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Sample records for core concrete interaction

  1. Core-concrete interactions using molten urania with zirconium on a limestone concrete basemat

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. ); Blose, R.E. )

    1992-09-01

    An inductively heated experiment SURC-1, using UO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] material, was executed to measure and assess the thermal, gas, and aerosol source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. The SURC-1 experiment eroded a total of 27 cm of limestone concrete during 130 minutes of sustained interaction using 204.2 kg of molten prototypic UO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] core debris material that included 18 kg of zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The melt pool temperature ranged from 2100 to 2400[degrees]C during the first 50 minutes of the test, followed by steady temperatures of 2000 to 2100[degrees]C during the middle portion of the test and temperatures of 1800 to 2000[degrees]C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 16 cm with an additional 2 cm during the middle part of the test and 9 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Aerosols were continuously released in concentrations ranging from 30 to 200 g/m[sup 3]. Comprehensive gas flow rates, gas compositions, and aerosol compositions were also measured during the SURC-1 test.

  2. The jet impingement phase of molten core-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    Scoping calculations have been carried out demonstrating that a significant and abrupt reduction in the corium temperature may be realized when molten corium drains as a jet from a localized breach in the RPV lower head to impinge upon the concrete basemat. The temperature decrease may range from a value of approx.170 K (approx.140 K) for limestone (basaltic) aggregate concrete to a value approaching the initial corium superheat depending upon whether the forced convection impingement heat flux is assumed to be controlled by either thermal conduction across a slag film layer or the temperature boundary condition represented by a corium crust. The magnitude of the temperature reduction remains significant as the initial corium temperature, impinging corium mass, and initial localized breach size are varied over their range of potential values.

  3. Key findings and remaining questions in the areas of core-concrete interaction and debris coolability

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, M. T.; Gerardi, C.; Bremer, N.; ...

    2016-10-31

    The reactor accidents at Fukushima-Dai-ichi have rekindled interest in late phase severe accident behavior involving reactor pressure vessel breach and discharge of molten core melt into the containment. Two technical issues of interest in this area include core-concrete interaction and the extent to which the core debris may be quenched and rendered coolable by top flooding. The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) programs at Argonne National Laboratory included the conduct of large scale reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensionalmore » molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. These tests provided a broad database to support accident management planning, as well as the development and validation of models and codes that can be used to extrapolate the experiment results to plant conditions. This paper provides a high level overview of the key experiment results obtained during the program. Finally, a discussion is also provided that describes technical gaps that remain in this area, several of which have arisen based on the sequence of events and operator actions during Fukushima.« less

  4. Key findings and remaining questions in the areas of core-concrete interaction and debris coolability

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Gerardi, C.; Bremer, N.; Basu, S.

    2016-10-31

    The reactor accidents at Fukushima-Dai-ichi have rekindled interest in late phase severe accident behavior involving reactor pressure vessel breach and discharge of molten core melt into the containment. Two technical issues of interest in this area include core-concrete interaction and the extent to which the core debris may be quenched and rendered coolable by top flooding. The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) programs at Argonne National Laboratory included the conduct of large scale reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. These tests provided a broad database to support accident management planning, as well as the development and validation of models and codes that can be used to extrapolate the experiment results to plant conditions. This paper provides a high level overview of the key experiment results obtained during the program. Finally, a discussion is also provided that describes technical gaps that remain in this area, several of which have arisen based on the sequence of events and operator actions during Fukushima.

  5. Experimental results of core-concrete interactions using molten steel with zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E.R.; Blose, R.E.; Brockmann, J.E.; Gomez, R.D.; Lucero, D.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Four inductively sustained experiments, QT-D, QT-E, SURC-3, and SURC-3A, were performed in order to investigate the additional effects of zirconium metal oxidation on core debris-concrete interactions using molten stainless steel as the core debris simulant. The QT-D experiment ablated 18 cm of concrete axially during 50 minutes of interaction on limestone-common sand concrete using a 10 kg charge of 304 stainless steel to which 2 kg of zirconium metal was added subsequent to the onset of erosion. The QT-E experiment ablated 10 cm of limestone-common sand concrete axially and 10 cm radially during 35 minutes of sustained interaction using 50 kg of stainless steel and 10 kg of zirconium. The SURC-3 experiment had a 45 kg charge of stainless steel to which 1.1 kg of zirconium was subsequently added. SURC-3 axially eroded 33 cm of limestone concrete during two hours of interaction. The fourth experiment, SURC-3A, eroded 25 cm of limestone concrete axially and 9 cm radially during 90 minutes of sustained interaction. It utilized 40 kg of stainless steel and 2.2 kg of added zirconium as the charge material. All four experiments showed in a large increase in erosion rate, gas production, and aerosol release following the addition of Zr metal to the melt. In the SURC-3 and SURC-3A tests the measured erosion rates increased from 14 cm/hr to 27 cm/hr, gas release increased from 50 slpm to 100 slpm, and aerosol release increased from .02 q/sec to .04 q/sec. The effluent gas was composed of 80% CO, 10% CO{sub 2}, and 2% H{sub 2} before Zr addition and 92% CO, 4% CO{sub 2}, 4% H{sub 2} during the Zr interactions which lasted 10--20 minutes. Addition measurements indicated that the melt pool temperature ranged from 1600{degree}C--1800{degree} and that the aerosols produced were comprised primarily of Te and Fe oxides. 21 refs., 120 figs., 51 tabs.

  6. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two

  7. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing

  8. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O.

    1993-10-01

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

  9. Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

    1993-11-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

  10. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core-Concrete Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell T.; Francis, Matthew W.

    2016-10-31

    Lower head failure and corium-concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for the analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, in this paper an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 weremore » used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH. For the MELCOR-based melt pour scenario, CORQUENCH predicted the melt would readily cool within 2.5 h after the pour, and the sumps would experience limited ablation (approximately 18 cm) under water-flooded conditions. Finally, for the MAAP-based melt pour scenarios, CORQUENCH predicted that the melt would cool in approximately 22.5 h, and the sumps would experience approximately 65 cm of concrete ablation under water-flooded conditions.« less

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core-Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell T.; Francis, Matthew W.

    2016-10-31

    Lower head failure and corium-concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for the analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, in this paper an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH. For the MELCOR-based melt pour scenario, CORQUENCH predicted the melt would readily cool within 2.5 h after the pour, and the sumps would experience limited ablation (approximately 18 cm) under water-flooded conditions. Finally, for the MAAP-based melt pour scenarios, CORQUENCH predicted that the melt would cool in approximately 22.5 h, and the sumps would experience approximately 65 cm of concrete ablation under water-flooded conditions.

  12. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Lower head failure and corium concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH.

  13. Core-concrete interactions using molten UO sub 2 with zirconium on a basaltic basemat: The SURC-2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. ); Blose, R.E. )

    1992-08-01

    An inductively heated experiment, SURC-2, using prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} materials was executed as part of the Integral Core-Concrete Interactions Experiments Program. The purpose of this experimental program was to measure and assess the variety of source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. These source terms include thermal energy released to both the reactor basemat and the containment environment, as well as flammable gas, condensable vapor and toxic or radioactive aerosols generated during the course of a severe reactor accident. The SURC-2 experiment eroded a total of 35 cm of basaltic concrete during 160 minutes of sustained interaction using 203.9 kg of prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris material that included 18 kg of Zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The meltpool temperature ranged from 2400--1900{degrees}C during the first 50 minutes of the test followed by steady temperatures of 1750--1800{degrees}C during the middle portion of the test and increased temperatures of 1800--1900{degrees}C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 15 cm with an additional 7 cm during the middle part of the test and 13 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Comprehensive gas flowrates, gas compositions, and aerosol release rates were also measured during the SURC-2 test. When combined with the SURC-1 results, SURC-2 forms a complete data base for prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris interactions with concrete.

  14. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  15. Core-concrete interactions with overlying water pools. The WETCOR-1 test

    SciTech Connect

    Blose, R.E.; Powers, D.A.; Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    The WETCOR-1 test of simultaneous interactions of a high-temperature melt with water and a limestone/common-sand concrete is described. The test used a 34.1-kg melt of 76.8 w/o Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 16.9 w/o CaO, and 4.0 w/o SiO{sub 2} heated by induction using tungsten susceptors. Once quasi-steady attack on concrete by the melt was established, an attempt was made to quench the melt at 1850 K with 295 K water flowing at 57 liters per minute. Net power into the melt at the time of water addition was 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.19 W/cm{sup 3}. The test configuration used in the WETCOR-1 test was designed to delay melt freezing to the walls of the test fixture. This was done to test hypotheses concerning the inherent stability of crust formation when high-temperature melts are exposed to water. No instability in crust formation was observed. The flux of heat through the crust to the water pool maintained over the melt in the test was found to be 0.52 {plus_minus} 0.13 MW/m{sup 2}. Solidified crusts were found to attenuate aerosol emissions during the melt concrete interactions by factors of 1.3 to 3.5. The combination of a solidified crust and a 30-cm deep subcooled water pool was found to attenuate aerosol emissions by factors of 3 to 15.

