylation consensus or by the same sequence in which the amino-terminal glycine was changed to alanine to prevent myristoylation. The goal was to generate constitutively active mutants of PKC that were either membrane bound, due to their myristoylation, or cytoplasmic. Western blotting of fractions from COS cells transfected with plasmids encoding wild-type and mutant proteins revealed that PKC alpha resided entirely in a Triton X-100 soluble (TS) fraction, whereas both the myristoylated and nonmyristoylated mutants were associated primarily with the nuclear envelope fraction. A similar mutant that lacked the 19 amino acid leader sequence was also found almost entirely in the nuclear envelope, as was a truncation mutant containing only the regulatory domain, hinge region, and a small portion of the catalytic domain. However, an additional truncation mutant consisting of only the regulatory domain plus the first one-third of the hinge region was almost entirely in the TS fraction. A nonmyristoylated fusion protein containing only the catalytic domain was also found in the nuclear envelope. Immunostaining of cells transfected with these constructs revealed that both the myristoylated and nonmyristoylated mutants were localized in nuclei, whereas wild-type PKC alpha was primarily cytoplasmic and perinuclear. Phorbol dibutyrate treatment of PKC alpha-transfected cells resulted in increased perinuclear and nuclear staining. The results are consistent with a model in which activation of PKC, by phorbol esters or by deletion of the

  6. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  7. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  8. Crystal structure of the APOBEC3G catalytic domain reveals potential oligomerization interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shandilya, Shivender M. D.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, John C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Harjes, Elena; Kouno, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has anti-viral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 Å. This structure corroborates features previously observed in NMR studies, a bulge in the second β-strand and a lengthening of the second α-helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function. PMID:20152150

  9. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  10. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the catalytic domain of sika deer MMP-13.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Jiawen; Liu, Meichen; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is one of three mammalian collagenases that are capable of initiating the degradation of interstitial collagens during wound healing. Herein, we report for the first time the molecular cloning of the catalytic domain (CD) of sika deer MMP-13, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The final yield was approximately 90.4 mg per liter of growth culture with a purity of 91.6%. The mass recovery during the purification and renaturation were 70.2% and 81.5%, respectively. Using gelatin zymography and a degradation assay, we found that the refolded sika deer MMP-13 (CD) could digest gelatin. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme bioactivity was 8.0 and 37 °C, respectively. The Km value for the enzyme-catalyzed digestion of gelatin was 136+/-8 μg/mL, and the Vmax was 4.12 × 10(3) U/μg. sdMMP13 (CD) was able to completely degrade collagen II and gelatin, and partially degrade fibronectin. The sdMMP-13 (CD) activity was significantly inhibited by several chemicals including 1, 10-phenanthroline, EDTA, Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+). PMID:27338011

  11. Single-domain intrabodies against hepatitis C virus core inhibit viral propagation and core-induced NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Saito, Kenji; Matsuda, Mami; Sato, Mitsuru; Kanegae, Yumi; Shi, Guoli; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Chiba, Joe; Saito, Izumu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core plays a key role in viral particle formation and is involved in viral pathogenesis. Here, constructs for single-domain intrabodies consisting of variable regions derived from mouse mAbs against HCV core were established. Expressed single-domain intrabodies were shown to bind to HCV core, and inhibit the growth of cell culture-produced HCV derived from JFH-1 (genotype 2a) and a TH (genotype 1b)/JFH-1 chimera. Adenovirus vectors expressing intrabodies were also capable of reducing HCV propagation. Intrabody expression did not affect viral entry or genome replication of single-round infectious trans-complemented HCV particles. However, intrabody expression reduced intracellular and extracellular infectious titres in CD81-defective Huh7-25 cells transfected with the HCV genome, suggesting that these intrabodies impair HCV assembly. Furthermore, intrabody expression suppressed HCV core-induced NFκB promoter activity. These intrabodies may therefore serve as tools for elucidating the role of core in HCV pathogenesis. PMID:26861864

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X.-L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.

    2008-04-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from H. jecorina was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  13. Structural and Thermodynamic Comparison of the Catalytic Domain of AMSH and AMSH-LP: Nearly Identical Fold but Different Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Christopher W.; Paul, Lake N.; Kim, Myung-Il; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-02-07

    AMSH plays a critical role in the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) machinery, which facilitates the down-regulation and degradation of cell-surface receptors. It displays a high level of specificity toward cleavage of Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, the structural basis of which has been understood recently through the crystal structure of a highly related, but ESCRT-independent, protein AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein). We have determined the X-ray structure of two constructs representing the catalytic domain of AMSH: AMSH244, the JAMM (JAB1/MPN/MOV34)-domain-containing polypeptide segment from residues 244 to 424, and AMSH219{sup E280A}, an active-site mutant, Glu280 to Ala, of the segment from 219 to 424. In addition to confirming the expected zinc coordination in the protein, the structures reveal that the catalytic domains of AMSH and AMSH-LP are nearly identical; however, guanidine-hydrochloride-induced unfolding studies show that the catalytic domain of AMSH is thermodynamically less stable than that of AMSH-LP, indicating that the former is perhaps structurally more plastic. Much to our surprise, in the AMSH219{sup E280A} structure, the catalytic zinc was still held in place, by the compensatory effect of an aspartate from a nearby loop moving into a position where it could coordinate with the zinc, once again suggesting the plasticity of AMSH. Additionally, a model of AMSH244 bound to Lys63-linked diubiquitin reveals a type of interface for the distal ubiquitin significantly different from that seen in AMSH-LP. Altogether, we believe that our data provide important insight into the structural difference between the two proteins that may translate into the difference in their biological function.

  14. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  15. The type II pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: molecular characterization of the gene and expression of the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Erra-Pujada, M; Debeire, P; Duchiron, F; O'Donohue, M J

    1999-05-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs, a Thr-rich region, and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The presence of these noncatalytic domains suggests that Th-Apu may be anchored to the cell surface and be O glycosylated.

  16. Cooperation between catalytic and DNA binding domains enhances thermostability and supports DNA synthesis at higher temperatures by thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Pavlova, Nadejda V; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2012-03-13

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases [Pavlov, A. R., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.99, 13510-13515]. The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various sequence-nonspecific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of Topo V HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105 °C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding of templates to DNA polymerases. PMID:22320201

  17. Structure-based mutagenesis of the catalytic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Liu, Y; Chen, H; Farzan, M; Dyda, F

    1997-01-01

    Two different crystal structures of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) catalytic domain were analyzed for interactions at the enzyme active site. Gln-62 and Glu-92 interact with active-site residue Asp-64, and Lys-136 interacts with active-site residue Asp-116 across a dimer interface. Conservative and nonconservative substitutions were introduced at these positions to probe the roles of these interactions in HIV-1 integration. Purified mutant proteins were assayed for in vitro 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities, and HIV-1 mutants were assayed for virion protein composition, reverse transcription, and infectivities in human cell lines. Each of the mutant IN proteins displayed wild-type disintegration activity, indicating that none of the interactions is essential for catalysis. Mutants carrying Gln or Ala for Glu-92 displayed wild-type activities, but substituting Lys for Glu-92 reduced in vitro 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities 5- to 10-fold and yielded a replication-defective IN active-site mutant viral phenotype. Substituting Glu for Gln-62 reduced in vitro 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities 5- to 10-fold without grossly affecting viral replication kinetics, suggesting that HIV-1 can replicate in T-cell lines with less than the wild-type level of IN activity. The relationship between IN solubility and HIV-1 replication was also investigated. We previously showed that substituting Lys for Phe-185 dramatically increased the solubility of recombinant IN but caused an HIV-1 particle assembly defect. Mutants carrying His at this position displayed increased solubility and wild-type replication kinetics, showing that increased IN solubility per se is not detrimental to virus growth. PMID:9094622

  18. The Evolutionarily Conserved Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), Lysin Motif (LysM), Domain Catalytic (TLDc) Domain Is Neuroprotective against Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Mattéa J.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Kevin X; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathological feature of many neurological disorders; therefore, utilizing proteins that are protective against such cellular insults is a potentially valuable therapeutic approach. Oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) has been shown previously to be critical for oxidative stress resistance in neuronal cells; deletion of this gene causes neurodegeneration in mice, yet conversely, overexpression of OXR1 is protective in cellular and mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. OXR1 contains the Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC), lysin motif (LysM), domain catalytic (TLDc) domain, a motif present in a family of proteins including TBC1 domain family member 24 (TBC1D24), a protein mutated in a range of disorders characterized by seizures, hearing loss, and neurodegeneration. The TLDc domain is highly conserved across species, although the structure-function relationship is unknown. To understand the role of this domain in the stress response, we carried out systematic analysis of all mammalian TLDc domain-containing proteins, investigating their expression and neuroprotective properties in parallel. In addition, we performed a detailed structural and functional study of this domain in which we identified key residues required for its activity. Finally, we present a new mouse insertional mutant of Oxr1, confirming that specific disruption of the TLDc domain in vivo is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that the integrity of the TLDc domain is essential for conferring neuroprotection, an important step in understanding the functional significance of all TLDc domain-containing proteins in the cellular stress response and disease. PMID:26668325

  19. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  20. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein–DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  1. Homodimerization of the Death-Associated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain: Development of a New Small Molecule Fluorescent Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael; Atmanene, Cédric; Xu, Qingyan; Fouillen, Laetitia; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Bonnet, Dominique; Marsol, Claire; Hibert, Marcel; Sanglier-Cianferani, Sarah; Pigault, Claire; McNamara, Laurie K.; Watterson, D. Martin; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Background Death-Associated Protein Kinase (DAPK) is a member of the Ca2+/calmodulin regulated serine/threonine protein kinases. Its biological function has been associated with induced cell death, and in vivo use of selective small molecule inhibitors of DAPK catalytic activity has demonstrated that it is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings In the in vitro study presented here, we describe the homodimerization of DAPK catalytic domain and the crucial role played by its basic loop structure that is part of the molecular fingerprint of death protein kinases. Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry of DAPK catalytic domain and a basic loop mutant DAPK protein performed under a variety of conditions was used to detect the monomer-dimer interchange. A chemical biological approach was used to find a fluorescent probe that allowed us to follow the oligomerization state of the protein in solution. Conclusions/Significance The use of this combined biophysical and chemical biology approach facilitated the elucidation of a monomer-dimer equilibrium in which the basic loop plays a key role, as well as an apparent allosteric conformational change reported by the fluorescent probe that is independent of the basic loop structure. PMID:21152427

  2. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    SciTech Connect

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  3. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-02-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1-x Si x induced by the influence of an "edge" of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion "Σ7" domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  4. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1−xSix induced by the influence of an “edge” of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion “Σ7” domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  5. Topology of mannosidase II in rat liver Golgi membranes and release of the catalytic domain by selective proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Moremen, K W; Touster, O

    1986-08-15

    into the detergent phase consistent with its location as an integral Golgi membrane protein, while the 110,000-dalton chymotrypsin-digested enzyme partitioned almost exclusively into the aqueous phase in a manner characteristic of a soluble protein. These results suggest that mannosidase II catalytic activity resides in a proteolytically resistant, hydrophilic 110,000-dalton domain. Attachment of this catalytic domain to the lumenal face of Golgi membranes is achieved by a proteolytically sensitive linkage to a 14,000-dalton hydrophobic membrane anchoring domain.

  6. Hematite homogeneous core/shell hierarchical spheres: Surfactant-free solvothermal preparation and their improved catalytic property of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Suoyuan; Li Haitao; He Xiaodie; Kang Zhenhui; Liu Yang; Lee, Shuit Tong

    2012-01-15

    Solvothermal synthesis is an efficient synthetic method for preparing nano and micromaterials. Preparation of hematite through alcoholysis of ferric ion under solvothermal condition has been carried out at low concentrations. In this paper, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical nanostructures were synthesized via solvothermal treatment of FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and ethanol. The achievements of such structures can be attributed to two important factors: high temperature and high concentration. Besides, the crystal water and reaction time were also important factors to the synthesis of hematite. The prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore size distribution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a satellite peak at 719.8 eV, which is the characteristic peak of Fe(III). The formation mechanism of the spheres and the effects of the reactant concentrations and reaction temperatures have been discussed. Moreover, the enhanced catalytic activity of the spheres has also been investigated through oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high conversion (42%) and selectivity (95%). - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/shell hierarchical microspheres were synthesized by solvothermal method. Owing to the special structure, the synthesized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microspheres exhibit a superior catalytic activity in benzyl oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hierarchical Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core/shell microspheres were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microspheres were assembled by {beta}-FeOOH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample exhibits a superior catalytic activity and selectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high activity and selectivity are due to the hierarchical core/shell structure.

  7. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina.

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X. -L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Biosciences Division; National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  9. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  10. Exploring the origin of the catalytic power and product specificity of SET domain protein methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lima, A H; Alves, C N; Prasad, R; Lameira, J

    2016-10-20

    Herein, we used computer simulation to evaluate the free energy activation barriers of the first and second methyl transfer for native SET8 PKMT and its Y334F mutant. The results suggest that the origin of SET8 catalytic power is mainly due to electrostatic preorganization.

  11. Feasibility and Domain Validation of RA Flare Core Domain Set: A Report of the OMERACT 2014 RA Flare Group Plenary

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Susan J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Cooksey, Roxanne; Choy, Ernest H.; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E.; Guillemin, Francis; Halls, Serena; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L.; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Orbai, Ana Maria; Pohl, Christoph; Voshaar, Marieke Scholte; Woodworth, Thasia G.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The OMERACT RA Flare Group was established to develop an approach to identify and measure rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flares. Here, we provide an overview of our OMERACT 2014 plenary. Methods Feasibility and validity of flare domains endorsed at OMERACT 11 (2012) were described based on initial data from three international studies collected using a common set of questions specific to RA flare. Mean flare frequency, severity, and duration data were presented, and domain scores were compared by flare status to examine known-groups validity. Breakout groups provided input for stiffness, self-management, contextual factors, and measurement considerations. Results Flare data from 501 patients in a observational study indicated 39% were in a flare, with mean (SD) severity of 6.0 (2.6) and 55% lasting > 14 days. Pain, physical function, fatigue, participation and stiffness scores averaged ≥ 2 times higher (2 of 11 points) in flaring individuals. Correlations between flare domains and corresponding legacy instruments were r’s from 0.46 to 0.93. A combined definition (patient-report of flare and DAS28 increase) was evaluated in two other trials with similar results. Breakout groups debated specific measurement issues. Conclusion These data contribute initial evidence of feasibility and content validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set. Our research agenda for OMERACT 2016 includes establishing duration/intensity criteria and developing criteria to identify RA flares using existing disease activity measures. Ongoing work will also address discordance between patients and physician ratings, facilitate applications to clinical care, elucidate the role of self-management and help finalize recommendations for RA flare measurement. PMID:25684764

  12. The role of factor XIa (FXIa) catalytic domain exosite residues in substrate catalysis and inhibition by the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of protease nexin 2.

    PubMed

    Su, Ya-Chi; Miller, Tara N; Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Schoonmaker, Robert T; Sinha, Dipali; Walsh, Peter N

    2011-09-01

    To select residues in coagulation factor XIa (FXIa) potentially important for substrate and inhibitor interactions, we examined the crystal structure of the complex between the catalytic domain of FXIa and the Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain of a physiologically relevant FXIa inhibitor, protease nexin 2 (PN2). Six FXIa catalytic domain residues (Glu(98), Tyr(143), Ile(151), Arg(3704), Lys(192), and Tyr(5901)) were subjected to mutational analysis to investigate the molecular interactions between FXIa and the small synthetic substrate (S-2366), the macromolecular substrate (factor IX (FIX)) and inhibitor PN2KPI. Analysis of all six Ala mutants demonstrated normal K(m) values for S-2366 hydrolysis, indicating normal substrate binding compared with plasma FXIa; however, all except E98A and K192A had impaired values of k(cat) for S-2366 hydrolysis. All six Ala mutants displayed deficient k(cat) values for FIX hydrolysis, and all were inhibited by PN2KPI with normal values of K(i) except for K192A, and Y5901A, which displayed increased values of K(i). The integrity of the S1 binding site residue, Asp(189), utilizing p-aminobenzamidine, was intact for all FXIa mutants. Thus, whereas all six residues are essential for catalysis of the macromolecular substrate (FIX), only four (Tyr(143), Ile(151), Arg(3704), and Tyr(5901)) are important for S-2366 hydrolysis; Glu(98) and Lys(192) are essential for FIX but not S-2366 hydrolysis; and Lys(192) and Tyr(5901) are required for both inhibitor and macromolecular substrate interactions. PMID:21778227

  13. Structures of the catalytic EAL domain of the Escherichia coli direct oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-06-01

    The direct oxygen sensor DosP is a multidomain protein that contains a gas-sensing haem domain and an EAL effector domain. EAL domains are omnipresent signal transduction domains in bacteria. Many EAL domains are active phosphodiesterases and are involved in breakdown of the ubiquitous bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP. Despite a great deal of information on the functional and structural aspects of active and inactive EAL domains, little is known about the structural basis of their regulation by their associated sensory domains. Here, two crystal structures of the Escherichia coli DosP EAL domain derived from cubic and monoclinic crystal forms that were obtained under tartrate and PEG conditions, respectively, are described. Both of the structures display the typical TIM (triosephosphate isomerase) barrel fold with one antiparallel β-strand. However, unlike other EAL structures, access to the active site in DosP EAL is sterically restricted by the presence of a short helical stretch (Ser637-Ala-Leu-His640) in loop L3 between strand β3 and helix α3. This element, together with an unordered fragment, replaces the short α-helix (named α5 in Tbd1265 EAL) that is found in other EAL-domain structures. Since DosP EAL is an active c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, the observed inactive conformation is suggested to be of functional relevance for the regulation mechanism of DosP.

  14. Ab Initio Modeling of the Herpesvirus VP26 Core Domain Assessed by CryoEM Density

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L; Jiang, Wen; Wedemeyer, William J; Rixon, Frazer J; Baker, David; Chiu, Wah

    2006-01-01

    Efforts in structural biology have targeted the systematic determination of all protein structures through experimental determination or modeling. In recent years, 3-D electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has assumed an increasingly important role in determining the structures of these large macromolecular assemblies to intermediate resolutions (6–10 Å). While these structures provide a snapshot of the assembly and its components in well-defined functional states, the resolution limits the ability to build accurate structural models. In contrast, sequence-based modeling techniques are capable of producing relatively robust structural models for isolated proteins or domains. In this work, we developed and applied a hybrid modeling approach, utilizing cryoEM density and ab initio modeling to produce a structural model for the core domain of a herpesvirus structural protein, VP26. Specifically, this method, first tested on simulated data, utilizes the cryoEM density map as a geometrical constraint in identifying the most native-like models from a gallery of models generated by ab initio modeling. The resulting model for the core domain of VP26, based on the 8.5-Å resolution herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid cryoEM structure and mutational data, exhibited a novel fold. Additionally, the core domain of VP26 appeared to have a complementary interface to the known upper-domain structure of VP5, its cognate binding partner. While this new model provides for a better understanding of the assembly and interactions of VP26 in HSV-1, the approach itself may have broader applications in modeling the components of large macromolecular assemblies. PMID:17069457

  15. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-). PMID:26183108

  16. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  17. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  18. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  19. Recombinant expression of the precursor of the hemorrhagic metalloproteinase HF3 and its non-catalytic domains using a cell-free synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Milene C; Imbert, Lionel; Kitano, Eduardo S; Vernet, Thierry; Serrano, Solange M T

    2016-09-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) participate in snakebite pathology such as hemorrhage, inflammation, and necrosis. They are synthesized as latent multi-domain precursors whose processing generates either catalytically active enzymes or free non-enzymatic domains. Recombinant expression of the precursor of P-III class SVMPs has failed due to the instability of the multi-domain polypeptide structure. Conversely, functional recombinant non-catalytic domains were obtained by prokaryotic expression systems. Here, we show for the first time the recombinant expression of the precursor of HF3, a highly hemorrhagic SVMP from Bothrops jararaca, and its non-catalytic domains, using an E. coli-based cell-free synthesis system. The precursor of HF3, composed of pro-, metalloproteinase-, disintegrin-like-, and cysteine-rich domains, and containing 38 Cys residues, was successfully expressed and purified. A protein composed of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domains (DC protein) and the cysteine-rich domain alone (C protein) were expressed in vitro individually and purified. Both proteins were shown to be functional in assays monitoring the interaction with matrix proteins and in modulating the cleavage of fibrinogen by HF3. These data indicate that recombinant expression using prokaryotic-based cell-free synthesis emerges as an attractive alternative for the study of the structure and function of multi-domain proteins with a high content of Cys residues. PMID:27209197

  20. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V.; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  1. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-21

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  2. The deposition of Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide and their catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiu; Wu, Shengnan; Jungwirth, Scott; Chen, Zhibing; Wang, Zhenghua; Wang, Lun; Li, Yongxin

    2013-07-01

    Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles have been synthesized on a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) surface by an under-potential deposition (UPD) redox replacement technique, which involves redox replacement of a copper UPD monolayer by {{PtCl}}_{4}^{2-} that could be reduced and deposited simultaneously. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods have been used to characterize the graphene decorated with Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. The electrochemical experiments show that the materials exhibit excellent catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction and the methanol oxidation reaction. It is believed that the high-performance of this new catalyst is due to the ultrathin Pt shell on the Au nanoparticles surface and the oxygen-containing functional groups on the RGO surface.

  3. Characterization of Solanum tuberosum Multicystatin and the Significance of Core Domains[C

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abigail R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Kumar, G.N. Mohan; Knowles, N. Richard; Kang, ChulHee

    2013-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) multicystatin (PMC) is a unique cystatin composed of eight repeating units, each capable of inhibiting cysteine proteases. PMC is a composite of several cystatins linked by trypsin-sensitive (serine protease) domains and undergoes transitions between soluble and crystalline forms. However, the significance and the regulatory mechanism or mechanisms governing these transitions are not clearly established. Here, we report the 2.2-Å crystal structure of the trypsin-resistant PMC core consisting of the fifth, sixth, and seventh domains. The observed interdomain interaction explains PMC’s resistance to trypsin and pH-dependent solubility/aggregation. Under acidic pH, weakening of the interdomain interactions exposes individual domains, resulting in not only depolymerization of the crystalline form but also exposure of cystatin domains for inhibition of cysteine proteases. This in turn allows serine protease–mediated fragmentation of PMC, producing ∼10-kD domains with intact inhibitory capacity and faster diffusion, thus enhancing PMC’s inhibitory ability toward cysteine proteases. The crystal structure, light-scattering experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the critical role of pH and N-terminal residues in these dynamic transitions between monomer/polymer of PMC. Our data support a notion that the pH-dependent structural regulation of PMC has defense-related implications in tuber physiology via its ability to regulate protein catabolism. PMID:24363310

  4. When core competence is not enough: functional interplay of the DEAD-box helicase core with ancillary domains and auxiliary factors in RNA binding and unwinding.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Markus G; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    DEAD-box helicases catalyze RNA duplex unwinding in an ATP-dependent reaction. Members of the DEAD-box helicase family consist of a common helicase core formed by two RecA-like domains. According to the current mechanistic model for DEAD-box mediated RNA unwinding, binding of RNA and ATP triggers a conformational change of the helicase core, and leads to formation of a compact, closed state. In the closed conformation, the two parts of the active site for ATP hydrolysis and of the RNA binding site, residing on the two RecA domains, become aligned. Closing of the helicase core is coupled to a deformation of the RNA backbone and destabilization of the RNA duplex, allowing for dissociation of one of the strands. The second strand remains bound to the helicase core until ATP hydrolysis and product release lead to re-opening of the core. The concomitant disruption of the RNA binding site causes dissociation of the second strand. The activity of the helicase core can be modulated by interaction partners, and by flanking N- and C-terminal domains. A number of C-terminal flanking regions have been implicated in RNA binding: RNA recognition motifs (RRM) typically mediate sequence-specific RNA binding, whereas positively charged, unstructured regions provide binding sites for structured RNA, without sequence-specificity. Interaction partners modulate RNA binding to the core, or bind to RNA regions emanating from the core. The functional interplay of the helicase core and ancillary domains or interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding is not entirely understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge on RNA binding to the DEAD-box helicase core and the roles of ancillary domains and interaction partners in RNA binding and unwinding by DEAD-box proteins.

  5. Shaped Pd-Ni-Pt core-sandwich-shell nanoparticles: influence of Ni sandwich layers on catalytic electrooxidations.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Brian T; Young, Allison P; Jalalpoor, Daniel; Golden, Matthew C; Mao, Shunjia; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Yong; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2014-07-22

    Shape-controlled metal nanoparticles (NPs) interfacing Pt and nonprecious metals (M) are highly active energy conversion electrocatalysts; however, there are still few routes to shaped M-Pt core-shell NPs and fewer studies on the geometric effects of shape and strain on catalysis by such structures. Here, well-defined cubic multilayered Pd-Ni-Pt sandwich NPs are synthesized as a model platform to study the effects of the nonprecious metal below the shaped Pt surface. The combination of shaped Pd substrates and mild reduction conditions directs the Ni and Pt overgrowth in an oriented, layer-by-layer fashion. Exposing a majority of Pt(100) facets, the catalytic performance in formic acid and methanol electro-oxidations (FOR and MOR) is assessed for two different Ni layer thicknesses and two different particle sizes of the ternary sandwich NPs. The strain imparted to the Pt shell layer by the introduction of the Ni sandwich layer (Ni-Pt lattice mismatch of ∼11%) results in higher specific initial activities compared to core-shell Pd-Pt bimetallic NPs in alkaline MOR. The trends in activity are the same for FOR and MOR electrocatalysis in acidic electrolyte. However, restructuring in acidic conditions suggests a more complex catalytic behavior from changes in composition. Notably, we also show that cubic quaternary Au-Pd-Ni-Pt multishelled NPs, and Pd-Ni-Pt nanooctahedra can be generated by the method, the latter of which hold promise as potentially highly active oxygen reduction catalysts.

  6. The properties of catalytically-inactivated Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: Role of the cellulose binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Donner, T.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1993-12-31

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was purified from a crude cellulase by preparative isoelectric focusing. Treatment of CBH I with 1-ethyl-3-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in its catalytic inactivation but did not abolish its ability to be absorbed to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). CBH I thus modified possessed a pI of between 8.5 and 9.3 and decreased tryptophan fluorescence compared to native CBH I. A comparison of the effect of native and modified CBH I on the morphology of crystalline cotton cellulose fibers was made using scanning electron microscopy.

  7. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY(1112), the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  8. Crystal structures of the catalytic domains of pseudouridine synthases RluC and RluD from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kenji; Machida, Yoshitaka; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2004-04-20

    The most frequent modification of RNA, the conversion of uridine bases to pseudouridines, is found in all living organisms and often in highly conserved locations in ribosomal and transfer RNA. RluC and RluD are homologous enzymes which each convert three specific uridine bases in Escherichia coli ribosomal 23S RNA to pseudouridine: bases 955, 2504, and 2580 in the case of RluC and 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the case of RluD. Both have an N-terminal S4 RNA binding domain. While the loss of RluC has little phenotypic effect, loss of RluD results in a much reduced growth rate. We have determined the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of RluC, and full-length RluD. The S4 domain of RluD appears to be highly flexible or unfolded and is completely invisible in the electron density map. Despite the conserved topology shared by the two proteins, the surface shape and charge distribution are very different. The models suggest significant differences in substrate binding by different pseudouridine synthases.

  9. Investigating the Allosteric Regulation of YfiN from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Clues from the Structure of the Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fernicola, Silvia; Franceschini, Stefano; Rinaldo, Serena; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for a plethora of biofilm mediated chronic infections among which cystic fibrosis pneumonia is the most frightening. The long-term survival strategy of P. aeruginosa in the patients lungs is based on a fine balance of virulence vs dormant states and on genetic adaptation, in order to select persistent phenotypes as the small colony variants (SCVs), which strongly correlate with antibiotic resistance and poor lung function. Recent studies have coupled SCV with increased levels of the signaling molecule cyclic di-GMP, and demonstrated the central role of the diguanylate cyclase YfiN, part of the tripartite signaling module YifBNR, in c-di-GMP dependent SCV regulation. YfiN, also called TpbB, is a multi-domain membrane enzyme connecting periplasmic stimuli to cytosolic c-di-GMP production by an allosteric inside-out signaling mechanism that, due to the lack of structural data, is still largely hypothetical. We have solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain (GGDEF), and measured the enzymatic activity of the cytosolic portion in real-time by means of a newly developed method. Based on these results we demonstrate that, unlike other diguanylate cyclase, YfiN does not undergo product feedback inhibition, and that the presence of the HAMP domain is required for dimerization and catalysis. Coupling our structural and kinetic data with an in silico study we are now able to propose a model for the allosteric regulation of YfiN. PMID:24278422

  10. The Catalytic and Lectin Domains of UDP-GalNAc:Polypeptide α-N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase Function in Concert to Direct Glycosylation Site Selection*

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Jayalakshmi; Fritz, Timothy A.; Gerken, Thomas A.; Jamison, Oliver; Live, David; Liu, Mian; Tabak, Lawrence A.

    2008-01-01

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (ppGalNAcTs), a family (EC 2.4.1.41) of enzymes that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation, are structurally composed of a catalytic domain and a lectin domain. Previous studies have suggested that the lectin domain modulates the glycosylation of glycopeptide substrates and may underlie the strict glycopeptide specificity of some isoforms (ppGalNAcT-7 and -10). Using a set of synthetic peptides and glycopeptides based upon the sequence of the mucin, MUC5AC, we have examined the activity and glycosylation site preference of lectin domain deletion and exchange constructs of the peptide/glycopeptide transferase ppGalNAcT-2 (hT2) and the glycopeptide transferase ppGalNAcT-10 (hT10). We demonstrate that the lectin domain of hT2 directs glycosylation site selection for glycopeptide substrates. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements show that this effect is attributable to two mechanisms, either lectin domain-aided substrate binding or lectin domain-aided product release following glycosylation. We find that glycosylation of peptide substrates by hT10 requires binding of existing GalNAcs on the substrate to either its catalytic or lectin domain, thereby resulting in its apparent strict glycopeptide specificity. These results highlight the existence of two modes of site selection used by these ppGalNAcTs: local sequence recognition by the catalytic domain and the concerted recognition of distal sites of prior glycosylation together with local sequence binding mediated, respectively, by the lectin and catalytic domains. The latter mode may facilitate the glycosylation of serine or threonine residues, which occur in sequence contexts that would not be efficiently glycosylated by the catalytic domain alone. Local sequence recognition by the catalytic domain differs between hT2 and hT10 in that hT10 requires a pre-existing GalNAc residue while hT2 does not. PMID:18562306

  11. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide that supports catalytic activity in the hammerhead ribozyme domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, P; Harvey, S C; Ferbeyre, G; Usman, N; Cedergren, R

    1995-01-01

    A study of the activity of deoxyribonucleotide-substituted analogs of the hammerhead domain of RNA catalysis has led to the design of a 14mer oligomer composed entirely of deoxyribonucleotides that promotes the cleavage of an RNA substrate. Characterization of this reaction with sequence variants and mixed DNA/RNA oligomers shows that, although the all-deoxyribonucleotide oligomer is less efficient in catalysis, the DNA/substrate complex shares many of the properties of the all-RNA hammerhead domain such as multiple turnover kinetics and dependence on Mg2+ concentration. On the other hand, the values of kinetic parameters distinguish the DNA oligomer from the all-RNA oligomer. In addition, an analog of the oligomer having a single ribonucleotide in a strongly conserved position of the hammerhead domain is associated with more efficient catalysis than the all-RNA oligomer. Images PMID:7479070

  12. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jeffrey A; Braker, Jay D; Jordan, Douglas B

    2010-12-01

    Catalytic properties of two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 are determined using heterologously expressed enzyme purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly one unit higher than the Rhizopus AmyA glucoamylase enzyme. Optimal initial activities are at 60 and 50 °C for AmyC and AmyD, respectively. Inactivation of both enzymes occurs at 50 °C following 30 min pre-incubation. The two enzymes demonstrate substantially slower catalytic rates toward soluble starch relative to AmyA. AmyC has similar k(cat) and K(m) for oligosaccharides to other Rhizopus and Aspergillus glucoamylases; however, the enzyme has a 2-fold lower K(m) (maltose) . AmyD has a 3-fold higher K(m) and lower k(cat) for maltooligosaccharides than AmyC and other glucoamylases. AmyC (but not AmyD) exhibits substrate inhibition. K(i) for substrate inhibition decreases with increasing length of the oligosaccharides. Data from pre-steady-state binding of AmyC to maltose and maltotriose and pre-steady-state to steady-state catalytic turnover experiments of AmyC acting on maltotriose were used to interrogate models of substrate inhibition. In the preferred model, AmyC accumulates an enzyme-maltose-maltotriose dead-end complex in the steady state.

  13. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  14. Secretory production of antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli using the catalytic domain of a cellulase as fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huili; Li, Haoran; Gao, Dongfang; Gao, Cuijuan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-11-20

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules which serve as essential components of the innate immune system in various organisms. AMPs possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. However, the scaled production of such peptides in Escherichia coli faces many difficulties because of their small size and toxicity to the host. Here, we described a new fusion strategy to extracellularly produce significant amounts of these antimicrobial peptides in recombinant E. coli at significant amount. Employing the catalytic domain of a cellulase (Cel-CD) from Bacillus subtilis KSM-64 as the fusion partner, five recombinant antimicrobial peptides were confirmed to accumulate in the culture medium at concentrations ranging from 184 mg/L to 297 mg/L. The radical diffusion experiment demonstrated that the released model antimicrobial peptide, bombinin, had antibacterial activities against both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This strategy will be suitable for the production of antimicrobial peptides and other toxicity proteins.

  15. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  16. Core domains of shared decision-making during psychiatric visits: Scientific and preference-based discussions

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Sadaaki; Matthias, Marianne S.; Salyers, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is imperative to person-centered care, yet little is known about what aspects of SDM are targeted during psychiatric visits. This secondary data analysis (191 psychiatric visits with 11 providers, coded with a validated SDM coding system) revealed two factors (scientific and preference-based discussions) underlying SDM communication. Preference-based discussion occurred less. Both provider and consumer initiation of SDM elements and decision complexity were associated with greater discussions in both factors, but were more strongly associated with scientific discussion. Longer visit length correlated with only scientific discussion. Providers’ understanding of core domains could facilitate engaging consumers in SDM. PMID:24500023

  17. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Meiler, Jens; O’Neill, Hugh

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  18. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers.