  16. Scoping assessments of ATF impact on late-stage accident progression including molten core-concrete interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, M. T.; Leibowitz, L.; Terrani, K. A.; Robb, K. R.

    2014-05-01

    Simple scoping models that can be used to evaluate ATF performance under severe accident conditions have been developed. The methodology provides a fundamental technical basis (a.k.a. metric) based on the thermodynamic boundary for evaluating performance relative to that of traditional Zr-based claddings. The initial focus in this study was on UO2 fuel with the advanced claddings 310 SS, D9, FeCrAl, and SiC. The evaluation considered only energy release with concurrent combustible gas production from fuel-cladding-coolant interactions and, separately, molten core-concrete interactions at high temperatures. Other important phenomenological effects that can influence the rate and extent of cladding decomposition (e.g., eutectic interactions, degradation of other core constituents) were not addressed. For the cladding types addressed, potential combustible gas production under both in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions was similar to that for Zr. However, exothermic energy release from cladding oxidation was substantially less for iron-based alloys (by at least a factor of 4), and modestly less (by ∼20%) for SiC. Data on SiC-clad UO2 fuel performance under severe accident conditions are sparse in the literature; thus, assumptions on the nature of the cladding decomposition process were made in order to perform this initial screening evaluation. Experimental data for this system under severe accident conditions is needed for a proper evaluation and comparison to iron-based claddings.

  17. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  18. Scoping assessments of ATF impact on late–stage accident progression including molten core-concrete interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Mitchell T.; Leibowitz, Leonard; Terrani, Kurt A.; Robb, Kevin R.

    2013-12-31

    Simple scoping models that can be used to evaluate ATF performance under severe accident conditions have been developed. The methodology provides a fundamental technical basis (a.k.a. metric) based on the thermodynamic boundary for evaluating performance relative to that of traditional Zr-based claddings. The initial focus in this study was on UO2 fuel with the advanced claddings 310 SS, D9, FeCrAl, and SiC. The evaluation considered only energy release with concurrent combustible gas production from fuel–cladding–coolant interactions and, separately, molten core–concrete interactions at high temperatures. Other important phenomenological effects that can influence the rate and extent of cladding decomposition (e.g., eutectic interactions, degradation of other core constituents) were not addressed. For the cladding types addressed, potential combustible gas production under both in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions was similar to that for Zr. However, exothermic energy release from cladding oxidation was substantially less for iron-based alloys (by at least a factor of 4), and modestly less (by ~20%) for SiC. Data on SiC-clad UO2 fuel performance under severe accident conditions are sparse in the literature; thus, assumptions on the nature of the cladding decomposition process were made in order to perform this initial screening evaluation. Furthermore, experimental data for this system under severe accident conditions is needed for a proper evaluation and comparison to iron-based claddings.

  19. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  20. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  1. Modelling of molten fuel/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, J. F.; Benjamin, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete (CORCON) is being developed to provide quantitative estimates of fuel-melt accident consequences suitable for risk assessment of light water reactors. The principal features of CORCON are reviewed. Models developed for the principal interaction phenomena, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. Alternative models for the controlling phenomenon, heat transfer from the molten pool to the surrounding concrete, are presented. These models, formulated in conjunction with the development of CORCON, are characterized by the presence or absence of either a gas film or viscous layer of molten concrete at the melt/concrete interface. Predictions of heat transfer based on these models compare favorably with available experimental data.

  2. DETAIL SHOWING TOP OF NORTH EMBANKMENT BERM, WITH CONCRETE CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL SHOWING TOP OF NORTH EMBANKMENT BERM, WITH CONCRETE CORE WALL ON UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  3. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part I: Concrete alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Cuevas, Jaime; Turrero, María Jesús; Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the modifications created in the concrete of the FEBEX shotcreted concrete plug after 13 years in the Grimsel Test Site conditions. During this time the concrete interacted with granite groundwater and also with bentonite porewater at the concrete/bentonite contact. Three long cores and 6 small cores from different parts of the concrete plug were evaluated. Mechanical performance was not modified during this time but hydraulic conductivity increased. The main transport mechanisms involved in the alteration of the concrete were groundwater flow from the host rock to the concrete and diffusion at the concrete/bentonite interface. Leaching occurred in the concrete parts near the host rock due to the action of granite water with further portlandite dissolution. The joint action of granite groundwater and bentonite porewater has caused many changes to the concrete matrix which was located at a depth lower than 5 cm from the bentonite-concrete interface. In the first centimetre C-S-H was significantly altered, incorporating elements like Al, S and Mg which change the initial microstructure by loss of compactness. The ettringite content was very high along the length of the concrete plug due to the shotcreting technique which made use of accelerator additives that caused the formation of ettringite. An increase in the ettringite content is also shown near the bentonite barrier. Therefore, sulphate diffused from the bentonite into the concrete, causing the massive formation of new ettringite. Chloride also diffused from the bentonite barrier deeper into the concrete by up to 4-5 cm from where the formation of Friedel's salt was detected.

  4. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles.

  5. The interaction between the atmosphere and curing concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Gary S.

    The long-term durability of concrete can be compromised by excessive concrete temperatures or temperature gradients and lack of moisture during the first few days after placement. Because the concrete binder components undergo temperature-dependent hydration reactions during this period, atmospheric and construction conditions influence the ultimate concrete quality. To understand this interaction, curing concrete bridge energy balances were estimated with meteorological techniques and calorimetry and model experiments were performed. The agreement of concrete hydration heat estimates from the energy balances, calorimetry experiments, and model simulations validates our methodology and results. In Chapter 2, we estimate from meteorological measurements and techniques the energy balances of four curing concrete bridge decks. One challenge is to determine fluxes from small surfaces (largest horizontal dimension <50 m) in a heterogeneous landscape with methods that are best suited for larger, more homogeneous areas. Estimating the concrete heat generation provides the means to successfully meet this challenge. The energy balance and calorimetry estimates of 24 h concrete heat generation agree within 20%. Between 70--85% of the concrete's heat transfer occurs at its top surface and heat transfer through steel support beams can be significant. A new parameterization for computing bulk exchange coefficients for small areas is developed. Chapter 3, we improve with calorimetry experiments a simple bimolecular heat generation expression for hydrating binder. We show that this expression, with a new parameterization accounting for retarder effects on hydration rates, simulates temperatures to within 2°C and 72 h heat generation (˜265 kJ kg-1) to within 10% of the observed. In Chapter 4, we present models developed with the field and laboratory work and show that the highest concrete temperatures occur at high initial concrete temperatures and air temperatures and

  6. Novel metaphor comprehension: Semantic neighbourhood density interacts with concreteness.

    PubMed

    Al-Azary, Hamad; Buchanan, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Previous research suggests that metaphor comprehension is affected both by the concreteness of the topic and vehicle and their semantic neighbours (Kintsch, 2000; Xu, 2010). However, studies have yet to manipulate these 2 variables simultaneously. To that end, we composed novel metaphors manipulated on topic concreteness and semantic neighbourhood density (SND) of topic and vehicle. In Experiment 1, participants rated the metaphors on the suitability (e.g. sensibility) of their topic-vehicle pairings. Topic concreteness interacted with SND such that participants rated metaphors from sparse semantic spaces to be more sensible than those from dense semantic spaces and preferred abstract topics over concrete topics only for metaphors from dense semantic spaces. In Experiments 2 and 3, we used presentation deadlines and found that topic concreteness and SND affect the online processing stages associated with metaphor comprehension. We discuss how the results are aligned with established psycholinguistic models of metaphor comprehension.

  7. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  8. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  9. Thermodynamic evaluation of the solidification phase of molten core-concrete under estimated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Ogino, Hideki; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    The solidification phases of molten core-concrete under the estimated molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) conditions in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 were predicted using the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool, FactSage 6.2, and the NUCLEA database in order to contribute toward the 1F decommissioning work and to understand the accident progression via the analytical results for the 1F MCCI products. We showed that most of the U and Zr in the molten core-concrete forms (U,Zr)O2 and (Zr,U)SiO4, and the formation of other phases with these elements is limited. However, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 requires a relatively long time because it involves a change in the crystal structure from fcc-(U,Zr)O2 to tet-(U,Zr)O2, followed by the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 by reaction with SiO2. Therefore, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 is limited under quenching conditions. Other common phases are the oxide phases, CaAl2Si2O8, SiO2, and CaSiO3, and the metallic phases of the Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys. The solidification phenomenon of the crust under quenching conditions and that of the molten pool under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the 1F MCCI progression are discussed.

  10. Experimental and analytical studies of sodium interactions with various concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.; Smaardyk, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanistic models of sodium/concrete interactions are described. The SCAM model of interactions with basaltic concrete is being verified by experiments. Modelling of sodium interactions with limestone concrete is still at a preliminary stage but shows promise of being able to predict quantitatively the experimental data. Comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  11. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu

    1997-06-01

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. 152Eu depth profiles in granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, K; Iwatani, K; Hasai, H; Hoshi, M; Oka, T

    1997-06-01

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of 152Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from a pillar top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of 152Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region.

  13. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  14. Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire E n g in e e r R e s e a rc h a n d...coarse aggregate boundary, (c) crack in coarse aggregate into the paste, (d) view of cement and fine aggregate, with infilling of voids...infilling crack and voids, (d) view of cement and fine aggregate, with infilling of voids

  15. Concrete drill core characterization finalized to optimal dismantling and aggregates recovery.

    PubMed

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Roberta; Serranti, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    An innovative strategy, based on micro X-ray fluorescence and HyperSpectralImaging in the short wave infrared range (1000-2500nm), was developed in order to characterize drill core samples collected from End-of-Life concrete. Micro X-ray fluorescence maps were realized to check the drill cores chemical composition, to develop the best approach for HSI analyses and to verify the correctness of the obtained HSI results. HSI analysis was carried out in order to recognize and classify aggregates and mortar paste in concrete. A morphological and morphometrical analysis of aggregates was also carried out on the prediction maps. Results showed as the proposed approach can be profitably applied to analyze and characterize demolition waste materials before dismantling. Starting from an efficient in-situ characterization of the objects to dismantle, demolition actions can be optimized in order to maximize the EOL concrete derived materials, minimizing the final waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In situ interaction between different concretes and Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Mäder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    Interactions between cementitious materials and claystone are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical modifications in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, this alteration might influence safety-relevant clay properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention. In this study, interfaces of Opalinus Clay, a potential host-rock in Switzerland, and three concrete formulations emplaced in the Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) were analysed after 2.2 years of interaction. Sampling techniques with interface stabilisation followed by inclined intersection drilling were developed. Element distribution maps of the concrete-clay interfaces show complex zonations like sulphur enrichment, zones depleted in Ca but enriched in Mg, strong Mg enrichment adjacent to the interface, or carbonation. Consistently, the carbonated zone shows a reduced porosity. Properties of the complex zonation strongly depend on cement properties like water content and pH (ordinary Portland cement vs. low-pH cement). An increased Ca or Mg content in the first 100 μm next to the interface is observed in Opalinus Clay. The cation occupancy of clay exchanger phases next to the ordinary Portland cement interface is depleted in Mg, but enriched in Na, whereas porosity shows no changes at all. The current data suggests migration of CO2/HCO3-, SO42-, and Mg species from clay into cement. pH decrease in the cement next to the interface leads to instability of ettringite, and the sulphate liberated diffuses towards higher pH regions (away from the interface), where additional ettringite can form.

  17. Refocusing core intuitions: A concretizing role for analogy in conceptual change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David E.

    1993-12-01

    This article outlines a theoretical framework for viewing students' conceptions and the effect of analogies on students' conceptions. There are several points involved in this perspective: (a) Components of students' conceptions can be considered to be at various levels - verbal-symbolic knowledge, conscious models, implicit models, and core intuitions. (b) Components at the deeper, less articulated levels (especially core intuitions) are particularly entrenched. (c) Conceptual change in cases involving core intuitions can be considered to be the adjustment of attributive clusters for a class of situations. (d) In order to change the attributive cluster for a target situation, the target must be enriched with new concrete entities or features, providing nuclei for the reattribution of agency. (e) Analogies can help with this reattribution or refocusing by helping the student enrich his or her representation of the target situation.

  18. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  19. Core networks for visual-concrete and abstract thought content: a brain electric microstate analysis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dietrich; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Strik, Werner K; Koenig, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Commonality of activation of spontaneously forming and stimulus-induced mental representations is an often made but rarely tested assumption in neuroscience. In a conjunction analysis of two earlier studies, brain electric activity during visual-concrete and abstract thoughts was studied. The conditions were: in study 1, spontaneous stimulus-independent thinking (post-hoc, visual imagery or abstract thought were identified); in study 2, reading of single nouns ranking high or low on a visual imagery scale. In both studies, subjects' tasks were similar: when prompted, they had to recall the last thought (study 1) or the last word (study 2). In both studies, subjects had no instruction to classify or to visually imagine their thoughts, and accordingly were not aware of the studies' aim. Brain electric data were analyzed into functional topographic brain images (using LORETA) of the last microstate before the prompt (study 1) and of the word-type discriminating event-related microstate after word onset (study 2). Conjunction analysis across the two studies yielded commonality of activation of core networks for abstract thought content in left anterior superior regions, and for visual-concrete thought content in right temporal-posterior inferior regions. The results suggest that two different core networks are automatedly activated when abstract or visual-concrete information, respectively, enters working memory, without a subject task or instruction about the two classes of information, and regardless of internal or external origin, and of input modality. These core machineries of working memory thus are invariant to source or modality of input when treating the two types of information.

  20. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  1. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  2. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  3. Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading configurations inferred from propagation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConaughy, David T.; Engelder, Terry

    1999-11-01

    The interaction between propagating joints and embedded concretions in a Devonian black shale near Seneca Lake, NY, permits identification of the loading configurations responsible for two joint sets of different ages striking at nearly the same orientation. The earlier set consists of systematic joints cut by later Alleghanian joints of the Appalachian Plateau. The later set consists of non-systematic curving cross joints that abut these same Alleghanian joints. Field evidence shows that concretions functioned as stiff inclusions in a compliant black shale. As a consequence of this elastic contrast, local perturbations in the remote stress field persisted around the concretions during burial, tectonic deformation, and exhumation. These stress perturbations influenced joint propagation paths of both joint sets. Our conclusions about loading configurations are based on finite-element modeling of the effect of the local stress perturbation on concretion-modified joint propagation. Modeling shows that the local stress perturbation from a thermoelastic loading was responsible for deflecting cross joints away from concretions in a curved propagation path near the concretion. This load configuration also led to arrest of cross joints before they penetrated the shale-concretion interface. At greater distances from the concretion, the propagation path of cross joints was controlled by the contemporary tectonic stress field. The interface between concretions and the surrounding shale was strongly bonded, as indicated by the crossing of the interface by some of the systematic ENE joints. Higher compressive stress levels within the concretions relative to the shale suppressed joint development in the concretion, causing the arrest of those joints once they had driven across the interface and a short distance into the concretion. Numerical modeling shows that interface penetration by the systematic ENE joints is consistent with a fluid load, the same loading configuration

  4. The Impact of Dam-Reservoir-Foundation Interaction on Nonlinear Response of Concrete Gravity Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Ali Reza; Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ghaemian, Mohsen

    2008-07-08

    To study the impact of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction on nonlinear response of concrete gravity dams, a two-dimensional finite element model of a concrete gravity dam including the dam body, a part of its foundation and a part of the reservoir was made. In addition, the proper boundary conditions were used in both reservoir and foundation in order to absorb the energy of outgoing waves at the far end boundaries. Using the finite element method and smeared crack approach, some different seismic nonlinear analyses were done and finally, we came to a conclusion that the consideration of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction in nonlinear analysis of concrete dams is of great importance, because from the performance point of view, this interaction significantly improves the nonlinear response of concrete dams.