    PubMed

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T; Nixon, B Tracy; Haigler, Candace H; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Meiler, Jens; O'Neill, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose synthesis complex with a "rosette" shape is responsible for synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. This work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. The conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. This study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  19. A Novel Family of Soluble Minimal Scaffolds Provides Structural Insight into the Catalytic Domains of Integral Membrane Metallopeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    López-Pelegrín, Mar; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Cintas-Pedrola, Anna; Canals, Albert; Peinado, Juan R.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Arolas, Joan L.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In the search for structural models of integral-membrane metallopeptidases (MPs), we discovered three related proteins from thermophilic prokaryotes, which we grouped into a novel family called “minigluzincins.” We determined the crystal structures of the zymogens of two of these (Pyrococcus abyssi proabylysin and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii projannalysin), which are soluble and, with ∼100 residues, constitute the shortest structurally characterized MPs to date. Despite relevant sequence and structural similarity, the structures revealed two unique mechanisms of latency maintenance through the C-terminal segments previously unseen in MPs as follows: intramolecular, through an extended tail, in proabylysin, and crosswise intermolecular, through a helix swap, in projannalysin. In addition, structural and sequence comparisons revealed large similarity with MPs of the gluzincin tribe such as thermolysin, leukotriene A4 hydrolase relatives, and cowrins. Noteworthy, gluzincins mostly contain a glutamate as third characteristic zinc ligand, whereas minigluzincins have a histidine. Sequence and structural similarity further allowed us to ascertain that minigluzincins are very similar to the catalytic domains of integral membrane MPs of the MEROPS database families M48 and M56, such as FACE1, HtpX, Oma1, and BlaR1/MecR1, which are provided with trans-membrane helices flanking or inserted into a minigluzincin-like catalytic domain. In a time where structural biochemistry of integral-membrane proteins in general still faces formidable challenges, the minigluzincin soluble minimal scaffold may contribute to our understanding of the working mechanisms of these membrane MPs and to the design of novel inhibitors through structure-aided rational drug design approaches. PMID:23733187

  20. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    DOE PAGES

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; et al

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer inmore » solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.« less

  1. In vitro selection of RNase P RNA reveals optimized catalytic activity in a highly conserved structural domain.

    PubMed

    Frank, D N; Ellington, A E; Pace, N R

    1996-12-01

    In vitro selection techniques are useful means of dissecting the functions of both natural and artificial ribozymes. Using a self-cleaving conjugate containing the Escherichia coli ribonuclease P RNA and its substrate, pre-tRNA (Frank DN, Harris ME, Pace NR, 1994, Biochemistry 33:10800-10808), we have devised a method to select for catalytically active variants of the RNase P ribozyme. A selection experiment was performed to probe the structural and sequence constraints that operate on a highly conserved region of RNase P: the J3/4-P4-J2/4 region, which lies within the core of RNase P and is thought to bind catalytically essential magnesium ions (Harris ME et al., 1994, EMBO J 13:3953-3963; Hardt WD et al., 1995, EMBO J 14:2935-2944; Harris ME, Pace NR, 1995, RNA 1:210-218). We sought to determine which, if any, of the nearly invariant nucleotides within J3/4-P4-J2/4 are required for ribozyme-mediated catalysis. Twenty-two residues in the J3/4-P4-J2/4 component of RNase P RNA were randomized and, surprisingly, after only 10 generations, each of the randomized positions returned to the wild-type sequence. This indicates that every position in J3/4-P4-J2/4 contributes to optimal catalytic activity. These results contrast sharply with selections involving other large ribozymes, which evolve improved catalytic function readily in vitro (Chapman KB, Szostak JW, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:618-622; Joyce GF, 1994, Curr Opin Struct Biol 4:331-336; Kumar PKR, Ellington AE, 1995, FASEB J 9:1183-1195). The phylogenetic conservation of J3/4-P4-J2/4, coupled with the results reported here, suggests that the contribution of this structure to RNA-mediated catalysis was optimized very early in evolution, before the last common ancestor of all life. PMID:8972768

  2. Kinetic analysis of bypass of O(6)- methylguanine by the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Gu, Shiling; Wang, Weiping; Chen, Jie; Li, Yingqing; Wang, Chunxue; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-04-15

    Alkylating agents can form O(6)-methylguansine (O(6)-MeG). To study the intrinsic kinetic behaviors of bypassing O(6)-MeG, we used the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase η (Pol ηcore, residues 1-513), instead of the full-length Pol η, to study their elementary steps, eliminating the effects of the C-terminal C2H2 motif on dNTP incorporation. The misincorporation frequencies were 10(-4) for G and 0.055-0.446 for O(6)-MeG. O(6)-MeG does not affect the extension efficiency. Pol ηcore showed no fast burst phase for any incorporation opposite G or O(6)-MeG. Primer extension was greatly blocked by O(6)-MeG and about 67% dTTP, 31% dCTP and 2% dATP were incorporated opposite O(6)-MeG. This study provides further understanding of the mutation mechanism of alkylated lesion for yeast DNA polymerase η.

  3. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  4. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  5. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. PMID:26801740

  6. Unraveling Surface Plasmon Decay in Core-Shell Nanostructures toward Broadband Light-Driven Catalytic Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Zhiheng; Long, Ran; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Yue; Wei, Kecheng; Wang, Chengming; Chen, Lu; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-06-01

    Harnessing surface plasmon of metal nanostructures to promote catalytic organic synthesis holds great promise in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. High conversion efficiency relies not only on broadening the absorption spectrum but on coupling the harvested energy into chemical reactions. Such coupling undergoes hot-electron transfer and photothermal conversion during the decay of surface plasmon; however, the two plasmonic effects are unfortunately entangled, making their individual roles still under debate. Here, we report that in a model system of bimetallic Au-Pd core-shell nanostructures the two effects can be disentangled through tailoring the shell thickness at atomic-level precision. As demonstrated by our ultrafast absorption spectroscopy characterizations, the achieved tunability of the two effects in a model reaction of Pd-catalyzed organic hydrogenation offers a knob for enhancing energy coupling. In addition, the two intrinsic plasmonic modes at 400-700 and 700-1000 nm in the bar-shaped nanostructures allow for utilizing photons to a large extent in full solar spectrum. This work establishes a paradigmatic guidance toward designing plasmonic-catalytic nanomaterials for enhanced solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

  7. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  8. Sequence of the core antenna domain from the anoxygenic phototroph Heliophilum fasciatum: implications for diversity of reaction center type I.

    PubMed

    Mix, Lucas J; Harmer, Tara L; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-06-01

    Broad variation among anoxygenic reaction centers makes it essential to consider a wide variety when considering the origins of photosynthesis. The photosynthetic core antenna domain in the gene pshA from Heliophilum fasciatum was sequenced doubling the number of core sequences available from heliobacteria. The sequence shares a pattern of hydrophobicity and histidine residues with the core antenna domain of pshA from Heliobacillus mobilis. Sequence identity between the two pshA sequences was 68%, indicating heliobacterial reaction centers show similar diversity to photosystem I throughout cyanobacteria and plastids. Thus, the diversity of anoxygenic phototrophic reaction centers may be greater than previously thought. PMID:15170240

  9. Sequence of the core antenna domain from the anoxygenic phototroph Heliophilum fasciatum: implications for diversity of reaction center type I.

    PubMed

    Mix, Lucas J; Harmer, Tara L; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-06-01

    Broad variation among anoxygenic reaction centers makes it essential to consider a wide variety when considering the origins of photosynthesis. The photosynthetic core antenna domain in the gene pshA from Heliophilum fasciatum was sequenced doubling the number of core sequences available from heliobacteria. The sequence shares a pattern of hydrophobicity and histidine residues with the core antenna domain of pshA from Heliobacillus mobilis. Sequence identity between the two pshA sequences was 68%, indicating heliobacterial reaction centers show similar diversity to photosystem I throughout cyanobacteria and plastids. Thus, the diversity of anoxygenic phototrophic reaction centers may be greater than previously thought.

  10. The N-terminal end of the catalytic domain of SRC kinase Hck is a conformational switch implicated in long-range allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Banavali, Nilesh K; Roux, Benoît

    2005-11-01

    Signal transduction in cell growth and proliferation involves regulation of kinases through long-range allostery between remote protein regions. Molecular dynamics free energy calculations are used to clarify the coupling between the catalytic domain of Src kinase Hck and its N-terminal end connecting to the regulatory SH2 and SH3 modules. The N-terminal end is stable in the orientation required for the regulatory modules to remain properly bound only in the inactive catalytic domain. In the active catalytic domain, the N-terminal end prefers a different conformation consistent with dissociation of the regulatory modules. The free energy surface shows that the N-terminal end acts as a reversible two-state conformational switch coupling the catalytic domain to the regulatory modules. Structural analogy with insulin receptor kinase and c-Src suggests that such reversible conformational switching in a critical hinge region could be a common mechanism in long-range allosteric regulation of protein kinase activity.

  11. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process. PMID:12059786

  12. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  13. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors. PMID:25286857

  14. A novel putative insect chitinase with multiple catalytic domains: hormonal regulation during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Royer, Véronique; Fraichard, Stéphane; Bouhin, Hervé

    2002-09-15

    We have used differential display to identify genes that are regulated by juvenile hormone in the epidermis of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. One of the genes encodes T. molitor chitinase 5 (TmChit5), a chitinase possessing an unusual structure. Sequence analysis of TmChit5 identified five 'chitinase units' of approx. 480 amino acids with similarity to chitinase family 18. These units are separated by less conserved regions containing putative PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequences, putative chitin-binding domains and mucin domains. Northern-blot analysis identified a single transcript of approx. 9 kb, whose abundance correlated with that of 20-hydroxyecdysone during metamorphosis. Injection of pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone alone, or in combination with cycloheximide, indicated that TmChit5 expression is directly induced by the hormone. Further experiments indicated that methoprene (a juvenile hormone analogue) indirectly induced TmChit5 mRNA expression. On the basis of the present results and previous studies, we propose a molecular mechanism for cuticle digestion during the moulting process.

  15. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; et al

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  16. The structure of the catalytic domain of Tannerella forsythia karilysin reveals it is a bacterial xenolog of animal matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Guevara, Tibisay; Karim, Abdulkarim Y.; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Arolas, Joan L.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Metallopeptidases (MPs) are among virulence factors secreted by pathogenic bacteria at the site of infection. One such pathogen is Tannerella forsythia, a member of the microbial consortium that causes peridontitis, arguably the most prevalent infective chronic inflammatory disease known to mankind. The only reported MP secreted by T. forsythia is karilysin, a 52-kDa multidomain protein comprising a central 18-kDa catalytic domain (CD), termed Kly18, flanked by domains unrelated to any known protein. We analyzed the 3D structure of Kly18 in the absence and presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+, which are required for function and stability, and found that it evidences most of the structural features characteristic of the CDs of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Unexpectedly, a peptide was bound to the active-site cleft of Kly18 mimicking a left-behind cleavage product, which revealed that the specificity pocket accommodates bulky hydrophobic side chains of substrates as in mammalian MMPs. In addition, Kly18 displayed a unique Mg2+ or Ca2+ binding site and two flexible segments that could play a role in substrate binding. Phylogenetic and sequence similarity studies revealed that Kly18 is evolutionarily much closer to winged-insect and mammalian MMPs than to potential bacterial counterparts found by genomic sequencing projects. Therefore, we conclude that this first structurally-characterized non-mammalian MMP is a xenolog co-opted through horizontal gene transfer during the intimate coexistence between T. forsythia and humans or other animals, in a very rare case of gene shuffling from eukaryotes to prokaryotes. Subsequently, this protein would have evolved in a bacterial environment to give rise to full-length karilysin that is furnished with unique flanking domains that do not conform to the general multidomain architecture of animal MMPs. PMID:21166898

  17. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Human APOBEC3B and the Critical Structural Role for a Conserved Methionine.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Sachini U; Guruge, Thisari A; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-09-25

    Human APOBEC3B deaminates cytosines in DNA and belongs to the AID/APOBEC family of enzymes. These proteins are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and may cause mutations in a variety of cancers. To characterize its ability to convert cytosines into uracils, we tested several derivatives of APOBEC3B gene for their ability to cause mutations in Escherichia coli. Through this analysis, a methionine residue at the junction of the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential for high mutagenicity. Properties of mutants with substitutions at this position, examination of existing molecular structures of APOBEC3 family members and molecular modeling suggest that this residue is essential for the structural stability of this family of proteins. The APOBEC3B CTD with the highest mutational activity was purified to homogeneity and its kinetic parameters were determined. Size-exclusion chromatography of the CTD monomer showed that it is in equilibrium with its dimeric form and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the protein suggested that the dimer may be quite stable. The partially purified NTD did not show intrinsic deamination activity and did not enhance the activity of the CTD in biochemical assays. Finally, APOBEC3B was at least 10-fold less efficient at mutating 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to thymine than APOBEC3A in a genetic assay and was at least 10-fold less efficient at deaminating 5mC compared to C in biochemical assays. These results shed light on the structural organization of APOBEC3B catalytic domain, its substrate specificity and its possible role in causing genome-wide mutations.

  18. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metalloproteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule.

  19. High-performance ZnCo₂O₄@CeO2₂₄ core@shell microspheres for catalytic CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Dapeng; Zhen, Jiangman; Li, Junqi; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Hongjie

    2014-12-24

    In this paper, we report a self-assembly method to synthesize high-quality ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres with tunable CeO2 thickness. ZnCo2O4 spheres were first synthesized as the core, followed by a controlled CeO2 shell coating process. The thickness of CeO2 shell could be easily tuned by varying the feeding molar ratio of Ce/Co. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) image have identified the core@shell structure of these samples. In CO oxidation tests these ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres exhibited promising catalytic performance, and the catalytic activity of the best sample is even close to the traditional noble metal-CeO2 system, attaining 100% CO conversion at a relatively low temperature of 200 °C. Cycling tests confirm their good stability of these core@shell microspheres besides activity. Their high catalytic performance should be attributed to the core@shell structure formation, and moreover further H2-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results revealed the possible synergistic effects between the two components of ZnCo2O4 and CeO2.

  20. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  1. A novel structural Fenton-like nanocatalyst with highly improved catalytic performance for generalized preparation of iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanghui; Peng, Xiaomen; Li, Hongping; Wang, Jianzhi; Zhou, Lincheng; Zhao, Tianqi; Huang, Zhihao; Jiang, Haifei

    2015-05-01

    FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles with a soap-bubble-like shell have been synthesized, and the materials exhibit excellent Fenton catalytic performance. More importantly, FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles as catalysts and precursors could catalyze organic dye molecules to form iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres.

  2. Hollow ruthenium nanoparticles with small dimensions derived from Ni@Ru core@shell structure: synthesis and enhanced catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Desinan, Stefano; Rosei, Renzo; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2012-08-18

    Hollow Ru nanoparticles with ~14 nm diameter and ~2 nm shell thickness are reported for the first time, by removal of Ni from the delicately designed Ni@Ru core@shell NPs. Such hollow Ru NPs exhibit enhanced catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane with respect to solid ones. PMID:22773309

  3. A novel structural Fenton-like nanocatalyst with highly improved catalytic performance for generalized preparation of iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanghui; Peng, Xiaomen; Li, Hongping; Wang, Jianzhi; Zhou, Lincheng; Zhao, Tianqi; Huang, Zhihao; Jiang, Haifei

    2015-05-01

    FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles with a soap-bubble-like shell have been synthesized, and the materials exhibit excellent Fenton catalytic performance. More importantly, FexOy@FexOy/C nanoparticles as catalysts and precursors could catalyze organic dye molecules to form iron oxide@organic dye polymer core-shell nanospheres. PMID:25828271

  4. Somatic Mutations in Catalytic Core of POLK Reported in Prostate Cancer Alter Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh; Mukhopadhyay, Sudurkia; Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Makridakis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    DNA Polymerase kappa is a Y-family polymerase that participates to bypass the damaged DNA known as translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase. Higher frequency of mutations in DNA polymerase kappa (POLK) recently been reported in prostate cancer. We sequenced entire exons of the POLK gene on genomic DNA from 40 prostate cancers and matched normal samples. We identified 28% of patients have somatic mutations in the POLK gene of the prostate tumors. Mutations in these prostate cancers have somatic mutation spectra which is dominated by C-to-T transitions. In the current study we further investigate the effect of p.E29K, p.G154E, p.F155S, p.E430K, p.L442F and p.E449K mutations on the biochemical properties of the polymerase in vitro. Using TLS assay and nucleotide incorporation fidelity, following site directed mutagenesis bacterial expression and purification of the respective polymerase variants. We report that following missense mutations p.E29K, p.G154E, p.F155S, p.E430K and p.L442F significantly diminished the catalytic efficiencies of POLK in regards to the lesion bypass (AP site). POLK variants show extraordinarily low fidelity by mis-incorporating T, C, and G as compared to wild type. Taken together these results suggest that interfering with normal polymerase kappa function by these mutations may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:26046662

  5. Domain structures as optical gratings controlled by electric field in a bent-core nematic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Ya; Zhou, Meng-jie; Xiang, Ying; Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Buka, Ágnes

    2015-06-15

    A regular domain structure consisting of parallel stripes - flexodomains - have been induced by low frequency (subHz) electric voltage in a bent core nematic liquid crystal. The wavelength of the pattern is in the range of 1-10 micrometers and thus can conveniently be observed in a polarizing microscope. It also serves as an optical grating and produces a regular system of laser diffraction spots. The pattern was found to emerge and disappear consecutively in each half period of the driving, with the wavelength of the flexodomains changing periodically as the ac voltage oscillates. Analyzing the polarization characteristics of the diffracted light, the polarization of the first order spot was found perpendicular to that of the incident light, in accordance with a recent theoretical calculation. PMID:26193504

  6. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  7. The Core of Chloroplast Nucleoids Contains Architectural SWIB Domain Proteins[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Melonek, Joanna; Matros, Andrea; Trösch, Mirl; Mock, Hans-Peter; Krupinska, Karin

    2012-01-01

    A highly enriched fraction of the transcriptionally active chromosome from chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins involved in structuring of the nucleoid core. Among such plastid nucleoid-associated candidate proteins a 12-kD SWIB (SWI/SNF complex B) domain–containing protein was identified. It belongs to a subgroup of low molecular mass SWIB domain proteins, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has six members (SWIB-1 to SWIB-6) with predictions for localization in the two DNA-containing organelles. Green/red fluorescent protein fusions of four of them were shown to be targeted to chloroplasts, where they colocalize with each other as well as with the plastid envelope DNA binding protein in structures corresponding to plastid nucleoids. For SWIB-6 and SWIB-4, a second localization in mitochondria and nucleus, respectively, could be observed. SWIB-4 has a histone H1 motif next to the SWIB domain and was shown to bind to DNA. Moreover, the recombinant SWIB-4 protein was shown to induce compaction and condensation of nucleoids and to functionally complement a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS. PMID:22797472

  8. Generation of a Maize B Centromere Minimal Map Containing the Central Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nathanael A.; Douglas, Ryan N.; Jackson, Caroline E.; Birchler, James A.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The maize B centromere has been used as a model for centromere epigenetics and as the basis for building artificial chromosomes. However, there are no sequence resources for this important centromere. Here we used transposon display for the centromere-specific retroelement CRM2 to identify a collection of 40 sequence tags that flank CRM2 insertion points on the B chromosome. These were confirmed to lie within the centromere by assaying deletion breakpoints from centromere misdivision derivatives (intracentromere breakages caused by centromere fission). Markers were grouped together on the basis of their association with other markers in the misdivision series and assembled into a pseudocontig containing 10.1 kb of sequence. To identify sequences that interact directly with centromere proteins, we carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to centromeric histone H3 (CENH3), a defining feature of functional centromeric sequences. The CENH3 chromatin immunoprecipitation map was interpreted relative to the known transmission rates of centromere misdivision derivatives to identify a centromere core domain spanning 33 markers. A subset of seven markers was mapped in additional B centromere misdivision derivatives with the use of unique primer pairs. A derivative previously shown to have no canonical centromere sequences (Telo3-3) lacks these core markers. Our results provide a molecular map of the B chromosome centromere and identify key sequences within the map that interact directly with centromeric histone H3. PMID:26511496

  9. Generation of a Maize B Centromere Minimal Map Containing the Central Core Domain.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Nathanael A; Douglas, Ryan N; Jackson, Caroline E; Birchler, James A; Dawe, R Kelly

    2015-10-28

    The maize B centromere has been used as a model for centromere epigenetics and as the basis for building artificial chromosomes. However, there are no sequence resources for this important centromere. Here we used transposon display for the centromere-specific retroelement CRM2 to identify a collection of 40 sequence tags that flank CRM2 insertion points on the B chromosome. These were confirmed to lie within the centromere by assaying deletion breakpoints from centromere misdivision derivatives (intracentromere breakages caused by centromere fission). Markers were grouped together on the basis of their association with other markers in the misdivision series and assembled into a pseudocontig containing 10.1 kb of sequence. To identify sequences that interact directly with centromere proteins, we carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using antibodies to centromeric histone H3 (CENH3), a defining feature of functional centromeric sequences. The CENH3 chromatin immunoprecipitation map was interpreted relative to the known transmission rates of centromere misdivision derivatives to identify a centromere core domain spanning 33 markers. A subset of seven markers was mapped in additional B centromere misdivision derivatives with the use of unique primer pairs. A derivative previously shown to have no canonical centromere sequences (Telo3-3) lacks these core markers. Our results provide a molecular map of the B chromosome centromere and identify key sequences within the map that interact directly with centromeric histone H3.

  10. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  11. Non-catalytic motor domains enable processive movement and functional diversification of the kinesin-14 Kar3

    PubMed Central

    Mieck, Christine; Molodtsov, Maxim I; Drzewicka, Katarzyna; van der Vaart, Babet; Litos, Gabriele; Schmauss, Gerald; Vaziri, Alipasha; Westermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Motor proteins of the conserved kinesin-14 family have important roles in mitotic spindle organization and chromosome segregation. Previous studies have indicated that kinesin-14 motors are non-processive enzymes, working in the context of multi-motor ensembles that collectively organize microtubule networks. In this study, we show that the yeast kinesin-14 Kar3 generates processive movement as a heterodimer with the non-motor proteins Cik1 or Vik1. By analyzing the single-molecule properties of engineered motors, we demonstrate that the non-catalytic domain has a key role in the motility mechanism by acting as a ‘foothold’ that allows Kar3 to bias translocation towards the minus end. This mechanism rivals the speed and run length of conventional motors, can support transport of the Ndc80 complex in vitro and is critical for Kar3 function in vivo. Our findings provide an example for a non-conventional translocation mechanism and can explain how Kar3 substitutes for key functions of Dynein in the yeast nucleus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04489.001 PMID:25626168

  12. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of RluD, the only rRNA pseudouridine synthase required for normal growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Mark; Ofengand, James; Malhotra, Arun

    2004-02-01

    Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase RluD makes pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the loop of helix 69 in 23S RNA. These are the most highly conserved ribosomal pseudouridines known. Of 11 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli, only cells lacking RluD have severe growth defects and abnormal ribosomes. We have determined the 2.0 A structure of the catalytic domain of RluD (residues 77-326), the first structure of an RluA family member. The catalytic domain folds into a mainly antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by several loops and helices. A positively charged cleft that presumably binds RNA leads to the conserved Asp 139. The RluD N-terminal S4 domain, connected by a flexible linker, is disordered in our structure. RluD is very similar in both catalytic domain structure and active site arrangement to the pseudouridine synthases RsuA, TruB, and TruA. We identify five sequence motifs, two of which are novel, in the RluA, RsuA, TruB, and TruA families, uniting them as one superfamily. These results strongly suggest that four of the five families of pseudouridine synthases arose by divergent evolution. The RluD structure also provides insight into its multisite specificity.

  13. Structure-Guided Systems-Level Engineering of Oxidation-Prone Methionine Residues in Catalytic Domain of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica for Significant Improvement of Both Oxidative Stability and Catalytic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    High oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency are required for the alkaline α-amylases to keep the enzymatic performance under the harsh conditions in detergent industries. In this work, we attempted to significantly improve both the oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica by engineering the five oxidation-prone methionine residues around the catalytic domain via a systematic approach. Specifically, based on the tertiary structure analysis, five methionines (Met 145, Met 214, Met 229, Met 247 and Met 317) were individually substituted with oxidation-resistant threonine, isoleucine and alaline, respectively. Among the created 15 mutants, 7 mutants M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T and M317I showed significantly enhanced oxidative stability or catalytic efficiency. In previous work, we found that the replacement of M247 with leucine could significantly improve the oxidative stability. Thus, these 8 positive mutants (M145A, M145I, M214A, M229A, M229T, M247T, M247L and M317I) were used to conduct the second round of combinational mutations. Among the constructed 85 mutants (25 two-point mutants, 36 three-point mutants, 16 four-point mutants and 8 five-point mutants), the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I showed a 5.4-fold increase in oxidative stability and a 3.0-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Interestingly, the specific activity, alkaline stability and thermal stability of this mutant were also increased. The increase of salt bridge and hydrogen bonds around the catalytic domain contributed to the significantly improved catalytic efficiency and stability, as revealed by the three-dimensional structure model of wild-type alkaline α-amylase and its mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I. With the significantly improved oxidative stability and catalytic efficiency, the mutant M145I-214A-229T-247T-317I has a great potential as a detergent additive, and this structure-guided systems engineering

  14. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  15. Highly catalytic hollow palladium nanoparticles derived from silver@silver-palladium core-shell nanostructures for the oxidation of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Hollow Palladium (hPd) nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared via a simple and mild successive method. Firstly, core-shell NPs with silver (Ag) cores and silver-palladium (Ag-Pd) alloy shells are synthesized in aqueous phase by galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) between Ag NPs and Pd2+ ion precursors. Saturated aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was then employed to remove the Ag component from the core and shell regions of core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs, resulting in the formation of hPd NPs with shrunk sizes in comparison with their core-shell parents. Specifically, the hPd NPs exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability for catalyzing the oxidation of formic acid, compared with the Pd NPs reduced by NaBH4 in aqueous solution and commercial Pd/C catalyst from Johnson Matthey, mainly due to the large electrochemically active surface areas of the hollow particles. In addition, The Ag component in core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs has an unfavorable influence on catalytic activity of NPs for formic acid oxidation. However, the durability could be improved due to the electron donating effect from Ag to Pd atoms in the core-shell NPs.

  16. The RIG-I ATPase core has evolved a functional requirement for allosteric stabilization by the Pincer domain.

    PubMed

    Rawling, David C; Kohlway, Andrew S; Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a pattern recognition receptor expressed in metazoan cells that is responsible for eliciting the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon detection of intracellular, non-self RNA. Structural studies of RIG-I have identified a novel Pincer domain composed of two alpha helices that physically tethers the C-terminal domain to the SF2 helicase core. We find that the Pincer plays an important role in mediating the enzymatic and signaling activities of RIG-I. We identify a series of mutations that additively decouple the Pincer motif from the ATPase core and show that this decoupling results in impaired signaling. Through enzymological and biophysical analysis, we further show that the Pincer domain controls coupled enzymatic activity of the protein through allosteric control of the ATPase core. Further, we show that select regions of the HEL1 domain have evolved to potentiate interactions with the Pincer domain, resulting in an adapted ATPase cleft that is now responsive to adjacent domains that selectively bind viral RNA.

  17. Cross-domain targeted ontology subsets for annotation: the case of SNOMED CORE and RxNorm.

    PubMed

    López-García, Pablo; Lependu, Paea; Musen, Mark; Illarramendi, Arantza

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of using ontology subsets versus full ontologies are well-documented for many applications. In this study, we propose an efficient subset extraction approach for a domain using a biomedical ontology repository with mappings, a cross-ontology, and a source subset from a related domain. As a case study, we extracted a subset of drugs from RxNorm using the UMLS Metathesaurus, the NDF-RT cross-ontology, and the CORE problem list subset of SNOMED CT. The extracted subset, which we termed RxNorm/CORE, was 4% the size of the full RxNorm (0.4% when considering ingredients only). For evaluation, we used CORE and RxNorm/CORE as thesauri for the annotation of clinical documents and compared their performance to that of their respective full ontologies (i.e., SNOMED CT and RxNorm). The wide range in recall of both CORE (29-69%) and RxNorm/CORE (21-35%) suggests that more quantitative research is needed to assess the benefits of using ontology subsets as thesauri in annotation applications. Our approach to subset extraction, however, opens a door to help create other types of clinically useful domain specific subsets and acts as an alternative in scenarios where well-established subset extraction techniques might suffer from difficulties or cannot be applied.

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-01-01

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  19. Systematic Domain Swaps of Iterative, Nonreducing Polyketide Synthases Provide a Mechanistic Understanding and Rationale For Catalytic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iterative, nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are multidomain enzymes responsible for the construction of the core architecture of aromatic polyketide natural products in fungi. Engineering these enzymes for the production of non-native metabolites has been a long-standing goal. We conducted a systematic survey of in vitro “domain swapped” NR-PKSs using an enzyme deconstruction approach. The NR-PKSs were dissected into mono- to multidomain fragments and recombined as noncognate pairs in vitro, reconstituting enzymatic activity. The enzymes used in this study produce aromatic polyketides that are representative of the four main chemical features set by the individual NR-PKS: starter unit selection, chain-length control, cyclization register control, and product release mechanism. We found that boundary conditions limit successful chemistry, which are dependent on a set of underlying enzymatic mechanisms. Crucial for successful redirection of catalysis, the rate of productive chemistry must outpace the rate of spontaneous derailment and thioesterase-mediated editing. Additionally, all of the domains in a noncognate system must interact efficiently if chemical redirection is to proceed. These observations refine and further substantiate current understanding of the mechanisms governing NR-PKS catalysis. PMID:24815013

  20. Reversible Aggregation Plays a Crucial Role on the Folding Landscape of p53 Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Lima, Luis M. T. R.; Maia, Lenize F.; Lopez, Priscila M.; Ano Bom, Ana P.; Valente, Ana P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2004-01-01

    The role of tumor suppressor protein p53 in cell cycle control depends on its flexible and partially unstructured conformation, which makes it crucial to understand its folding landscape. Here we report an intermediate structure of the core domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 (p53C) during equilibrium and kinetic folding/unfolding transitions induced by guanidinium chloride. This partially folded structure was undetectable when investigated by intrinsic fluorescence. Indeed, the fluorescence data showed a simple two-state transition. On the other hand, analysis of far ultraviolet circular dichroism in 1.0 M guanidinium chloride demonstrated a high content of secondary structure, and the use of an extrinsic fluorescent probe, 4,4′-dianilino-1,1′ binaphthyl-5,5′-disulfonic acid, indicated an increase in exposure of the hydrophobic core at 1 M guanidinium chloride. This partially folded conformation of p53C was plagued by aggregation, as suggested by one-dimensional NMR and demonstrated by light-scattering and gel-filtration chromatography. Dissociation by high pressure of these aggregates reveals the reversibility of the process and that the aggregates have water-excluded cavities. Kinetic measurements show that the intermediate formed in a parallel reaction between unfolded and folded structures and that it is under fine energetic control. They are not only crucial to the folding pathway of p53C but may explain as well the vulnerability of p53C to undergo departure of the native to an inactive state, which makes the cell susceptible to malignant transformation. PMID:15298872

  1. Catalytic mechanism of cyclic di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase: a study of the EAL domain-containing RocR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Yang, Ye; Qi, Yaning; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2008-05-01

    EAL domain proteins are the major phosphodiesterases for maintaining the cellular concentration of second-messenger cyclic di-GMP in bacteria. Given the pivotal roles of EAL domains in the regulation of many bacterial behaviors, the elucidation of their catalytic and regulatory mechanisms would contribute to the effort of deciphering the cyclic di-GMP signaling network. Here, we present data to show that RocR, an EAL domain protein that regulates the expression of virulence genes and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO-1, catalyzes the hydrolysis of cyclic di-GMP by using a general base-catalyzed mechanism with the assistance of Mg(2+) ion. In addition to the five essential residues involved in Mg(2+) binding, we propose that the essential residue E(352) functions as a general base catalyst assisting the deprotonation of Mg(2+)-coordinated water to generate the nucleophilic hydroxide ion. The mutation of other conserved residues caused various degree of changes in the k(cat) or K(m), leading us to propose their roles in residue positioning and substrate binding. With functions assigned to the conserved groups in the active site, we discuss the molecular basis for the lack of activity of some characterized EAL domain proteins and the possibility of predicting the phosphodiesterase activities for the vast number of EAL domains in bacterial genomes in light of the catalytic mechanism.

  2. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic efficiency to synthetic substrate AAPF, with the V355 variant having the highest kcat /Km value of 143.6 s−1 mM−1. The truncation of keratinase had little effect on alkaline stability but obviously decreased collagenase activity, developing its potential application in leather treatment. The variants V380, V370, and V355 were thermophilic, with a 1.7-fold enhancement of keratinlytic activity at 60 °C when compared to the wild type. The entire truncation of PPC domain obtained the variant V355 with improved tolerance to alkalinity, salt, chaotropic agents, and detergents. The V355 variant showed more than a 40% improvement in activity under 15% (w/v) NaCl or 4% (w/v) SDS solution, showing excellent stability under harsh washing and unhairing conditions. Our work investigated how protein engineering affects the function of PPC domain of KerSMD. PMID:27298079

  3. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic efficiency to synthetic substrate AAPF, with the V355 variant having the highest kcat /Km value of 143.6 s(-1) mM(-1). The truncation of keratinase had little effect on alkaline stability but obviously decreased collagenase activity, developing its potential application in leather treatment. The variants V380, V370, and V355 were thermophilic, with a 1.7-fold enhancement of keratinlytic activity at 60 °C when compared to the wild type. The entire truncation of PPC domain obtained the variant V355 with improved tolerance to alkalinity, salt, chaotropic agents, and detergents. The V355 variant showed more than a 40% improvement in activity under 15% (w/v) NaCl or 4% (w/v) SDS solution, showing excellent stability under harsh washing and unhairing conditions. Our work investigated how protein engineering affects the function of PPC domain of KerSMD. PMID:27298079

  4. A single catalytic domain of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I is a non-specific nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chudi; Kumar, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    A stable heterodimeric protein containing a single correctly folded catalytic domain (SCD) of T7 endonuclease I was produced by means of a trans-splicing intein system. As predicted by a model presented earlier, purified SCD protein acts a non-specific nicking endonuclease on normal linear DNA. The SCD retains some ability to recognize and cleave a deviated DNA double-helix near a nick or a strand-crossing site. Thus, we infer that the non-specific and nicked-site cleavage activities observed for the native T7 endonuclease I (as distinct from the resolution activity) are due to uncoordinated actions of the catalytic domains. The positively charged C-terminus of T7 Endo I is essential for the enzymatic activity of SCD, as it is for the native enzyme. We propose that the preference of the native enzyme for the resolution reaction is achieved by cooperativity in the binding of its two catalytic domains when presented with two of the arms across a four-way junction or cruciform structure. PMID:16264086

  5. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  6. Highly retentive core domains in K-feldspar preserve argon ages from high temperature stages of granite exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Lister, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Retentive core domains are characterized by diffusion parameters that imply K-feldspar should be able to retain argon even at temperatures near or above the granite solidus. In this case it should be possible to date granite emplacement using argon geochronology, and the same answer should be obtained as by using other methods. We present one case study where this is the case, from the elevated Capoas granite stock on Palawan, in the Philippines, and another where it is not, from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, on Ios, Greece. We attempt to determine the factors such as the role of fluid ingress in triggering the in situ recrystallization that can eliminate and/or modify the core domains, leading to relatively youthful ages. Thermochronology is still possible, because less retentive diffusion domains exist, but different methods need to be applied to interpret the data. The work also demonstrates that K-feldspar can be sufficiently retentive as to allow direct dating of processes that reduce the dimensions of diffusion domains, e.g., cataclased and/or recrystallized K-feldspar in fault rock and/or mylonite. These are important developments in the methodology of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but to further advance we need to clarify the nature of these highly retentive core domains. In particular, we need better understand how they are modified by microstructural processes during deformation and metamorphism. We need also to assess the role of any crystal structural changes during step-heating in vacuo.

  7. CORE Knowledge Domain C.4 Employment and Career Development: Application for Rehabilitation Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire-Kuletz, Maureen; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) CORE revised the standards for rehabilitation counseling master's degree program accreditation in 2004. These standards seek to promote effective rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in both private and public programs (CORE, 2008). This article focuses on the new CORE standard…

  8. One-Pot Synthesis of Monodisperse Noble Metal @ Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (M@RF) and M@Carbon Core-Shell Nanostructure and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peipei; Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-10-27

    We demonstrate that noble metal @ RF core-shell nanostructures can be obtained through a facile one-pot synthesis approach in the absence of any additional surfactants. Monodisperse metal@RF core-shell nanostructures can be produced within 1 h on a large scale. Both the core size and shell thickness can be readily tuned by altering the reaction parameters. Systematic studies reveal that resorcinol could have several functions: it could act as a reactant to form RF resin, and it also could passivate the surface of metallic nanoparticles to prevent them from aggregating. Additionally, for the first time, our results suggest that resorcinol may act as a reducing agent that can reduce metal salts to form metal nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles can be carbonized into M@carbon nanostructures, which have shown great performance in the catalytic hydrogenation of chlorobenzene. This work not only will help to achieve the controllable synthesis of noble metal@RF resin and M@carbon core-shell nanostructures but also will promote research into other RF-based nanostructures and their catalytic applications.