  5. In situ interactions between Opalinus Clay and Low Alkali Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, Catherine; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Warmont, Fabienne; Jenni, Andreas; Cloet, Veerle; Mäder, Urs

    2017-06-01

    A five-year-old interface between a Low Alkali Concrete (LAC) formulation (CEM III/B containing 66% slag and 10% nano-silica) and Opalinus Clay (OPA) from a field experiment at Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory in Switzerland (Jenni et al., 2014) has been studied to decipher the textural, mineralogical and chemical changes that occurred between the two reacting materials. Reactivity between LAC concrete and OPA is found to be limited to a ∼1 mm thick highly porous (ca. 75% porosity) white crust developed on the concrete side. Quantitative mineralogical mapping of the white crust using an electron microprobe and infrared spectroscopy on the cement matrix provides evidence of a Mg-rich phase accounting for approximatively 25 wt % of the matrix associated with 11 wt % of calcite, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and other cement phases. EDX analyses and electron diffraction combined with transmission electron microscopy of the Mg-rich phase provide evidence for a tri-octahedral 2:1 phyllosilicate with mean composition: (Ca0.5±0.2) (Mg2.0±0.4, Fe0.2±0.1, Al0.5±03, □0.3±0.3) (Al0.9±0.2, Si3.1±0.2) O10 (OH)2, where □ represents vacancies in the octahedral site. Apart from this reactive contact, textural, mineralogical and chemical modifications at the contact with the LAC concrete are limited. OPA mineralogy remains largely unmodified. X-ray micro-fluorescence and EPMA mapping of major elements on the OPA side also provides evidence for a Mg-enriched 300-400 μm thick layer. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) values measured in the OPA in contact with the LAC concrete range between 153 and 175 meq kg-1 of dry OPA, close to the reference value of 170 ± 10 meq kg-1 of dry OPA (Pearson et al., 2003). Changing cation occupancies at the interface with LAC concrete are mainly marked by increased Ca, Mg and K, and decreased Na. Leaching tests performed on OPA with deionized water and at different solid to water ratios strongly suggest that Cl and SO4 have

  6. Physical properties of core-concrete systems: Al2O3-ZrO2 molten materials measured by aerodynamic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kargl, F.; Nakamori, F.; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    During a molten core-concrete interaction, molten oxides consisting of molten core materials (UO2 and ZrO2) and concrete (Al2O3, SiO2, CaO) are formed. Reliable data on the physical properties of the molten oxides will allow us to accurately predict the progression of a nuclear reactor core meltdown accident. In this study, the viscosities and densities of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x (x = 0.356 and 0.172) were measured using an aerodynamic levitation technique. The densities of two small samples were estimated from their masses and their volumes (calculated from recorded images of the molten samples). The droplets were forced to oscillate using speakers, and their viscosities were evaluated from the damping behaviors of their oscillations. The results showed that the viscosity of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x compared to that of pure molten Al2O3 is 25% lower for x = 0.172, while it is unexpectedly 20% higher for x = 0.356.

  7. OUTFLOW-CORE INTERACTION IN BARNARD 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Masaaki; Hirano, Naomi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2010-04-01

    In order to study how outflows from protostars influence the physical and chemical conditions of the parent molecular cloud, we have observed the Barnard 1 (B1) main core, which harbors four Class 0 and three Class I sources, in the CO (J = 1 - 0), CH{sub 3}OH (J{sub K} = 2{sub K} - 1{sub K}), and the SiO (J = 1 - 0) lines using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We have identified three CO outflows in this region: one is an elongated ({approx}0.3 pc) bipolar outflow from a Class 0 protostar B1-c in the submillimeter clump SMM 2, another is a rather compact ({approx}0.1 pc) outflow from a Class I protostar B1 IRS in the clump SMM 6, and the other is an extended outflow from a Class I protostar in SMM 11. In the western lobe of the SMM 2 outflow, both the SiO and CH{sub 3}OH lines show broad redshifted wings with the terminal velocities of 25 km s{sup -1} and 13 km s{sup -1}, respectively. It is likely that the shocks caused by the interaction between the outflow and ambient gas enhance the abundance of SiO and CH{sub 3}OH in the gas phase. The total energy input rate by the outflows (1.1 x 10{sup -3} L{sub sun}) is smaller than the energy-loss rate (8.5 x 10{sup -3} L{sub sun}) through the turbulence decay in the B1 main core, which suggests that the outflows cannot sustain the turbulence in this region. Since the outflows are energetic enough to compensate the dissipating turbulence energy in the neighboring, more evolved star-forming region NGC 1333, we suggest that the turbulence energy balance depends on the evolutionary state of the star formation in molecular clouds.

  8. Interaction between the radiative flux emitted by a corium melt and aerosols from corium/concrete interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zabiego, M.; Cognet, G.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we present a one-dimensional numerical model that deals with radiative transfer in a medium where aerosols are present. This model is written with the aim of performing radiative transfer calculations in the framework of severe Pressurized Water Reactor accidents, especially during the last stage of such an accident Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI) when aerosols are very numerous. We explain the theoretical basis of our model, writing the general radiative transfer equation, knowing that aerosol droplets participate in radiation transport. We then simplify this equation for a one-dimensional medium and we propose to solve it using the spherical harmonics approximation. This gives us the radiative intensity and we can then deduce the radiative flux. Aerosol optical properties (extinction and scattering coefficients) are also required in such a calculation. They are determined using Rayleigh or Mie theory, depending, depending on the aerosol size. In order to provide an example of results one can expect from such a calculation, we applied our model to a test problem with given aerosol size and concentration distributions. Our example does not model any experiment explicitly but the physical conditions used are very close to the L4 test from the Advanced Containment Experiment (ACE) program.

  9. Clogging evaluation of porous asphalt concrete cores in conjunction with medical x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hsu, Chen-Yu; Lin, Jyh-Dong

    2014-03-01

    This study was to assess the porosity of Porous Asphalt Concrete (PAC) in conjunction with a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) facility. The PAC was designed as the surface course to achieve the target porosity 18%. There were graded aggregates, soils blended with 50% of coarse sand, and crushed gravel wrapped with geotextile compacted and served as the base, subbase, and infiltration layers underneath the PAC. The test site constructed in 2004 is located in Northern of Taiwan in which the daily traffic has been light and limited. The porosity of the test track was investigated. The permeability coefficient of PAC was found severely degraded from 2.2×10-1 to 1.2×10-3 -cm/sec, after nine-year service, while the permeability below the surface course remained intact. Several field PAC cores were drilled and brought to evaluate the distribution of air voids by a medical X-ray CT nondestructively. The helical mode was set to administrate the X-ray CT scan and two cross-sectional virtual slices were exported in seconds for analyzing air voids distribution. It shows that the clogging of voids occurred merely 20mm below the surface and the porosity can reduce as much about 3%. It was also found that the roller compaction can decrease the porosity by 4%. The permeability reduction in this test site can attribute to the voids of PAC that were compacted by roller during the construction and filled by the dusts on the surface during the service.

  10. The Interaction of Concreteness and Phonological Similarity in Verbal Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Daniel J.; Postle, Bradley R.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    Although phonological representations have been a primary focus of verbal working memory research, lexical-semantic manipulations also influence performance. In the present study, the authors investigated whether a classic phenomenon in verbal working memory, the phonological similarity effect (PSE), is modulated by a lexical-semantic variable, word concreteness. Phonological overlap and concreteness were factorially manipulated in each of four experiments across which presentation modality (Experiments 1 and 2: visual presentation; Experiments 3 and 4: auditory presentation) and concurrent articulation (present in Experiments 2 and 4) were manipulated. In addition to main effects of each variable, results show a Phonological Overlap × Concreteness interaction whereby the magnitude of the PSE is greater for concrete word lists relative to abstract word lists. This effect is driven by superior item memory for nonoverlapping, concrete lists and is robust to the modality of presentation and concurrent articulation. These results demonstrate that in verbal working memory tasks, there are multiple routes to the phonological form of a word and that maintenance and retrieval occur over more than just a phonological level. PMID:20053042

  11. Core and periphery structures in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Li, Bo; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Background Characterizing the structural properties of protein interaction networks will help illuminate the organizational and functional relationships among elements in biological systems. Results In this paper, we present a systematic exploration of the core/periphery structures in protein interaction networks (PINs). First, the concepts of cores and peripheries in PINs are defined. Then, computational methods are proposed to identify two types of cores, k-plex cores and star cores, from PINs. Application of these methods to a yeast protein interaction network has identified 110 k-plex cores and 109 star cores. We find that the k-plex cores consist of either "party" proteins, "date" proteins, or both. We also reveal that there are two classes of 1-peripheral proteins: "party" peripheries, which are more likely to be part of protein complex, and "connector" peripheries, which are more likely connected to different proteins or protein complexes. Our results also show that, besides connectivity, other variations in structural properties are related to the variation in biological properties. Furthermore, the negative correlation between evolutionary rate and connectivity are shown toysis. Moreover, the core/periphery structures help to reveal the existence of multiple levels of protein expression dynamics. Conclusion Our results show that both the structure and connectivity can be used to characterize topological properties in protein interaction networks, illuminating the functional organization of cellular systems. PMID:19426456

  12. Unidirectional Core-Shell Hybrids for Concrete Reinforcement - A preliminary Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    18, no. 1, Jan 1987, pp 13-23. 38. Z. Hashin and B.W. Rosen. "The elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced materials," Journal of Applied Mechanics, vol 31...MAT DIV. MATHEY, GAITHERSBURG. MD NEPTCO / RACZELOWSKI. PAWTUCKET. RI NEW ZEALAND CONCRETE RSCH ASSN / LIB, PORIRUA, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY / BAZANT

  13. Earthquake Resilient Tall Reinforced Concrete Buildings at Near-Fault Sites Using Base Isolation and Rocking Core Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calugaru, Vladimir

    This dissertation pursues three main objectives: (1) to investigate the seismic response of tall reinforced concrete core wall buildings, designed following current building codes, subjected to pulse type near-fault ground motion, with special focus on the relation between the characteristics of the ground motion and the higher-modes of response; (2) to determine the characteristics of a base isolation system that results in nominally elastic response of the superstructure of a tall reinforced concrete core wall building at the maximum considered earthquake level of shaking; and (3) to demonstrate that the seismic performance, cost, and constructability of a base-isolated tall reinforced concrete core wall building can be significantly improved by incorporating a rocking core-wall in the design. First, this dissertation investigates the seismic response of tall cantilever wall buildings subjected to pulse type ground motion, with special focus on the relation between the characteristics of ground motion and the higher-modes of response. Buildings 10, 20, and 40 stories high were designed such that inelastic deformation was concentrated at a single flexural plastic hinge at their base. Using nonlinear response history analysis, the buildings were subjected to near-fault seismic ground motions as well as simple close-form pulses, which represented distinct pulses within the ground motions. Euler-Bernoulli beam models with lumped mass and lumped plasticity were used to model the buildings. Next, this dissertation investigates numerically the seismic response of six seismically base-isolated (BI) 20-story reinforced concrete buildings and compares their response to that of a fixed-base (FB) building with a similar structural system above ground. Located in Berkeley, California, 2 km from the Hayward fault, the buildings are designed with a core wall that provides most of the lateral force resistance above ground. For the BI buildings, the following are investigated

  14. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  15. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of concrete sewer pipe condition.

    PubMed

    Stanić, N; de Haan, C; Tirion, M; Langeveld, J G; Clemens, F H L R

    2013-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management. Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection by closed circuit television (CCTV) and core sampling are among the methods mostly applied to assess sewer pipe condition. This paper compares visual inspection and drill core analysis in order to enhance further understanding of the limitations and potentials of both methods. Both methods have been applied on a selected sewer reach in the city of The Hague, which was reportedly subject to pipe corrosion. Results show that both methods, visual inspection and core sampling, are associated with large uncertainties and that there is no obvious correlation between results of visual inspection and results of drill core analysis.

  16. The interaction between concrete pavement and corrosion-induced copper runoff from buildings.

    PubMed

    Bahar, B; Herting, G; Wallinder, I Odnevall; Hakkila, K; Leygraf, C; Virta, M

    2008-05-01

    Changes in chemical speciation of copper and the capacity of concrete pavement to retain copper in runoff water from external buildings have been investigated at urban field conditions, and in parallel laboratory experiments simulating outdoor scenarios. The research study showed the concrete surface to form a copper rich surface layer ( approximately 50 microm thick) upon exposure, and a high capacity to significantly reduce the bioavailable fraction of released copper (20-95%). The retention capacity of copper varied between 5 and 20% during single runoff events in the laboratory, and between 10 and 40% of the total copper release during single natural runoff events. The capacity to retain and reduce the bioavailable fraction of non-retained copper increased with increasing wetness of the concrete surfaces, increasing pH of the runoff water and decreasing flow rates. Bioassay testing with bacterial and yeast bioreporters showed the bioavailable fraction of non-retained copper to be significantly lower than the total copper concentration in the runoff water, between 22 and 40% for bacteria and between 8 and 31% for yeast. The application of generated data to simulate a fictive outdoor scenario, suggests a significant reduction of bioavailable and total copper to background values during environmental entry as a result of dilution, and the interaction with solid surfaces, organic matter and complexing agents already in the drainage system.

  17. Strength, and Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete and Soil Structures Interaction Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    AUTHOR(S) Hon-Yim Ko 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 1 3b, IFIMI COVk:RE%. 14. DATE OF REPORT (k’r.. Mo.. Day) j 5. PAGE COUNT Final F RO 1/15/I81 TO 8/31/84j 6/29/87...GR. Fiber-Reinforced Concrete; Biaxial Tension -Compression; ___________________________ SolStucture Interaction, Numerical Modeling, Centrifuge...compression- tension loadings. A new piece of direct tension loading apparatus was designed and assembled for this study. Load history effects on the

  18. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part II: Bentonite contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.; Cuevas, Jaime; Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Rodríguez, Enrique; Turrero, María Jesús

    2017-06-01

    The in situ FEBEX experiment performed at the URL in Grimsel (Swizerland) was dismantled after 18 years of operation. Interface samples between bentonite and a shotcreted concrete plug that was constructed in a second operational phase have been studied after 13 years of interaction. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of samples have been performed by XRD, SEM-EDX, TG and FTIR techniques in addition to determinations of major ions by chemical analysis of aqueous extracts, δ18O and δ13C stable isotopes both in concrete paste and bentonite, and exchangeable cations in bentonite. Low mineralogical alteration impact was observed in bentonite that is only affected by a few millimeters. A large accumulation of Mg was observed at the bentonite side of the interface precipitating as silicates in various forms. In addition, heterogeneous carbonation was observed at the interface, but mostly affecting the concrete side. Migration of aqueous species occurred, being the most relevant the diffusion of chloride and sulfate from bentonite to concrete, in agreement with Part I of this study. Chloride advanced more into the concrete, while sulfates reacted to form ettringite, which has an evident alteration impact at the very interface (<0.5 mm rim) within the concrete. The ionic mobility has also redistributed the exchangeable cations in bentonite, increasing the content in Ca2+ and Na+, compensated by a decrease in Mg2+. The results presented in this paper complement those presented in Part I, focusing on the alteration of concrete by the bentonite and the granite groundwater.

  19. Resolving 20 Years of Inconsistent Interactions Between Lexical Familiarity and Orthography, Concreteness, and Polysemy

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    Numerous word recognition studies conducted over the past 2 decades are examined. These studies manipulated lexical familiarity by presenting words of high versus low printed frequency and most reported an interaction between printed frequency and one of several second variables, namely, orthographic regularity, semantic concreteness, or polysemy. However, the direction of these interactions was inconsistent from study to study. Six new experiments clarify these discordant results. The first two demonstrate that words of the same low printed frequency are not always equally familiar to subjects. Instead, subjects’ ratings of “experiential familiarity” suggest that many of the low-printed-frequency words used in prior studies varied along this dimension. Four lexical decision experiments reexamine the prior findings by orthogonally manipulating lexical familiarity, as assessed by experiential familiarity ratings, with bigram frequency, semantic concreteness, and number of meanings. The results suggest that of these variables, only experiential familiarity reliably affects word recognition latencies. This in turn suggests that previous inconsistent findings are due to confounding experiential familiarity with a second variable. PMID:6242753

  20. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements. Part 3: Prestressed hollow-core slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions. In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The model takes into account the resistance against the formation of cracks due to prestressing as well as the variation of the prestressing force in the transfer zone. Due to the fact that the anchorage of the reinforcement takes place by bond, a rotation failure, which is indeed by a crack formed at the support with subsequent slip of the reinforcement, is also considered. This failure mode is likely to occur in cases with a high prestressing force combined with a short shear span. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results form the literature. A good agreement has been found.

  1. Weak-interaction processes in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.

    2015-02-24

    Weak interaction processes play an important role for the dynamics of a core-collapse supernova. Due to progress of nuclear modeling and constrained by data it has been possible to improve the rates of these processes for supernova conditions decisively. This manuscript describes the recent advances and the current status in deriving electron capture rates on nuclei and of inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering for applications in supernova simulations and briefly discusses their impact on such studies.