  9. The prolyl isomerase domain of PpiD from Escherichia coli shows a parvulin fold but is devoid of catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Weininger, Ulrich; Jakob, Roman P; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Schmid, Franz X

    2010-01-01

    PpiD is a periplasmic folding helper protein of Escherichia coli. It consists of an N-terminal helix that anchors PpiD in the inner membrane near the SecYEG translocon, followed by three periplasmic domains. The second domain (residues 264–357) shows homology to parvulin-like prolyl isomerases. This domain is a well folded, stable protein and follows a simple two-state folding mechanism. In its solution structure, as determined by NMR spectroscopy, it resembles most closely the first parvulin domain of the SurA protein, which resides in the periplasm of E. coli as well. A previously reported prolyl isomerase activity of PpiD could not be reproduced when using improved protease-free peptide assays or assays with refolding proteins as substrates. The parvulin domain of PpiD interacts, however, with a proline-containing tetrapeptide, and the binding site, as identified by NMR resonance shift analysis, colocalized with the catalytic sites of other parvulins. In its structure, the parvulin domain of PpiD resembles most closely the inactive first parvulin domain of SurA, which is part of the chaperone unit of this protein and presumably involved in substrate recognition. PMID:19866485

  10. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B.; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. PMID:23904483

  11. Polyglutamine Amyloid Core Boundaries and Flanking Domain Dynamics in Huntingtin Fragment Fibrils Determined by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the huntingtin (htt) protein leads to misfolding and aggregation. There is much interest in the molecular features that distinguish monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillar species that populate the aggregation pathway and likely differ in cytotoxicity. The mechanism and rate of aggregation are greatly affected by the domains flanking the polyQ segment within exon 1 of htt. A “protective” C-terminal proline-rich flanking domain inhibits aggregation by inducing polyproline II structure (PPII) within an extended portion of polyQ. The N-terminal flanking segment (httNT) adopts an α-helical structure as it drives aggregation, helps stabilize oligomers and fibrils, and is seemingly integral to their supramolecular assembly. Via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe how, in the mature fibrils, the htt flanking domains impact the polyQ domain and in particular the localization of the β-structured amyloid core. Using residue-specific and uniformly labeled samples, we find that the amyloid core occupies most of the polyQ domain but ends just prior to the prolines. We probe the structural and dynamical features of the remarkably abrupt β-sheet to PPII transition and discuss the potential connections to certain htt-binding proteins. We also examine the httNT α-helix outside the polyQ amyloid core. Despite its presumed structural and demonstrated stabilizing roles in the fibrils, quantitative ssNMR measurements of residue-specific dynamics show that it undergoes distinct solvent-coupled motion. This dynamical feature seems reminiscent of molten-globule-like α-helix-rich features attributed to the nonfibrillar oligomeric species of various amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:25280367

  12. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  13. Trp122 and Trp134 on the surface of the catalytic domain are essential for crystalline chitin hydrolysis by Bacillus circulans chitinase A1.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Ishibashi, A; Ariga, Y; Hashimoto, M; Nikaidou, N; Sugiyama, J; Matsumoto, T; Nonaka, T

    2001-04-01

    From the 3D-structural analysis of the catalytic domain of chitinase A1, two exposed tryptophan residues (W122 and W134) are proposed to play an important role in guiding a chitin chain into the catalytic cleft during the crystalline chitin hydrolysis. Mutation of either W122 or W134 to alanine significantly reduced the hydrolyzing activity against highly crystalline beta-chitin microfibrils. Double mutation almost completely abolished the hydrolyzing activity. On the other hand, the hydrolyzing activity against either soluble or amorphous substrate was not reduced. These mutations slightly impaired the binding activity of this enzyme. These results clearly demonstrated that the two exposed aromatic residues play a critical role in hydrolyzing the chitin chain in crystalline chitin.

  14. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  15. Facile synthesis of near-monodisperse Ag@Ni core-shell nanoparticles and their application for catalytic generation of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huizhang; Chen, Yuanzhi; Chen, Xiaozhen; Wen, Ruitao; Yue, Guang-Hui; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2011-05-13

    Magnetically recyclable Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles have been fabricated via a simple one-pot synthetic route using oleylamine both as solvent and reducing agent and triphenylphosphine as a surfactant. As characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles exhibit a very narrow size distribution with a typical size of 14.9 ± 1.2 nm and a tunable shell thickness. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy study shows that the formation of a Ni shell on Ag core can damp the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the Ag core and lead to a red-shifted SPR absorption peak. Magnetic measurement indicates that all the as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature, and their blocking temperatures can be controlled by modulating the shell thickness. The as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles exhibit excellent catalytic properties for the generation of H(2) from dehydrogenation of sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions. The hydrogen generation rate of Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles is found to be much higher than that of Ag and Ni nanoparticles of a similar size, and the calculated activation energy for hydrogen generation is lower than that of many bimetallic catalysts. The strategy employed here can also be extended to other noble-magnetic metal systems.

  16. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-Terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Close, D.; Robinson, H.; Johnson, S. J.; Sdano, M. A.; McDonald, S. M.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2011-05-13

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  17. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    D Close; S Johnson; M Sdano; S McDonald; H Robinson; T Formosa; C Hill

    2011-12-31

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  18. Structure of core domain of fibril-forming PHF/Tau fragments.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Hideyo; Sharma, Deepak; Goux, Warren J; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2006-03-01

    Short peptide sequences within the microtubule binding domain of the protein Tau are proposed to be core nucleation sites for formation of amyloid fibrils displaying the paired helical filament (PHF) morphology characteristic of neurofibrillary tangles. To study the structure of these proposed nucleation sites, we analyzed the x-ray diffraction patterns from the assemblies formed by a variety of PHF/tau-related peptide constructs containing the motifs VQIINK (PHF6*) in the second repeat and VQIVYK (PHF6) in the third repeat of tau. Peptides included: tripeptide acetyl-VYK-amide (AcVYK), tetrapeptide acetyl-IVYK-amide (AcPHF4), hexapeptide acetyl-VQIVYK-amide (AcPHF6), and acetyl-GKVQIINKLDLSNVQKDNIKHGSVQIVYKPVDLSKVT-amide (AcTR4). All diffraction patterns showed reflections at spacings of 4.7 A, 3.8 A, and approximately 8-10 A, which are characteristic of an orthogonal unit cell of beta-sheets having dimensions a=9.4 A, b=6.6 A, and c=approximately 8-10 A (where a, b, and c are the lattice constants in the H-bonding, chain, and intersheet directions). The sharp 4.7 A reflections indicate that the beta-crystallites are likely to be elongated along the H-bonding direction and in a cross-beta conformation. The assembly of the AcTR4 peptide, which contains both the PHF6 and PHF6* motifs, consisted of twisted sheets, as indicated by a unique fanning of the diffuse equatorial scattering and meridional accentuation of the (210) reflection at 3.8 A spacing. The diffraction data for AcVYK, AcPHF4, and AcPHF6 all were consistent with approximately 50 A-wide tubular assemblies having double-walls, where beta-strands constitute the walls. In this structure, the peptides are H-bonded together in the fiber direction, and the intersheet direction is radial. The positive-charged lysine residues face the aqueous medium, and tyrosine-tyrosine aromatic interactions stabilize the intersheet (double-wall) layers. This particular contact, which may be involved in PHF fibril formation

  19. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials. PMID:27276187

  20. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials.

  1. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  2. Comparative Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Substrate Binding in Human Fatty Acid Synthase: Enoyl Reductase and β-Ketoacyl Reductase Catalytic Domains

    PubMed Central

    John, Arun; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, EC 2.3.1.85), is a multi-enzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. This lipogenic enzyme has gained importance beyond its physiological role due to its implications in several clinical conditions-cancers, obesity, and diabetes. This has made FASN an attractive pharmacological target. Here, we have attempted to predict the theoretical models for the human enoyl reductase (ER) and β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) domains based on the porcine FASN crystal structure, which was the structurally closest template available at the time of this study. Comparative modeling methods were used for studying the structure-function relationships. Different validation studies revealed the predicted structures to be highly plausible. The respective substrates of ER and KR domains-namely, trans-butenoyl and β-ketobutyryl-were computationally docked into active sites using Glide in order to understand the probable binding mode. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo and holo states of ER and KR showed stable backbone root mean square deviation trajectories with minimal deviation. Ramachandran plot analysis showed 96.0% of residues in the most favorable region for ER and 90.3% for the KR domain, respectively. Thus, the predicted models yielded significant insights into the substrate binding modes of the ER and KR catalytic domains and will aid in identifying novel chemical inhibitors of human FASN that target these domains. PMID:25873848

  3. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue.

    PubMed

    Wallentine, Brad D; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol(-1) (15.1 kJ mol(-1)). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the β-sandwich scaffold. On the other hand, the substitution N239Y creates an advantageous hydrophobic contact between the aromatic ring of this tyrosine and the adjacent Leu137. Surprisingly, the rescued cancer mutant shows much larger structural deviations than the cancer mutant alone when compared

  4. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  5. Catalytic domains of the LAR and CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatases from Escherichia coli expression systems: Purification and characterization for specificity and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyeongjin; Ramer, S.E.; Itoh, Michiyasu; Saito, Haruo; Walsh, C.T. ); Kitas, E.; Bannwarth, W.; Burn, P. )

    1992-01-14

    The cytoplasmic domains of two human transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), LAR and CD45, have been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity, and compared for catalytic efficiency toward several phosphotyrosine-containing peptide substrates. A 615-residue LAR fragment (LAR-D1D2) containing both tandemly repeated PTPase domains shows almost identical specific activity and high catalytic efficiency as the 40-kDa single-domain LAR-D1 fragment, consistent with a single functional active site in the 70-kDa LAR-D1D2 enzyme. A 90-kDa fragment of the human leukocyte CD45 PTPase, containing two similar tandemly repeated PTPase domains, shows parallel specificity to LAR-D1 and LAR-D1D2 with a high k{sub cat}/K{sub M} value for a phosphotyrosyl undecapeptide. Sufficient purified LAR-D1 and LAR-D1D2 PTPases were available to demonstrate enzymatic exchange of {sup 18}O from {sup 18}O{sub 4} inorganic phosphate into H{sub 2} {sup 16}O at rates of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The oxygen-18 exchange probably proceeds via a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Brief incubation of all three PTPase fragments with a ({sup 32}P)phosphotyrosyl peptide substrate prior to quench with SDS sample buffer and gel electrophoresis led to autoradiographic detection of {sup 32}P-labeled enzymes. Pulse/chase studies on the LAR {sup 32}P-enzyme showed turnover of the labeled phosphoryl group.

  6. Lactoperoxidase folding and catalysis relies on the stabilization of the alpha-helix rich core domain: a thermal unfolding study.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Barbara; Leal, Sónia S; Ghibaudi, Elena M; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2007-09-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) belongs to the mammalian peroxidase family and catalyzes the oxidation of halides, pseudo-halides and a number of aromatic substrates at the expense of hydrogen peroxide. Despite the complex physiological role of LPO and its potential involvement in carcinogenic mechanisms, cystic fibrosis and inflammatory processes, little is known on the folding and structural stability of this protein. We have undertaken an investigation of the conformational dynamics and catalytic properties of LPO during thermal unfolding, using complementary biophysical techniques (differential scanning calorimetry, electron spin resonance, optical absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies) together with biological activity assays. LPO is a particularly stable protein, capable of maintaining catalysis and structural integrity up to a high temperature, undergoing irreversible unfolding at 70 degrees C. We have observed that the first stages of the thermal denaturation involve a minor conformational change occurring at 40 degrees C, possibly at the level of the protein beta-sheets, which nevertheless does not result in an unfolding transition. Only at higher temperature, the protein hydrophobic core, which is rich in alpha-helices, unfolds with concomitant disruption of the catalytic heme pocket and activity loss. Evidences concerning the stabilizing role of the disulfide bridges and the covalently bound heme cofactor are shown and discussed in the context of understanding the structural stability determinants in a relatively large protein.

  7. Crystal structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 core and C-terminal tandem SH2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Close, Devin; Johnson, Sean J; Sdano, Matthew A; McDonald, Seth M; Robinson, Howard; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report crystal structures of the 168 kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the ~900 residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure comprised of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII CTD revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII CTD-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain. PMID:21419780

  8. Role of arginine-43 and arginine-69 of the Hin recombinase catalytic domain in the binding of Hin to the hix DNA recombination sites.

    PubMed

    Adams, C W; Nanassy, O; Johnson, R C; Hughes, K T

    1997-06-01

    The Hin recombinase mediates the site-specific inversion of a segment of the Salmonella chromosome between two flanking 26bp hix DNA recombination sites. Mutations in two amino acid residues, R43 and R69 of the catalytic domain of the Hin recombinase, were identified that can compensate for loss of binding resulting from elimination of certain major and minor groove contacts within the hix recombination sites. With one exception, the R43 and R69 mutants were also able to bind a hix sequence with an additional 4bp added to the centre of the site, unlike wild-type Hin. Purified Hin mutants R43H and R69C had both partial cleavage and inversion activities in vitro while mutants R43L, R43C, R69S, and R69P had no detectable cleavage and inversion activities. These data support a model in which the catalytic domain plays a role in DNA-binding specificity, and suggest that the arginine residues at positions 43 and 69 function to position the Hin recombinase on the DNA for a step in the recombination reaction which occurs either at and/or prior to DNA cleavage.

  9. Structure of the Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Catalytic Domain in Complex With An Extended Inhibitor Targeting the Adaptive Pocket of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Hanan, E.J.; Barr, K.J.; Zhu, J.; Paulvannan, K.; Yang, W.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of the Polo-like kinase family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. The catalytic domain of this enzyme shares significant primary amino-acid homology and structural similarity with another mitotic kinase, Aurora A. While screening an Aurora A library of ATP-competitive compounds, a urea-containing inhibitor with low affinity for mouse Aurora A but with submicromolar potency for human and zebrafish Plk1 (hPlk1 and zPlk1, respectively) was identified. A crystal structure of the zebrafish Plk1 kinase domain-inhibitor complex reveals that the small molecule occupies the purine pocket and extends past the catalytic lysine into the adaptive region of the active site. Analysis of the structures of this protein-inhibitor complex and of similar small molecules cocrystallized with other kinases facilitates understanding of the specificity of the inhibitor for Plk1 and documents for the first time that Plk1 can accommodate extended ATP-competitive compounds that project toward the adaptive pocket and help the enzyme order its activation segment.

  10. Characterization of the N-Terminal Catalytic Domain of Lytµ1/6, an Endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens Phage µ1/6.

    PubMed

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2016-10-01

    Previous characterization of Lytµ1/6, an endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens phage µ1/6, suggested that the N-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of Lytµ1/6. Mutational analyses (deletions and site-directed mutagenesis) demonstrated that lytic activity of Lytµ1/6 relies on the N-terminal part of about 200 amino acid residues. Various C-terminally truncated versions of Lytµ1/6 failed to cause lysis, indicating the necessity of the CBD for full enzyme activity. Functional analysis of the point mutants suggested that the residues K27, H31, E109, H176, and D184 were essential for lytic activity of the µ1/6 endolysin. Further characterization of the purified Lytµ1/6 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase which seems to be unrelated to any of the known conserved catalytic domains of phage endolysins or bacterial autolysins.

  11. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  12. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  13. In situ facile synthesis of Ru-based core-shell nanoparticles supported on carbon black and their high catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of amine-boranes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Su, Jun; Hong, Xinlin; Luo, Wei; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Well-dispersed core-shell Ru@M (M=Co, Ni, Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) supported on carbon black have been synthesized via a facile in situ one-step procedure under ambient condition. Core-shell Ru@Co NPs were synthesized and characterized for the first time. The as-synthesized Ru@Co and Ru@Ni NPs exhibit superior catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane compared with their monometallic and alloy counterparts. The Ru@Co/C NPs are the most reactive, with a turnover frequency (TOF) value of 320 (mol H 2 min(-1)) molRu (-1) and activation energy (Ea) of 21.16 kJ mol(-1). Ru@Ni/C NPs are the next most active, whereas Ru@Fe/C NPs are almost inactive. Additionally, the as-synthesized NPs supported on carbon black exhibit higher catalytic activity than catalysts on other conventional supports, such as SiO2 and γ-Al2O3. PMID:24288206

  14. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors. PMID:27363415

  15. Domains of the catalytically self-sufficient cytochrome P-450 BM-3. Genetic construction, overexpression, purification and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Miles, J S; Munro, A W; Rospendowski, B N; Smith, W E; McKnight, J; Thomson, A J

    1992-01-01

    1. The gene CYP102 encoding cytochrome P-450 BM-3 and subgenes encoding the cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome P-450 reductase domains have been cloned in Escherichia coli. 2. The protein products of these genes have been overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. 3. The cytochrome P-450 domain is purified in the ferric low-spin state, but is readily converted into the high-spin state by addition of the substrate palmitate (Ks = 1 microM). The cytochrome P-450 reductase domain readily reduces cytochrome c. Mixing the two domains reconstitutes only about one-thousandth of the fatty acid hydroxylase activity associated with the intact cytochrome P-450 BM-3. 4. The X-band e.p.r. spectra of both the cytochrome P-450 domain and intact cytochrome P-450 BM-3 give g-values indicating low-spin ferric haem. The spectra are virtually identical with those of the equivalent form of cytochrome P-450 cam indicating that the haem ligation in cytochrome P-450 BM-3 is identical with that of cytochrome P-450 cam. 5. Resonance Raman spectra of the substrate-free and substrate-bound forms of the cytochrome P-450 domain are given. Spectral differences in comparison with cytochrome P-450 cam may reflect subtle electronic differences between the respective haem environments. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1334408

  16. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C.

  17. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C. PMID:27601667

  18. Insights into the role of the (alpha+beta) insertion in the TIM-barrel catalytic domain, regarding the stability and the enzymatic activity of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Zees, Athanassios C; Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion; Vorgias, Constantinos E

    2009-01-01

    Chitinase A (ChiA) from Serratia marcescens is a mesophilic enzyme with high catalytic activity and high stability. The crystal structure of ChiA has revealed a TIM-barrel fold of the catalytic domain, an (alpha+beta) insertion between the B7 beta-strand and A7 alpha-helix of the TIM-barrel, an FnIII domain at the N-terminus of the molecule and a hinge region that connects the latter to the catalytic domain. In this study, the role of the (alpha+beta) domain on the stability, catalytic activity and specificity of the enzyme was investigated by deleting this domain and studying the enzymatic and structural properties of the resulting truncated enzyme. The obtained data clearly show that by removing the (alpha+beta) domain, the thermal stability of the enzyme is substantially reduced, with an apparent T(m) of 42.0+/-1.0 degrees C, compared to the apparent T(m) of 58.1+/-1.0 degrees C of ChiA at pH 9.0. The specific activity of ChiADelta(alpha+beta) was substantially decreased, the pH optimum was shifted from 6.5 to 5.0 and the substrate and product specificities were altered.

  19. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  20. Increased Crystalline Cellulose Activity via Combinations of Amino Acid Changes in the Family 9 Catalytic Domain and Family 3c Cellulose Binding Module of Thermobifida fusca Cel9A ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Irwin, Diana C.; Wilson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid modifications of the Thermobifida fusca Cel9A-68 catalytic domain or carbohydrate binding module 3c (CBM3c) were combined to create enzymes with changed amino acids in both domains. Bacterial crystalline cellulose (BC) and swollen cellulose (SWC) assays of the expressed and purified enzymes showed that three combinations resulted in 150% and 200% increased activity, respectively, and also increased synergistic activity with other cellulases. Several other combinations resulted in drastically lowered activity, giving insight into the need for a balance between the binding in the catalytic cleft on either side of the cleavage site, as well as coordination between binding affinity for the catalytic domain and CBM3c. The same combinations of amino acid variants in the whole enzyme, Cel9A-90, did not increase BC or SWC activity but did have higher filter paper (FP) activity at 12% digestion. PMID:20173060

  1. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  2. In vitro catalytic activity of N-terminal and C-terminal domains in NukM, the post-translational modification enzyme of nukacin ISK-1.

    PubMed

    Shimafuji, Chinatsu; Noguchi, Megumi; Nishie, Mami; Nagao, Jun-Ichi; Shioya, Kouki; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Lantibiotics are antibacterial peptides containing unique thioether cross-links termed lanthionine and methyllanthionine. NukM, the modifying enzyme of nukacin ISK-1, which is produced by Staphylococcus warneri ISK-1, catalyzes the dehydration of specific Ser/Thr residues in a precursor peptide, followed by conjugative addition of intramolecular Cys to dehydrated residues to generate a cyclic structure. By contrast, the precursor peptide of nisin is modified by 2 enzymes, NisB and NisC, which mediate dehydration and cyclization, respectively. While the C-terminal domain of NukM is homologous to NisC, the N-terminal domain has no homology with other known proteins. We expressed and characterized the N- and C-terminal domains of NukM, NukMN, and NukMC, separately. In vitro reconstitution revealed that full-length NukM fully modified the substrate peptide NukA. NukMN partially phosphorylated, dehydrated, and cyclized NukA. By contrast, NukMC did not catalyze dehydration, phosphorylation, or cyclization reactions. Interaction studies using surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that NukM and NukMN can bind NukA with high affinity, whereas NukMC has low substrate-recognition activity. These results suggest that NukMN is mainly responsible for substrate recognition and dehydration and that the whole NukM structure, including the C-terminal domain, is required for the complete modification of NukA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report providing insights into the in vitro catalytic activity of individual domains of a LanM-type modification enzyme. PMID:25971839

  3. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-01

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes.

  4. Importance of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha catalytic domains for interactions with SHP-2 and interleukin-1-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Laschinger, Carol; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2010-07-16

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) induces extracellular matrix degradation as a result of increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We examined adhesion-restricted signaling pathways that enable IL-1-induced MMP release in human gingival and murine fibroblasts. Of the seven MMPs and three tissue inhibitors of MMPs screened, IL-1 enhanced release only of MMP3 when cells formed focal adhesions. Inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enriched in focal adhesions, blocked IL-1-induced MMP3 release. Accordingly, in contrast to wild-type cells, fibroblasts null for PTPalpha did not exhibit IL-1-induced MMP3 release. IL-1 treatment enhanced the recruitment of SHP-2 and PTPalpha to focal adhesions and the association of PTPalpha with SHP-2. Pulldown assays confirmed a direct interaction between PTPalpha and SHP-2, which was dependent on the intact, membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPalpha. Interactions between SHP-2 and PTPalpha, recruitment of SHP-2 to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced ERK activation, and MMP3 expression were all blocked by point mutations in the phosphatase domains of PTPalpha. These data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions leading to MMP3 release and interactions between SHP-2 and PTPalpha are dependent on the integrity of the catalytic domains of PTPalpha.

  5. Importance of Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase-α Catalytic Domains for Interactions with SHP-2 and Interleukin-1-induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Laschinger, Carol; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) induces extracellular matrix degradation as a result of increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We examined adhesion-restricted signaling pathways that enable IL-1-induced MMP release in human gingival and murine fibroblasts. Of the seven MMPs and three tissue inhibitors of MMPs screened, IL-1 enhanced release only of MMP3 when cells formed focal adhesions. Inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which are enriched in focal adhesions, blocked IL-1-induced MMP3 release. Accordingly, in contrast to wild-type cells, fibroblasts null for PTPα did not exhibit IL-1-induced MMP3 release. IL-1 treatment enhanced the recruitment of SHP-2 and PTPα to focal adhesions and the association of PTPα with SHP-2. Pulldown assays confirmed a direct interaction between PTPα and SHP-2, which was dependent on the intact, membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Interactions between SHP-2 and PTPα, recruitment of SHP-2 to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced ERK activation, and MMP3 expression were all blocked by point mutations in the phosphatase domains of PTPα. These data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions leading to MMP3 release and interactions between SHP-2 and PTPα are dependent on the integrity of the catalytic domains of PTPα. PMID:20472558

  6. Functional dissection of the catalytic carboxyl-terminal domain of origin recognition complex subunit 1 (PfORC1) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Mehra, Parul; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Dar, Ashraf; Mitra, Pallabi; Roy, Nilanjan; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Origin recognition complex subunit 1 (ORC1) is essential for DNA replication in eukaryotes. The deadly human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains an ORC1/CDC6 homolog with several interesting domains at the catalytic carboxyl-terminal region that include a putative nucleoside triphosphate-binding and hydrolysis domain, a putative PCNA-interacting-protein (PIP) motif, and an extreme C-terminal region that shows poor homology with other ORC1 homologs. Due to the unavailability of a dependable inducible gene expression system, it is difficult to study the structure and function of essential genes in Plasmodium. Using a genetic yeast complementation system and biochemical experiments, here we show that the putative PIP domain in ORC1 that facilitates in vitro physical interaction with PCNA is functional in both yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Plasmodium in vivo, confirming its essential biological role in eukaryotes. Furthermore, despite having less sequence homology, the extreme C-terminal region can be swapped between S. cerevisiae and P. falciparum and it binds to DNA directly, suggesting a conserved role of this region in DNA replication. These results not only provide us a useful system to study the function of the essential genes in Plasmodium, they help us to identify the previously undiscovered unique features of replication proteins in general.

  7. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1. PMID:23663131

  8. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  9. High-resolution structure of an α-spectrin SH3-domain mutant with a redesigned hydrophobic core

    PubMed Central

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Andújar-Sánchez, Monserrat; Ortiz-Salmerón, Emilia; Cuadri, Celia; Cobos, Eva S.; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The α-spectrin SH3 domain (Spc-SH3) is a small modular domain which has been broadly used as a model protein in folding studies and these studies have sometimes been supported by structural information obtained from the coordinates of Spc-SH3 mutants. The structure of B5/D48G, a multiple mutant designed to improve the hydrophobic core and as a consequence the protein stability, has been solved at 1 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 24.79, b = 37.23, c = 62.95 Å. This mutant also bears a D48G substitution in the distal loop and this mutation has also been reported to increase the stability of the protein by itself. The structure of the B5/D48G mutant shows a highly packed hydrophobic core and a more ordered distal loop compared with previous Spc-SH3 structures. PMID:20823517

  10. A three-dimensional FRET analysis to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin-troponin core domain complex on a muscle thin filament.

    PubMed

    Miki, Masao; Makimura, Satoshi; Sugahara, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Ryuta; Bunya, Masashi; Saitoh, Takahiro; Tobita, Hidetaka

    2012-06-29

    It is essential to know the detailed structure of the thin filament to understand the regulation mechanism of striated muscle contraction. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin (Tm)-troponin (Tn) core domain complex. We generated single-cysteine mutants in the 167-195 region of Tm and in TnC, TnI, and the β-TnT 25-kDa fragment, and each was attached with an energy donor probe. An energy acceptor probe was located at actin Gln41, actin Cys374, or the actin nucleotide-binding site. From these donor-acceptor pairs, FRET efficiencies were determined with and without Ca(2+). Using the atomic coordinates for F-actin, Tm, and the Tn core domain, we searched all possible arrangements for Tm or the Tn core domain on F-actin to calculate the FRET efficiency for each donor-acceptor pair in each arrangement. By minimizing the squared sum of deviations for the calculated FRET efficiencies from the observed FRET efficiencies, we determined the location of Tm segment 167-195 and the Tn core domain on F-actin with and without Ca(2+). The bulk of the Tn core domain is located near actin subdomains 3 and 4. The central helix of TnC is nearly perpendicular to the F-actin axis, directing the N-terminal domain of TnC toward the actin outer domain. The C-terminal region in the I-T arm forms a four-helix-bundle structure with the Tm 175-185 region. After Ca(2+) release, the Tn core domain moves toward the actin outer domain and closer to the center of the F-actin axis.

  11. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing analysis of the hepatitis B virus preCore region and main catalytic motif of the viral polymerase in the same viral genome.

    PubMed

    Homs, Maria; Buti, Maria; Quer, Josep; Jardí, Rosendo; Schaper, Melanie; Tabernero, David; Ortega, Israel; Sanchez, Alex; Esteban, Rafael; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) pregenomic RNA contains a hairpin structure (ε) located in the preCore region, essential for viral replication. ε stability is enhanced by the presence of preCore variants and ε is recognized by the HBV polymerase (Pol). Mutations in the retrotranscriptase domain (YMDD) of Pol are associated with treatment resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze the preCore region and YMDD motif by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS). To evaluate the UDPS error rate, an internal control sequence was inserted in the amplicon. A newly developed technique enabled simultaneous analysis of the preCore region and Pol in the same viral genome, as well as the conserved sequence of the internal control. Nucleotide errors in HindIII yielded a UDPS error rate <0.05%. UDPS study confirmed the possibility of simultaneous detection of preCore and YMDD mutations, and demonstrated the complexity of the HBV quasispecies and cooperation between viruses. Thermodynamic stability of the ε signal was found to be the main constraint for selecting main preCore mutations. Analysis of ε-signal variability suggested the essential nature of the ε structural motif and that certain nucleotides may be involved in ε signal functions.

  12. Caspase-1 Protein Induces Apoptosis-associated Speck-like Protein Containing a Caspase Recruitment Domain (ASC)-mediated Necrosis Independently of Its Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Motani, Kou; Kushiyama, Hiroko; Imamura, Ryu; Kinoshita, Takeshi; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Suda, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The adaptor protein, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), connects pathogen/danger sensors such as NLRP3 and NLRC4 with caspases and is involved in inflammation and cell death. We have found that ASC activation induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis or CA-074Me (cathepsin B inhibitor)-inhibitable necrosis depending on the cell type. Unlike necroptosis, another necrotic cell death, ASC-mediated necrosis, was neither RIP3-dependent nor necrostatin-1-inhibitable. Although acetyl–YVAD–chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-CMK) (caspase-1 inhibitor) did not inhibit ASC-mediated necrosis, comprehensive gene expression analyses indicated that caspase-1 expression coincided with the necrosis type. Furthermore, caspase-1 knockdown converted necrosis-type cells to apoptosis-type cells, whereas exogenous expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive caspase-1 did the opposite. Knockdown of caspase-1, but not Ac-YVAD-CMK, suppressed the monocyte necrosis induced by Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas infection. Thus, the catalytic activity of caspase-1 is dispensable for necrosis induction. Intriguingly, a short period of caspase-1 knockdown inhibited IL-1β production but not necrosis, although longer knockdown suppressed both responses. Possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:21832064

  13. Human cap methyltransferase (RNMT) N-terminal non-catalytic domain mediates recruitment to transcription initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is dependent on the mRNA methyl cap which mediates mRNA processing and translation initiation. Synthesis of the methyl cap initiates with the addition of 7-methylguanosine to the initiating nucleotide of RNA pol II (polymerase II) transcripts, which occurs predominantly during transcription and in mammals is catalysed by RNGTT (RNA guanylyltransferase and 5′ phosphatase) and RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase). RNMT has a methyltransferase domain and an N-terminal domain whose function is unclear; it is conserved in mammals, but not required for cap methyltransferase activity. In the present study we report that the N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for RNMT recruitment to transcription initiation sites and that recruitment occurs in a DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole)-dependent manner. The RNMT-activating subunit, RAM (RNMT-activating miniprotein), is also recruited to transcription initiation sites via an interaction with RNMT. The RNMT N-terminal domain is required for transcript expression, translation and cell proliferation. PMID:23863084

  14. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  15. Crystal Structure of DNA Cytidine Deaminase ABOBEC3G Catalytic Deamination Domain Suggests a Binding Mode of Full-length Enzyme to Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  16. Crystal structure of DNA cytidine deaminase ABOBEC3G catalytic deamination domain suggests a binding mode of full-length enzyme to single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-02-13

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA.

  17. A QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of metal-ion-independent core 2 β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tvaroška, Igor; Kozmon, Stanislav; Wimmerová, Michaela; Koča, Jaroslav

    2013-06-17

    β1,6-GlcNAc-transferase (C2GnT) is an important controlling factor of biological functions for many glycoproteins and its activity has been found to be altered in breast, colon, and lung cancer cells, in leukemia cells, in the lymhomonocytes of multiple sclerosis patients, leukocytes from diabetes patients, and in conditions causing an immune deficiency. The result of the action of C2GnT is the core 2 structure that is essential for the further elongation of the carbohydrate chains of O-glycans. The catalytic mechanism of this metal-ion-independent glycosyltransferase is of paramount importance and is investigated here by using quantum mechanical (QM) (density functional theory (DFT))/molecular modeling (MM) methods with different levels of theory. The structural model of the reaction site used in this report is based on the crystal structures of C2GnT. The entire enzyme-substrate system was subdivided into two different subsystems: the QM subsystem containing 206 atoms and the MM region containing 5914 atoms. Three predefined reaction coordinates were employed to investigate the catalytic mechanism. The calculated potential energy surfaces discovered the existence of a concerted SN 2-like mechanism. In this mechanism, a nucleophilic attack by O6 facilitated by proton transfer to the catalytic base and the separation of the leaving group all occur almost simultaneously. The transition state for the proposed reaction mechanism at the M06-2X/6-31G** (with diffuse functions on the O1', O5', OGlu , and O6 atoms) level was located at C1-O6=1.74 Å and C1-O1=2.86 Å. The activation energy for this mechanism was estimated to be between 20 and 29 kcal mol⁻¹, depending on the method used. These calculations also identified a low-barrier hydrogen bond between the nucleophile O6H and the catalytic base Glu320, and a hydrogen bond between the N-acetamino group and the glycosidic oxygen of the donor in the TS. It is proposed that these interactions contribute to a

  18. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PigE: a transaminase involved in the biosynthesis of 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole (MAP) from Serratia sp. FS14.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiangdi; Ran, Tingting; Han, Ning; Gao, Yanyan; He, Jianhua; Tang, Lin; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2014-04-25

    Prodigiosin, a tripyrrole red pigment synthesized by Serratia and some other microbes through a bifurcated biosynthesis pathway, MBC (4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carbaldehyde) and MAP (2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole) are synthesized separately and then condensed by PigC to form prodigiosin. MAP is synthesized sequentially by PigD, PigE and PigB. PigE catalyzes the transamination of an amino group to the aldehyde group of 3-acetyloctanal, resulting in an aminoketone, which spontaneously cyclizes to form H2MAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PigE which involved in the biosynthesis of prodigiosin precursor MAP for the first time to a resolution of 2.3Å with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The monomer of PigE catalytic domain is composed of three domains with PLP as cofactor: a small N-terminal domain connecting the catalytic domain with the front part of PigE, a large PLP-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. The residues from both monomers build the PLP binding site at the interface of the dimer which resembles the other PLP-dependent enzymes. Structural comparison of PigE with Thermus thermophilus AcOAT showed a higher hydrophobic and smaller active site of PigE, these differences may be the reason for substrate specificity.

  19. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour. PMID:25820380

  20. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  1. Dissociation of Bak α1 helix from the core and latch domains is required for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Amber E; Fennell, Stephanie C; Bartolo, Ray C; Tan, Iris K L; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak permeabilizes mitochondria after undergoing major conformational changes, including poorly defined N-terminal changes. Here, we characterize those changes using 11 antibodies that were epitope mapped using peptide arrays and mutagenesis. After Bak activation by Bid, epitopes throughout the α1 helix are exposed indicating complete dissociation of α1 from α2 in the core and from α6-α8 in the latch. Moreover, disulfide tethering of α1 to α2 or α6 blocks cytochrome c release, suggesting that α1 dissociation is required for further conformational changes during apoptosis. Assaying epitope exposure when α1 is tethered shows that Bid triggers α2 movement, followed by α1 dissociation. However, α2 reaches its final position only after α1 dissociates from the latch. Thus, α1 dissociation is a key step in unfolding Bak into three major components, the N terminus, the core (α2-α5) and the latch (α6-α8). PMID:25880232

  2. Plasmonic enhancement of the optical absorption and catalytic efficiency of BiVO₄ photoanodes decorated with Ag@SiO₂ core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Fatwa F; Dabirian, Ali; Dam, Bernard; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-08-01

    Recent progress in the development of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanodes has firmly established it as a promising material for solar water splitting applications. Performance limitations due to intrinsically poor catalytic activity and slow electron transport have been successfully addressed through the application of water oxidation co-catalysts and novel doping strategies. The next bottleneck to tackle is the modest optical absorption in BiVO4, particularly close to its absorption edge of 2.4 eV. Here, we explore the modification of the BiVO4 surface with Ag@SiO2 core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles. A photocurrent enhancement by a factor of ~2.5 is found under 1 sun illumination (AM1.5). We show that this enhancement consists of two contributions: optical absorption and catalysis. The optical absorption enhancement is induced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances in the Ag nanoparticles, and agrees well with our full-field electromagnetic simulations. Far-field effects (scattering) are found to be dominant, with a smaller contribution from near-field plasmonic enhancement. In addition, a significant catalytic enhancement is observed, which is tentatively attributed to the electrocatalytic activity of the Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:24942363

  3. Purification and crystallization of the catalytic PRONE domain of RopGEF8 and its complex with Rop4 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christoph; Weyand, Michael; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2006-06-01

    Crystals of the catalytic PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 and its complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 from A. thaliana were obtained that diffract to 2.2 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. The PRONE domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RopGEF8 (PRONE8) was purified and crystallized free and in complex with the Rho-family protein Rop4 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. PRONE8 crystals were obtained using NaCl as precipitating agent and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 5}22. Native and anomalous data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation at 100 K to 2.2 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. Crystals of the Rop4–PRONE8 complex belonging to space group P6{sub 3} were obtained using Tacsimate and PEG 3350 as precipitating agents and diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution.