  2. A diffusion mechanism for core-mantle interaction.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Leslie A; Watson, E Bruce

    2007-11-29

    Understanding the geochemical behaviour of the siderophile elements--those tending to form alloys with iron in natural environments--is important in the search for a deep-mantle chemical 'fingerprint' in upper mantle rocks, and also in the evaluation of models of large-scale differentiation of the Earth and terrestrial planets. These elements are highly concentrated in the core relative to the silicate mantle, but their concentrations in upper mantle rocks are higher than predicted by most core-formation models. It has been suggested that mixing of outer-core material back into the mantle following core formation may be responsible for the siderophile element ratios observed in upper mantle rocks. Such re-mixing has been attributed to an unspecified metal-silicate interaction in the reactive D'' layer just above the core-mantle boundary. The siderophile elements are excellent candidates as indicators of an outer-core contribution to the mantle, but the nature and existence of possible core-mantle interactions is controversial. In light of the recent findings that grain-boundary diffusion of oxygen through a dry intergranular medium may be effective over geologically significant length scales and that grain boundaries can be primary storage sites for incompatible lithophile elements, the question arises as to whether siderophile elements might exhibit similar (or greater) grain-boundary mobility. Here we report experimental results from a study of grain-boundary diffusion of siderophile elements through polycrystalline MgO that were obtained by quantifying the extent of alloy formation between initially pure metals separated by approximately 1 mm of polycrystalline MgO. Grain-boundary diffusion resulted in significant alloying of sink and source particles, enabling calculation of grain-boundary fluxes. Our computed diffusivities were high enough to allow transport of a number of siderophile elements over geologically significant length scales (tens of kilometres

  3. Innovative hyperspectral imaging (HSI) based techniques applied to end-of-life concrete drill core characterization for optimal dismantling and materials recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Picone, Nicoletta; Serranti, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The reduction of EOL concrete disposal in landfills, together with a lower exploitation of primary raw materials, generates a strong interest to develop, set-up and apply innovative technologies to maximize Construction and Demolition Waste (C&DW) conversion into useful secondary raw materials. Such a goal can be reached starting from a punctual in-situ efficient characterization of the objects to dismantle in order to develop demolition actions aimed to set up innovative mechanical-physical processes to recover the different materials and products to recycle. In this paper an innovative recycling-oriented characterization strategy based on HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) is described in order to identify aggregates and mortar in drill core samples from end-of-life concrete. To reach this goal, concrete drill cores from a demolition site were systematically investigated by HSI in the short wave infrared field (1000-2500 nm). Results obtained by the adoption of the HSI approach showed as this technology can be successfully applied to analyze quality and characteristics of C&DW before dismantling and as final product to reutilise after demolition-milling-classification actions. The proposed technique and the related recognition logics, through the spectral signature detection of finite physical domains (i.e. concrete slice and/or particle) of different nature and composition, allows; i) to develop characterization procedures able to quantitatively assess end-of-life concrete compositional/textural characteristics and ii) to set up innovative sorting strategies to qualify the different materials constituting drill core samples.

  4. Improvements in modelling (by ESCADRE mod1.0) radiative heat losses through gas and aerosols generated by molten corium-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Passalacqua, R.; Zabiego, M.; Cognet, G.; Pascale, C. De; Commande, A.; Renault, C.

    1996-07-01

    Aerosols generated during the molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) influence the reactor cavity thermal hydraulics: the cloud of aerosols, located inside the reactor cavity, restrains the upward-directed heat exchange consequently the cool-down of the high-temperature molten corium for a considerable period of time. IPSN is developing a computer code system for source predictions in severe accident scenarios. This code system is named ESCADRE. WECHSL/CALTHER is internal module dealing with MCCI (it is also a stand-alone code): it models the heat transfers involving the superior volume of the cavity. When modelling the upward-directed power distribution by WECHSL/CALTHER, a faster concrete basemat penetration takes place due to the low heat losses of the closed MCCI cavity enclosure. The model, here presented, is going to be validated with data from the AEROSTAT experiment. This experiment, planned at CEA Cadarache, will evaluate the influence of aerosols on the global power distribution in the reactor cavity. Radiative heat losses are important especially for cavity configurations such as those of new plant designs (equipped with a core-catcher) where the upward power losses are promoted by the corium spreading in a flat cavity.

  5. Core-collapse supernova remnants and interactions with their surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, Thomas Felton

    This thesis examines three core-collapse supernova remnants (SNR)---the Cygnus Loop in the Milky Way and 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud---of varying ages and in varying states of interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), using X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra and supplemental data from other wavelengths. We use results from our analysis to address three main questions. First, we examine the applicability of the common Sedov-Taylor adiabatic blast wave model to core-collapse supernovae. Second, we determine the elemental abundances around the shell of these supernova remnants to determine if the use of SNRs as a gauge of abundances in the ISM is justified. Finally, we examine the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 and search for evidence of interaction between these PWNe and their immediate surroundings. We see highly inhomogeneous ISM surrounding all three surveyed SNRs, contrary to the key assumption in the Sedov-Taylor model of a uniform surrounding medium. In all three studied SNRs, we find that shock speeds are dependent on the density of the surrounding material. As subsidiary results, we also find depleted elemental abundances of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon, relative to typical ISM, around all three studied supernova remnants. Although this subsidiary result is not conclusive, we believe that it merits a followup study. In 0540-69.3 and 0453-68.5, which contain central pulsars, we find that the explosion directionality, which can be inferred from the pulsar's proper motion relative to the SNR, is not related to the morphology of the SNR itself. We conclude from this that the asymmetric shapes common in core-collapse supernova remnants can be more a function of the complex environments surrounding the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae than of the supernova explosions themselves. Finally, we see that the PWN in 0453-68.5 shows signs of having mixed with the surrounding thermal- emitting

  6. Computational Analysis of a Pylon-Chevron Core Nozzle Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Kinzie, Kevin W.; Pao, S. Paul

    2001-01-01

    In typical engine installations, the pylon of an engine creates a flow disturbance that interacts with the engine exhaust flow. This interaction of the pylon with the exhaust flow from a dual stream nozzle was studied computationally. The dual stream nozzle simulates an engine with a bypass ratio of five. A total of five configurations were simulated all at the take-off operating point. All computations were performed using the structured PAB3D code which solves the steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. These configurations included a core nozzle with eight chevron noise reduction devices built into the nozzle trailing edge. Baseline cases had no chevron devices and were run with a pylon and without a pylon. Cases with the chevron were also studied with and without the pylon. Another case was run with the chevron rotated relative to the pylon. The fan nozzle did not have chevron devices attached. Solutions showed that the effect of the pylon is to distort the round Jet plume and to destroy the symmetrical lobed pattern created by the core chevrons. Several overall flow field quantities were calculated that might be used in extensions of this work to find flow field parameters that correlate with changes in noise.

  7. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  8. Self-interaction correction and relativistic exchange on the core states and core hyperfine fields in Fe, Co, and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, L.; Richter, M.; Steinbeck, L.

    1997-04-01

    Local density calculations with self-interaction-corrected core states are reported for the transition-metal ferromagnets Fe, Co, and Ni. The hyperfine field matrix elements have been computed. Good agreement with measurements is obtained for Co, whereas for Fe and Ni the discrepancy between local density theory and experiment remains also in the self-interaction-corrected calculation. Possible changes in the core states due to relativistic exchange corrections are also discussed and found to be of minor importance.

  9. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  10. Lunar Power Dissipated by Tides and Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Yoder, C. F.; Dickey, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranges gives information on lunar tidal dissipation and a molten core. For the ancient moon tidal heating of the interior and heating at the core-mantle boundary could have rivaled radiogenic heating.

  11. Lunar Power Dissipated by Tides and Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Yoder, C. F.; Dickey, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranges gives information on lunar tidal dissipation and a molten core. For the ancient moon tidal heating of the interior and heating at the core-mantle boundary could have rivaled radiogenic heating.

  12. Early age stresses and creep-shrinkage interaction of restrained concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoubat, Salah Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed to characterize the early age tensile creep and shrinkage behavior of concrete. A uniaxial restrained shrinkage test was developed. The experiment tested two identical specimens: restrained and unrestrained. The test was controlled by computer, and the shrinkage deformation was checked continuously and compared to a threshold value of 5 mum, which when exceeded, triggered an increase in tensile load to recover the shrinkage strain in the restrained specimen. Thus, a restrained condition is achieved and the stress generated by shrinkage mechanisms was measurable. The experiment revealed how shrinkage stresses developed and how creep mechanisms reduced shrinkage strain. The tests revealed that shrinkage stresses in the first days after casting are significant and caused fracture of the concrete. The rate of stress evolution influenced the time and stress of first cracking. The tensile creep of concrete formed a substantial part of the time dependent deformation and reduced the shrinkage stresses by 50%. A method separating drying creep mechanisms of concrete into stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking was developed. The method required measurement of creep and shrinkage of concrete under drying, sealed, and moist curing conditions. The moist-curing test produce the basic creep; the sealed test provided data on basic creep and stress-induced shrinkage, and the drying test provided data on basic creep, stress-induced shrinkage and microcracking. The basic creep results of young concrete indicated a high creep rate in the initial 10--20 hours after loading. Then, the rate decreased and the creep function approached a stable value. The initial rate of creep was sensitive to age at loading in the first two days, and became age-independent after a few days. The analysis revealed stress-induced shrinkage as a major mechanism of drying creep for plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC). Microcracking forms a significant

  13. Galvanic interaction between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites and steel in chloride contaminated concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Acosta, A.A.; Sagues, A.A.; Sen, R.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were performed to determine the possible extent of galvanic corrosion when CFRP and steel are in contact in chloride contaminated concrete. Three concrete environments (water-to-cement (w/c) ratio of 0.41) at relative humidities (RH) of {approx}60%, {approx}80% and {approx}95%, and 14 kg/m{sup 3} chloride were investigated. The CFRP composite potential reached between {minus}180 and {minus}590 mV (vsCSE) when it was in contact with steel at these environments. Results showed significant galvanic action in the 80% RH chloride contaminated concrete (nominal steel current densities as high as 0.3 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}).