  4. Nucleoside monophosphate complex structures of the endonuclease domain from the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit reveal the substrate binding site inside the catalytic center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cong; Lou, Zhiyong; Guo, Yu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Yutao; Liang, Shuaiyi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Shoudeng; Li, Xuemei; Liu, Yingfang; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe

    2009-09-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza virus strains currently in circulation pose a significant risk of a global pandemic. Following the reported crystal structure of the endonuclease domain from the avian influenza virus polymerase PA subunit, here we report the results of a systematic X-ray crystallographic analysis of its complex with adenosine, uridine, and thymidine nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs). Electron density corresponding to the monophosphate moiety of each nucleotide was apparent in each NMP complex and bound to the catalytic metal. A hydrophobic site was found to contribute to nucleoside binding. The NMP complex structures should represent the conformation of the bound product after nuclease cleavage. Moreover, one solvent molecule was found to occupy an equivalent position to the second reported Mn(2+) ion, where it mediates the interaction between bound NMPs and the N-terminal PA domain in the presence of the Mg(2+) ion. The results presented here indicate a possible cleavage mechanism and identify a distinct nucleotide binding pocket. The identification of this binding pocket opens a new avenue for anti-influenza drug discovery, targeting the cap-dependent endonuclease, in response to the worldwide threat of influenza. PMID:19587036

  5. Structure of the catalytic domain of the human mitochondrial Lon protease: proposed relation of oligomer formation and activity.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Ondrovicová, Gabriela; Blagova, Elena; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Bauer, Jacob A; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Kutejová, Eva; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S

    2010-05-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are crucial for cellular homeostasis. By degrading short-lived regulatory proteins, they play an important role in the control of many cellular pathways and, through the degradation of abnormally misfolded proteins, protect the cell from a buildup of aggregates. Disruption or disregulation of mammalian mitochondrial Lon protease leads to severe changes in the cell, linked with carcinogenesis, apoptosis, and necrosis. Here we present the structure of the proteolytic domain of human mitochondrial Lon at 2 A resolution. The fold resembles those of the three previously determined Lon proteolytic domains from Escherichia coli, Methanococcus jannaschii, and Archaeoglobus fulgidus. There are six protomers in the asymmetric unit, four arranged as two dimers. The intersubunit interactions within the two dimers are similar to those between adjacent subunits of the hexameric ring of E. coli Lon, suggesting that the human Lon proteolytic domain also forms hexamers. The active site contains a 3(10) helix attached to the N-terminal end of alpha-helix 2, which leads to the insertion of Asp852 into the active site, as seen in M. jannaschii. Structural considerations make it likely that this conformation is proteolytically inactive. When comparing the intersubunit interactions of human with those of E. coli Lon taken with biochemical data leads us to propose a mechanism relating the formation of Lon oligomers with a conformational shift in the active site region coupled to a movement of a loop in the oligomer interface, converting the proteolytically inactive form seen here to the active one in the E. coli hexamer.

  6. Structure of the catalytic domain of the human mitochondrial Lon protease: Proposed relation of oligomer formation and activity

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Blagova, Elena; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Bauer, Jacob A; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Kutejová, Eva; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are crucial for cellular homeostasis. By degrading short-lived regulatory proteins, they play an important role in the control of many cellular pathways and, through the degradation of abnormally misfolded proteins, protect the cell from a buildup of aggregates. Disruption or disregulation of mammalian mitochondrial Lon protease leads to severe changes in the cell, linked with carcinogenesis, apoptosis, and necrosis. Here we present the structure of the proteolytic domain of human mitochondrial Lon at 2 Å resolution. The fold resembles those of the three previously determined Lon proteolytic domains from Escherichia coli, Methanococcus jannaschii, and Archaeoglobus fulgidus. There are six protomers in the asymmetric unit, four arranged as two dimers. The intersubunit interactions within the two dimers are similar to those between adjacent subunits of the hexameric ring of E. coli Lon, suggesting that the human Lon proteolytic domain also forms hexamers. The active site contains a 310 helix attached to the N-terminal end of α-helix 2, which leads to the insertion of Asp852 into the active site, as seen in M. jannaschii. Structural considerations make it likely that this conformation is proteolytically inactive. When comparing the intersubunit interactions of human with those of E. coli Lon taken with biochemical data leads us to propose a mechanism relating the formation of Lon oligomers with a conformational shift in the active site region coupled to a movement of a loop in the oligomer interface, converting the proteolytically inactive form seen here to the active one in the E. coli hexamer. PMID:20222013

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-11-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21.

  8. The repeat domain of the melanosome fibril protein Pmel17 forms the amyloid core promoting melanin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Shewmaker, Frank; McPhie, Peter; Monterroso, Begoña; Thurber, Kent; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte protein necessary for eumelanin deposition 1 in mammals and found in melanosomes in a filamentous form. The luminal part of human Pmel17 includes a region (RPT) with 10 copies of a partial repeat sequence, pt.e.gttp.qv., known to be essential in vivo for filament formation. We show that this RPT region readily forms amyloid in vitro, but only under the mildly acidic conditions typical of the lysosome-like melanosome lumen, and the filaments quickly become soluble at neutral pH. Under the same mildly acidic conditions, the Pmel filaments promote eumelanin formation. Electron diffraction, circular dichroism, and solid-state NMR studies of Pmel17 filaments show that the structure is rich in beta sheet. We suggest that RPT is the amyloid core domain of the Pmel17 filaments so critical for melanin formation. PMID:19666488

  9. Homology modelling of the core domain of the endogenous lectin comitin: structural basis for its mannose-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1999-03-01

    The N-terminal core domain of comitin from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum has been modelled from the X-ray coordinates of the monocot mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). Docking experiments performed on the three-dimensional model showed that two of the three mannose-binding sites of the comitin monomer are functional. They are located at both ends of the comitin dimer whereas the actin-interacting region occurs in the central hinge region where both monomers are non covalently associated. This distribution is fully consistent with the bifunctional character of comitin which is believed to link the Golgi vesicles exhibiting mannosylated membrane glycans to the actin cytoskeleton in the cell.

  10. Structural insight into the mechanism of substrate specificity and catalytic activity of an HD-domain phosphohydrolase: the 5'-deoxyribonucleotidase YfbR from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Matthew D; Proudfoot, Michael; Yakunin, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2008-04-18

    HD-domain phosphohydrolases have nucleotidase and phosphodiesterase activities and play important roles in the metabolism of nucleotides and in signaling. We present three 2.1-A-resolution crystal structures (one in the free state and two complexed with natural substrates) of an HD-domain phosphohydrolase, the Escherichia coli 5'-nucleotidase YfbR. The free-state structure of YfbR contains a large cavity accommodating the metal-coordinating HD motif (H33, H68, D69, and D137) and other conserved residues (R18, E72, and D77). Alanine scanning mutagenesis confirms that these residues are important for activity. Two structures of the catalytically inactive mutant E72A complexed with Co(2+) and either thymidine-5'-monophosphate or 2'-deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate disclose the novel binding mode of deoxyribonucleotides in the active site. Residue R18 stabilizes the phosphate on the Co(2+), and residue D77 forms a strong hydrogen bond critical for binding the ribose. The indole side chain of W19 is located close to the 2'-carbon atom of the deoxyribose moiety and is proposed to act as the selectivity switch for deoxyribonucleotide, which is supported by comparison to YfdR, another 5'-nucleotidase in E. coli. The nucleotide bases of both deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate and thymidine-5'-monophosphate make no specific hydrogen bonds with the protein, explaining the lack of nucleotide base selectivity. The YfbR E72A substrate complex structures also suggest a plausible single-step nucleophilic substitution mechanism. This is the first proposed molecular mechanism for an HD-domain phosphohydrolase based directly on substrate-bound crystal structures.

  11. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of an HD-Domain Phosphohydrolase: The 5;#8242;-Deoxyribonucleotidase YfbR from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Proudfoot, Michael; Yakunin, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2011-08-16

    HD-domain phosphohydrolases have nucleotidase and phosphodiesterase activities and play important roles in the metabolism of nucleotides and in signaling. We present three 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structures (one in the free state and two complexed with natural substrates) of an HD-domain phosphohydrolase, the Escherichia coli 5'-nucleotidase YfbR. The free-state structure of YfbR contains a large cavity accommodating the metal-coordinating HD motif (H33, H68, D69, and D137) and other conserved residues (R18, E72, and D77). Alanine scanning mutagenesis confirms that these residues are important for activity. Two structures of the catalytically inactive mutant E72A complexed with Co{sup 2+} and either thymidine-5'-monophosphate or 2'-deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate disclose the novel binding mode of deoxyribonucleotides in the active site. Residue R18 stabilizes the phosphate on the Co{sup 2+}, and residue D77 forms a strong hydrogen bond critical for binding the ribose. The indole side chain of W19 is located close to the 2'-carbon atom of the deoxyribose moiety and is proposed to act as the selectivity switch for deoxyribonucleotide, which is supported by comparison to YfdR, another 5'-nucleotidase in E. coli. The nucleotide bases of both deoxyriboadenosine-5'-monophosphate and thymidine-5'-monophosphate make no specific hydrogen bonds with the protein, explaining the lack of nucleotide base selectivity. The YfbR E72A substrate complex structures also suggest a plausible single-step nucleophilic substitution mechanism. This is the first proposed molecular mechanism for an HD-domain phosphohydrolase based directly on substrate-bound crystal structures.

  12. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  13. An amphioxus RAG1-like DNA fragment encodes a functional central domain of vertebrate core RAG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Xu, Ke; Deng, Anqi; Fu, Xing; Xu, Anlong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    The highly diversified repertoire of antigen receptors in the vertebrate immune system is generated via proteins encoded by the recombination activating genes (RAGs) RAG1 and RAG2 by a process known as variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] gene recombination. Based on the study of vertebrate RAG proteins, many hypotheses have been proposed regarding the origin and evolution of RAG. This issue remains unresolved, leaving a significant gap in our understanding of the evolution of adaptive immunity. Here, we show that the amphioxus genome contains an ancient RAG1-like DNA fragment (bfRAG1L) that encodes a virus-related protein that is much shorter than vertebrate RAG1 and harbors a region homologous to the central domain of core RAG1 (cRAG1). bfRAG1L also contains an unexpected retroviral type II nuclease active site motif, DXN(D/E)XK, and is capable of degrading both DNA and RNA. Moreover, bfRAG1L shares important functional properties with the central domain of cRAG1, including interaction with RAG2 and localization to the nucleus. Remarkably, the reconstitution of bfRAG1L into a cRAG1-like protein yielded an enzyme capable of recognizing recombination signal sequences and performing V(D)J recombination in the presence of mouse RAG2. Moreover, this reconstituted cRAG1-like protein could mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes in RAG1-deficient mice. Together, our results demonstrate that amphioxus bfRAG1L encodes a protein that is functionally equivalent to the central domain of cRAG1 and is well prepared for further evolution to mediate V(D)J recombination. Thus, our findings provide unique insights into the evolutionary origin of RAG1.

  14. An amphioxus RAG1-like DNA fragment encodes a functional central domain of vertebrate core RAG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Xu, Ke; Deng, Anqi; Fu, Xing; Xu, Anlong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    The highly diversified repertoire of antigen receptors in the vertebrate immune system is generated via proteins encoded by the recombination activating genes (RAGs) RAG1 and RAG2 by a process known as variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] gene recombination. Based on the study of vertebrate RAG proteins, many hypotheses have been proposed regarding the origin and evolution of RAG. This issue remains unresolved, leaving a significant gap in our understanding of the evolution of adaptive immunity. Here, we show that the amphioxus genome contains an ancient RAG1-like DNA fragment (bfRAG1L) that encodes a virus-related protein that is much shorter than vertebrate RAG1 and harbors a region homologous to the central domain of core RAG1 (cRAG1). bfRAG1L also contains an unexpected retroviral type II nuclease active site motif, DXN(D/E)XK, and is capable of degrading both DNA and RNA. Moreover, bfRAG1L shares important functional properties with the central domain of cRAG1, including interaction with RAG2 and localization to the nucleus. Remarkably, the reconstitution of bfRAG1L into a cRAG1-like protein yielded an enzyme capable of recognizing recombination signal sequences and performing V(D)J recombination in the presence of mouse RAG2. Moreover, this reconstituted cRAG1-like protein could mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes in RAG1-deficient mice. Together, our results demonstrate that amphioxus bfRAG1L encodes a protein that is functionally equivalent to the central domain of cRAG1 and is well prepared for further evolution to mediate V(D)J recombination. Thus, our findings provide unique insights into the evolutionary origin of RAG1. PMID:24368847

  15. Functional and structural characterization of a dense core secretory granule sorting domain from the PC1/3 protease

    PubMed Central

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Di Lello, Paola; Lacombe, Marie-Josée; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Legault, Pascale; Reudelhuber, Timothy L.; Omichinski, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Several peptide hormones are initially synthesized as inactive precursors. It is only on entry of these prohormones and their processing proteases into dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) that the precursors are cleaved to generate their active forms. Prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 is a processing protease that is targeted to DCSGs. The signal for targeting PC1/3 to DCSGs resides in its carboxy-terminal tail (PC1/3617–753), where 3 regions (PC1/3617–625, PC1/3665–682, and PC1/3711–753) are known to aid in sorting and membrane association. In this article, we have determined a high-resolution structure of the extreme carboxy-terminal sorting domain, PC1/3711–753 in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. PC1/3711–753 contains 2 alpha helices located between residues 722–728 and 738–750. Functional assays demonstrate that the second helix (PC1/3738–750) is necessary and sufficient to target a constitutively secreted protein to granules, and that L745 anchors a hydrophobic patch that is critical for sorting. Also, we demonstrate that calcium binding by the second helix of PC1/3711–753 promotes aggregation of the domain via the hydrophobic patch centered on L745. These results provide a structure-function analysis of a DCSG-sorting domain, and reveal the importance of a hydrophobic patch and calcium binding in controlling the sorting of proteins containing alpha helices to DCSGs. PMID:19376969

  16. Functional and structural characterization of a dense core secretory granule sorting domain from the PC1/3 protease.

    PubMed

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D; Di Lello, Paola; Lacombe, Marie-Josée; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Legault, Pascale; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Omichinski, James G

    2009-05-01

    Several peptide hormones are initially synthesized as inactive precursors. It is only on entry of these prohormones and their processing proteases into dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) that the precursors are cleaved to generate their active forms. Prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 is a processing protease that is targeted to DCSGs. The signal for targeting PC1/3 to DCSGs resides in its carboxy-terminal tail (PC1/3(617-753)), where 3 regions (PC1/3(617-625), PC1/3(665-682), and PC1/3(711-753)) are known to aid in sorting and membrane association. In this article, we have determined a high-resolution structure of the extreme carboxy-terminal sorting domain, PC1/3(711-753) in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. PC1/3(711-753) contains 2 alpha helices located between residues 722-728 and 738-750. Functional assays demonstrate that the second helix (PC1/3(738-750)) is necessary and sufficient to target a constitutively secreted protein to granules, and that L(745) anchors a hydrophobic patch that is critical for sorting. Also, we demonstrate that calcium binding by the second helix of PC1/3(711-753) promotes aggregation of the domain via the hydrophobic patch centered on L(745). These results provide a structure-function analysis of a DCSG-sorting domain, and reveal the importance of a hydrophobic patch and calcium binding in controlling the sorting of proteins containing alpha helices to DCSGs. PMID:19376969

  17. Societal and individual burden of illness among fibromyalgia patients in France: Association between disease severity and OMERACT core domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with fibromyalgia (FM) report widespread pain, fatigue, and other functional limitations. This study aimed to provide an assessment of the burden of illness associated with FM in France and its association with disease severity and core domains as defined by Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) for FM. Methods This cross-sectional, observational study recruited patients with a prior diagnosis of FM from 18 community-based physician offices in France. Patients completed questions about FM impact (Fibromyalgia-Impact Questionnaire [FIQ]), core symptoms (defined by OMERACT), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), current overall health status (rated on a scale from 0 to 100), productivity, treatment satisfaction, and out-of-pocket expenses related to FM. Site staff recorded patients' treatment and health resource use based on medical record review. Costs were extrapolated from 4-week patient-reported data and 3-month clinical case report form data and calculated in 2008 Euros using a societal perspective. Tests of significance used the Kruskal-Wallis test or Fisher's Exact test where P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Eighty-eight patients (mean 55.2 y; female:male 74:14) were recruited. The majority of patients (84.1%) were prescribed medications for FM. Patients mainly described medications as a little/not at all effective (40.0%) or somewhat effective (52.9%). Current Overall Health rating was 52.9 (± 17.8) and FIQ total score was 54.8 (± 17.3). FIQ total score was used to define FM severity, and 17 patients scored 0- < 39 (mild FM), 33 patients 39- < 59 (moderate FM), and 38 scored 59-100 (severe FM). As FM severity level worsened, patients had poorer overall health status and perceived their prescription medications to be less effective. Average cost/FM patient was higher for severe (€10,087) vs. moderate (€6,633) or mild FM (€5,473); however, the difference was not significant. Conclusions In a sample

  18. In Silico Rational Design and Systems Engineering of Disulfide Bridges in the Catalytic Domain of an Alkaline α-Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica To Improve Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Deng, Zhuangmei; Yang, Haiquan; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.

    2014-01-01

    High thermostability is required for alkaline α-amylases to maintain high catalytic activity under the harsh conditions used in textile production. In this study, we attempted to improve the thermostability of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica through in silico rational design and systems engineering of disulfide bridges in the catalytic domain. Specifically, 7 residue pairs (P35-G426, Q107-G167, G116-Q120, A147-W160, G233-V265, A332-G370, and R436-M480) were chosen as engineering targets for disulfide bridge formation, and the respective residues were replaced with cysteines. Three single disulfide bridge mutants—P35C-G426C, G116C-Q120C, and R436C-M480C—of the 7 showed significantly enhanced thermostability. Combinational mutations were subsequently assessed, and the triple mutant P35C-G426C/G116C-Q120C/R436C-M480C showed a 6-fold increase in half-life at 60°C and a 5.2°C increase in melting temperature compared with the wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, other biochemical properties of this mutant also improved: the optimum temperature increased from 50°C to 55°C, the optimum pH shifted from 9.5 to 10.0, the stable pH range extended from 7.0 to 11.0 to 6.0 to 12.0, and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) increased from 1.8 × 104 to 2.4 × 104 liters/g · min. The possible mechanism responsible for these improvements was explored through comparative analysis of the model structures of wild-type and mutant enzymes. The disulfide bridge engineering strategy used in this work may be applied to improve the thermostability of other industrial enzymes. PMID:24212581

  19. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  20. Unique Biological Properties of Catalytic Domain Directed Human Anti-CAIX Antibodies Discovered through Phage-Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Lo, Agnes; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Tallarico, Aimee St. Clair; Brady, Kristen; Murakami, Akikazu; Barteneva, Natasha; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein) is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC), but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs) were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv) phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD) determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule. PMID:20224781

  1. Core promoter sequence of SEMG I spans between the two putative GATA-1 binding domains and is responsive to IL-4 and IL-6 in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yana; Wang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Jian; Lim, Seah H

    2009-01-01

    Semenogelin (SEMG) I is a cancer-testis antigen expressed in myeloma cells. SEMG I expression is upregulated by IL-4, IL-6 and 5-azacytidine. In this study, we set out to define the core promoter sequence needed for the expression of SEMG I in myeloma cells. We found that nucleotide sequences spanning the two putative GATA-1 binding domains are vital for the primary regulation of SEMG I promoter function while the other parts of the promoter sequence are responsible for the fine adjustment of the core promoter function. The core promoter sequence is responsive to the enhancing effect of IL-4 and IL-6. PMID:18602691

  2. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  3. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA.

  4. The Phage Lytic Proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 Display Multiple Active Catalytic Domains and Do Not Trigger Staphylococcal Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Donovan, David M.; Götz, Friedrich; García, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88) and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso). We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture) was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections. PMID:23724076

  5. Effect of core-shell structure and chitosan addition on catalytic activities of copper-containing silica-aluminosilicate composites in deNO(x) reaction by H2.

    PubMed

    Chamnankid, Busaya; Samanpratan, Rattanaporn; Kongkachuichay, Paisan

    2012-12-01

    Mesoporous silica-aluminosilicate composites were used as supports for selective catalytic reduction of NO by H2 using copper catalyst. Effect of loading techniques and structures of the supports on the catalytic performance were investigated. The nature, the oxidation state of copper, the structural properties and the morphology of the catalysts were characterized by means of UV-vis spectra, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), nitrogen sorption, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. By using substitution technique, the copper(II) species were introduced into the silica-aluminosilicate framework by replacing aluminum atoms that located in the tetrahedral coordination. On the other hand, by using incipient wetness impregnation method, the copper species were deposited on the surface of composite materials. Upon testing their performances in deNO(x) reaction, the catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method showed higher catalytic activity than those prepared by substitution technique in any copper content. The core-shell structure was able to enhance the catalytic performance. It was found that, among the tested catalysts, the 1.5% Cu loaded core-shell mesoporous silica aluminosilicate composites prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation yielded the highest NO conversion of approximately 59%. However, the addition of chitosan creating macroporosity and controlling the uniform small clusters did not improve the catalytic performance. PMID:23447996

  6. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails

    PubMed Central

    Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michał; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH), govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64) and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH) domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG)—like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners. PMID:26325194

  7. Topological constraints of structural elements in regulation of catalytic activity in HDV-like self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Chiu-Ho T.; Nguyen, Dang; Myszka, Marie; Lupták, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes fold into intricate structures, which orient active site groups into catalytically competent conformations. Most ribozyme families have distinct catalytic cores stabilized by tertiary interactions between domains peripheral to those cores. We show that large hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-like ribozymes are activated by peripheral domains that bring two helical segments, P1 and P2, into proximity – a “pinch” that results in rate acceleration by almost three orders of magnitude. Kinetic analysis of ribozymes with systematically altered length and stability of the peripheral domain revealed that about one third of its free energy of formation is used to lower an activation energy barrier, likely related to a rate-limiting conformational change leading to the pre-catalytic state. These findings provide a quantitative view of enzyme regulation by peripheral domains and may shed light on the energetics of allosteric regulation. PMID:27302490

  8. Common Core State Standards in the Middle Grades: What's New in the Geometry Domain and How Can Teachers Support Student Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teuscher, Dawn; Tran, Dung; Reys, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) is a primary focus of attention for many stakeholders' (e.g., teachers, district mathematics leaders, and curriculum developers) intent on improving mathematics education. This article reports on specific content shifts related to the geometry domain in the middle grades (6-8)…

  9. Catalytic Function and Substrate Specificity of the Papain-Like Protease Domain of nsp3 from the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M.; Mielech, Anna M.; Deng, Xufang; Baker, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papain-like protease (PLpro) domain from the deadly Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was overexpressed and purified. MERS-CoV PLpro constructs with and without the putative ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain at the N terminus were found to possess protease, deubiquitinating, deISGylating, and interferon antagonism activities in transfected HEK293T cells. The quaternary structure and substrate preferences of MERS-CoV PLpro were determined and compared to those of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) PLpro, revealing prominent differences between these closely related enzymes. Steady-state kinetic analyses of purified MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV PLpros uncovered significant differences in their rates of hydrolysis of 5-aminomethyl coumarin (AMC) from C-terminally labeled peptide, ubiquitin, and ISG15 substrates, as well as in their rates of isopeptide bond cleavage of K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. MERS-CoV PLpro was found to have 8-fold and 3,500-fold higher catalytic efficiencies for hydrolysis of ISG15-AMC than for hydrolysis of the Ub-AMC and Z-RLRGG-AMC substrates, respectively. A similar trend was observed for SARS-CoV PLpro, although it was much more efficient than MERS-CoV PLpro toward ISG15-AMC and peptide-AMC substrates. MERS-CoV PLpro was found to process K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains at similar rates and with similar debranching patterns, producing monoubiquitin species. However, SARS-CoV PLpro much preferred K48-linked polyubiquitin chains to K63-linked chains, and it rapidly produced di-ubiquitin molecules from K48-linked chains. Finally, potent inhibitors of SARS-CoV PLpro were found to have no effect on MERS-CoV PLpro. A homology model of the MERS-CoV PLpro structure was generated and compared to the X-ray structure of SARS-CoV PLpro to provide plausible explanations for differences in substrate and inhibitor recognition. IMPORTANCE Unlocking the secrets of how coronavirus (CoV) papain

  10. A graphene-based smart catalytic system with superior catalytic performances and temperature responsive catalytic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lv, Weipeng; Zhang, Guanghui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao; Fan, Xiaobin

    2013-07-21

    We have successfully developed a unique graphene-based smart catalytic system which consists of the graphene supported Au-Pt bimetallic nanocatalyst with a well-defined core-shell structure and a dextran-based temperature-responsive polymer. The unique catalytic system possesses excellent catalytic performances and the catalytic activities could be readily switched on or off at different temperature windows. PMID:23740038

  11. Zinc-dependent cleavage in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme: evidence for a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Emily J.; Markley, John C.; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized a novel Zn2+-catalyzed cleavage site between nucleotides C3 and U4 in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme. In contrast to previously described divalent metal-ion-dependent cleavage of RNA, U4 cleavage is only observed in the presence of Zn2+. This new cleavage site has an unusual pH dependence, in that U4 cleavage products are only observed above pH 7.9 and reach a maximum yield at about pH 8.5. These data, together with the fact that no metal ion-binding site is observed in proximity to the U4 cleavage site in either of the crystal structures, point toward a pH-dependent conformational change in the hammerhead ribozyme. We have described previously Zn2+-dependent cleavage between G8 and A9 in the hammerhead ribozyme and have discovered that U4 cleavage occurs only after A9 cleavage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of sequential cleavage events as a possible regulatory mechanism in ribozymes. PMID:12736309

  12. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  13. Transmembrane/cytoplasmic, rather than catalytic, domains of Mmp14 signal to MAPK activation and mammary branching morphogenesis via binding to integrin β1

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Lo, Alvin T.; Inman, Jamie L.; Alcaraz, Jordi; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Mott, Joni D.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Connie S.; Zhang, Hui; Bascom, Jamie L.; Seiki, Motoharu; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell invasion through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a crucial step in branching morphogenesis. The mechanisms by which the mammary epithelium integrates cues from the ECM with intracellular signaling in order to coordinate invasion through the stroma to make the mammary tree are poorly understood. Because the cell membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase Mmp14 is known to play a key role in cancer cell invasion, we hypothesized that it could also be centrally involved in integrating signals for mammary epithelial cells (MECs) to navigate the collagen 1 (CL-1)-rich stroma of the mammary gland. Expression studies in nulliparous mice that carry a NLS-lacZ transgene downstream of the Mmp14 promoter revealed that Mmp14 is expressed in MECs at the tips of the branches. Using both mammary organoids and 3D organotypic cultures, we show that MMP activity is necessary for invasion through dense CL-1 (3 mg/ml) gels, but dispensable for MEC branching in sparse CL-1 (1 mg/ml) gels. Surprisingly, however, Mmp14 without its catalytic activity was still necessary for branching. Silencing Mmp14 prevented cell invasion through CL-1 and disrupted branching altogether; it also reduced integrin β1 (Itgb1) levels and attenuated MAPK signaling, disrupting Itgb1-dependent invasion/branching within CL-1 gels. FRET imaging revealed that Mmp14 associates directly with Itgb1. We identified a domain of Mmp14 that is required for modulating the levels of Itgb1, MEC signaling and the rate of invasion within CL-1. These results shed light on hitherto undescribed non-proteolytic activities of Mmp14 that are necessary for the Itgb1-dependent biochemical and mechanical signals that regulate branching in the mammary epithelium. PMID:23250208

  14. Analysis of catalytic carboxylate mutants E552Q and E1197Q suggests asymmetric ATP hydrolysis by the two nucleotide-binding domains of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Isabelle; Julien, Michel; Gros, Philippe

    2003-11-11

    In the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters, such as mouse Mdr3 P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an invariant carboxylate residue (E552 in NBD1; E1197 in NBD2) immediately follows the Walker B motif (hyd(4)DE/D). Removal of the negative charge in mutants E552Q and E1197Q abolishes drug-stimulated ATPase activity measured by P(i) release. Surprisingly, drug-stimulated trapping of 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]ATP is still observed in the mutants in both the presence and absence of the transition-state analogue vanadate (V(i)), and ADP can be recovered from the trapped enzymes. The E552Q and E1197Q mutants show characteristics similar to those of the wild-type (WT) enzyme with respect to 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]ATP binding and 8-azido-[alpha-(32)P]nucleotide trapping, with the latter being both Mg(2+) and temperature dependent. Importantly, drug-stimulated nucleotide trapping in E552Q is stimulated by V(i) and resembles the WT enzyme, while it is almost completely V(i) insensitive in E1197Q. Similar nucleotide trapping properties are observed when aluminum fluoride or beryllium fluoride is used as an alternate transition-state analogue. Partial proteolytic cleavage of photolabeled enzymes indicates that, in the absence of V(i), nucleotide trapping occurs exclusively at the mutant NBD, whereas in the presence of V(i), nucleotide trapping occurs at both NBDs. Together, these results suggest that there is single-site turnover occurring in the E552Q and E1197Q mutants and that ADP release from the mutant site, or another catalytic step, is impaired in these mutants. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the two NBDs of P-gp are not functionally equivalent.

  15. Characterization of zinc-binding sites in human stromelysin-1: stoichiometry of the catalytic domain and identification of a cysteine ligand in the proenzyme.

    PubMed

    Salowe, S P; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Smith, C K; Kopka, I E; Hagmann, W K; Hermes, J D

    1992-05-19

    A determination of the zinc stoichiometry of the catalytic domain of the human matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 has been carried out using enzyme purified from recombinant Escherichia coli that express C-terminally truncated protein. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed that both the proenzyme (prostrom255) and the mature active form (strom255) contained nearly 2 mol of Zn/mol of protein. Full-length prostromelysin purified from a mammalian cell culture line also contained zinc in excess of 1 equiv. While zinc in prostrom255 could not be removed by dialysis against o-phenanthroline, similar treatment of mature strom255 resulted in the loss of one-half of the original zinc content. The peptidase activity of the zinc-depleted protein was reduced by greater than 85% but could be restored upon addition of Zn2+ or Co2+. Addition of a thiol-containing inhibitor to a CoZn hybrid enzyme resulted in marked spectral changes in both the visible and ultraviolet regions characteristic of sulfur ligation to Co2+. This direct evidence for an integral role in catalysis and inhibitor binding confirms the location of the exchangeable metal at the active site. To examine the environment of zinc in the proenzyme, a fully cobalt-substituted proenzyme was prepared by in vivo metal replacement. The absorbance features of dicobalt prostrom255 were consistent with metal coordination by the single cysteine present in the propeptide, although the data do not allow assignment to a particular zinc site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1581308

  16. P- T- t constraints on the development of the Doi Inthanon metamorphic core complex domain and implications for the evolution of the western gneiss belt, northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, A. S.; Barr, S. M.; Miller, B. V.; Reynolds, P. H.; Rhodes, B. P.; Yokart, B.

    2010-01-01

    The western gneiss belt in northern Thailand is exposed within two overlapping Cenozoic structural domains: the extensional Doi Inthanon metamorphic core complex domain located west of the Chiang Mai basin, and the Mae Ping strike-slip fault domain located west of the Tak batholith. New P- T estimates and U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations from the Doi Inthanon domain show that the gneiss there records a complex multi-stage history that can be represented by a clockwise P- T- t path. U-Pb zircon and titanite dating of mylonitic calc-silicate gneiss from the Mae Wang area of the complex indicates that the paragneissic sequence experienced high-grade, medium-pressure metamorphism (M1) in the Late Triassic - Early Jurassic (ca. 210 Ma), in good agreement with previously determined zircon ages from the underlying core orthogneiss exposed on Doi Inthanon. Late Cretaceous monazite ages of 84 and 72 Ma reported previously from the core orthogneiss are attributed to a thermal overprint (M2) to upper-amphibolite facies in the sillimanite field. U-Pb zircon and monazite dating of granitic mylonite from the Doi Suthep area of the complex provides an upper age limit of 40 Ma (Late Eocene) for the early stage(s) of development of the actual core complex, by initially ductile, low-angle extensional shearing under lower amphibolite-facies conditions (M3), accompanied by near-isothermal diapiric rise and decompression melting. 40Ar/ 39Ar laserprobe dating of muscovite from both Doi Suthep and Doi Inthanon provided Miocene ages of ca. 26-15 Ma, representing cooling through the ca. 350 °C isotherm and marking late-stage development of the core complex by detachment faulting of the cover rocks and isostatic uplift of the sheared core zone and mantling gneisses in the footwall. Similarities in the thermochronology of high-grade gneisses exposed in the core complex and shear zone domains in the western gneiss belt of northern Thailand (and also in northern Vietnam, Laos, Yunnan

  17. The DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 directly interacts with the SET and RING finger-associated (SRA) domain of the multifunctional protein Uhrf1 to facilitate accession of the catalytic center to hemi-methylated DNA.

    PubMed

    Berkyurek, Ahmet Can; Suetake, Isao; Arita, Kyohei; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tajima, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Dnmt1 is responsible for the maintenance DNA methylation during replication to propagate methylation patterns to the next generation. The replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS), which plugs the catalytic pocket, is necessary for recruitment of Dnmt1 to the replication site. In the present study we found that the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1 was DNA length-dependent and scarcely methylated 12-bp short hemi-methylated DNA. Contrarily, the RFTS-deleted Dnmt1 and Dnmt1 mutants that destroyed the hydrogen bonds between the RFTS and catalytic domain showed significant DNA methylation activity even toward 12-bp hemi-methylated DNA. The DNA methylation activity of the RFTS-deleted Dnmt1 toward 12-bp hemi-methylated DNA was strongly inhibited on the addition of RFTS, but to a lesser extent by Dnmt1 harboring the mutations that impair the hydrogen bond formation. The SRA domain of Uhrf1, which is a prerequisite factor for maintenance methylation and selectively binds to hemi-methylated DNA, stimulated the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1. The SRA to Dnmt1 concentration ratio was the determinant for the maximum stimulation. In addition, a mutant SRA, which had lost the DNA binding activity but was able to bind to Dnmt1, stimulated the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1. The results indicate that the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1 was stimulated on the direct interaction of the SRA and Dnmt1. The SRA facilitated acceptance of the 12-bp fluorocytosine-containing DNA by the catalytic center. We propose that the SRA removes the RFTS plug from the catalytic pocket to facilitate DNA acceptance by the catalytic center.

  18. The DNA Methyltransferase Dnmt1 Directly Interacts with the SET and RING Finger-associated (SRA) Domain of the Multifunctional Protein Uhrf1 to Facilitate Accession of the Catalytic Center to Hemi-methylated DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Berkyurek, Ahmet Can; Suetake, Isao; Arita, Kyohei; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tajima, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Dnmt1 is responsible for the maintenance DNA methylation during replication to propagate methylation patterns to the next generation. The replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS), which plugs the catalytic pocket, is necessary for recruitment of Dnmt1 to the replication site. In the present study we found that the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1 was DNA length-dependent and scarcely methylated 12-bp short hemi-methylated DNA. Contrarily, the RFTS-deleted Dnmt1 and Dnmt1 mutants that destroyed the hydrogen bonds between the RFTS and catalytic domain showed significant DNA methylation activity even toward 12-bp hemi-methylated DNA. The DNA methylation activity of the RFTS-deleted Dnmt1 toward 12-bp hemi-methylated DNA was strongly inhibited on the addition of RFTS, but to a lesser extent by Dnmt1 harboring the mutations that impair the hydrogen bond formation. The SRA domain of Uhrf1, which is a prerequisite factor for maintenance methylation and selectively binds to hemi-methylated DNA, stimulated the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1. The SRA to Dnmt1 concentration ratio was the determinant for the maximum stimulation. In addition, a mutant SRA, which had lost the DNA binding activity but was able to bind to Dnmt1, stimulated the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1. The results indicate that the DNA methylation activity of Dnmt1 was stimulated on the direct interaction of the SRA and Dnmt1. The SRA facilitated acceptance of the 12-bp fluorocytosine-containing DNA by the catalytic center. We propose that the SRA removes the RFTS plug from the catalytic pocket to facilitate DNA acceptance by the catalytic center. PMID:24253042

  19. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-guided mutagenesis provide insight into the architecture of the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Widderich, Nils; Pittelkow, Marco; Höppner, Astrid; Mulnaes, Daniel; Buckel, Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2014-02-01

    Many bacteria amass compatible solutes to fend-off the detrimental effects of high osmolarity on cellular physiology and water content. These solutes also function as stabilizers of macromolecules, a property for which they are referred to as chemical chaperones. The tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine is such a compatible solute and is widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria. Many ectoine producers also synthesize the stress protectant 5-hydroxyectoine from the precursor ectoine, a process that is catalyzed by the ectoine hydroxylase (EctD). The EctD enzyme is a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. A crystal structure of the EctD protein from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens has previously been reported and revealed the coordination of the iron catalyst, but it lacked the substrate ectoine and the co-substrate 2-oxoglutarate. Here we used this crystal structure as a template to assess the likely positioning of the ectoine and 2-oxoglutarate ligands within the active site by structural comparison, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis. Collectively, these approaches suggest the positioning of the iron, ectoine, and 2-oxoglutarate ligands in close proximity to each other and with a spatial orientation that will allow the region-selective and stereo-specific hydroxylation of (4S)-ectoine to (4S,5S)-5-hydroxyectoine. Our study thus provides a view into the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase and suggests an intricate network of interactions between the three ligands and evolutionarily highly conserved residues in members of the EctD protein family.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-guided mutagenesis provide insight into the architecture of the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Widderich, Nils; Pittelkow, Marco; Höppner, Astrid; Mulnaes, Daniel; Buckel, Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2014-02-01

    Many bacteria amass compatible solutes to fend-off the detrimental effects of high osmolarity on cellular physiology and water content. These solutes also function as stabilizers of macromolecules, a property for which they are referred to as chemical chaperones. The tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine is such a compatible solute and is widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria. Many ectoine producers also synthesize the stress protectant 5-hydroxyectoine from the precursor ectoine, a process that is catalyzed by the ectoine hydroxylase (EctD). The EctD enzyme is a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. A crystal structure of the EctD protein from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens has previously been reported and revealed the coordination of the iron catalyst, but it lacked the substrate ectoine and the co-substrate 2-oxoglutarate. Here we used this crystal structure as a template to assess the likely positioning of the ectoine and 2-oxoglutarate ligands within the active site by structural comparison, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis. Collectively, these approaches suggest the positioning of the iron, ectoine, and 2-oxoglutarate ligands in close proximity to each other and with a spatial orientation that will allow the region-selective and stereo-specific hydroxylation of (4S)-ectoine to (4S,5S)-5-hydroxyectoine. Our study thus provides a view into the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase and suggests an intricate network of interactions between the three ligands and evolutionarily highly conserved residues in members of the EctD protein family. PMID:24184278

  2. Role of inter-domain cavity in the attachment of the orange carotenoid protein to the phycobilisome core and to the fluorescence recovery protein.

    PubMed

    Zlenko, Dmitry V; Krasilnikov, Pavel M; Stadnichuk, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular modeling and known spatial structure of proteins, we have derived a universal 3D model of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) and phycobilisome (PBS) interaction in the process of non-photochemical PBS quenching. The characteristic tip of the phycobilin domain of the core-membrane linker polypeptide (LCM) forms the attachment site on the PBS core surface for interaction with the central inter-domain cavity of the OCP molecule. This spatial arrangement has to be the most advantageous one because the LCM, as the major terminal PBS-fluorescence emitter, accumulates energy from the most other phycobiliproteins within the PBS before quenching by OCP. In agreement with the constructed model, in cyanobacteria, the small fluorescence recovery protein is wedged in the OCP's central cavity, weakening the PBS and OCP interaction. The presence of another one protein, the red carotenoid protein, in some cyanobacterial species, which also can interact with the PBS, also corresponds to this model. PMID:25905572

  3. A recombinant hepatitis B core antigen polypeptide with the protamine-like domain deleted self-assembles into capsid particles but fails to bind nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, A; Bonelli, F; Zentilin, L; Rindi, G; Muttini, M; Milanesi, G

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned in Escherichia coli both the complete core gene of hepatitis B virus and a truncated version of it, leading to the synthesis of high levels of a core-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p22) and of an e-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p16), respectively. We then compared the structural and antigenic properties of the two polypeptides, as well as their ability to bind viral nucleic acids. r-p16 was found to self-assemble into capsid-like particles that appeared similar, when observed under the electron microscope, to those formed by r-p22. In r-p16 particles, disulfide bonds linked the truncated polypeptides in dimers, assembled in the particle by noncovalent interactions. In r-p22 capsids, further disulfide bonds, conceivably involving the carboxy-terminal cysteines of r-p22 polypeptides, joined the dimers together, converting the structure into a covalently closed lattice. The protamine-like domain was at least partly exposed on the surface of r-p22 particles, since it was accessible to selective proteolysis. Finally, r-p22, but not r-p16, was shown to bind native and denatured DNA as well as RNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the protamine-like domain in core polypeptides is a nucleic acid-binding domain and is dispensable for the correct folding and assembly of amino-terminal and central regions. Images PMID:2677399

  4. Binding of a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding factor to the simian virus 40 core origin inverted repeat domain is cell cycle regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, E P; Roome, J M; Wahl, A F

    1993-01-01

    The inverted repeat domain (IR domain) within the simian virus 40 origin of replication is the site of initial DNA melting prior to the onset of DNA synthesis. The domain had previously been shown to be bound by a cellular factor in response to DNA damage. We demonstrate that two distinct cellular components bind opposite strands of the IR domain. Replication protein A (RPA), previously identified as a single-stranded DNA binding protein required for origin-specific DNA replication in vitro, is shown to have a preference for the pyrimidine-rich strand. A newly described component, IR factor B (IRF-B), specifically recognizes the opposite strand. IRF-B binding activity in nuclear extract varies significantly with cell proliferation and the cell cycle, so that binding of IRF-B to the IR domain is negatively correlated with the onset of DNA synthesis. Loss of IRF-B binding from the nucleus also occurs in response to cellular DNA damage. UV cross-linking indicates that the core binding component of IRF-B is a protein of ca. 34 kDa. We propose that RPA and IRF-B bind opposite strands of the IR domain and together may function in the regulation of origin activation. Images PMID:8380226

  5. Plasmon-enhanced optical properties of Au/TiO2 core-shell nanowires studied by finite difference time domain calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jubok; Lee, Sun-Hee; Kim, Min Su; Shin, Hyungjung; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-09-01

    We performed Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) calculation to investigate the enhancement of optical properties such as light scattering and absorption of Au-hybridized TiO2 core-shell structures which can lead to the improvement of photocatalytic and solar cell performance. The results showed that by hybridization of Au as core and TiO2 as shell provides the significant enhancement of light scattering and absorption. Furthermore, the tuning of scattering resonance wavelength may be achieved by varying the diameter of Au core. Our result suggests that hybridization Au and TiO2, with proper introduction of interband states in TiO2, can increase and color-tune the photocatalytic efficiency and solar cell performance of TiO2 nanostructures.

  6. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  7. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins. PMID:26492945

  8. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins.

  9. The catalytic domain of endogenous urokinase-type plasminogen activator is required for the mitogenic activity of platelet-derived and basic fibroblast growth factors in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Padró, Teresa; Mesters, Rolf M; Dankbar, Berno; Hintelmann, Heike; Bieker, Ralf; Kiehl, Michael; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Kienast, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    Emerging data suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA), beyond its role in pericellular proteolysis, may also act as a mitogen. We investigated the function of endogenous UPA in mediating the mitogenic effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Growth-arrested SMC constitutively expressed UPA, but UPA expression and secretion increased several times upon stimulation with either PDGF or bFGF. Inhibition of endogenous UPA with a polyclonal antibody significantly reduced DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDGF or bFGF stimulated SMC, this effect already being evident when the cells entered S-phase. The proliferative activity of endogenous UPA was dependent on a functional catalytic domain as demonstrated by inhibition experiments with a specific monoclonal antibody (394OA) and p-aminobenzamidine, respectively. In contrast, neither plasmin generation nor binding of UPA to its receptor (CD87) were required for UPA-mediated mitogenic effects. The results demonstrate that endogenous UPA is not only overexpressed in SMC upon stimulation with PDGF/bFGF, but also mediates the mitogenic activity of the growth factors in a catalytic-domain-dependent manner. Specific inhibition of this UPA domain may represent an attractive target for pharmacological interventions in atherogenesis and restenosis after angioplasty. PMID:11956327

  10. Zasp52, a Core Z-disc Protein in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscles, Interacts with α-Actinin via an Extended PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo An; González-Morales, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    Z-discs are organizing centers that establish and maintain myofibril structure and function. Important Z-disc proteins are α-actinin, which cross-links actin thin filaments at the Z-disc and Zasp PDZ domain proteins, which directly interact with α-actinin. Here we investigate the biochemical and genetic nature of this interaction in more detail. Zasp52 is the major Drosophila Zasp PDZ domain protein, and is required for myofibril assembly and maintenance. We show by in vitro biochemistry that the PDZ domain plus a C-terminal extension is the only area of Zasp52 involved in the interaction with α-actinin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of 5 amino acid residues in the N-terminal part of the PDZ domain, within the PWGFRL motif, abolish binding to α-actinin, demonstrating the importance of this motif for α-actinin binding. Rescue assays of a novel Zasp52 allele demonstrate the crucial importance of the PDZ domain for Zasp52 function. Flight assays also show that a Zasp52 mutant suppresses the α-actinin mutant phenotype, indicating that both proteins are core structural Z-disc proteins required for optimal Z-disc function. PMID:27783625

  11. Structural Study of the HD-PTP Bro1 Domain in a Complex with the Core Region of STAM2, a Subunit of ESCRT-0.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhyeon; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Joon Sig; Ku, Bonsu; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-01-01

    EGFR is a key player in cell proliferation and survival signaling, and its sorting into MVBs for eventual lysosomal degradation is controlled by the coordination of multiple ESCRT complexes on the endosomal membrane. HD-PTP is a cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase, and is associated with EGFR trafficking by interacting with the ESCRT-0 protein STAM2 and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP4B via its N-terminal Bro1 domain. Intriguingly, the homologous domain of two other human Bro1 domain-containing proteins, Alix and Brox, binds CHMP4B but not STAM2, despite their high structural similarity. To elucidate this binding specificity, we determined the complex structure of the HD-PTP Bro1 domain bound to the STAM2 core region. STAM2 binds to the hydrophobic concave pocket of the HD-PTP Bro1 domain, as CHMP4B does to the pocket of Alix, Brox, or HD-PTP but in the opposite direction. Critically, Thr145 of HD-PTP, corresponding to Lys151 of Alix and Arg145 of Brox, is revealed to be a determinant residue enabling this protein to bind STAM2, as the Alix- or Brox-mimicking mutations of this residue blocks the intermolecular interaction. This work therefore provides the structural basis for how HD-PTP recognizes the ESCRT-0 component to control EGFR sorting. PMID:26866605

  12. Reporting of IMMPACT-recommended core outcome domains among trials assessing opioids for chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sohail M; Maqbool, Amna; Sivananthan, Laxsanaa; Lopes, Luciane C; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Kamaleldin, Mostafa; Hsu, Sandy; Riva, John J; Vandvik, Per Olav; Tsoi, Ludwig; Lam, Tommy; Ebrahim, Shanil; Johnston, Bradley C; Olivieri, Lori; Montoya, Luis; Kunz, Regina; Scheidecker, Anne; Buckley, D Norman; Sessler, Daniel I; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2015-09-01

    The Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) has recommended that trialists evaluating treatments for chronic pain should consider reporting 9 patient-important outcome domains. We examined the extent to which clinical trials evaluating the effect of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) report outcome domains recommended by IMMPACT. We systematically searched electronic databases for English-language studies that randomized patients with CNCP to receive an opioid or a non-opioid control. In duplicate and independently, reviewers established the eligibility of each identified study and recorded all reported outcome domains from eligible trials. We conducted a priori regression analyses to explore factors that may be associated with IMMPACT-recommended outcome domains. Among 156 eligible trials, reporting of IMMPACT-recommended outcome domains was highly variable, ranging from 99% for pain to 7% for interpersonal functioning. Recently published trials were more likely to report the effect of treatment on physical functioning, emotional functioning, role functioning, sleep and fatigue, and participant disposition. Trials for which the corresponding author was from North America were more likely to report treatment effects on physical functioning and participant ratings of improvement and satisfaction with treatment. Trials published in higher impact journals were more likely to report treatment effects on emotional function, but less likely to report participant ratings of improvement and satisfaction with treatment. Most IMMPACT domains showed an increased rate of reporting over time, although many patient-important outcome domains remained unreported by over half of all trials evaluating the effects of opioids for CNCP.

  13. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  14. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Tokamak Core Plasma Diagnostics Based on the Synergy of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A novel plasma diagnostic method is proposed based on the synergy of stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. A nonlinear plasma mode is excited in a 4-wave coupling,footnotetextV. Alexander STEFAN, Nonlinear Electromagnetic Radiation Plasma Interactions, (S-U-Press, 2008). leading to the appearance of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the plasma edgefootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, Abstract: D1.00018 : ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions; Bulletin of the American Physical Society APS April Meeting 2011 Volume 56, Number 4. with the parameters directly dependent on the plasma parameters in the core of tokamak. Accordingly, plasma diagnostic in the core region, (ion temperature), can be performed by the diagnostics of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the edge plasma.

  15. Security core to the edge: securing critical information through enhanced Cross Domain Systems (CDS) to the tactical edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farroha, Bassam S.; Farroha, Deborah L.; Whitfield, Melinda M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper analyzes secure data sharing outside its security domain with services, agencies, coalition partners and state/local authorities. There is a high demand for multiple levels of secure data at the tactical edge; however the threat level at that point is elevated compared to the enterprise environment. This paper investigates the requirements, technologies and risk mitigation techniques for securely sharing information with the tactical warfighter while protecting the data and the information systems from intruders and malware. The new CD Systems need to eliminate the stovepipe architectures and open the doors to share information across traditional and non-traditional domain boundaries.

  16. PrionW: a server to identify proteins containing glutamine/asparagine rich prion-like domains and their amyloid cores.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rafael; Conchillo-Sole, Oscar; Iglesias, Valentin; Illa, Ricard; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Sabate, Raimon; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Prions are a particular type of amyloids with the ability to self-perpetuate and propagate in vivo. Prion-like conversion underlies important biological processes but is also connected to human disease. Yeast prions are the best understood transmissible amyloids. In these proteins, prion formation from an initially soluble state involves a structural conversion, driven, in many cases, by specific domains enriched in glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) residues. Importantly, domains sharing this compositional bias are also present in the proteomes of higher organisms, thus suggesting that prion-like conversion might be an evolutionary conserved mechanism. We have recently shown that the identification and evaluation of the potency of amyloid nucleating sequences in putative prion domains allows discrimination of genuine prions. PrionW is a web application that exploits this principle to scan sequences in order to identify proteins containing Q/N enriched prion-like domains (PrLDs) in large datasets. When used to scan the complete yeast proteome, PrionW identifies previously experimentally validated prions with high accuracy. Users can analyze up to 10 000 sequences at a time, PrLD-containing proteins are identified and their putative PrLDs and amyloid nucleating cores visualized and scored. The output files can be downloaded for further analysis. PrionW server can be accessed at http://bioinf.uab.cat/prionw/.

  17. PrionW: a server to identify proteins containing glutamine/asparagine rich prion-like domains and their amyloid cores

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Rafael; Conchillo-Sole, Oscar; Iglesias, Valentin; Illa, Ricard; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Sabate, Raimon; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Prions are a particular type of amyloids with the ability to self-perpetuate and propagate in vivo. Prion-like conversion underlies important biological processes but is also connected to human disease. Yeast prions are the best understood transmissible amyloids. In these proteins, prion formation from an initially soluble state involves a structural conversion, driven, in many cases, by specific domains enriched in glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) residues. Importantly, domains sharing this compositional bias are also present in the proteomes of higher organisms, thus suggesting that prion-like conversion might be an evolutionary conserved mechanism. We have recently shown that the identification and evaluation of the potency of amyloid nucleating sequences in putative prion domains allows discrimination of genuine prions. PrionW is a web application that exploits this principle to scan sequences in order to identify proteins containing Q/N enriched prion-like domains (PrLDs) in large datasets. When used to scan the complete yeast proteome, PrionW identifies previously experimentally validated prions with high accuracy. Users can analyze up to 10 000 sequences at a time, PrLD-containing proteins are identified and their putative PrLDs and amyloid nucleating cores visualized and scored. The output files can be downloaded for further analysis. PrionW server can be accessed at http://bioinf.uab.cat/prionw/. PMID:25977297

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  19. Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme assembly, activation, and inhibition by domains of the p50 central hub.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyungah; Upton, Heather; Miracco, Edward J; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhou, Z Hong; Feigon, Juli; Collins, Kathleen

    2013-10-01

    The eukaryotic reverse transcriptase, telomerase, adds tandem telomeric repeats to chromosome ends to promote genome stability. The fully assembled telomerase holoenzyme contains a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) catalytic core and additional proteins that modulate the ability of the RNP catalytic core to elongate telomeres. Electron microscopy (EM) structures of Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme revealed a central location of the relatively uncharacterized p50 subunit. Here we have investigated the biochemical and structural basis for p50 function. We have shown that the p50-bound RNP catalytic core has a relatively low rate of tandem repeat synthesis but high processivity of repeat addition, indicative of high stability of enzyme-product interaction. The rate of tandem repeat synthesis is enhanced by p50-dependent recruitment of the holoenzyme single-stranded DNA binding subunit, Teb1. An N-terminal p50 domain is sufficient to stimulate tandem repeat synthesis and bridge the RNP catalytic core, Teb1, and the p75 subunit of the holoenzyme subcomplex p75/p19/p45. In cells, the N-terminal p50 domain assembles a complete holoenzyme that is functional for telomere maintenance, albeit at shortened telomere lengths. Also, in EM structures of holoenzymes, only the N-terminal domain of p50 is visible. Our findings provide new insights about subunit and domain interactions and functions within the Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme.

  20. Validation and application of a core set of patient-relevant outcome domains to assess the effectiveness of multimodal pain therapy (VAPAIN): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Kopkow, Christian; Deckert, Stefanie; Sabatowski, Rainer; Schmitt, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multimodal pain therapy (MPT) has been established accounting for biopsychosocial consideration in diagnostic and therapy. MPT seems to be effective, but comparability of studies is limited due to diversity of study designs and outcome measurements. The presented study aims to develop a core outcome set consisting of a minimum of outcome measures deemed necessary for medical and therapeutic decision-making, which must be measured in all clinical trials and non-randomised intervention studies. Methods and analysis The study consists of several parts. First, the development and recommendation of preliminary core outcome domains will be based on results of a systematic review and structured online surveys. Participants of the expert panel are representatives of methodological, medical, physiotherapeutic, psychotherapeutic profession and patients suffering from chronic pain (n=25). Subsequently, candidate instruments to measure preliminary core outcome domains will be recommended by these experts. Therefore, systematic reviews on measurement properties of preliminary outcome measures will be conducted and finalised in a consensus meeting. Consented instruments and lacking psychometric properties of relevant instruments will be addressed and validated in the following part, a prospective multicentre study in multimodal pain centres on approximately 300 patients with chronic pain. Based on all previous results, a core outcome set for MPT measured in effectiveness studies and daily recordkeeping will be finalised by consensus. Statistical analyses will be performed according to methodological standards (COSMIN). Ethics and dissemination The methods and procedure of the study are developed in compliance with the ethical principles of the Helsinki Declaration and Good Epidemiologic Practice. Recruitment of study participants will require approval of the study by the responsible ethics committee and signed informed consent from each participant. Pseudonymised

  1. Pseudo-merohedral twinning and noncrystallographic symmetry in orthorhombic crystals of SIVmac239 Nef core domain bound to different-length TCRζ fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Walter M.; Sigalov, Alexander B.; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2010-02-01

    P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} crystals of SIV Nef core domain bound to a peptide fragment of the T-cell receptor ζ subunit exhibited noncrystallographic symmetry and nearly perfect pseudo-merohedral twinning simulating tetragonal symmetry. For a different peptide fragment, nontwinned tetragonal crystals were observed but diffracted to lower resolution. The structure was determined after assignment of the top molecular-replacement solutions to various twin or NCS domains followed by refinement under the appropriate twin law. HIV/SIV Nef mediates many cellular processes through interactions with various cytoplasmic and membrane-associated host proteins, including the signalling ζ subunit of the T-cell receptor (TCRζ). Here, the crystallization strategy, methods and refinement procedures used to solve the structures of the core domain of the SIVmac239 isolate of Nef (Nef{sub core}) in complex with two different TCRζ fragments are described. The structure of SIVmac239 Nef{sub core} bound to the longer TCRζ polypeptide (Leu51–Asp93) was determined to 3.7 Å resolution (R{sub work} = 28.7%) in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. The structure of SIVmac239 Nef{sub core} in complex with the shorter TCRζ polypeptide (Ala63–Arg80) was determined to 2.05 Å resolution (R{sub work} = 17.0%), but only after the detection of nearly perfect pseudo-merohedral crystal twinning and proper assignment of the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The reduction in crystal space-group symmetry induced by the truncated TCRζ polypeptide appears to be caused by the rearrangement of crystal-contact hydrogen-bonding networks and the substitution of crystallographic symmetry operations by similar noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) operations. The combination of NCS rotations that were nearly parallel to the twin operation (k, h, −l) and a and b unit-cell parameters that were nearly identical predisposed the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} crystal form to pseudo

  2. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The images of XRD, UV-vis, EDX and soot-TPR. The table providing information on Co/Ti-NA catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03757f

  3. Identification and Analysis of the SET-Domain Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailong; Zheng, Chunqin; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    As an important economic insect, Bombyx mori is also a useful model organism for lepidopteran insect. SET-domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET-domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various nonhistone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. To explore their diverse functions of SET-domain superfamily in insect, we identified, cloned, and analyzed the SET-domains proteins in silkworm, Bombyx mori. Firstly, 24 genes containing SET domain from silkworm genome were characterized and 17 of them belonged to six subfamilies of SUV39, SET1, SET2, SUV4-20, EZ, and SMYD. Secondly, SET domains of silkworm SET-domain family were intraspecifically and interspecifically conserved, especially for the catalytic core "NHSC" motif, substrate binding site, and catalytic site in the SET domain. Lastly, further analyses indicated that silkworm SET-domain gene BmSu(var)3-9 owned different characterization and expression profiles compared to other invertebrates. Overall, our results provide a new insight into the functional and evolutionary features of SET-domain family.

  4. Identification and Analysis of the SET-Domain Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailong; Zheng, Chunqin; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    As an important economic insect, Bombyx mori is also a useful model organism for lepidopteran insect. SET-domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET-domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various nonhistone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. To explore their diverse functions of SET-domain superfamily in insect, we identified, cloned, and analyzed the SET-domains proteins in silkworm, Bombyx mori. Firstly, 24 genes containing SET domain from silkworm genome were characterized and 17 of them belonged to six subfamilies of SUV39, SET1, SET2, SUV4-20, EZ, and SMYD. Secondly, SET domains of silkworm SET-domain family were intraspecifically and interspecifically conserved, especially for the catalytic core “NHSC” motif, substrate binding site, and catalytic site in the SET domain. Lastly, further analyses indicated that silkworm SET-domain gene BmSu(var)3-9 owned different characterization and expression profiles compared to other invertebrates. Overall, our results provide a new insight into the functional and evolutionary features of SET-domain family. PMID:26558257

  5. Timing and modes of granite magmatism in the core of the Alboran Domain, Rif chain, northern Morocco: Implications for the Alpine evolution of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Federico; Theye, Thomas; Lucci, Federico; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.; Dini, Andrea; Gerdes, Axel; Phillips, David; Cozzupoli, Domenico

    2010-04-01

    The Betic-Rif orogen forms the western termination of the Alpine orogenic system in the Mediterranean region. The precise timing, structural evolution, and distribution of high-grade metamorphic units (Alpine versus pre-Alpine) in the inner zones of the orogen (Alboran Domain) remain controversial issues. In this paper we report occurrence of distinct generations of peraluminous granitic bodies intruded within Beni Bousera peridotites and their amphibolite-to-granulite facies envelope, in the core of the Alboran Domain of the Rif chain (northern Morocco). These granitic bodies are central to the reconstruction of the high-grade evolution of the Alboran Domain because they provide first-order structural markers to assess the P-T-t deformation history of the high-grade terranes. Here we document the petrography and structural relationships with the host rocks and constrain the timing of granite emplacement using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry U-Pb zircon and/or monazite dating, complemented by 40Ar/39Ar dating. The results indicate that granite emplacement occurred in two major episodes of anatectic magmatism, during the Hercynian (circa 300 Ma) and Alpine (circa 22 Ma) periods, respectively. These data (1) provide conclusive evidence for an important phase of Hercynian magmatism and high-grade metamorphism in the Alboran Domain and (2) permit a revaluation of the significance of the high-grade early Miocene event documented in the Alboran Domain in terms of a late stage, thermal pulse that reworked a polymetamorphic (Hercynian and Alpine) nappe pile. These results provide new constraints for construction of a feasible tectonometamorphic model for the Alpine evolution of the western Mediterranean.

  6. Repurposing TRASH: emergence of the enzyme organomercurial lyase from a non-catalytic zinc finger scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2014-10-01

    The mercury resistance pathway enzyme organomercurial lyase (MerB) catalyzes the conversion of organomercurials to ionic mercury (Hg(2+)). Here, we provide evidence for the emergence of this enzyme from a TRASH-like, non-enzymatic, treble-clef zinc finger ancestor by domain duplication and fusion. Surprisingly, the structure-stabilizing metal-binding core of the treble-clef appears to have been repurposed in evolution to serve a catalytic role. Novel enzymatic functions are believed to have evolved from ancestral generalist catalytic scaffolds or from already specialized enzymes with catalytic promiscuity. The emergence of MerB from a zinc finger ancestor serves as a rare example of how a novel enzyme may emerge from a non-catalytic scaffold with a related binding function.

  7. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of TcpE, the inner membrane core protein required for assembly of the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Craig, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long thin surface-displayed polymers of the pilin subunit that are present in a diverse group of bacteria. These multifunctional filaments are critical to virulence for pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, which use them to form microcolonies and to secrete the colonization factor TcpF. The type IV pili are assembled from pilin subunits by a complex inner membrane machinery. The core component of the type IV pilus-assembly platform is an integral inner membrane protein belonging to the GspF superfamily of secretion proteins. These proteins somehow convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis by an assembly ATPase on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane to mechanical energy for extrusion of the growing pilus filament out of the inner membrane. Most GspF-family inner membrane core proteins are predicted to have N-terminal and central cytoplasmic domains, cyto1 and cyto2, and three transmembrane segments, TM1, TM2 and TM3. Cyto2 and TM3 represent an internal repeat of cyto1 and TM1. Here, the 1.88 Å resolution crystal structure of the cyto1 domain of V. cholerae TcpE, which is required for assembly of the toxin-coregulated pilus, is reported. This domain folds as a monomeric six-helix bundle with a positively charged membrane-interaction face at one end and a hydrophobic groove at the other end that may serve as a binding site for partner proteins in the pilus-assembly complex.

  8. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazak, Remon; Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-11-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells.A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA

  9. Phosphorylation regulates fibrillation of an aggregation core peptide in the second repeat of microtubule-binding domain of human tau.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Kaida, Shinji; Nakano, Shun; Annoni, Chiara; Nakata, Eiji; Konno, Takashi; Morii, Takashi

    2014-11-15

    Hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is believed to play a crucial role in the neurofibrillary tangles formation in Alzheimer’s disease brain. In this study, fibril formation of peptides containing the critical sequences for tau aggregation VQIINK and a plausible serine phosphorylation site of tau at its C-terminal was investigated. All the peptides formed fibrils with the typical cross-b structural core. However, stability of the fibrils was highly sensitive to the pH conditions for the phosphorylated VQIINK peptide, suggesting a regulatory role of phosphorylation for the amyloid-formation of tau.

  10. Thermodynamic linkage between the S1 site, the Na+ site, and the Ca2+ site in the protease domain of human coagulation factor xa. Studies on catalytic efficiency and inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M C; Zhong, D; Mathur, A; Heyduk, T; Bajaj, S P

    2000-11-24

    The serine protease domain of factor Xa (FXa) contains a sodium as well as a calcium-binding site. Here, we investigated the functional significance of these two cation-binding sites and their thermodynamic links to the S1 site. Kinetic data reveal that Na(+) binds to the substrate bound FXa with K(d) approximately 39 mm in the absence and approximately 9.5 mm in the presence of Ca(2+). Sodium-bound FXa (sodium-Xa) has approximately 18-fold increased catalytic efficiency ( approximately 4.5-fold decrease in K(m) and approximately 4-fold increase in k(cat)) in hydrolyzing S-2222 (benzoyl-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide), and Ca(2+) further increases this k(cat) approximately 1.4-fold. Ca(2+) binds to the protease domain of substrate bound FXa with K(d) approximately 705 microm in the absence and approximately 175 microm in the presence of Na(+). Ca(2+) binding to the protease domain of FXa (Xa-calcium) has no effect on the K(m) but increases the k(cat) approximately 4-fold in hydrolyzing S-2222, and Na(+) further increases this k(cat) approximately 1.4-fold. In agreement with the K(m) data, sodium-Xa has approximately 5-fold increased affinity in its interaction with p-aminobenzamidine (S1 site probe) and approximately 4-fold increased rate in binding to the two-domain tissue factor pathway inhibitor; Ca(2+) (+/-Na(+)) has no effect on these interactions. Antithrombin binds to Xa-calcium with a approximately 4-fold faster rate, to sodium-Xa with a approximately 24-fold faster rate and to sodium-Xa-calcium with a approximately 28-fold faster rate. Thus, Ca(2+) and Na(+) together increase the catalytic efficiency of FXa approximately 28-fold. Na(+) enhances Ca(2+) binding, and Ca(2+) enhances Na(+) binding. Further, Na(+) enhances S1 site occupancy, and S1 site occupancy enhances Na(+) binding. Therefore, Na(+) site is thermodynamically linked to the S1 site as well as to the protease domain Ca(2+) site, whereas Ca(2+) site is only linked to the Na(+) site. The

  11. The Rho Termination Factor of Clostridium botulinum Contains a Prion-Like Domain with a Highly Amyloidogenic Core

    PubMed Central

    Pallarès, Irantzu; Iglesias, Valentin; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Prion-like proteins can switch between a soluble intrinsically disordered conformation and a highly ordered amyloid assembly. This conformational promiscuity is encoded in specific sequence regions, known as prion domains (PrDs). Prions are best known as the causative factors of neurological diseases in mammals. However, bioinformatics analyses reveal that proteins bearing PrDs are present in all kingdoms of life, including bacteria, thus supporting the idea that they serve conserved beneficial cellular functions. Despite the proportion of predicted prion-like proteins in bacterial proteomes is generally low, pathogenic species seem to have a higher prionic load, suggesting that these malleable proteins may favor pathogenic traits. In the present work, we performed a stringent computational analysis of the Clostridium botulinum pathogen proteome in the search for prion-like proteins. A total of 54 candidates were predicted for this anaerobic bacterium, including the transcription termination Rho factor. This RNA-binding protein has been shown to play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation to changing environments. We show here that the predicted disordered PrD domain of this RNA-binding protein contains an inner, highly polar, asparagine-rich short sequence able to spontaneously self-assemble into amyloid-like structures, bearing thus the potential to induce a Rho factor conformational switch that might rewire gene expression in response to environmental conditions. PMID:26779170

  12. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This “KH peptide” enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared an Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells. PMID:23824281

  13. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Remon; Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-12-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This "KH peptide" enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells.

  14. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PknG by non-catalytic rubredoxin domain specific modification: reaction of an electrophilic nitro-fatty acid with the Fe-S center.

    PubMed

    Gil, Magdalena; Graña, Martín; Schopfer, Francisco J; Wagner, Tristan; Denicola, Ana; Freeman, Bruce A; Alzari, Pedro M; Batthyány, Carlos; Durán, Rosario

    2013-12-01

    PknG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates key metabolic processes within the bacterial cell as well as signaling pathways from the infected host cell. This multidomain protein has a conserved canonical kinase domain with N- and C-terminal flanking regions of unclear functional roles. The N-terminus harbors a rubredoxin-like domain (Rbx), a bacterial protein module characterized by an iron ion coordinated by four cysteine residues. Disruption of the Rbx-metal binding site by simultaneous mutations of all the key cysteine residues significantly impairs PknG activity. This encouraged us to evaluate the effect of a nitro-fatty acid (9- and 10-nitro-octadeca-9-cis-enoic acid; OA-NO2) on PknG activity. Fatty acid nitroalkenes are electrophilic species produced during inflammation and metabolism that react with nucleophilic residues of target proteins (i.e., Cys and His), modulating protein function and subcellular distribution in a reversible manner. Here, we show that OA-NO2 inhibits kinase activity by covalently adducting PknG remote from the catalytic domain. Mass spectrometry-based analysis established that cysteines located at Rbx are the specific targets of the nitroalkene. Cys-nitroalkylation is a Michael addition reaction typically reverted by thiols. However, the reversible OA-NO2-mediated nitroalkylation of the kinase results in an irreversible inhibition of PknG. Cys adduction by OA-NO2 induced iron release from the Rbx domain, revealing a new strategy for the specific inhibition of PknG. These results affirm the relevance of the Rbx domain as a target for PknG inhibition and support that electrophilic lipid reactions of Rbx-Cys may represent a new drug strategy for specific PknG inhibition.

  15. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  16. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nucleotide-binding domain from the ATP-binding Cassette transporter MsbA: ATP hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Falk; Suveyzdis, Yan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard

    2012-07-01

    MsbA is an essential Escherichia coli ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter involved in the flipping of lipid A across the cytoplasmic membrane. It is a close homologue of human P-glycoprotein involved in multidrug resistance, and it similarly accepts a variety of small hydrophobic xenobiotics as transport substrates. X-ray structures of three full-length ABC multidrug exporters (including MsbA) have been published recently and reveal large conformational changes during the transport cycle. However, how ATP hydrolysis couples to these conformational changes and finally the transport is still an open question. We employed time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy, a powerful method to elucidate molecular reaction mechanisms of soluble and membrane proteins, to address this question with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we monitored the hydrolysis reaction in the nucleotide-binding domain of MsbA at the atomic level. The isolated MsbA nucleotide-binding domain hydrolyzed ATP with V(max) = 45 nmol mg(-1) min(-1), similar to the full-length transporter. A Hill coefficient of 1.49 demonstrates positive cooperativity between the two catalytic sites formed upon dimerization. Global fit analysis of time-resolved FTIR data revealed two apparent rate constants of ~1 and 0.01 s(-1), which were assigned to formation of the catalytic site and hydrolysis, respectively. Using isotopically labeled ATP, we identified specific marker bands for protein-bound ATP (1245 cm(-1)), ADP (1101 and 1205 cm(-1)), and free phosphate (1078 cm(-1)). Cleavage of the β-phosphate-γ-phosphate bond was found to be the rate-limiting step; no protein-bound phosphate intermediate was resolved.

  17. Cystatins as calpain inhibitors: engineered chicken cystatin- and stefin B-kininogen domain 2 hybrids support a cystatin-like mode of interaction with the catalytic subunit of mu-calpain.

    PubMed

    Díaz, B G; Gross, S; Assfalg-Machleidt, I; Pfeiler, D; Gollmitzer, N; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, D; Stubbs, M T; Fritz, H; Auerswald, E A; Machleidt, W

    2001-01-01

    Within the cystatin superfamily, only kininogen domain 2 (KD2) is able to inhibit mu- and m-calpain. In an attempt to elucidate the structural requirements of cystatins for calpain inhibition, we constructed recombinant hybrids of human stefin B (an intracellular family 1 cystatin) with KD2 and deltaL110 deletion mutants of chicken cystatin-KD2 hybrids. Substitution of the N-terminal contact region of stefin B by the corresponding KD2 sequence resulted in a calpain inhibitor of Ki = 188 nM. Deletion of L110, which forms a beta-bulge in family 1 and 2 cystatins but is lacking in KD2, improved inhibition of mu-calpain 4- to 8-fold. All engineered cystatins were temporary inhibitors of calpain due to slow substrate-like cleavage of a single peptide bond corresponding to Gly9-Ala10 in chicken cystatin. Biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that, unlike calpastatin, the cystatin-type inhibitors do not bind to the calmodulin-like domain of the small subunit of calpain, and their interaction with the mu-calpain heterodimer is completely prevented by a synthetic peptide comprising subdomain B of calpastatin domain 1. Based on these results we propose that (i) cystatin-type calpain inhibitors interact with the active site of the catalytic domain of calpain in a similar cystatin-like mode as with papain and (ii) the potential for calpain inhibition is due to specific subsites within the papain-binding regions of the general cystatin fold.

  18. Characterization of long RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes with short catalytic cores: the effect of excess sequence elements on the outcome of in vitro selection.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Kenny; Lam, Jeffrey C F; Li, Yingfu

    2006-01-01

    We previously conducted an in vitro selection experiment for RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes, using a combinatorial DNA library containing 80 random nucleotides. Ultimately, 110 different sequence classes were isolated, but the vast majority contained a short14-15 nt catalytic DNA motif commonly known as 8-17. Herein, we report extensive truncation experiments conducted on multiple sequence classes to confirm the suspected catalytic role played by 8-17 and to determine the effect of excess sequence elements on the activity of this motif and the outcome of selection. Although we observed beneficial, detrimental and neutral consequences for activity, the magnitude of the effect rarely exceeded 2-fold. These deoxyribozymes appear to have survived increasing selection pressure despite the presence of additional sequence elements, rather than because of them. A new deoxyribozyme with comparable activity, called G15-30, was approximately 2.5-fold larger and experienced a approximately 4-fold greater inhibitory effect from excess sequence elements than the average 8-17 motif. Our results suggest that 8-17 may be less susceptible to the potential inhibitory effects of excess arbitrary sequence than larger motifs, which represents a previously unappreciated selective advantage that may contribute to its widespread recurrence. PMID:16682452

  19. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use. PMID:25736195

  20. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use.