  14. CoreWall: A Scalable Interactive Tool for Visual Core Description, Data Visualization, and Stratigraphic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. G.; Rack, F.; Kamp, B.; Fils, D.; Ito, E.; Morin, P.; Higgins, S.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.; Renambot, L.

    2005-12-01

    A primary need for studies of sediment, ice and rock cores is an integrated environment for visual core description. CoreWall is a tool that uses digital line-scan images of split-core surfaces as the fundamental template for all sediment descriptive work. Textual and image annotations support description about structures, lithologic variation, macroscopic grain size variation, bioturbation intensity, chemical composition, and micropaleontology at points of interest registered within the core image itself. The integration of core-section images with discrete data streams and nested annotations provide a robust approach to the description of sediment and rock cores. This project provides for the real-time and/or simultaneous display of multiple integrated databases, with all the data rectified (co-registered) to the fundamental template of the core image. This visualization tool enables rapid multidisciplinary interpretation during the Initial Core Description process. A prototype computer environment for working with the high-resolution data is the Personal GeoWall-2, a single computer used to drive six tiled LCD screens. As a wideband display, the Personal GeoWall-2 can show more content then a single display system. This new visualization tool is both scaleable and portable from the Personal GeoWall-2 environment down to a single screen driven by a laptop computer. Using the screen resolution, core sections are drawn at a life size scale with both core and downhole wireline logging data drawn alongside. Using standard computer interfaces, individuals can pan through meters of core imagery and data, annotating along the length of the core itself. They can zoom in on a high-resolution core image to see details that appear under the proper lighting in which the images were taken. Using the Internet, CoreWall can retrieve images and data files from remote databases or web portals/services, such as CHRONOS, allowing individuals from ship to shore to look at data and

  15. Interactions of aqueous Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ ions with crushed concrete fines.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Nichola J; Lee, William E; Slipper, Ian J

    2005-05-20

    The crushing of reclaimed concrete-based demolition waste to produce recycled aggregate gives rise to a large volume of cement-rich fine material for which market development would be beneficial. It was envisaged that this fine fraction may prove to be an effective sorbent for aqueous heavy metal species by virtue of its ion exchangeable phases and high pH. A batch sorption study confirmed that crushed concrete, in the particle size range 1-2 mm, successfully excluded Cu2+ (35 mg g(-1)), Zn2+ (33 mg g(-1)) and Pb2+ (37 mg g(-1)) from aqueous media. Subsequent distilled water leaching of the metal-laden concrete particles indicated that 1.9, 0.9 and 0.2% of the bound metals, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+, respectively, were readily soluble. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the removal of Cu2+ and Zn2+ arose from surface precipitation reactions, whereas, the principal mechanism of uptake of Pb2+ was found to be by diffusion into the cement matrix. The metal ion removal efficiency of crushed concrete fines is compared with those of other low cost sorbents and potential applications which may exploit this sorptive property are also discussed.

  16. Concrete bridge-borne low-frequency noise simulation based on train-track-bridge dynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Xu, Y. L.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-05-01

    Both the vibration of a railway bridge under a moving train and the associated bridge-borne noise are time-varying in nature. The former is commonly predicted in the time domain to take its time-varying and nonlinear properties into account, whereas acoustic computation is generally conducted in the frequency domain to obtain steady responses. This paper presents a general procedure for obtaining various characteristics of concrete bridge-borne low-frequency noise by bridging the gap between time-domain bridge vibration computation and frequency-domain bridge-borne noise simulation. The finite element method (FEM) is first used to solve the transient train-track-bridge dynamic interaction problem, with an emphasis on the local vibration of the bridge. The boundary element method (BEM) is then applied to find the frequency-dependent modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs). The time-domain sound pressure is finally obtained with the help of time-frequency transforms. The proposed procedure is applied to a real urban rail transit U-shaped concrete bridge to compute the bridge acceleration and bridge-borne noise, and these results are compared with the field measurement results. Both sets of results show the proposed procedure to be feasible and accurate and the dominant frequencies of concrete bridge-borne noise to range from 32 Hz to 100 Hz.

  17. Conceptual model analysis of interaction at a concrete-Boom Clay interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sanheng; Jacques, Diederik; Govaerts, Joan; Wang, Lian

    In many concepts for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste, cementitious materials are used in the engineered barriers. For example, in Belgium the engineered barrier system is based on a considerable amount of cementitious materials as buffer and backfill in the so-called supercontainer embedded in the hosting geological formation. A potential hosting formation is Boom Clay. Insight in the interaction between the high-pH pore water of the cementitious materials and neutral-pH Boom Clay pore water is required. Two problems are quite common for modeling of such a system. The first one is the computational cost due to the long timescale model assessments envisaged for the deep disposal system. Also a very fine grid (in sub-millimeter), especially at interfaces has to be used in order to accurately predict the evolution of the system. The second one is whether to use equilibrium or kinetic reaction models. The objectives of this paper are twofold. First, we develop an efficient coupled reactive transport code for this diffusion-dominated system by making full use of multi-processors/cores computers. Second, we investigate how sensitive the system is to chemical reaction models especially when pore clogging due to mineral precipitation is considered within the cementitious system. To do this, we selected two portlandite dissolution models, i.e., equilibrium (fastest) and diffusion-controlled model with precipitation of a calcite layer around portlandite particles (diffusion-controlled dissolution). The results show that with shrinking core model portlandite dissolution and calcite precipitation are much slower than with the equilibrium model. Also diffusion-controlled dissolution smooths out dissolution fronts compared to the equilibrium model. However, only a slight difference with respect to the clogging time can be found even though we use a very small diffusion coefficient (10-20 m2/s) in the precipitated calcite layer.

  18. Superstructures of self assembled multiferroic core shell nanoparticles and studies on magneto electric interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-19

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Superstructures of linear chains and arrays of chemically self-assembled core -shell nanoparticles of nickel ferrite and...interactions Report Title Superstructures of linear chains and arrays of chemically self-assembled core -shell nanoparticles of nickel ferrite and barium...of ferrite -ferroelectric core -shell nanofibers and studies on magneto- electric interactions Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 052910 (2014); 10.1063/1.4864113

  19. Effects of Aggregate Microfines and Potassium Acetate Interactions on Concrete Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jessica Marie Sanfilippo

    The principal objective of this research is to elucidate the role that microfines from coarse and fine aggregates play in the development of the Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) related distress observed in airport pavements subject to anti-icing agents. As a secondary objective, it was proposed to identify other potential impacts of microfines and deicers on concrete durability. It was determined that combinations of microfines at less than 5% of the total aggregate weight and potassium acetate deicer (KAC Deicer) exposure caused significant deterioration of concrete that may be mistaken for ASR cracking and expansion. However, our analyses suggest it was not ASR, at least as traditionally diagnosed through the presence of ASR gel and reaction rims around aggregates. Expansions in modified ASTM C1293 produced expansions from 0.05% to 0.70% at one year depending on the type of microfine. Expansions of specimens containing microfines but not exposed to KAc Deicer produced negligible expansion. Expansions were larger with base aggregate known to be prone to ASR, but significant expansions (up to 0.50% at one year) also occurred in specimens with unreactive aggregates. Degradation combined with the reduction in entrained air content led to dramatic loss of freeze-thaw durability. These degradations were associated with specific mineralogical profiles of microfines in the presence of KAc Deicer and these profiles consistently were associated with corresponding levels of degradation. The KAc Deicer transformed in the concrete pore solutions to form potassium sulfate and calcium-bearing potassium sulfate compounds. During the transformation of the potassium acetate the level of hydroxide increases dramatically in the pore solution and can lead to reformation of silica species released by the microfines and the aggregates. While these reactions do not appear to be the classical alkali silica reaction, they may exhibit some similarity and create an environment where expansion

  20. Mineralogical characterization of the Tournemire argillite after in situ interaction with concretes.

    PubMed

    Tinseau, E; Bartier, D; Hassouta, L; Devol-Brown, I; Stammose, D

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate, through mineralogical characterization (SEM, XRD) and mass-balance calculations, the effects of contact time, concrete types and presence of free water on the Tournemire argillite under in situ conditions. Three sampling zones from Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) areas have been chosen: (1) dry contacts, collected at the tunnel masonry/argillite interface (contact time - 125 years), (2) wet contacts, taken close to drained areas below the tunnel roadbed in contact with the canal draining the Cernon fault water (contact time - 15 and 7 years) and at the tunnel masonry/argillite interface over 70 m from the Cernon fault (contact time - 125 years). This study shows that: in the absence of water, no significant modification of argillite is observed after 125 years, except for pyrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation; in the presence of water, precipitation of gypsum, recrystallization of mixed-layer clays, neoformation of zeolites and K-feldspars overgrowths are observed. At the concrete/argillite interface near the Cernon fault, important dolomite neoformation and leaching of chlorite and kaolinite occur. These processes are enhanced with contact time, low flow rate and the nature of the concrete (compound cement Portland CEM II 32.5). Evidence for oxidation processes linked to the EDZ (pyrite oxidation, Fe-oxy-hydroxide and gypsum precipitation) is observed.