  1. Connective tissue disease related interstitial lung diseases and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: provisional core sets of domains and instruments for use in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Mittoo, Shikha; Huscher, Dörte; Khanna, Dinesh; Dellaripa, Paul F; Distler, Oliver; Flaherty, Kevin R; Frankel, Sid; Oddis, Chester V; Denton, Christopher P; Fischer, Aryeh; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia M; LeSage, Daphne; Merkel, Peter A; Phillips, Kristine; Pittrow, David; Swigris, Jeffrey; Antoniou, Katerina; Baughman, Robert P; Castelino, Flavia V; Christmann, Romy B; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent; Danoff, Sonye; Highland, Kristin B; Hummers, Laura; Shah, Ami A; Kim, Dong Soon; Lynch, David A; Miller, Frederick W; Proudman, Susanna M; Richeldi, Luca; Ryu, Jay H; Sandorfi, Nora; Sarver, Catherine; Wells, Athol U; Strand, Vibeke; Matteson, Eric L; Brown, Kevin K; Seibold, James R

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Clinical trial design in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) has been hampered by lack of consensus on appropriate outcome measures for reliably assessing treatment response. In the setting of connective tissue diseases (CTDs), some measures of ILD disease activity and severity may be confounded by non-pulmonary comorbidities. Methods The Connective Tissue Disease associated Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD) working group of Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—a non-profit international organisation dedicated to consensus methodology in identification of outcome measures—conducted a series of investigations which included a Delphi process including >248 ILD medical experts as well as patient focus groups culminating in a nominal group panel of ILD experts and patients. The goal was to define and develop a consensus on the status of outcome measure candidates for use in randomised controlled trials in CTD-ILD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Results A core set comprising specific measures in the domains of lung physiology, lung imaging, survival, dyspnoea, cough and health-related quality of life is proposed as appropriate for consideration for use in a hypothetical 1-year multicentre clinical trial for either CTD-ILD or IPF. As many widely used instruments were found to lack full validation, an agenda for future research is proposed. Conclusion Identification of consensus preliminary domains and instruments to measure them was attained and is a major advance anticipated to facilitate multicentre RCTs in the field. PMID:24368713

  2. Solution structure of histone chaperone ANP32B: interaction with core histones H3-H4 through its acidic concave domain.

    PubMed

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Takashi; Munemasa, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Shin; Tsuda, Kengo; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Nagai, Ryozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by histone deposition onto and eviction from nucleosomes, which are mediated by several chromatin-modulating factors. Among them, histone chaperones are key factors that facilitate nucleosome assembly. Acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) belongs to the ANP32 family, which shares N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a C-terminal variable anionic region. The C-terminal region functions as an inhibitor of histone acetylation, but the functional roles of the LRR domain in chromatin regulation have remained elusive. Here, we report that the LRR domain of ANP32B possesses histone chaperone activity and forms a curved structure with a parallel beta-sheet on the concave side and mostly helical elements on the convex side. Our analyses revealed that the interaction of ANP32B with the core histones H3-H4 occurs on its concave side, and both the acidic and hydrophobic residues that compose the concave surface are critical for histone binding. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the functional mechanisms of acidic histone chaperones.

  3. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  4. Three-dimensional solution structure of the E3-binding domain of the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase core from the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Robien, M A; Clore, G M; Omichinski, J G; Perham, R N; Appella, E; Sakaguchi, K; Gronenborn, A M

    1992-04-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of a 51-residue synthetic peptide comprising the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3)-binding domain of the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (E2) core of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Escherichia coli has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and hybrid distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing calculations. The structure is based on 630 approximate interproton distance and 101 torsion angle (phi, psi, chi 1) restraints. A total of 56 simulated annealing structures were calculated, and the atomic rms distribution about the mean coordinate positions for residues 12-48 of the synthetic peptide is 1.24 A for the backbone atoms, 1.68 A for all atoms, and 1.33 A for all atoms excluding the six side chains which are disordered at chi 1 and the seven which are disordered at chi 2; when the irregular partially disordered loop from residues 31 to 39 is excluded, the rms distribution drops to 0.77 A for the backbone atoms, 1.55 A for all atoms, and 0.89 A for ordered side chains. Although proton resonance assignments for the N-terminal 11 residues and the C-terminal 3 residues were obtained, these two segments of the polypeptide are disordered in solution as evidenced by the absence of nonsequential nuclear Overhauser effects. The solution structure of the E3-binding domain consists of two parallel helices (residues 14-23 and 40-48), a short extended strand (24-26), a five-residue helical-like turn, and an irregular (and more disordered) loop (residues 31-39). This report presents the first structure of an E3-binding domain from a 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1554728

  5. The Non-catalytic “Cap Domain” of a Mycobacterial Metallophosphoesterase Regulates Its Expression and Localization in the Cell*

    PubMed Central

    Matange, Nishad; Podobnik, Marjetka; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite highly conserved core catalytic domains, members of the metallophosphoesterase (MPE) superfamily perform diverse and crucial functions ranging from nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism to phospholipid hydrolysis. Unique structural elements outside of the catalytic core called “cap domains” are thought to provide specialization to these enzymes; however, no directed study has been performed to substantiate this. The cap domain of Rv0805, an MPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is located C-terminal to its catalytic domain and is dispensable for the catalytic activity of this enzyme in vitro. We show here that this C-terminal extension (CTE) mediates in vivo localization of the protein to the cell membrane and cell wall as well as modulates expression levels of Rv0805 in mycobacteria. We also demonstrate that Rv0805 interacts with the cell wall of mycobacteria, possibly with the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex, by virtue of its C terminus, a hitherto unknown property of this MPE. Using a panel of mutant proteins, we identify interactions between active site residues of Rv0805 and the CTE that determine its association with the cell wall. Finally, we show that Rv0805 and a truncated mutant devoid of the CTE produce different phenotypic effects when expressed in mycobacteria. Our study thus provides a detailed dissection of the functions of the cap domain of an MPE and suggests that the repertoire of cellular functions of MPEs cannot be understood without exploring the modulatory effects of these subdomains. PMID:24970891

  6. Properties and catalytic activities of MICAL1, the flavoenzyme involved in cytoskeleton dynamics, and modulation by its CH, LIM and C-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Teresa; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Vanoni, Maria A

    2016-03-01

    MICAL1 is a cytoplasmic 119 kDa protein participating in cytoskeleton dynamics through the NADPH-dependent oxidase and F-actin depolymerizing activities of its N-terminal flavoprotein domain, which is followed by calponin homology (CH), LIM domains and a C-terminal region with Pro-, Glu-rich and coiled-coil motifs. MICAL1 and truncated forms lacking the C-terminal, LIM and/or CH regions have been produced and characterized. The CH, LIM and C-terminal regions cause an increase of Km,NADPH exhibited by the NADPH oxidase activity of the flavoprotein domain, paralleling changes in the overall protein charge. The C-terminus also determines a ∼ 10-fold decrease of kcat, revealing its role in establishing an inactive/active conformational equilibrium, which is at the heart of the regulation of MICAL1 in cells. F-actin lowers Km,NADPH (10-50 μM) and increases kcat (10-25 s(-1)) to similar values for all MICAL forms. The apparent Km,actin of MICAL1 is ∼ 10-fold higher than that of the other forms (3-5 μM), reflecting the fact that F-actin binds to the flavoprotein domain in the MICAL's active conformation and stabilizes it. Analyses of the reaction in the presence of F-actin indicate that actin depolymerization is mediated by H2O2 produced by the NADPH oxidase reaction, rather than due to direct hydroxylation of actin methionine residues.

  7. Stabilization of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III ε subunit by the θ subunit favors in vivo assembly of the Pol III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Conte, Emanuele; Vincelli, Gabriele; Schaaper, Roel M; Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2012-07-15

    Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (HE) contains a core polymerase consisting of three subunits: α (polymerase), ε (3'-5' exonuclease), and θ. Genetic experiments suggested that θ subunit stabilizes the intrinsically labile ε subunit and, furthermore, that θ might affect the cellular amounts of Pol III core and HE. Here, we provide biochemical evidence supporting this model by analyzing the amounts of the relevant proteins. First, we show that a ΔholE strain (lacking θ subunit) displays reduced amounts of free ε. We also demonstrate the existence of a dimer of ε, which may be involved in the stabilization of the protein. Second, θ, when overexpressed, dissociates the ε dimer and significantly increases the amount of Pol III core. The stability of ε also depends on cellular chaperones, including DnaK. Here, we report that: (i) temperature shift-up of ΔdnaK strains leads to rapid depletion of ε, and (ii) overproduction of θ overcomes both the depletion of ε and the temperature sensitivity of the strain. Overall, our data suggest that ε is a critical factor in the assembly of Pol III core, and that this is role is strongly influenced by the θ subunit through its prevention of ε degradation.

  8. Domain Specificity and Variability in Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Rochel

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that there are core-specific and non-core-specific domains of knowledge, but that only the core-specific domains benefit from innate skeletal structures. Asserts that core skeletal domains are universally shared, even though their particular foci may vary. Emphasizes that individuals vary in terms of the noncore domains they acquire.…

  9. A comparative electron paramagnetic resonance study of the nucleotide-binding domains' catalytic cycle in the assembled maltose ATP-binding cassette importer.

    PubMed

    Grote, Mathias; Bordignon, Enrica; Polyhach, Yevhen; Jeschke, Gunnar; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin

    2008-09-15

    We present a quantitative analysis of conformational changes of the nucleotide-binding subunits, MalK(2), of the maltose ATP-binding cassette importer MalFGK(2) during the transport cycle. Distance changes occurring between selected residues were monitored in the full transporter by site-directed spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and site-directed chemical cross-linking. We considered S83C and A85C from the conserved Q-loop and V117C located on the outer surface of MalK. Additionally, two native cysteines (C350, C360) were included in the study. On ATP binding, small rearrangements between the native sites, and no distance changes between positions 117 were detected. In contrast, positions 85 come closer together in the ATP-bound state and in the vanadate-trapped intermediate and move back toward the apo-state after ATP hydrolysis. The distance between positions 83 is shown to slightly decrease on ATP binding, and to further decrease after ATP hydrolysis. Results from cross-linking experiments are in agreement with these findings. The data are compared with in silico spin-labeled x-ray structures from both isolated MalK(2) and the MalFGK(2)-E complex. Our results are consistent with a slightly modified "tweezers-like" model of closure and reopening of MalK(2) during the catalytic cycle, and show an unforeseen potential interaction between MalK and the transmembrane subunit MalG.

  10. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  11. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui; Zhu, Hongjun

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  12. Structure-Based Engineering of Methionine Residues in the Catalytic Cores of Alkaline Amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica for Improved Oxidative Stability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Wang, Mingxing; Li, Jianghua; Wang, Nam Sun; Du, Guocheng

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to improve the oxidative stability of alkaline amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica through structure-based site-directed mutagenesis. Based on an analysis of the tertiary structure, five methionines (Met 145, Met 214, Met 229, Met 247, and Met 317) were selected as the mutation sites and individually replaced with leucine. In the presence of 500 mM H2O2 at 35°C for 5 h, the wild-type enzyme and the M145L, M214L, M229L, M247L, and M317L mutants retained 10%, 28%, 46%, 28%, 72%, and 43% of the original activity, respectively. Concomitantly, the alkaline stability, thermal stability, and catalytic efficiency of the M247L mutant were also improved. The pH stability of the mutants (M145L, M214L, M229L, and M317L) remained unchanged compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, while the stable pH range of the M247L mutant was extended from pH 7.0 to 11.0 for the wild type to pH 6.0 to 12.0 for the mutant. The wild-type enzyme lost its activity after incubation at 50°C for 2 h, and the M145L, M214L, M229L, and M317L mutants retained less than 14% of the activity, whereas the M247L mutant retained 34% of the activity under the same conditions. Compared to the wild-type enzyme, the kcat values of the M145L, M214L, M229L, and M317L mutants decreased, while that of the M247L mutant increased slightly from 5.0 × 104 to 5.6 × 104 min−1. The mechanism responsible for the increased oxidative stability, alkaline stability, thermal stability, and catalytic efficiency of the M247L mutant was further analyzed with a structure model. The combinational mutants were also constructed, and their biochemical properties were characterized. The resistance of the wild-type enzyme and the mutants to surfactants and detergents was also investigated. Our results indicate that the M247L mutant has great potential in the detergent and textile industries. PMID:22865059

  13. Plasminogen Substrate Recognition by the Streptokinase-Plasminogen Catalytic Complex Is Facilitated by Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 in the Streptokinase β-Domain and Kringle 5 of the Substrate*

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Anthony C.; Laha, Malabika; Panizzi, Peter; Thompson, Michael W.; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Bock, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Streptokinase (SK) conformationally activates the central zymogen of the fibrinolytic system, plasminogen (Pg). The SK·Pg* catalytic complex binds Pg as a specific substrate and cleaves it into plasmin (Pm), which binds SK to form the SK·Pm complex that propagates Pm generation. Catalytic complex formation is dependent on lysine-binding site (LBS) interactions between a Pg/Pm kringle and the SK COOH-terminal Lys414. Pg substrate recognition is also LBS-dependent, but the kringle and SK structural element(s) responsible have not been identified. SK mutants lacking Lys414 with Ala substitutions of charged residues in the SK β-domain 250-loop were evaluated in kinetic studies that resolved conformational and proteolytic Pg activation. Activation of [Lys]Pg and mini-Pg (containing only kringle 5 of Pg) by SK with Ala substitutions of Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 showed decreases in the bimolecular rate constant for Pm generation, with nearly total inhibition for the SK Lys256/Lys257 double mutant. Binding of bovine Pg (BPg) to the SK·Pm complex containing fluorescently labeled Pm demonstrated LBS-dependent assembly of a SK·labeled Pm·BPg ternary complex, whereas BPg did not bind to the complex containing the SK Lys256/Lys257 mutant. BPg was activated by SK·Pm with a Km indistinguishable from the KD for BPg binding to form the ternary complex, whereas the SK Lys256/Lys257 mutant did not support BPg activation. We conclude that SK residues Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 mediate Pg substrate recognition through kringle 5 of the [Lys]Pg and mini-Pg substrates. A molecular model of the SK·kringle 5 complex identifies the putative interactions involved in LBS-dependent Pg substrate recognition. PMID:19473980

  14. Different Regulation of the p53 Core Domain Activities 3′-to-5′ Exonuclease and Sequence-Specific DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Janus, Friedemann; Albrechtsen, Nils; Knippschild, Uwe; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Grosse, Frank; Deppert, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    In this study we further characterized the 3′-5′ exonuclease activity intrinsic to wild-type p53. We showed that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is mediated by the p53 core domain. Truncation of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of the p53 molecule enhanced the p53 exonuclease activity by at least 10-fold, indicating that this activity, like sequence-specific DNA binding, is negatively regulated by the C-terminal basic regulatory domain of p53. However, treatments which activated sequence-specific DNA binding of p53, like binding of the monoclonal antibody PAb421, which recognizes a C-terminal epitope on p53, or a higher phosphorylation status, strongly inhibited the p53 exonuclease activity. This suggests that at least on full-length p53, sequence-specific DNA binding and exonuclease activities are subject to different and seemingly opposing regulatory mechanisms. Following up the recent discovery in our laboratory that p53 recognizes and binds with high affinity to three-stranded DNA substrates mimicking early recombination intermediates (C. Dudenhoeffer, G. Rohaly, K. Will, W. Deppert, and L. Wiesmueller, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:5332–5342), we asked whether such substrates might be degraded by the p53 exonuclease. Addition of Mg2+ ions to the binding assay indeed started the p53 exonuclease and promoted rapid degradation of the bound, but not of the unbound, substrate, indicating that specifically recognized targets can be subjected to exonucleolytic degradation by p53 under defined conditions. PMID:10022902

  15. The Crystal Structure of the Core Domain of a Cellulose Induced Protein (Cip1) from Hypocrea jecorina, at 1.5 Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Frida; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Hansson, Henrik; Goedegebuur, Frits; Wallace, Louise; Mitchinson, Colin; Piens, Kathleen; Stals, Ingeborg; Sandgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to characterise the whole transcriptome of the fungus Hypocrea jecorina, cDNA clones of this fungus were identified that encode for previously unknown proteins that are likely to function in biomass degradation. One of these newly identified proteins, found to be co-regulated with the major H. jecorina cellulases, is a protein that was denoted Cellulose induced protein 1 (Cip1). This protein consists of a glycoside hydrolase family 1 carbohydrate binding module connected via a linker region to a domain with yet unknown function. After cloning and expression of Cip1 in H. jecorina, the protein was purified and biochemically characterised with the aim of determining a potential enzymatic activity for the novel protein. No hydrolytic activity against any of the tested plant cell wall components was found. The proteolytic core domain of Cip1 was then crystallised, and the three-dimensional structure of this was determined to 1.5 Å resolution utilising sulphur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing (sulphor-SAD). A calcium ion binding site was identified in a sequence conserved region of Cip1 and is also seen in other proteins with the same general fold as Cip1, such as many carbohydrate binding modules. The presence of this ion was found to have a structural role. The Cip1 structure was analysed and a structural homology search was performed to identify structurally related proteins. The two published structures with highest overall structural similarity to Cip1 found were two poly-lyases: CsGL, a glucuronan lyase from H. jecorina and vAL-1, an alginate lyase from the Chlorella virus. This indicates that Cip1 may be a lyase. However, initial trials did not detect significant lyase activity for Cip1. Cip1 is the first structure to be solved of the 23 currently known Cip1 sequential homologs (with a sequence identity cut-off of 25%), including both bacterial and fungal members. PMID:24039705

  16. RNase H2 catalytic core Aicardi-Goutières syndrome–related mutant invokes cGAS–STING innate immune-sensing pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pokatayev, Vladislav; Hasin, Naushaba; Chon, Hyongi; Cerritelli, Susana M.; Sakhuja, Kiran; Ward, Jerrold M.; Morris, H. Douglas; Yan, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) develops from mutations in genes encoding several nucleotide-processing proteins, including RNase H2. Defective RNase H2 may induce accumulation of self-nucleic acid species that trigger chronic type I interferon and inflammatory responses, leading to AGS pathology. We created a knock-in mouse model with an RNase H2 AGS mutation in a highly conserved residue of the catalytic subunit, Rnaseh2aG37S/G37S (G37S), to understand disease pathology. G37S homozygotes are perinatal lethal, in contrast to the early embryonic lethality previously reported for Rnaseh2b- or Rnaseh2c-null mice. Importantly, we found that the G37S mutation led to increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes dependent on the cGAS–STING signaling pathway. Ablation of STING in the G37S mice results in partial rescue of the perinatal lethality, with viable mice exhibiting white spotting on their ventral surface. We believe that the G37S knock-in mouse provides an excellent animal model for studying RNASEH2-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26880576

  17. Evolutionary versatility of eukaryotic protein domains revealed by their bigram networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein domains are globular structures of independently folded polypeptides that exert catalytic or binding activities. Their sequences are recognized as evolutionary units that, through genome recombination, constitute protein repertoires of linkage patterns. Via mutations, domains acquire modified functions that contribute to the fitness of cells and organisms. Recent studies have addressed the evolutionary selection that may have shaped the functions of individual domains and the emergence of particular domain combinations, which led to new cellular functions in multi-cellular animals. This study focuses on modeling domain linkage globally and investigates evolutionary implications that may be revealed by novel computational analysis. Results A survey of 77 completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes implies a potential hierarchical and modular organization of biological functions in most living organisms. Domains in a genome or multiple genomes are modeled as a network of hetero-duplex covalent linkages, termed bigrams. A novel computational technique is introduced to decompose such networks, whereby the notion of domain "networking versatility" is derived and measured. The most and least "versatile" domains (termed "core domains" and "peripheral domains" respectively) are examined both computationally via sequence conservation measures and experimentally using selected domains. Our study suggests that such a versatility measure extracted from the bigram networks correlates with the adaptivity of domains during evolution, where the network core domains are highly adaptive, significantly contrasting the network peripheral domains. Conclusions Domain recombination has played a major part in the evolution of eukaryotes attributing to genome complexity. From a system point of view, as the results of selection and constant refinement, networks of domain linkage are structured in a hierarchical modular fashion. Domains with high degree of networking

  18. Functional roles of the non-catalytic calcium-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of human peptidylarginine deiminase 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Liang; Tsai, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Ya-Fan; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the functional roles of the N-terminal Ca(2+) ion-binding sites, in terms of enzyme catalysis and stability, of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Amino acid residues located in the N-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site of PAD4 were mutated to disrupt the binding of Ca(2+) ions. Kinetic data suggest that Asp155, Asp157 and Asp179, which directly coordinate Ca3 and Ca4, are essential for catalysis in PAD4. For D155A, D157A and D179A, the k(cat)/K(m,BAEE) values were 0.02, 0.63 and 0.01 s(-1)mM(-1) (20.8 s(-1)mM(-1) for WT), respectively. Asn153 and Asp176 are directly coordinated with Ca3 and indirectly coordinated with Ca5 via a water molecule. However, N153A displayed low enzymatic activity with a k(cat) value of 0.3 s(-1) (13.3 s(-1) for wild-type), whereas D176A retained some catalytic power with a k(cat) of 9.7 s(-1). Asp168 is the direct ligand for Ca5, and Ca5 coordination by Glu252 is mediated by two water molecules. However, mutation of these two residues to Ala did not cause a reduction in the k(cat)/K(m,BAEE) values, which indicates that the binding of Ca5 may not be required for PAD4 enzymatic activity. The possible conformational changes of these PAD4 mutants were examined. Thermal stability analysis of the PAD4 mutants in the absence or presence of Ca(2+) indicated that the conformational stability of the enzyme is highly dependent on Ca(2+) ions. In addition, the results of urea-induced denaturation for the N153, D155, D157 and D179 series mutants further suggest that the binding of Ca(2+) ions in the N-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site stabilizes the overall conformational stability of PAD4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that the N-terminal Ca(2+) ions play critical roles in the full activation of the PAD4 enzyme.

  19. Metallic Sn spheres and SnO2@C core-shells by anaerobic and aerobic catalytic ethanol and CO oxidation reactions over SnO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Joo; Lee, Sung Woo; Sohn, Youngku

    2015-01-01

    SnO2 has been studied intensely for applications to sensors, Li-ion batteries and solar cells. Despite this, comparatively little attention has been paid to the changes in morphology and crystal phase that occur on the metal oxide surface during chemical reactions. This paper reports anaerobic and aerobic ethanol and CO oxidation reactions over SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs), as well as the subsequent changes in the nature of the NPs. Uniform SnO2@C core-shells (10 nm) were formed by an aerobic ethanol oxidation reaction over SnO2 NPs. On the other hand, metallic Sn spheres were produced by an anaerobic ethanol oxidation reaction at 450 °C, which is significantly lower than that (1200 °C) used in industrial Sn production. Anaerobic and aerobic CO oxidation reactions were also examined. The novelty of the methods for the production of metallic Sn and SnO2@C core-shells including other anaerobic and aerobic reactions will contribute significantly to Sn and SnO2-based applications. PMID:26300041

  20. Metallic Sn spheres and SnO2@C core-shells by anaerobic and aerobic catalytic ethanol and CO oxidation reactions over SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Joo; Lee, Sung Woo; Sohn, Youngku

    2015-08-01

    SnO2 has been studied intensely for applications to sensors, Li-ion batteries and solar cells. Despite this, comparatively little attention has been paid to the changes in morphology and crystal phase that occur on the metal oxide surface during chemical reactions. This paper reports anaerobic and aerobic ethanol and CO oxidation reactions over SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs), as well as the subsequent changes in the nature of the NPs. Uniform SnO2@C core-shells (10 nm) were formed by an aerobic ethanol oxidation reaction over SnO2 NPs. On the other hand, metallic Sn spheres were produced by an anaerobic ethanol oxidation reaction at 450 °C, which is significantly lower than that (1200 °C) used in industrial Sn production. Anaerobic and aerobic CO oxidation reactions were also examined. The novelty of the methods for the production of metallic Sn and SnO2@C core-shells including other anaerobic and aerobic reactions will contribute significantly to Sn and SnO2-based applications.

  1. The core domain of Aquifex aeolicus tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase has the methyl-transfer activity to tRNA.

    PubMed

    Tomikawa, Chie; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    Transfer RNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase [TrmB] catalyses the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(7)-atom of guanine at position 46 in tRNA. TrmB proteins from thermophilic bacteria such as Aquifex aeolicus have a long C-terminal region as compared to those from mesophilic bacteria. Further, N-terminal region observed in TrmB proteins from mesophiles is missing in A. aeolicus TrmB. Therefore, we considered that this distinct C-terminal region in A. aeolicus TrmB might compensate the N-terminal region in mesophile TrmB and function as a part of tRNA binding site. To confirm this idea, we deleted the C-terminal region by introduction of the stop codon at position 202. To our surprise, methyl-transfer assay using yeast tRNA(Phe) transcript clearly showed that the resultant mutant protein (Glu202Stop) had an enzymatic activity. Thus, the core domain of the A. aeolicus TrmB has a methyl-transfer activity.

  2. VP22 core domain from Herpes simplex virus 1 reveals a surprising structural conservation in both the Alpha- and Gammaherpesvirinae subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Pan, Lucy Xin; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2015-01-01

    The viral tegument is a layer of proteins between the herpesvirus capsid and its outer envelope. According to phylogenetic studies, only a third of these proteins are conserved amongst the three subfamilies (Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaherpesvirinae) of the family Herpesviridae. Although some of these tegument proteins have been studied in more detail, the structure and function of the majority of them are still poorly characterized. VP22 from Herpes simplex virus 1 (subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae) is a highly interacting tegument protein that has been associated with tegument assembly. We have determined the crystal structure of the conserved core domain of VP22, which reveals an elongated dimer with several potential protein–protein interaction regions and a peptide-binding site. The structure provides us with the structural basics to understand the numerous functional mutagenesis studies of VP22 found in the literature. It also establishes an unexpected structural homology to the tegument protein ORF52 from Murid herpesvirus 68 (subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae). Homologues for both VP22 and ORF52 have been identified in their respective subfamilies. Although there is no obvious sequence overlap in the two subfamilies, this structural conservation provides compelling structural evidence for shared ancestry and functional conservation. PMID:26068188

  3. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGES

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  4. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  5. Vanadium complexes having [VO]2+, [VO]3+ and [VO2]+ cores with hydrazones of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol: synthesis, characterization, reactivity, and catalytic potential.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Haldar, Chanchal; Kumar, Amit; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João

    2013-09-01

    The Schiff bases H3dfmp(L)2 obtained by the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and hydrazones [L = isonicotinoylhydrazide (inh), nicotinoylhydrazide (nah) and benzoylhydrazide (bhz)] are prepared and characterized. By reaction of [V(IV)O(acac)2] and the H3dfmp(L)2 in methanol the V(IV)O-complexes [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(inh)2}(H2O)] (1), [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(nah)2}(H2O)] (2) and [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(bhz)2}(H2O)] (3) were obtained. Upon their aerial oxidation in methanol [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(inh)2}] (4), [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(nah)2}] (5) and [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (6) were isolated. In the presence of KOH, oxidation of 1-3 results in the formation of [V(V)O2{H2dfmp(inh)2}]n·5H2O (7), K[V(V)O2{Hdfmp(nah)2}] (8) and K[V(V)O2{Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (9). All compounds are characterized in the solid state and in solution, namely by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-Vis, EPR, (1)H, (13)C and (51)V NMR), and DFT is also used to calculate the V(IV) hyperfine coupling constants of V(IV)-compounds and (51)V NMR chemical shifts of several V(V)-species and assign them to those formed in solution. Single crystal X-ray analysis of [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (6) and [V(V)O2{H2dfmp(inh)2}]n·5H2O (7) confirm the coordination of the ligand in the dianionic (ONO(2-)) enolate tautomeric form, one of the hydrazide moieties remaining non-coordinated. In the case of 7 the free N(pyridine) atom of the inh moiety coordinates to the other vanadium center yielding a polynuclear complex in the solid state. It is also demonstrated that the V(V)O2-complexes are catalyst precursors in the oxidative bromination of styrene by H2O2, therefore acting as functional models of vanadium dependent haloperoxidases. Plausible intermediates involved in the catalytic process are established by UV-Vis, (51)V NMR and DFT studies. PMID:23680862

  6. A single-domain llama antibody potently inhibits the enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxin by binding to the non-catalytic alpha-exosite binding region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Stevens, Raymond C; Marks, James D

    2010-04-01

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K(d) for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10(-)(10) M and an IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10(-)(10) M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 A resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the alpha-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc alpha-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  7. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  8. The cysteine-rich core domain of REIC/Dkk-3 is critical for its effect on monocyte differentiation and tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Rie; Watanabe, Masami; Huang, Peng; Li, Shun-Ai; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kumon, Hiromi; Futami, Junichiro

    2015-06-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells (REIC)/Dickkopf (Dkk)-3 is a tumor-suppressor gene and has been studied as a promising therapeutic gene for cancer gene therapy. Intratumoral injection of an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) elicits cancer cell-specific apoptosis and anticancer immune responses. The cytokine-like effect of secretory REIC/Dkk-3 on the induction of dendritic cell (DC)-like cell differentiation from monocytes plays a role in systemic anticancer immunity. In the present study, we generated recombinant full-length and N-terminally truncated REIC/Dkk-3 to characterize the biological activity of the protein. During the purification procedure, we identified a 17 kDa cysteine-rich stable product (C17-REIC) showing limited degradation. Further analysis showed that the C17-REIC domain was sufficient for the induction of DC-like cell differentiation from monocytes. Concomitant with the differentiation of DCs, the REIC/Dkk-3 protein induced the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) at a level comparable to that of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In a mouse model of subcutaneous renal adenocarcinoma, intraperitoneal injection of full-length and C17-REIC proteins exerted anticancer effects in parallel with the activation of immunocompetent cells such as DCs and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Taken together, our results indicate that the stable cysteine-rich core region of REIC/Dkk-3 is responsible for the induction of anticancer immune responses. Because REIC/Dkk-3 is a naturally circulating serum protein, the upregulation REIC/Dkk-3 protein expression could be a promising option for cancer therapy.

  9. An early intermediate in the folding reaction of the B1 domain of protein G contains a native-like core.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; O'Neil, K T; Roder, H

    1997-11-25

    The folding kinetics of a 57-residue IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G has been studied under varying solvent conditions, using stopped-flow fluorescence methods. Although GB1 has been cited as an example of a protein that obeys a two-state folding mechanism, the following kinetic observations suggest the presence of an early folding intermediate. Under stabilizing conditions (low denaturant concentrations, especially in the presence of sodium sulfate), the kinetics of folding shows evidence of a major unresolved fluorescence change during the 1.5 ms dead time of the stopped-flow experiment (burst phase). Together with some curvature in the rate profile for the single observable folding phase, this provides clear evidence of the rapid formation of compact states with native-like fluorescence for the single tryptophan at position 43. In refolding experiments at increasing denaturant concentrations, the amplitude of the sub-millisecond phase decreases sharply and the corresponding slope (m value) is only about 30% lower than that of the equilibrium unfolding curve indicative of a pre-equilibrium transition involving cooperative unfolding of an ensemble of compact intermediates. The dependence on guanidine hydrochloride concentration of both rates and amplitudes (including the equilibrium transition) is described quantitatively by a sequential three-state mechanism, U [symbol: see text] I [symbol: see text] N, where an intermediate (I) in rapid equilibrium with the unfolded state (U) precedes the rate-limiting formation of the native state (N). A 66-residue fragment of GB1 with an N-terminal extension containing five apolar side chains exhibits three-state kinetic behavior virtually identical to that of the 57-residue fragment. This is consistent with the presence of a well-shielded native-like core excluding the N-terminal tail in the early folding intermediate and argues against a mechanism involving random hydrophobic collapse, which would predict a

  10. Cellulose hydrolysis and binding with Trichoderma reesei Cel5A and Cel7A and their core domains in ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Wahlström, Ronny; Rahikainen, Jenni; Kruus, Kristiina; Suurnäkki, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) dissolve lignocellulosic biomass and have a high potential as pretreatment prior to total enzymatic hydrolysis. ILs are, however, known to inactivate cellulases. In this article, enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and enzyme binding onto the cellulosic substrate were studied in the presence of cellulose-dissolving ILs. Two different ILs, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([DMIM]DMP) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]AcO), and two monocomponent cellulases, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase Cel7A and endoglucanase Cel5A, were used in the study. The role and IL sensitivity of the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) were studied by performing hydrolysis and binding experiments with both the intact cellulases, and their respective core domains (CDs). Based on hydrolysis yields and substrate binding experiments for the intact enzymes and their CDs in the presence of ILs, the function of the CBM appeared to be very IL sensitive. Binding data suggested that the CBM was more important for the substrate binding of endoglucanase Cel5A than for the binding of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A. The CD of Cel7A was able to bind well to cellulose even without a CBM, whereas Cel5A CD had very low binding affinity. Hydrolysis also occurred with Cel5A CD even if this protein had very low binding affinity in all the studied matrices. Binding and hydrolysis were less affected by the studied ILs for Cel7A than for Cel5A. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study of IL effects on cellulase substrate binding. PMID:24258388

  11. Core domain mutant Y220C of p53 protein has a key role in copper homeostasis in case of free fatty acids overload.

    PubMed

    Arciello, Mario; Longo, Alessia; Viscomi, Carmela; Capo, Concetta; Angeloni, Antonio; Rossi, Luisa; Balsano, Clara

    2015-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a pathology that includes a wide variety of clinical conditions ranging from simple steatosis to end-stage liver diseases. Despite the huge amount of researches, the molecular basis of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested a role for p53 in NAFLD pathogenesis. Among its targets there is Synthesis of Cytochrome c Oxidase 2 (SCO2), a copper chaperone, involved in both aerobic respiration and metal cellular excretion. Copper seems to play a role in NAFLD. It was demonstrated a low hepatic copper content in NAFLD patients, which correlates with metabolic syndrome parameters. Copper homeostasis deregulation, in fact, seems to be related to lipid metabolism alteration and insulin resistance. Here we provide evidence on the role of p53 in the modulation of copper homeostasis, in an experimental model of NAFLD. We used two different hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh 7.5.1, characterized by the presence of wt p53 and its Y220C mutant, respectively, treated with a free fatty acids (FFAs) solution. Interestingly, p53 activation correlated with the intracellular copper level maintenance. We demonstrated that, in hepatoma cell lines, core domain mutant Y220C of p53 affects the modulation of SCO2 and Copper transporter 1 (CTR1), influencing, in this way, intracellular copper homeostasis in presence of FFAs accumulation, and that the 220 residue of the protein is crucial for such control. The role of p53 we highlighted may have deep implications in clinical conditions where copper homeostasis is deregulated.

  12. Structure of the catalytic a(0)a fragment of the protein disulfide isomerase ERp72.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Azeroual, Simon; Rosenauer, Angelika; Määttänen, Pekka; Denisov, Alexey Yu; Thomas, David Y; Gehring, Kalle

    2010-08-27

    Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) are responsible for catalyzing the proper oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER contains many different PDI-like proteins. Some, such as PDI, are general enzymes that directly recognize misfolded proteins while others, such as ERp57 and ERp72, have more specialized roles. Here, we report the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal portion of ERp72 (also known as CaBP2 or PDI A4), which contains two a(0)a catalytic thioredoxin-like domains. The structure shows that the a(0) domain contains an additional N-terminal beta-strand and a different conformation of the beta5-alpha4 loop relative to other thioredoxin-like domains. The structure of the a domain reveals that a conserved arginine residue inserts into the hydrophobic core and makes a salt bridge with a conserved glutamate residue in the vicinity of the catalytic site. A structural model of full-length ERp72 shows that all three catalytic sites roughly face each other and positions the adjacent hydrophobic patches that are likely involved in protein substrate binding.

  13. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  14. The C34 Peptide Fusion Inhibitor Binds to the Six-Helix Bundle Core Domain of HIV-1 gp41 by Displacement of the C-Terminal Helical Repeat Region.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Clore, G Marius

    2015-11-17

    The conformational transition of the core domain of HIV-1 gp41 from a prehairpin intermediate to a six-helix bundle is responsible for virus-cell fusion. Several inhibitors which target the N-heptad repeat helical coiled-coil trimer that is fully accessible in the prehairpin intermediate have been designed. One such inhibitor is the peptide C34 derived from the C-heptad repeat of gp41 that forms the exterior of the six-helix bundle. Here, using a variety of biophysical techniques, including dye tagging, size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle light scattering, double electron-electron resonance EPR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we investigate the binding of C34 to two six-helix bundle mimetics comprising N- and C-heptad repeats either without (core(SP)) or with (core(S)) a short spacer connecting the two. In the case of core(SP), C34 directly exchanges with the C-heptad repeat. For core(S), up to two molecules of C34 bind the six-helix bundle via displacement of the C-heptad repeat. These results suggest that fusion inhibitors such as C34 can target a continuum of transitioning conformational states from the prehairpin intermediate to the six-helix bundle prior to the occurrence of irreversible fusion of viral and target cell membranes.

  15. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the myeloid zinc finger protein MZF1: two independent DNA-binding domains recognize two DNA consensus sequences with a common G-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J F; Hromas, R; Rauscher, F J

    1994-01-01

    The myeloid zinc finger gene 1, MZF1, encodes a transcription factor which is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells that are committed to myeloid lineage differentiation. MZF1 contains 13 C2H2 zinc fingers arranged in two domains which are separated by a short glycine- and proline-rich sequence. The first domain consists of zinc fingers 1 to 4, and the second domain is formed by zinc fingers 5 to 13. We have determined that both sets of zinc finger domains bind DNA. Purified, recombinant MZF1 proteins containing either the first set of zinc fingers or the second set were prepared and used to affinity select DNA sequences from a library of degenerate oligonucleotides by using successive rounds of gel shift followed by PCR amplification. Surprisingly, both DNA-binding domains of MZF1 selected similar DNA-binding consensus sequences containing a core of four or five guanine residues, reminiscent of an NF-kappa B half-site: 1-4, 5'-AGTGGGGA-3'; 5-13, 5'-CGGGnGAGGGGGAA-3'. The full-length MZF1 protein containing both sets of zinc finger DNA-binding domains recognizes synthetic oligonucleotides containing either the 1-4 or 5-13 consensus binding sites in gel shift assays. Thus, we have identified the core DNA consensus binding sites for each of the two DNA-binding domains of a myeloid-specific zinc finger transcription factor. Identification of these DNA-binding sites will allow us to identify target genes regulated by MZF1 and to assess the role of MZF1 as a transcriptional regulator of hematopoiesis. Images PMID:8114711

  16. Single Domain SmCo5@Co Exchange-coupled Magnets Prepared from Core/shell Sm[Co(CN)6]·4H2O@GO Particles: A Novel Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Jia, Lihui; Wang, Shouguo; Gao, Chen; Shi, Dawei; Hou, Yanglong; Gao, Song

    2013-01-01

    SmCo5 based magnets with smaller size and larger maximum energy product have been long desired in various fields such as renewable energy technology, electronic industry and aerospace science. However, conventional relatively rough synthetic strategies will lead to either diminished magnetic properties or irregular morphology, which hindered their wide applications. In this article, we present a facile chemical approach to prepare 200 nm single domain SmCo5@Co core/shell magnets with coercivity of 20.7 kOe and saturation magnetization of 82 emu/g. We found that the incorporation of GO sheets is responsible for the generation of the unique structure. The single domain SmCo5 core contributes to the large coercivity of the magnets and the exchange-coupled Co shell enhances the magnetization. This method can be further utilized in the synthesis other Sm-Co based exchange-coupled magnets. PMID:24356309

  17. CPDadh: A new peptidase family homologous to the cysteine protease domain in bacterial MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Lupardus, Patrick J; Garcia, K Christopher; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    A cysteine protease domain (CPD) has been recently discovered in a group of multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxins (MARTX) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B. These CPDs (referred to as CPDmartx) autocleave the toxins to release domains with toxic effects inside host cells. We report identification and computational analysis of CPDadh, a new cysteine peptidase family homologous to CPDmartx. CPDadh and CPDmartx share a Rossmann-like structural core and conserved catalytic residues. In bacteria, domains of the CPDadh family are present at the N-termini of a diverse group of putative cell-cell interaction proteins and at the C-termini of some RHS (recombination hot spot) proteins. In eukaryotes, catalytically inactive members of the CPDadh family are found in cell surface protein NELF (nasal embryonic LHRH factor) and some putative signaling proteins. PMID:19309740

  18. Design of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75: a scaffold hopping approach using salicylate and catechol groups.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Al-Safi, Rasha I; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shabaik, Yumna; Debnath, Bikash; Sanchez, Tino W; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2011-08-15

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well mechanistically different. Herein, we describe the design and discovery of novel IN inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75, which is essential for the HIV-1 integration as an IN cofactor. By merging the pharmacophores of salicylate and catechol, the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide (5a) was identified as a new scaffold to inhibit the strand transfer reaction efficiently. Further structural modifications on the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide scaffold revealed that the heteroaromatic functionality attached on the carboxamide portion and the piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl substituted at the phenyl ring are beneficial for the activity, resulting in a low micromolar IN inhibitor (5p, IC(50)=5 μM) with more than 40-fold selectivity for the strand transfer over the 3'-processing reaction. More significantly, this active scaffold remarkably inhibited the interaction between IN and LEDGF/p75 cofactor. The prototype example, N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroxy-5-(piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl) benzamide (5u) inhibited the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction with an IC(50) value of 8 μM. Using molecular modeling, the mechanism of action was hypothesized to involve the chelation of the divalent metal ions inside the IN active site. Furthermore, the inhibitor of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction was properly bound to the LEDGF/p75 binding site on IN. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors from rational integration and optimization of previously reported inhibitors.

  19. Design of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Targeting the Catalytic Domain as Well as Its Interaction with LEDGF/p75: A Scaffold Hopping Approach Using Salicylate and Catechol Groups

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Al-Safi, Rasha I.; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shabaik, Yumna; Debnath, Bikash; Sanchez, Tino W.; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral agents. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands new structure and new mechanism IN inhibitors. Herein, we describe the design and discovery of novel IN inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain as well as its interaction with LEDGF/p75, which is essential for the HIV-1 integration as an IN cofactor. By merging the pharmacophores of salicylate and catechol, the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide (5a) was identified as a new scaffold to inhibit the strand transfer reaction efficiently. Further structural modifications on the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamide scaffold revealed that the heteroaromatic functionality attached on the carboxamide portion and the piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl substituted at the phenyl ring are beneficial for the activity, resulting in a low micromolar IN inhibitor (5p, IC50 = 5 μM) with more than 40-fold selectivity for the strand transfer over the 3′-processing reaction. More significantly, this active scaffold remarkably inhibited the interaction between IN and LEDGF/p75 cofactor. The prototype example, N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroxy-5-(piperidin-1-ylsulfonyl) benzamide (5u) inhibited the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction with an IC50 value of 8 μM. Based on the molecular modeling, the mechanism of action was hypothesized to involve the chelation of the divalent metal ions inside the IN active site. And the inhibitor of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction was properly bound to the LEDGF/p75 binding site in IN protein. This work provided a new and efficient approach to evolve novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors from rational integration and optimization of previously reported inhibitors. PMID:21778063

  20. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus DgkB Structure Reveals a Common Catalytic Mechanism for the Soluble Diacylglycerol Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Jerga, Agoston; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2008-08-11

    Soluble diacylglycerol (DAG) kinases function as regulators of diacylglycerol metabolism in cell signaling and intermediary metabolism. We report the structure of a DAG kinase, DgkB from Staphylococcus aureus, both as the free enzyme and in complex with ADP. The molecule is a tight homodimer, and each monomer comprises two domains with the catalytic center located within the interdomain cleft. Two distinctive features of DkgB are a structural Mg{sup 2+} site and an associated Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network that extends toward the active site locale. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that these features play important roles in the catalytic mechanism. The key active site residues and the components of the Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network are conserved in the catalytic cores of the mammalian signaling DAG kinases, indicating that these enzymes use the same mechanism and have similar structures as DgkB.

  1. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  2. A non-active-site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E; Ng, Sarah B; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2014-06-12

    The mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1-MLL4 and SETd1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active-site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or KIS, are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  3. Bound or free: interaction of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) with the tetrameric core of SSB.

    PubMed

    Su, Xun-Cheng; Wang, Yao; Yagi, Hiromasa; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Mason, Claire E; Smith, Paul J; Vandevenne, Marylène; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) protects ssDNA from degradation and recruits other proteins for DNA replication and repair. Escherichia coli SSB is the prototypical eubacterial SSB in a family of tetrameric SSBs. It consists of a structurally well-defined ssDNA binding domain (OB-domain) and a disordered C-terminal domain (C-domain). The eight-residue C-terminal segment of SSB (C-peptide) mediates the binding of SSB to many different SSB-binding proteins. Previously published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the monomeric state at pH 3.4 showed that the C-peptide binds to the OB-domain at a site that overlaps with the ssDNA binding site, but investigating the protein at neutral pH is difficult because of the high molecular mass and limited solubility of the tetramer. Here we show that the C-domain is highly mobile in the SSB tetramer at neutral pH and that binding of the C-peptide to the OB-domain is so weak that most of the C-peptides are unbound even in the absence of ssDNA. We address the problem of determining intramolecular binding affinities in the situation of fast exchange between two states, one of which cannot be observed by NMR and cannot be fully populated. The results were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. The C-peptide-OB-domain interaction is shown to be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, so that binding of 1 equiv of (dT)35 releases practically all C-peptides from the OB-domain tetramer. The interaction is much more sensitive to NaCl than to potassium glutamate, which is the usual osmolyte in E. coli. As the C-peptide is predominantly in the unbound state irrespective of the presence of ssDNA, long-range electrostatic effects from the C-peptide may contribute more to regulating the activity of SSB than any engagement of the C-peptide by the OB-domain.

  4. Structural and histone binding ability characterization of the ARB2 domain of a histone deacetylase Hda1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Yan, Hui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Hda1 is the catalytic core component of the H2B- and H3- specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is involved in the epigenetic repression and plays a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and developmental events. Though the N-terminal catalytic HDAC domain of Hda1 is well characterized, the function of the C-terminal ARB2 domain remains unknown. In this study, we determine the crystal structure of the ARB2 domain from S. cerevisiae Hda1 at a resolution of 2.7 Å. The ARB2 domain displays an α/β sandwich architecture with an arm protruding outside. Two ARB2 domain molecules form a compact homo-dimer via the arm elements, and assemble as an inverse “V” shape. The pull-down and ITC results reveal that the ARB2 domain possesses the histone binding ability, recognizing both the H2A-H2B dimer and H3-H4 tetramer. Perturbation of the dimer interface abolishes the histone binding ability of the ARB2 domain, indicating that the unique dimer architecture of the ARB2 domain coincides with the function for anchoring to histone. Collectively, our data report the first structure of the ARB2 domain and disclose its histone binding ability, which is of benefit for understanding the deacetylation reaction catalyzed by the class II Hda1 HDAC complex. PMID:27665728

  5. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  6. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Modeling of Gold Core-Shell Structures with Different Shell Morphology for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorunmez, Zohre; Jana, Debrina; He, Jie; Sagle, Laura; Beck, Thomas

    Core-shell (CS) nanostructures have received attention in recent years due to their usefulness in applications ranging from catalysis to cancer treatment. SERS has been shown to be one of the most sensitive techniques for molecular detection, achieving single molecule detection. It has been established that the electromagnetic mechanism (EM) provides the main contribution to SERS enhancement due to the normal Raman spectroscopy arising from coupling of both the incident and re-emitted fields. The FDTD technique has been developed to provide numerical solutions to Maxwell's time-dependent curl equations in order to promise modeling capabilities for EM enhancement of SERS. Herein, we apply this method to the study of three morphologically different gold core-shell nanoparticles to investigate their contributions to SERS. In these structures, the dye/probe molecule resides in between the shell and the core and only the shell morphology is altered. The data shows that the surface plasmon resonances (PRs) influencing the SERS of the probe molecules, due to the coupling of the core and shell, are tunable by changing the shell morphologies and CS structures with sharp features on their surfaces highlight larger enhancements due to stronger localized surface PRs. University of Cincinnati start-up funds, NSF, Ohio Supercomputer Center, and the Ministry of National Education of the Republic of Turkey.

  7. Examination of the catalytic fitness of the hammerhead ribozyme by in vitro selection.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J; Breaker, R R

    1997-01-01

    We have designed a self-cleaving ribozyme construct that is rendered inactive during preparative in vitro transcription by allosteric interactions with ATP. This allosteric ribozyme was constructed by joining a hammerhead domain to an ATP-binding RNA aptamer, thereby creating a ribozyme whose catalytic rate can be controlled by ATP. Upon purification by PAGE, the engineered ribozyme undergoes rapid self-cleavage when incubated in the absence of ATP. This strategy of "allosteric delay" was used to prepare intact hammerhead ribozymes that would otherwise self-destruct during transcription. Using a similar strategy, we have prepared a combinatorial pool of RNA in order to assess the catalytic fitness of ribozymes that carry the natural consensus sequence for the hammerhead. Using in vitro selection, this comprehensive RNA pool was screened for sequence variants of the hammerhead ribozyme that also display catalytic activity. We find that sequences that comprise the core of naturally occurring hammerhead dominate the population of selected RNAs, indicating that the natural consensus sequence of this ribozyme is optimal for catalytic function. PMID:9257650

  8. Unusual features of fibrillarin cDNA and gene structure in Euglena gracilis: evolutionary conservation of core proteins and structural predictions for methylation-guide box C/D snoRNPs throughout the domain Eucarya.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony G; Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Charette, J Michael; Gray, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Box C/D ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles mediate O2'-methylation of rRNA and other cellular RNA species. In higher eukaryotic taxa, these RNPs are more complex than their archaeal counterparts, containing four core protein components (Snu13p, Nop56p, Nop58p and fibrillarin) compared with three in Archaea. This increase in complexity raises questions about the evolutionary emergence of the eukaryote-specific proteins and structural conservation in these RNPs throughout the eukaryotic domain. In protists, the primarily unicellular organisms comprising the bulk of eukaryotic diversity, the protein composition of box C/D RNPs has not yet been extensively explored. This study describes the complete gene, cDNA and protein sequences of the fibrillarin homolog from the protozoon Euglena gracilis, the first such information to be obtained for a nucleolus-localized protein in this organism. The E.gracilis fibrillarin gene contains a mixture of intron types exhibiting markedly different sizes. In contrast to most other E.gracilis mRNAs characterized to date, the fibrillarin mRNA lacks a spliced leader (SL) sequence. The predicted fibrillarin protein sequence itself is unusual in that it contains a glycine-lysine (GK)-rich domain at its N-terminus rather than the glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain found in most other eukaryotic fibrillarins. In an evolutionarily diverse collection of protists that includes E.gracilis, we have also identified putative homologs of the other core protein components of box C/D RNPs, thereby providing evidence that the protein composition seen in the higher eukaryotic complexes was established very early in eukaryotic cell evolution.

  9. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  10. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins.

  11. Amino acid residues that flank core peptide epitopes and the extracellular domains of CD4 modulate differential signaling through the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Hen egg lysozyme 52-61-specific CD4+ T cells responded by interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion to any peptide containing this epitope regardless of length of NH2- and COOH-terminal composition. However, CD4- variants could only respond to peptides containing the two COOH-terminal tryptophans at positions 62 and 63. Substitutions at these positions defined patterns of reactivity that were specific for individual T cells inferring a T cell receptor (TCR)-based phenomenon. Thus, the fine specificity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide recognition by the TCR was dramatically affected by CD4 and the COOH- terminal peptide composition. Peptides that failed to induce IL-2 secretion in the CD4- variants nevertheless induced strong tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3 zeta. Thus, whereas the TCR still recognized and bound to the MHC class II-peptide complex resulting in protein phosphorylation, this interaction failed to induce effective signal transduction manifested by IL-2 secretion. This provides a clear example of differential signaling mediated by peptides known to be naturally processed. In addition, the external domains of CD4, rather than its cytoplasmic tail, were critical in aiding TCR recognition of all peptides derived from a single epitope. These data suggest that the nested flanking residues, which are present on MHC class II but not class I bound peptides, are functionally relevant. PMID:7515103

  12. Functional role of the additional domains in inulosucrase (IslA) from Leuconostoc citreum CW28

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, Sandra; Olvera, Clarita; Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Munguia, Agustin Lopez

    2008-01-01

    Background Inulosucrase (IslA) from Leuconostoc citreum CW28 belongs to a new subfamily of multidomain fructosyltransferases (FTFs), containing additional domains from glucosyltransferases. It is not known what the function of the additional domains in this subfamily is. Results Through construction of truncated versions we demonstrate that the acquired regions are involved in anchoring IslA to the cell wall; they also confer stability to the enzyme, generating a larger structure that affects its kinetic properties and reaction specificity, particularly the hydrolysis and transglycosylase ratio. The accessibility of larger molecules such as EDTA to the catalytic domain (where a Ca2+ binding site is located) is also affected as demonstrated by the requirement of 100 times higher EDTA concentrations to inactivate IslA with respect to the smallest truncated form. Conclusion The C-terminal domain may have been acquired to anchor inulosucrase to the cell surface. Furthermore, the acquired domains in IslA interact with the catalytic core resulting in a new conformation that renders the enzyme more stable and switch the specificity from a hydrolytic to a transglycosylase mechanism. Based on these results, chimeric constructions may become a strategy to stabilize and modulate biocatalysts based on FTF activity. PMID:18237396

  13. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Das, Debanu; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2_DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfito­bacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23_SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63_THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2_DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63_THEAC and Q2LQ23_SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63_THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23_SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure of Q9HJ63_THEAC is atypical for a treble-cleft zinc finger in that three Cys side chains and an Asp side chain are within coordination distance of the zinc. PMID:20944230

  14. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg(2+) transfer between flexibly linked domains of mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel E; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-10-28

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase MerA is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) that can transfer Hg(2+) to the catalytic core domain (Core) for reduction to Hg(0). These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are susceptible to proteolysis, the latter of which has prevented characterization of the interactions of NmerA and the Core in the full-length protein. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA from the Tn21 mer operon using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structures of full-length wild-type and mutant MerA proteins that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg(2+) from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions, and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations as a result of flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg(2+) from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed the formation of a metal-mediated interaction between NmerA and the Core and the determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg(2+) handoff.

  15. A β-Turn Motif in the Steroid Hormone Receptor's Ligand-Binding Domains Interacts with the Peptidyl-prolyl Isomerase (PPIase) Catalytic Site of the Immunophilin FKBP52.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Cillian; Henen, Morkos A; Belnou, Mathilde; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Kamah, Amina; Qi, Haoling; Giustiniani, Julien; Chambraud, Béatrice; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Jacquot, Yves

    2016-09-27

    The immunophilin FKBP52 interacts with nuclear steroid hormone receptors. Studying the crystal structure of human estrogen receptor α (hERα) and using nuclear magnetic resonance, we show here that the short V(364)PGF(367) sequence, which is located within its ligand-binding domain and adopts a type II β-turn conformation in the protein, binds the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase or rotamase) FK1 domain of FKBP52. Interestingly, this turn motif displays strong similarities with the FKBP52 FK1 domain-binding moiety of macrolide immunomodulators such as rapamycin and GPI-1046, an immunophilin ligand with neuroprotective characteristics. An increase in the hydrophobicity of the residue preceding the proline and cyclization of the VPGF peptide strengthen its recognition by the FK1 domain of FKBP52. Replacement of the Pro residue with a dimethylproline also enhances this interaction. Our study not only contributes to a better understanding of how the interaction between the FK1 domain of FKBP52 and steroid hormone receptors most likely works but also opens new avenues for the synthesis of FKBP52 FK1 peptide ligands appropriate for the control of hormone-dependent physiological mechanisms or of the functioning of the Tau protein. Indeed, it has been shown that FKBP52 is involved in the intraneuronal dynamics of the Tau protein. PMID:27641460

  16. A β-Turn Motif in the Steroid Hormone Receptor's Ligand-Binding Domains Interacts with the Peptidyl-prolyl Isomerase (PPIase) Catalytic Site of the Immunophilin FKBP52.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Cillian; Henen, Morkos A; Belnou, Mathilde; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Kamah, Amina; Qi, Haoling; Giustiniani, Julien; Chambraud, Béatrice; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Jacquot, Yves

    2016-09-27

    The immunophilin FKBP52 interacts with nuclear steroid hormone receptors. Studying the crystal structure of human estrogen receptor α (hERα) and using nuclear magnetic resonance, we show here that the short V(364)PGF(367) sequence, which is located within its ligand-binding domain and adopts a type II β-turn conformation in the protein, binds the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase or rotamase) FK1 domain of FKBP52. Interestingly, this turn motif displays strong similarities with the FKBP52 FK1 domain-binding moiety of macrolide immunomodulators such as rapamycin and GPI-1046, an immunophilin ligand with neuroprotective characteristics. An increase in the hydrophobicity of the residue preceding the proline and cyclization of the VPGF peptide strengthen its recognition by the FK1 domain of FKBP52. Replacement of the Pro residue with a dimethylproline also enhances this interaction. Our study not only contributes to a better understanding of how the interaction between the FK1 domain of FKBP52 and steroid hormone receptors most likely works but also opens new avenues for the synthesis of FKBP52 FK1 peptide ligands appropriate for the control of hormone-dependent physiological mechanisms or of the functioning of the Tau protein. Indeed, it has been shown that FKBP52 is involved in the intraneuronal dynamics of the Tau protein.

  17. Real-Time Spectroscopic Monitoring of the Synthesis of Core and Core/Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals and Finite-Difference Time Domain Modeling of the Interaction Between Light and Spherical Microwell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, John

    Nanocrystalline beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ has significant potential for applications in a wide variety of fields including solar technologies, security printing, and biological imaging and sensing. In order to increase the potential of these nanocrystals for these applications, we have developed a method for the real-time, in situ, spectroscopic monitoring of nanocrystal growth and shell-addition. In situ real-time monitoring of upconversion emission is applied to study the reaction mechanism for the synthesis of beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3++ nanoparticles in oleic acid and octadecene via the heat-up method. Transmission electron microscopy is used to correlate the spectroscopic signature of the reaction mixture with its composition. The power of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to precisely time the duration of the various stages of the reaction, and to accurately identify the transitions between those stages, including the completion of the reaction, is demonstrated. Real-time spectroscopic monitoring is used to study the effect of increasing the oleic acid concentration on the duration of these stages as well as the size and shape of resulting nanocrystals. The use of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to study shell-addition, specifically, the addition of an un-doped NaYF4 shell, is also discussed. Patterned gold surfaces are known to enhance the upconversion efficiency of lanthanide based upconversion materials, such as nanocrystalline beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3+. Here, spherical microwell arrays are shown to provide up to a 40x enhancement of upconversion emission from beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ nanocrystals. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) is a method to solve, numerically, the Maxwell equations across a 3D simulation grid and has been used to simulate the interaction of light with a variety of materials, including metal surfaces and particles. FDTD simulations is used to investigate the nature of the enhancement from the patterned gold

  18. Characterization of DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 reveals the POLXc and PHP domains are both required for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) comprise a highly conserved DNA polymerase family found in all kingdoms. Mammalian PolXs are known to be involved in several DNA-processing pathways including repair, but the cellular functions of bacterial PolXs are less known. Many bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain at their C-termini in addition to a PolX core (POLXc) domain, and possess 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Although both domains are highly conserved in bacteria, their molecular functions, especially for a PHP domain, are unknown. We found Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) has Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent DNA/RNA polymerase, Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease and DNA-binding activities. We identified the domains of ttPolX by limited proteolysis and characterized their biochemical activities. The POLXc domain was responsible for the polymerase and DNA-binding activities but exonuclease activity was not detected for either domain. However, the POLXc and PHP domains interacted with each other and a mixture of the two domains had Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis revealed catalytically important residues in the PHP domain for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Our findings provide a molecular insight into the functional domain organization of bacterial PolXs, especially the requirement of the PHP domain for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

  19. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  20. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  1. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively. PMID:10539210

  2. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  3. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg2+ transfer between flexibly-linked domains of mercuric ion reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase, MerA, is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess a metallochaperone-like N-terminal domain, NmerA, that can transfer Hg2+ to the catalytic core (Core) for reduction to Hg0. These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are subject to proteolysis, which has limited structural and functional characterization of the interactions of these domains. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structure of constructs that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg2+ from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations resulting from flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg2+ from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg2+ handoff. The small buried surface area at the site of interaction suggests molecular recognition may be of less importance for the integrity of metal ion transfers between tethered domains than for transfers between separate proteins in metal trafficking pathways.

  4. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  5. (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) from the Clostridium difficile binary toxin catalytic component (CDTa, residues 1-221).

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-10-01

    Once considered a relatively harmless bacterium, Clostridium difficile has become a major concern for healthcare facilities, now the most commonly reported hospital-acquired pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) is usually contracted when the normal gut microbiome is compromised by antibiotic therapy, allowing the opportunistic pathogen to grow and produce its toxins. The severity of infection ranges from watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis, or death. The past decade has seen a marked increase in the frequency and severity of CDI among industrialized nations owing directly to the emergence of a highly virulent C. difficile strain, NAP1. Along with the large Clostridial toxins expressed by non-epidemic strains, C. difficile NAP1 produces a binary toxin, C. difficile transferase (CDT). As the name suggests, CDT is a two-component toxin comprised of an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) component (CDTa) and a cell-binding/translocation component (CDTb) that function to destabilize the host cytoskeleton by covalent modification of actin monomers. Central to the mechanism of binary toxin-induced pathogenicity is the formation of CDTa/CDTb complexes at the cell surface. From the perspective of CDTa, this interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain (residues 1-215) and is spatially and functionally independent of ART activity, which is located in the C-terminal domain (residues 216-420). Here we report the (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of a 221 amino acid, ~26 kDa N-terminal CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) construct by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These NMR assignments represent the first component coordination domain for a family of Clostridium or Bacillus species harboring ART activity. Our assignments lay the foundation for detailed solution state characterization of structure-function relationships, toxin complex formation, and NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  6. Zinc-binding Domain-dependent, Deaminase-independent Actions of Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing Enzyme, Catalytic Polypeptide 2 (Apobec2), Mediate Its Effect on Zebrafish Retina Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Curtis; Cornblath, Eli; Goldman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Apobec/AID family of cytosine deaminases can deaminate cytosine and thereby contribute to adaptive and innate immunity, DNA demethylation, and the modification of cellular mRNAs. Unique among this family is Apobec2, whose enzymatic activity has been questioned and whose function remains poorly explored. We recently reported that zebrafish Apobec2a and Apobec2b (Apobec2a,2b) regulate retina regeneration; however, their mechanism of action remained unknown. Here we show that although Apobec2a,2b lack cytosine deaminase activity, they require a conserved zinc-binding domain to stimulate retina regeneration. Interestingly, we found that human APOBEC2 is able to functionally substitute for Apobec2a,2b during retina regeneration. By identifying Apobec2-interacting proteins, including ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9); topoisomerase I-binding, arginine/serine-rich, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (Toporsa); and POU class 6 homeobox 2 (Pou6f2), we uncovered that sumoylation regulates Apobec2 subcellular localization and that nuclear Apobec2 controls Pou6f2 binding to DNA. Importantly, mutations in the zinc-binding domain of Apobec2 diminished its ability to stimulate Pou6f2 binding to DNA, and knockdown of Ubc9 or Pou6f2 suppressed retina regeneration. PMID:25190811

  7. Core-Corona Functionalization of Diblock Copolymer Micelles by Heterogeneous Metal Nanoparticles for Dual Modality in Chemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyun Woo; Song, Minkyung; Je, Nam Jin; Oh, Sung-Hoon; Chang, Byoung-Yong; Yoon, Jinhwan; Kim, Joo Hyun; Chung, Bonghoon; Yoo, Seong Il

    2015-08-26

    Nanoscale assemblies composed of different types of nanoparticles (NPs) can reveal interesting aspects about material properties beyond the functions of individual constituent NPs. This research direction may also represent current challenges in nanoscience toward practical applications. With respect to the assembling method, synthetic or biological nanostructures can be utilized to organize heterogeneous NPs in specific sites via chemical or physical interactions. However, those assembling methods often encounter uncontrollable particle aggregation or phase separation. In this study, we anticipated that the self-segregating properties of block copolymer micelles could be particularly useful for organizing heterogeneous NPs, because the presence of chemically distinct domains such as the core and the corona can facilitate the selective placement of constituent NPs in separate domains. Here, we simultaneously functionalized the core and the corona of micelles by Au NPs and Ag NPs, which exhibited plasmonic and catalytic functions, respectively. Our primary question is whether these plasmonic and catalytic functions can be combined in the assembled structures to engineer the kinetics of a model chemical reaction. To test this hypothesis, the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol was selected to evaluate the collective properties of the micellar assemblies in a chemical reaction.

  8. Core-shell Au-Pd nanoparticles as cathode catalysts for microbial fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gaixiu; Chen, Dong; Lv, Pengmei; Kong, Xiaoying; Sun, Yongming; Wang, Zhongming; Yuan, Zhenhong; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles with core-shell structures usually display enhanced catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created between the core and shell regions. In this study, we demonstrate the application of bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a thin Pd shell as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells, which represent a promising technology for wastewater treatment, while directly generating electrical energy. In specific, in comparison with the hollow structured Pt nanoparticles, a benchmark for the electrocatalysis, the bimetallic core-shell Au-Pd nanoparticles are found to have superior activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction in a neutral condition due to the strong electronic interaction and lattice strain effect between the Au core and the Pd shell domains. The maximum power density generated in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell running on wastewater with core-shell Au-Pd as cathode catalysts is ca. 16.0 W m‑3 and remains stable over 150 days, clearly illustrating the potential of core-shell nanostructures in the applications of microbial fuel cells.

  9. Core-shell Au-Pd nanoparticles as cathode catalysts for microbial fuel cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gaixiu; Chen, Dong; Lv, Pengmei; Kong, Xiaoying; Sun, Yongming; Wang, Zhongming; Yuan, Zhenhong; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles with core-shell structures usually display enhanced catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created between the core and shell regions. In this study, we demonstrate the application of bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a thin Pd shell as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells, which represent a promising technology for wastewater treatment, while directly generating electrical energy. In specific, in comparison with the hollow structured Pt nanoparticles, a benchmark for the electrocatalysis, the bimetallic core-shell Au-Pd nanoparticles are found to have superior activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction in a neutral condition due to the strong electronic interaction and lattice strain effect between the Au core and the Pd shell domains. The maximum power density generated in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell running on wastewater with core-shell Au-Pd as cathode catalysts is ca. 16.0 W m−3 and remains stable over 150 days, clearly illustrating the potential of core-shell nanostructures in the applications of microbial fuel cells. PMID:27734945

  10. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  11. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) is involved in the amplification of regulatory microRNAs during post-transcriptional gene silencing. This enzyme is highly conserved in most eukaryotes but is missing in archaea and bacteria. No evolutionary relationship between RDRP and other polymerases has been reported so far, hence the origin of this eukaryote-specific polymerase remains a mystery. Results Using extensive sequence profile searches, we identified bacteriophage homologs of the eukaryotic RDRP. The comparison of the eukaryotic RDRP and their homologs from bacteriophages led to the delineation of the conserved portion of these enzymes, which is predicted to harbor the catalytic site. Further, detailed sequence comparison, aided by examination of the crystal structure of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DDRP), showed that the RDRP and the β' subunit of DDRP (and its orthologs in archaea and eukaryotes) contain a conserved double-psi β-barrel (DPBB) domain. This DPBB domain contains the signature motif DbDGD (b is a bulky residue), which is conserved in all RDRPs and DDRPs and contributes to catalysis via a coordinated divalent cation. Apart from the DPBB domain, no similarity was detected between RDRP and DDRP, which leaves open two scenarios for the origin of RDRP: i) RDRP evolved at the onset of the evolution of eukaryotes via a duplication of the DDRP β' subunit followed by dramatic divergence that obliterated the sequence similarity outside the core catalytic domain and ii) the primordial RDRP, which consisted primarily of the DPBB domain, evolved from a common ancestor with the DDRP at a very early stage of evolution, during the RNA world era. The latter hypothesis implies that RDRP had been subsequently eliminated from cellular life forms and might have been reintroduced into the eukaryotic genomes through a bacteriophage. Sequence and structure analysis of the DDRP led to further insights into the evolution of RNA polymerases

  12. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  13. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  14. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  15. Structures of the Wild-Type And Activated Catalytic Domains of Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1): Changes in the Active-Site Conformation And Interactions With Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of a family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. A zebrafish homolog of the human Plk1 (hPlk1) kinase domain (KD) was identified that can be expressed in large quantities in bacteria and crystallizes readily, whether in a wild-type form or as a variant containing the activating Thr196-->Asp substitution, in one space group and under similar conditions both in the absence and presence of active-site compounds. This construct was validated by testing a panel of hPlk1 inhibitors against human and zebrafish proteins and it was shown that the selected small molecules inhibited the homologs with a high degree of correlation. Crystal structures of ligand-free wild-type and activated zebrafish Plk1 (zPlk1) KDs revealed the organization of the secondary structural elements around the active site and demonstrated that the activation segment was disordered in the activated form of the domain but possessed a well defined secondary structure in the wild-type enzyme. The cocrystal structure of wild-type zPlk1 KD with ADP documented the hydrolysis of ATP and revealed the phosphorylation site. The cocrystal structure of the activated KD with wortmannin, a covalent inhibitor of Plk1 and PI3 kinases, showed the binding mode of the small molecule to the enzyme and may facilitate the design of more potent Plk1 inhibitors. The work presented in this study establishes the zPlk1 KD as a useful tool for rapid low- and high-throughput structure-based screening and drug discovery of compounds specific for this mitotic target.

  16. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  17. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  18. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells

    PubMed Central

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R.; Neubig, Richard R.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated Gα13 subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc family RhoGEFs. PMID:19560536

  19. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of Rgs1 in Magnaporthe oryzae: Role of DEP Domains in Subcellular Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Yishi, Xu; Liu, Hao; Naqvi, Naweed I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rgs1, a prototypical Regulator of G protein Signaling, negatively modulates the cyclic AMP pathway thereby influencing various aspects of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Rgs1 possesses tandem DEP motifs (termed DEP-A and DEP-B; for Dishevelled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin) at the N-terminus, and a Gα-GTP interacting RGS catalytic core domain at the C-terminus. In this study, we focused on gaining further insights into the mechanisms of Rgs1 regulation and subcellular localization by characterizing the role(s) of the individual domains and the full-length protein during asexual development and pathogenesis in Magnaporthe. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing western blot analysis and specific antisera against the N- and C-terminal halves of Rgs1, we identify and report the in vivo endoproteolytic processing/cleavage of full-length Rgs1 that yields an N-terminal DEP and a RGS core domain. Independent expression of the resultant DEP-DEP half (N-Rgs1) or RGS core (C-Rgs1) fragments, failed to complement the rgs1Δ defects in colony morphology, aerial hyphal growth, surface hydrophobicity, conidiation, appressorium formation and infection. Interestingly, the full-length Rgs1-mCherry, as well as the tagged N-terminal DEP domains (individually or in conjunction) localized to distinct punctate vesicular structures in the cytosol, while the catalytic RGS core motif was predominantly vacuolar. Conclusions/Significance Based on our data from sequence alignments, immuno-blot and microscopic analysis, we propose that the post-translational proteolytic processing of Rgs1 and the vacuolar sequestration of the catalytic RGS domain represents an important means of down regulating Rgs1 function and thus forming an additional and alternative means of regulating G protein signaling in Magnaporthe. We further hypothesize the prevalence of analogous mechanisms functioning in other filamentous fungi. Furthermore, we conclusively

  1. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  2. Degenerate Connective Polypeptide 1 (CP1) Domain from Human Mitochondrial Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Ji, Quan-Quan; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    The connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) editing domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from various species either harbors a conserved active site to exclude tRNA mis-charging with noncognate amino acids or is evolutionarily truncated or lost because there is no requirement for high translational fidelity. However, human mitochondrial LeuRS (hmtLeuRS) contains a full-length but degenerate CP1 domain that has mutations in some residues important for post-transfer editing. The significance of such an inactive CP1 domain and a translational accuracy mechanism with different noncognate amino acids are not completely understood. Here, we identified the essential role of the evolutionarily divergent CP1 domain in facilitating hmtLeuRS's catalytic efficiency and endowing enzyme with resistance to AN2690, a broad-spectrum drug acting on LeuRSs. In addition, the canonical core of hmtLeuRS is not stringent for noncognate norvaline (Nva) and valine (Val). hmtLeuRS has a very weak tRNA-independent pre-transfer editing activity for Nva, which is insufficient to remove mis-activated Nva. Moreover, hmtLeuRS chimeras fused with a functional CP1 domain from LeuRSs of other species, regardless of origin, showed restored post-transfer editing activity and acquired fidelity during aminoacylation. This work offers a novel perspective on the role of the CP1 domain in optimizing aminoacylation efficiency. PMID:26272616

  3. Catalytic combustion over hexaaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Kingsley, J.J.; Hubler, T.L.; McCready, D.E.; Cox, J.L.