  1. Reactive transport modeling of concrete-clay interaction: The DM borehole at Tournemire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Concrete and cement paste were in contact with a clay-rich rock during 15 years in a borehole at the Tournemire Underground Rock Laboratory in France. Overcoring of the borehole and mineralogical analyses have shown a reduction of porosity at the interface due to the precipitation of ettringite, C-S-H/C-A-S-H and calcium carbonate, together with dissolution of portlandite in the cement (De Windt et al., 2008; Gaboreau et al., 2011). In the framework of the GTS-LCS project (POSIVA, Finland; JAEA, Japan; NDA, UK; SKB, Sweden; NAGRA, Switzerland), new reactive transport modeling (solute diffusion + mineral reaction) has been performed. Results using the CrunchFlow code (Steefel, 2008) show sealing of porosity at the rock side of the interface (mm scale) due to the precipitation of C-A-S-H (calcium aluminum silicate hydrate), calcite and ettringite, together with some clay dissolution. The location of sealing is influenced by cation exchange. Inclusion of cation exchange results in sealing at the rock side of the interface. Without cation exchange, sealing is at the concrete side of the interface. Recent results (Gaboreau et al., 2011) confirm the sealing on the rock side of the interface and the increase in porosity on the concrete side (portlandite dissolution).

  2. High performance multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia: microwave synthesis, and the role of core-to-core interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Andujar, C.; Ortega, D.; Southern, P.; PankhurstJoint Last Authors., Q. A.; Thanh, N. T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism.The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Reproducibility studies and additional characterisation data including SQUID Magnetometry, TEM, ATR-FTIR, XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06239f

  3. Interchannel interactions following shape resonant excitation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Kelly, L. A.; Duffy, L. M.; Space, B.; Roy, P.; Southworth, S. H.; White, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Interchannel coupling of a core electron shape resonance with a valence-hole ionic continuum is studied with vibrational resolution. A core-hole shape resonance is created via N 2 (1s→continuum e -) photoabsorption, and this complex decays to form the N 2+ (B 2Σ u+) state via continuum interchannel coupling. The vibrational branching ratios for the N 2+ (B 2Σ u+) state are then determined from N 2+ (B 2Σ u+→ 2Σ g+) fluorescence. The molecular motion provides excellent sensitivity to the resonant excitation, as underscored by two observations. First, the vibrational branching ratios for resonant and nonresonant excitation are qualitatively different. Secondly, the rotational motion of the ion is affected by the resonant excitation. These measurements demonstrate that continuum interchannel coupling can be probed precisely via dispersed fluorescence.

  4. Proteomic profiling of cellular proteins interacting with the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Shin, Min-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The core protein of HCV packages the viral RNA genome to form a nucleocapsid. In addition to its function as a structural protein, core protein is involved in regulation of cellular transcription, virus-induced transformation, and pathogenesis. To gain insights into cellular functions of the core protein by identification of cellular proteins interacting with the core protein, we employed a proteomic approach. Hepatocytes soluble cytoplasmic proteins were applied to the core proteins immobilized on Ni-nitrilotriacetic resin and total bound cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE. Analyses of interacting proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry allowed identification of 14 cellular proteins binding to the core protein. These proteins include DEAD-box polypeptide 5, similar in function to a known protein identified previously by yeast two-hybrid screening and 13 newly identified cellular proteins. Interestingly, nine protein spots were identified as intermediate microfilament proteins, including cytokeratins (five spots for cytokeratin 8, two for cytokeratin 19, and one for cytokeratin 18) and vimentin. Cytokeratin 8 and vimentin, which were previously shown to be involved in the infection processes of other viruses, were further analyzed to confirm their in vivo interactions with the core protein by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. We discuss the functional implications of the interactions of the core protein with newly identified cellular proteins in HCV infection and pathogenesis.

  5. Density Anomalies in the Mantle and the Gravitational Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Liu, Lanbo

    2003-01-01

    Seismic studies suggest that the bulk of the mantle is heterogeneous, with density variations in depth as well as in horizontal directions (latitude and longitude). This density variation produces a three- dimensional gravity field throughout the Earth. On the other hand, the core density also varies in both time and space, due to convective core flow. Consequently, the fluid outer core and the solid mantle interact gravitationally due to the mass anomalies in both regions. This gravitational core-mantle interaction could play a significant role in exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle, and thus the change in Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer. Aiming at estimating the significance of the gravitational core-mantle interaction on Earth's rotation variation, we introduce in our MoSST core dynamics model a heterogeneous mantle, with a density distribution derived from seismic results. In this model, the core convection is driven by the buoyancy forces. And the density variation is determined dynamically with the convection. Numerical simulation is carried out with different parameter values, intending to extrapolate numerical results for geophysical implications.

  6. Density Anomalies in the Mantle and the Gravitational Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Liu, Lanbo

    2003-01-01

    Seismic studies suggest that the bulk of the mantle is heterogeneous, with density variations in depth as well as in horizontal directions (latitude and longitude). This density variation produces a three- dimensional gravity field throughout the Earth. On the other hand, the core density also varies in both time and space, due to convective core flow. Consequently, the fluid outer core and the solid mantle interact gravitationally due to the mass anomalies in both regions. This gravitational core-mantle interaction could play a significant role in exchange of angular momentum between the core and the mantle, and thus the change in Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer. Aiming at estimating the significance of the gravitational core-mantle interaction on Earth's rotation variation, we introduce in our MoSST core dynamics model a heterogeneous mantle, with a density distribution derived from seismic results. In this model, the core convection is driven by the buoyancy forces. And the density variation is determined dynamically with the convection. Numerical simulation is carried out with different parameter values, intending to extrapolate numerical results for geophysical implications.

  7. Water-Rock Interaction Simulations of Iron Oxide Mobilization and Precipitation: Implications of Cross-diffusion Reactions for Terrestrial and Mars 'Blueberry' Hematite Concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.; Parry, W. T.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling of how terrestrial concretions form can provide valuable insights into understanding water-rock interactions that led to the formation of hematite concretions at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Numerical simulations of iron oxide concretions in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah provide physical and chemical input parameters for emulating conditions that may have prevailed on Mars. In the terrestrial example, iron oxide coatings on eolian sand grains are reduced and mobilized by methane or petroleum. Precipitation of goethite or hematite occurs as Fe interacts with oxygen. Conditions that produced Navajo Sandstone concretions can range from a regional scale that is strongly affected by advection of large pore volumes of water, to small sub-meter scale features that are dominantly controlled by diffusive processes. Hematite concretions are results of a small-scale cross-diffusional process, where Fe and oxygen are supplied from two opposite sides from the 'middle' zone of mixing where concretions precipitate. This is an ideal natural system where Liesegang banding and other self-organized patterns can evolve. A complicating variable here is the sedimentologic (both mineralogic and textural) heterogeneity that, in reality, may be the key factor controlling the nucleation and precipitation habits (including possible competitive growth) of hematite concretions. Sym.8 water-rock interaction simulator program was used for the Navajo Sandstone concretions. Sym.8 is a water-rock simulator that accounts for advective and diffusive mass-transfer, and equilibrium and kinetic reactions. The program uses a dynamic composite media texture model to address changing sediment composition and texture to be consistent with the reaction progress. Initial one-dimensional simulation results indicate precipitation heterogeneity in the range of sub-meters, e.g., possible banding and distribution of iron oxide nodules may be centimeters apart for published diffusivities and

  8. From chaos to selective ordering of vortex cores in interacting mesomagnets.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Novosad, V; Fradin, F Y; Pearson, J E; Tiberkevich, V; Slavin, A N; Bader, S D

    2012-01-01

    A spin vortex consists of an in-plane curling magnetization and a small core region (~10 nm) with out-of-plane magnetization. An oscillating field or current induce gyrotropic precession of the spin vortex. Dipole-dipole and exchange coupling between the interacting vortices may lead to excitation of collective modes whose frequencies depend on the core polarities. Here we demonstrate an effective method for controlling the relative core polarities in a model system of overlapping Ni(80)Fe(20) dots. This is achieved by driving the system to a chaotic regime of continuous core reversals and subsequently relaxing the cores