    1997-12-31

    Combustion is the oldest and most extensively used process for the production of light, heat, and energy utilization. Mankind has sought to control combustion since prehistoric times to more effectively utilize the combustible material, control the products of combustion, and harness the energy released during combustion. Catalysts provide the means to control the reactions of combustion beyond what can be achieved in the homogeneous gas phase (1). Catalysts also enable operation outside the range of flammability limits and control atmospheric pollutants of combustion, mainly NO{sub x}, carbon monoxide, and particles of incomplete combustion (soot). The major technical difficulty that has hindered widespread application of catalytic combustion devices is their poor performance, particularly durability of their ceramic substrates and catalytically active phases in the high temperature environment. Catalytic combustion of hydrocarbons over metals and metal oxide catalysts has been explored extensively. Recent reviews of materials for high temperature catalytic combustion have been provided by Marcus et al. (2) and Trim (3). Hexaaluminates which show good thermal stability above 1200{degrees}C are one class of metal oxides receiving consideration for application in high temperature combustion devices. Matsuda et al. (4) have developed thermally stable La-hexaaluminates with the same layer structure as Ba-hexaaluminate and have investigated their catalytic application. Machida et al. (5-7) have investigated the catalytic properties of a number of hexaaluminates of BaMAl{sub 11}O{sub 19-{alpha}}(M=Cr, Mn,Fe,Co,Ni). Here we report the synthesis, properties and catalytic combustion of some new hexaaluminates.

  4. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  5. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  6. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  7. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  8. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  9. Catalytic molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, M N; de Prada, P; Landry, D W

    2001-06-01

    We have constructed catalytic molecular beacons from a hammerhead-type deoxyribozyme by a modular design. The deoxyribozyme was engineered to contain a molecular beacon stem-loop module that, when closed, inhibits the deoxyribozyme module and is complementary to a target oligonucleotide. Binding of target oligonucleotides opens the beacon stem-loop and allosterically activates the deoxyribozyme module, which amplifies the recognition event through cleavage of a doubly labeled fluorescent substrate. The customized modular design of catalytic molecular beacons allows for any two single-stranded oligonucleotide sequences to be distinguished in homogenous solution in a single step. Our constructs demonstrate that antisense conformational triggers based on molecular beacons can be used to initiate catalytic events. The selectivity of the system is sufficient for analytical applications and has potential for the construction of deoxyribozyme-based drug delivery tools specifically activated in cells containing somatic mutations.

  10. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, B.H.; Petty, R.H.

    1982-08-17

    Gaseous sulfur compounds are removed from a sulfur-containing gas mixture by reacting sulfur oxides in the gas mixture with alumina in association with bismuth. The process is particularly useful in fluid catalytic cracking of sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks wherein sulfur is contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst. By the process of this invention, sulfur oxides may be removed from regenerator off-gases from a fluidized catalytic cracking unit by incorporating particulate alumina impregnated with bismuth in particulate cracking catalyst whereby sulfur oxides generated in the regeneration of the catalyst are reacted with bismuth-impregnated alumina. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air are captured and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  13. Crystal structure of a group II intron in the pre-catalytic state

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Russell T.; Robart, Aaron R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Pyle, Anna Marie; Toor, Navtej

    2012-12-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that are thought to be ancestral to the spliceosome. Here we report the 3.65-{angstrom} crystal structure of the group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis in the pre-catalytic state. The structure reveals the conformation of the 5' splice site in the catalytic core and represents the first structure of an intron prior to the first step of splicing.

  14. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, R.H.; Bartley, B.H.

    1984-05-01

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is disclosed for sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks. Sulfur contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst in the reactor is converted to sulfur oxides in the regenerator and removed from regenerator off-gases by incorporating a composite of alumina and bismuth oxides in a particulate cracking catalyst. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air in the regenerator are captured by the alumina-bismuth oxides composite and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  15. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  16. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  17. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  18. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    PubMed

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  19. Catalytic asymmetric formal synthesis of beraprost.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kuramoto, Ryuta; Takemoto, Yoshiji

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the key intermediate for beraprost has been achieved through an enantioselective intramolecular oxa-Michael reaction of an α,β-unsaturated amide mediated by a newly developed benzothiadiazine catalyst. The Weinreb amide moiety and bromo substituent of the Michael adduct were utilized for the C-C bond formations to construct the scaffold. All four contiguous stereocenters of the tricyclic core were controlled via Rh-catalyzed stereoselective C-H insertion and the subsequent reduction from the convex face.

  20. Catalytic asymmetric formal synthesis of beraprost

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kuramoto, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the key intermediate for beraprost has been achieved through an enantioselective intramolecular oxa-Michael reaction of an α,β-unsaturated amide mediated by a newly developed benzothiadiazine catalyst. The Weinreb amide moiety and bromo substituent of the Michael adduct were utilized for the C–C bond formations to construct the scaffold. All four contiguous stereocenters of the tricyclic core were controlled via Rh-catalyzed stereoselective C–H insertion and the subsequent reduction from the convex face. PMID:26734111

  1. The Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)-Liphagal**

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua J.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Virgil, Scott C.; Kolding, Helene; Alleva, Jennifer L.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Ring a ding: The first catalytic enantioselective total synthesis of the meroterpenoid natural product (+)-liphagal is disclosed. The approach showcases a variety of technology including enantioselective enolate alkylation, a photochemical alkyne-alkene [2+2] reaction, microwave-assisted metal catalysis, and an intramolecular aryne capture cyclization reaction. Pivotal to the successful completion of the synthesis was a sequence involving ring expansion from a [6-5-4] tricycle to a [6-7] bicyclic core followed by stereoselective hydrogenation of a sterically occluded tri-substituted olefin to establish the trans homodecalin system found in the natural product. PMID:21671325

  2. Volcano-like behavior of Au-Pd core-shell nanoparticles in the selective oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago A G; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; López, Núria; Rossi, Liane M

    2014-01-01

    Gold-palladium (AuPd) nanoparticles have shown significantly enhanced activity relative to monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. Knowledge of composition and metal domain distributions is crucial to understanding activity and selectivity, but these parameters are difficult to ascertain in catalytic experiments that have primarily been devoted to equimolar nanoparticles. Here, we report AuPd nanoparticles of varying Au:Pd molar ratios that were prepared by a seed growth method. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol was used as a model reaction to study catalytic activity and selectivity changes that occurred after varying the composition of Pd in bimetallic catalysts. We observed a remarkable increase in catalytic conversion when using a 10:1 Au:Pd molar ratio. This composition corresponds to the amount of Pd necessary to cover the existing Au cores with a monolayer of Pd as a full-shell cluster. The key to increased catalytic activity derives from the balance between the number of active sites and the ease of product desorption. According to density functional theory calculations, both parameters are extremely sensitive to the Pd content resulting in the volcano-like activity observed.

  3. Volcano-like Behavior of Au-Pd Core-shell Nanoparticles in the Selective Oxidation of Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tiago A. G.; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; López, Núria; Rossi, Liane M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold-palladium (AuPd) nanoparticles have shown significantly enhanced activity relative to monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. Knowledge of composition and metal domain distributions is crucial to understanding activity and selectivity, but these parameters are difficult to ascertain in catalytic experiments that have primarily been devoted to equimolar nanoparticles. Here, we report AuPd nanoparticles of varying Au:Pd molar ratios that were prepared by a seed growth method. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol was used as a model reaction to study catalytic activity and selectivity changes that occurred after varying the composition of Pd in bimetallic catalysts. We observed a remarkable increase in catalytic conversion when using a 10:1 Au:Pd molar ratio. This composition corresponds to the amount of Pd necessary to cover the existing Au cores with a monolayer of Pd as a full-shell cluster. The key to increased catalytic activity derives from the balance between the number of active sites and the ease of product desorption. According to density functional theory calculations, both parameters are extremely sensitive to the Pd content resulting in the volcano-like activity observed. PMID:25042537

  4. Volcano-like behavior of Au-Pd core-shell nanoparticles in the selective oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago A G; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; López, Núria; Rossi, Liane M

    2014-01-01

    Gold-palladium (AuPd) nanoparticles have shown significantly enhanced activity relative to monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. Knowledge of composition and metal domain distributions is crucial to understanding activity and selectivity, but these parameters are difficult to ascertain in catalytic experiments that have primarily been devoted to equimolar nanoparticles. Here, we report AuPd nanoparticles of varying Au:Pd molar ratios that were prepared by a seed growth method. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol was used as a model reaction to study catalytic activity and selectivity changes that occurred after varying the composition of Pd in bimetallic catalysts. We observed a remarkable increase in catalytic conversion when using a 10:1 Au:Pd molar ratio. This composition corresponds to the amount of Pd necessary to cover the existing Au cores with a monolayer of Pd as a full-shell cluster. The key to increased catalytic activity derives from the balance between the number of active sites and the ease of product desorption. According to density functional theory calculations, both parameters are extremely sensitive to the Pd content resulting in the volcano-like activity observed. PMID:25042537

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  8. Dynamics of endoglucanase catalytic domains: implications towards thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The function of proteins is controlled by their dynamics inherently determined by their structure. Exploring the protein structure-dynamics relationship is important to develop an understanding of protein function that allows tapping the potential of economically important proteins, such as endogluc...

  9. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  10. Catalytic cycling in beta-phosphoglucomutase: a kinetic and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofeng; Dai, Jianying; Wang, Liangbing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Tremblay, Lee W; Allen, Karen N

    2005-07-12

    Lactococcus lactis beta-phosphoglucomutase (beta-PGM) catalyzes the interconversion of beta-d-glucose 1-phosphate (beta-G1P) and beta-d-glucose 6-phosphate (G6P), forming beta-d-glucose 1,6-(bis)phosphate (beta-G16P) as an intermediate. Beta-PGM conserves the core domain catalytic scaffold of the phosphatase branch of the HAD (haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase) enzyme superfamily, yet it has evolved to function as a mutase rather than as a phosphatase. This work was carried out to identify the structural basis underlying this diversification of function. In this paper, we examine beta-PGM activation by the Mg(2+) cofactor, beta-PGM activation by Asp8 phosphorylation, and the role of cap domain closure in substrate discrimination. First, the 1.90 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Mg(2+)-beta-PGM complex is examined in the context of previously reported structures of the Mg(2+)-alpha-d-galactose-1-phosphate-beta-PGM, Mg(2+)-phospho-beta-PGM, and Mg(2+)-beta-glucose-6-phosphate-1-phosphorane-beta-PGM complexes to identify conformational changes that occur during catalytic turnover. The essential role of Asp8 in nucleophilic catalysis was confirmed by demonstrating that the D8A and D8E mutants are devoid of catalytic activity. Comparison of the ligands to Mg(2+) in the different complexes shows that a single Mg(2+) coordination site must alternatively accommodate water, phosphate, and the phosphorane intermediate during catalytic turnover. Limited involvement of the HAD family metal-binding loop in Mg(2+) anchoring in beta-PGM is consistent with the relatively loose binding indicated by the large K(m) for Mg(2+) activation (270 +/- 20 microM) and with the retention of activity found in the E169A/D170A double loop mutant. Comparison of the relative positions of cap and core domains in the different complexes indicated that interaction of cap domain Arg49 with the "nontransferring" phosphoryl group of the substrate ligand might stabilize the cap

  11. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  12. The crystal structure of bacillus cereus phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase: insight into catalysis of phosphorus bond cleavage and catalytic diversification within the HAD enzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, M C; Zhang, W; Baker, A S; Zhang, G; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K N

    2000-08-29

    Phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphonoacetaldehyde to acetaldehyde and phosphate using Mg(II) as cofactor. The reaction proceeds via a novel bicovalent catalytic mechanism in which an active-site nucleophile abstracts the phosphoryl group from the Schiff-base intermediate formed from Lys53 and phosphonoacetaldehyde. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus cereus phosphonatase homodimer complexed with the phosphate (product) analogue tungstate (K(i) = 50 microM) and the Mg(II) cofactor was determined to 3.0 A resolution with an R(cryst) = 0.248 and R(free) = 0.284. Each monomer is made up of an alpha/beta core domain consisting of a centrally located six-stranded parallel beta-sheet surrounded by six alpha-helices. Two flexible, solvated linkers connect to a small cap domain (residues 21-99) that consists of an antiparallel, five-helix bundle. The subunit-subunit interface, formed by the symmetrical packing of the two alpha8 helices from the respective core domains, is stabilized through the hydrophobic effect derived from the desolvation of paired Met171, Trp164, Tyr162, Tyr167, and Tyr176 side chains. The active site is located at the domain-domain interface of each subunit. The Schiff base forming Lys53 is positioned on the cap domain while tungstate and Mg(II) are bound to the core domain. Mg(II) ligands include two oxygens of the tungstate ligand, one oxygen of the carboxylates of Asp12 and Asp186, the backbone carbonyl oxygen of Ala14, and a water that forms a hydrogen bond with the carboxylate of Asp190 and Thr187. The guanidinium group of Arg160 binds tungstate and the proposed nucleophile Asp12, which is suitably positioned for in-line attack at the tungsten atom. The side chains of the core domain residue Tyr128 and the cap domain residues Cys22 and Lys53 are located nearby. The identity of Asp12 as the active-site nucleophile was further evidenced by the observed removal of catalytic

  13. Catalytic Layer Makes Aircraft Seats More Fire Retardant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1987-01-01

    Specially constructed cushion retards fires in aircraft seats through action of catalytic matrix that cracks flammable gaseous decomposition products to less flammable species. Improved cushion contributes substantially to fire safety without adding significantly to weight or to manufacturing cost. In this fire-blocking covering for an aircraft seat cushion, flammable pyrolysis products cracked to less flammable species by catalytic layer covering foam core of cushion. Aluminum foil holds in pyrolysis vapors to promote catalysis and prevent spread of fire by ignition of released vapors.

  14. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  15. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  16. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  17. Structural and Biochemical Studies of the C-Terminal Domain of Mouse Peptide-N-glycanase Identify it as a Mannose-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,X.; Zhao, G.; Truglio, J.; Wang, L.; Li, G.; Lennarz, W.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The inability of certain N-linked glycoproteins to adopt their native conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to their retrotranslocation into the cytosol and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In this pathway the cytosolic peptide-N-glycanase (PNGase) cleaves the N-linked glycan chains off denatured glycoproteins. PNGase is highly conserved in eukaryotes and plays an important role in ER-associated protein degradation. In higher eukaryotes, PNGase has an N-terminal and a C-terminal extension in addition to its central catalytic domain, which is structurally and functionally related to transglutaminases. Although the N-terminal domain of PNGase is involved in protein-protein interactions, the function of the C-terminal domain has not previously been characterized. Here, we describe biophysical, biochemical, and crystallographic studies of the mouse PNGase C-terminal domain, including visualization of a complex between this domain and mannopentaose. These studies demonstrate that the C-terminal domain binds to the mannose moieties of N-linked oligosaccharide chains, and we further show that it enhances the activity of the mouse PNGase core domain, presumably by increasing the affinity of mouse PNGase for the glycan chains of misfolded glycoproteins.

  18. Transforming the domain structure of botulinum neurotoxins into novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chaddock, John

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are comprised of multiple identifiable protein domains. Recent advances in understanding the relationships between domain structure and neurotoxin function have provided a number of opportunities to engineer innovative therapeutic proteins that utilise the neurotoxins and neurotoxin domains. For example, recent insights into the properties of the catalytic, translocation and binding domains open up opportunities to develop botulinum neurotoxins with enhanced properties of selectivity, potency and duration of action. In parallel, the broad scope for utilisation of the individual domains is becoming clearer as significant advancements are made to exploit the unique biology of the catalytic and translocation domains. These opportunities and the status of their development will be reviewed in this chapter.

  19. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  1. X-ray structure of tRNA pseudouridine synthase TruD reveals an inserted domain with a novel fold.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Ulrika B; Nordlund, Pär; Hallberg, B Martin

    2004-05-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyse the isomerisation of uridine to pseudouridine in structural RNA. The pseudouridine synthase TruD, that modifies U13 in tRNA, belongs to a recently identified and large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. We report here the crystal structure of Escherichia coli TruD at 2.0 A resolution. The structure reveals an overall V-shaped molecule with an RNA-binding cleft formed between two domains: a catalytic domain and an insertion domain. The catalytic domain has a fold similar to that of the catalytic domains of previously characterised pseudouridine synthases, whereas the insertion domain displays a novel fold.

  2. Turbofan engine core noise source diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, Allen M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a turbofan-engine measurement program utilizing a variety of diagnostic techniques to identify a source of core-generated noise which contributes to the overall external engine noise characteristics. Included in the turbofan engine diagnostics are data examination, time domain correlation, and frequency domain analysis. It is found that the turbulent pressure fluctuations within the combustor are a source for core noise which propagates through the nozzle and radiates to the far-field.

  3. MBD2 and Multiple Domains of CHD4 Are Required for Transcriptional Repression by Mi-2/NuRD Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Julita; Dege, Carissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2012-01-01

    Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) chromatin remodeling complexes are important regulators of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. We examined requirements for individual domains of chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4), a core catalytic component of NuRD complexes, as well as the NuRD subunit methyl-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) and methylated DNA, for NuRD function in the context of tissue-specific transcription. By itself, loss of NuRD activity is not sufficient for transcriptional activation. However, NuRD complexes greatly reduce activation of the B cell-specific mb-1 (Cd79a) gene by the transcription factors EBF1 and Pax5. Using our B cell model system, we determined that the two chromodomains and ATPase/helicase and C-terminal domains (CTD) of CHD4 are all necessary for repression of mb-1 promoters by NuRD. All of these domains except the CTD are required for efficient association of CHD4 with mb-1 promoter chromatin. Loss of MBD2 expression or of DNA methylation impaired association of CHD4 with mb-1 promoter chromatin and enhanced its transcription. We conclude that repressive functions of MBD2-containing NuRD complexes are dependent on cooperative interactions between the major domains of CHD4 with histones and DNA and on binding of methylated DNA by MBD2. PMID:23071088

  4. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  5. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  6. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases

    PubMed Central

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements. PMID:26024355

  7. Multiple domains in endoglucanase B (CenB) from Cellulomonas fimi: functions and relatedness to domains in other polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, A; Gilkes, N R; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Endoglucanase B (CenB) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi is divided into five discrete domains by linker sequences rich in proline and hydroxyamino acids (A. Meinke, C. Braun, N. R. Gilkes, D. G. Kilburn, R. C. Miller, Jr., and R. A. J. Warren, J. Bacteriol. 173:308-314, 1991). The catalytic domain of 608 amino acids is at the N terminus. The sequence of the first 477 amino acids in the catalytic domain is related to the sequences of cellulases in family E, which includes procaryotic and eucaryotic enzymes. The sequence of the last 131 amino acids of the catalytic domain is related to sequences present in a number of cellulases from different families. The catalytic domain alone can bind to cellulose, and this binding is mediated at least in part by the C-terminal 131 amino acids. Deletion of these 131 amino acids reduces but does not eliminate activity. The catalytic domain is followed by three domains which are repeats of a 98-amino-acid sequence. The repeats are approximately 50% identical to two repeats of 95 amino acids in a chitinase from Bacillus circulans which are related to fibronectin type III repeats (T. Watanabe, K. Suzuki, K. Oyanagi, K. Ohnishi, and H. Tanaka, J. Biol. Chem. 265:15659-15665, 1990). The C-terminal domain of 101 amino acids is related to sequences, present in a number of bacterial cellulases and xylanases from different families, which form cellulose-binding domains (CBDs). It functions as a CBD when fused to a heterologous polypeptide. Cells of Escherichia coli expressing the wild-type cenB gene accumulate both native CenB and a stable proteolytic fragment of 41 kDa comprising the three repeats and the C-terminal CBD. The 41-kDa polypeptide binds to cellulose but lacks enzymatic activity. Images FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:1938913

  8. PiZ Mouse Liver Accumulates Polyubiquitin Conjugates That Associate with Catalytically Active 26S Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Christopher J.; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gautam, Madhav; James, Jared; Mielcarska, Joanna; Gogol, Edward; Teckman, Jeffrey; Skowyra, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z) protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S proteasome

  9. PiZ mouse liver accumulates polyubiquitin conjugates that associate with catalytically active 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Christopher J; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gautam, Madhav; James, Jared; Mielcarska, Joanna; Gogol, Edward; Teckman, Jeffrey; Skowyra, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z) protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S proteasome

  10. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle.

    PubMed

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-04-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are "highways" of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  11. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  12. Structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB, HhH, and BRCT domains of Escherichia coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kai; Nair, Pravin A; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-08-22

    NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigAs) are ubiquitous in bacteria and essential for growth. LigA enzymes have a modular structure in which a central catalytic core composed of nucleotidyltransferase and oligonucleotide-binding (OB) domains is linked via a tetracysteine zinc finger to distal helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT (BRCA1-like C-terminal) domains. The OB and HhH domains contribute prominently to the protein clamp formed by LigA around nicked duplex DNA. Here we conducted a structure-function analysis of the OB and HhH domains of Escherichia coli LigA by alanine scanning and conservative substitutions, entailing 43 mutations at 22 amino acids. We thereby identified essential functional groups in the OB domain that engage the DNA phosphodiester backbone flanking the nick (Arg(333)); penetrate the minor grove and distort the nick (Val(383) and Ile(384)); or stabilize the OB fold (Arg(379)). The essential constituents of the HhH domain include: four glycines (Gly(455), Gly(489), Gly(521), Gly(553)), which bind the phosphate backbone across the minor groove at the outer margins of the LigA-DNA interface; Arg(487), which penetrates the minor groove at the outer margin on the 3 (R)-OH side of the nick; and Arg(446), which promotes protein clamp formation via contacts to the nucleotidyltransferase domain. We find that the BRCT domain is required in its entirety for effective nick sealing and AMP-dependent supercoil relaxation. PMID:18515356

  13. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  14. Inositol hexakisphosphate is bound in the ADAR2 core and required for RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Schubert, Heidi L; Vandemark, Andrew P; Lingam, Arunth T; Hill, Christopher P; Bass, Brenda L

    2005-09-01

    We report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2, an RNA editing enzyme, at 1.7 angstrom resolution. The structure reveals a zinc ion in the active site and suggests how the substrate adenosine is recognized. Unexpectedly, inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is buried within the enzyme core, contributing to the protein fold. Although there are no reports that adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) require a cofactor, we show that IP6 is required for activity. Amino acids that coordinate IP6 in the crystal structure are conserved in some adenosine deaminases that act on transfer RNA (tRNA) (ADATs), related enzymes that edit tRNA. Indeed, IP6 is also essential for in vivo and in vitro deamination of adenosine 37 of tRNAala by ADAT1.

  15. Degradation of Granular Starch by the Bacterium Microbacterium aurum Strain B8.A Involves a Modular α-Amylase Enzyme System with FNIII and CBM25 Domains.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Eeuwema, Wieger; Sarian, Fean D; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-10-01

    The bacterium Microbacterium aurum strain B8.A, originally isolated from a potato plant wastewater facility, is able to degrade different types of starch granules. Here we report the characterization of an unusually large, multidomain M. aurum B8.A α-amylase enzyme (MaAmyA). MaAmyA is a 1,417-amino-acid (aa) protein with a predicted molecular mass of 148 kDa. Sequence analysis of MaAmyA showed that its catalytic core is a family GH13_32 α-amylase with the typical ABC domain structure, followed by a fibronectin (FNIII) domain, two carbohydrate binding modules (CBM25), and another three FNIII domains. Recombinant expression and purification yielded an enzyme with the ability to degrade wheat and potato starch granules by introducing pores. Characterization of various truncated mutants of MaAmyA revealed a direct relationship between the presence of CBM25 domains and the ability of MaAmyA to form pores in starch granules, while the FNIII domains most likely function as stable linkers. At the C terminus, MaAmyA carries a 300-aa domain which is uniquely associated with large multidomain amylases; its function remains to be elucidated. We concluded that M. aurum B8.A employs a multidomain enzyme system to initiate degradation of starch granules via pore formation. PMID:26187958

  16. Degradation of Granular Starch by the Bacterium Microbacterium aurum Strain B8.A Involves a Modular α-Amylase Enzyme System with FNIII and CBM25 Domains.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Eeuwema, Wieger; Sarian, Fean D; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-10-01

    The bacterium Microbacterium aurum strain B8.A, originally isolated from a potato plant wastewater facility, is able to degrade different types of starch granules. Here we report the characterization of an unusually large, multidomain M. aurum B8.A α-amylase enzyme (MaAmyA). MaAmyA is a 1,417-amino-acid (aa) protein with a predicted molecular mass of 148 kDa. Sequence analysis of MaAmyA showed that its catalytic core is a family GH13_32 α-amylase with the typical ABC domain structure, followed by a fibronectin (FNIII) domain, two carbohydrate binding modules (CBM25), and another three FNIII domains. Recombinant expression and purification yielded an enzyme with the ability to degrade wheat and potato starch granules by introducing pores. Characterization of various truncated mutants of MaAmyA revealed a direct relationship between the presence of CBM25 domains and the ability of MaAmyA to form pores in starch granules, while the FNIII domains most likely function as stable linkers. At the C terminus, MaAmyA carries a 300-aa domain which is uniquely associated with large multidomain amylases; its function remains to be elucidated. We concluded that M. aurum B8.A employs a multidomain enzyme system to initiate degradation of starch granules via pore formation.

  17. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  18. RAG1 Core and V(D)J Recombination Signal Sequences Were Derived from Transib Transposons

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The V(D)J recombination reaction in jawed vertebrates is catalyzed by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which are believed to have emerged approximately 500 million years ago from transposon-encoded proteins. Yet no transposase sequence similar to RAG1 or RAG2 has been found. Here we show that the approximately 600-amino acid “core” region of RAG1 required for its catalytic activity is significantly similar to the transposase encoded by DNA transposons that belong to the Transib superfamily. This superfamily was discovered recently based on computational analysis of the fruit fly and African malaria mosquito genomes. Transib transposons also are present in the genomes of sea urchin, yellow fever mosquito, silkworm, dog hookworm, hydra, and soybean rust. We demonstrate that recombination signal sequences (RSSs) were derived from terminal inverted repeats of an ancient Transib transposon. Furthermore, the critical DDE catalytic triad of RAG1 is shared with the Transib transposase as part of conserved motifs. We also studied several divergent proteins encoded by the sea urchin and lancelet genomes that are 25%−30% identical to the RAG1 N-terminal domain and the RAG1 core. Our results provide the first direct evidence linking RAG1 and RSSs to a specific superfamily of DNA transposons and indicate that the V(D)J machinery evolved from transposons. We propose that only the RAG1 core was derived from the Transib transposase, whereas the N-terminal domain was assembled from separate proteins of unknown function that may still be active in sea urchin, lancelet, hydra, and starlet sea anemone. We also suggest that the RAG2 protein was not encoded by ancient Transib transposons but emerged in jawed vertebrates as a counterpart of RAG1 necessary for the V(D)J recombination reaction. PMID:15898832

  19. Full-Length Gαq–Phospholipase C-β3 Structure Reveals Interfaces of the C-terminal Coiled-Coil Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM 3D reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with murine Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended, monomeric helical bundle consisting of three anti-parallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin–amphiphysin–Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD identifies putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests the distal CTD plays roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23377541

  20. Full-length Gαq-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2014-08-21

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis.

  1. Full-length Gα(q)-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Angeline M; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J G

    2013-03-01

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23377541

  2. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  3. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  4. Molecular Basis for Auto- and Hetero-catalytic Maturation of a Thermostable Subtilase from Thermophilic Bacillus sp. WF146*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Xu, Bi-Lin; Liang, Xiaoliang; Yang, Yi-Ran; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The proform of the WF146 protease, an extracellular subtilase produced by thermophilic Bacillus sp. WF146, matures efficiently at high temperatures. Here we report that the proform, which contains an N-terminal propeptide composed of a core domain (N*) and a linker peptide, is intrinsically able to mature via multiple pathways. One autocatalytic pathway is initiated by cis-processing of N* to generate an autoprocessed complex N*-IWT, and this step is followed by truncation of the linker peptide and degradation of N*. Another autocatalytic pathway is initiated by trans-processing of the linker peptide followed by degradation of N*. Unlike most reported subtilases, the maturation of the WF146 protease occurs not only autocatalytically but also hetero-catalytically whereby heterogeneous proteases accelerate the maturation of the WF146 protease via trans-processing of the proform and N*-IWT. Although N* acts as an intramolecular chaperone and an inhibitor of the mature enzyme, the linker peptide is susceptible to proteolysis, allowing the trans-processing reaction to occur auto- and hetero-catalytically. These studies also demonstrate that the WF146 protease undergoes subtle structural adjustments during the maturation process and that the binding of Ca2+ is required for routing the proform to mature properly at high temperatures. Interestingly, under Ca2+-free conditions, the proform is cis-processed into a unique propeptide-intermediate complex (N*-IE) capable of re-synthesis of the proform. Based on the basic catalytic principle of serine proteases and these experimental results, a mechanism for the cis-processing/re-synthesis equilibrium of the proform and the role of the linker peptide in regulation of this equilibrium has been proposed. PMID:24145031

  5. RNA topoisomerase is prevalent in all domains of life and associates with polyribosomes in animals.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muzammil; Xue, Yutong; Lee, Seung Kyu; Martindale, Jennifer L; Shen, Weiping; Li, Wen; Zou, Sige; Ciaramella, Maria; Debat, Hélène; Nadal, Marc; Leng, Fenfei; Zhang, Hongliang; Wang, Quan; Siaw, Grace Ee-Lu; Niu, Hengyao; Pommier, Yves; Gorospe, Myriam; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2016-07-27

    DNA Topoisomerases are essential to resolve topological problems during DNA metabolism in all species. However, the prevalence and function of RNA topoisomerases remain uncertain. Here, we show that RNA topoisomerase activity is prevalent in Type IA topoisomerases from bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Moreover, this activity always requires the conserved Type IA core domains and the same catalytic residue used in DNA topoisomerase reaction; however, it does not absolutely require the non-conserved carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD), which is necessary for relaxation reactions of supercoiled DNA. The RNA topoisomerase activity of human Top3β differs from that of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I in that the former but not the latter requires the CTD, indicating that topoisomerases have developed distinct mechanisms during evolution to catalyze RNA topoisomerase reactions. Notably, Top3β proteins from several animals associate with polyribosomes, which are units of mRNA translation, whereas the Top3 homologs from E. coli and yeast lack the association. The Top3β-polyribosome association requires TDRD3, which directly interacts with Top3β and is present in animals but not bacteria or yeast. We propose that RNA topoisomerases arose in the early RNA world, and that they are retained through all domains of DNA-based life, where they mediate mRNA translation as part of polyribosomes in animals.

  6. RNA topoisomerase is prevalent in all domains of life and associates with polyribosomes in animals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muzammil; Xue, Yutong; Lee, Seung Kyu; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Shen, Weiping; Li, Wen; Zou, Sige; Ciaramella, Maria; Debat, Hélène; Nadal, Marc; Leng, Fenfei; Zhang, Hongliang; Wang, Quan; Siaw, Grace Ee-Lu; Niu, Hengyao; Pommier, Yves; Gorospe, Myriam; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    DNA Topoisomerases are essential to resolve topological problems during DNA metabolism in all species. However, the prevalence and function of RNA topoisomerases remain uncertain. Here, we show that RNA topoisomerase activity is prevalent in Type IA topoisomerases from bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Moreover, this activity always requires the conserved Type IA core domains and the same catalytic residue used in DNA topoisomerase reaction; however, it does not absolutely require the non-conserved carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD), which is necessary for relaxation reactions of supercoiled DNA. The RNA topoisomerase activity of human Top3β differs from that of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I in that the former but not the latter requires the CTD, indicating that topoisomerases have developed distinct mechanisms during evolution to catalyze RNA topoisomerase reactions. Notably, Top3β proteins from several animals associate with polyribosomes, which are units of mRNA translation, whereas the Top3 homologs from E. coli and yeast lack the association. The Top3β-polyribosome association requires TDRD3, which directly interacts with Top3β and is present in animals but not bacteria or yeast. We propose that RNA topoisomerases arose in the early RNA world, and that they are retained through all domains of DNA-based life, where they mediate mRNA translation as part of polyribosomes in animals. PMID:27257063

  7. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.

  8. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  9. GEOS-CORE

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  10. Physical and genetic interactions of yeast Cwc21p, an ortholog of human SRm300/SRRM2, suggest a role at the catalytic center of the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Richard J; Barrass, J David; Jacquier, Alain; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Beggs, Jean D

    2009-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cwc21p is a protein of unknown function that is associated with the NineTeen Complex (NTC), a group of proteins involved in activating the spliceosome to promote the pre-mRNA splicing reaction. Here, we show that Cwc21p binds directly to two key splicing factors-namely, Prp8p and Snu114p-and becomes the first NTC-related protein known to dock directly to U5 snRNP proteins. Using a combination of proteomic techniques we show that the N-terminus of Prp8p contains an intramolecular fold that is a Snu114p and Cwc21p interacting domain (SCwid). Cwc21p also binds directly to the C-terminus of Snu114p. Complementary chemical cross-linking experiments reveal reciprocal protein footprints between the interacting Prp8 and Cwc21 proteins, identifying the conserved cwf21 domain in Cwc21p as a Prp8p binding site. Genetic and functional interactions between Cwc21p and Isy1p indicate that they have related functions at or prior to the first catalytic step of splicing, and suggest that Cwc21p functions at the catalytic center of the spliceosome, possibly in response to environmental or metabolic changes. We demonstrate that SRm300, the only SR-related protein known to be at the core of human catalytic spliceosomes, is a functional ortholog of Cwc21p, also interacting directly with Prp8p and Snu114p. Thus, the function of Cwc21p is likely conserved from yeast to humans.

  11. Folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: Pyrrolo-cytosine fluorescence separates core folding from global folding and reveals a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Buskiewicz, Iwona A.; Burke, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme is limited by its ability to fold into the native tertiary structure. Analysis of folding has been hampered by a lack of assays that can independently monitor the environment of nucleobases throughout the ribozyme–substrate complex in real time. Here, we report the development and application of a new folding assay in which we use pyrrolo-cytosine (pyC) fluorescence to (1) probe active-site formation, (2) examine the ability of peripheral ribozyme domains to support native folding, (3) identify a pH-dependent conformational change within the ribozyme, and (4) explore its influence on the equilibrium between the folded and unfolded core of the hammerhead ribozyme. We conclude that the natural ribozyme folds in two distinct noncooperative steps and the pH-dependent correlation between core folding and activity is linked to formation of the G8-C3 base pair. PMID:22274955

  12. Identification of functionally important amino acids in the cellulose-binding domain of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, M.; Mattinen, M. L.; Kontteli, M.; Lindeberg, G.; Ståhlberg, J.; Drakenberg, T.; Reinikainen, T.; Pettersson, G.; Annila, A.

    1995-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) of Trichoderma reesei has two functional domains, a catalytic core domain and a cellulose binding domain (CBD). The structure of the CBD reveals two distinct faces, one of which is flat and the other rough. Several other fungal cellulolytic enzymes have similar two-domain structures, in which the CBDs show a conserved primary structure. Here we have evaluated the contributions of conserved amino acids in CBHI CBD to its binding to cellulose. Binding isotherms were determined for a set of six synthetic analogues in which conserved amino acids were substituted. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy was used to assess the structural effects of the substitutions by comparing chemical shifts, coupling constants, and NOEs of the backbone protons between the wild-type CBD and the analogues. In general, the structural effects of the substitutions were minor, although in some cases decreased binding could clearly be ascribed to conformational perturbations. We found that at least two tyrosine residues and a glutamine residue on the flat face were essential for tight binding of the CBD to cellulose. A change on the rough face had only a small effect on the binding and it is unlikely that this face interacts with cellulose directly. PMID:7549870

  13. Multiple regulatory domains on the Byr2 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, H; Barr, M; Dong, D L; Wigler, M

    1997-01-01

    Byr2 protein kinase, a homolog of mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEKK) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11, is required for pheromone-induced sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Byr2 functions downstream of Ste4, Ras1, and the membrane-associated receptor-coupled heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit, Gpa1. Byr2 has a distinctive N-terminal kinase regulatory domain and a characteristic C-terminal kinase catalytic domain. Ste4 and Ras1 interact with the regulatory domain of Byr2 directly. Here, we define the domains of Byr2 that bind Ste4 and Ras1 and show that the Byr2 regulatory domain binds to the catalytic domain in the two-hybrid system. Using Byr2 mutants, we demonstrate that these direct physical interactions are all required for proper signaling. In particular, the physical association between Byr2 regulatory and catalytic domains appears to result in autoinhibition, the loss of which results in kinase activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Shk1, the S. pombe homolog of the STE20 protein kinase, can directly antagonize the Byr2 intramolecular interaction, possibly by phosphorylating Byr2. PMID:9315645

  14. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak p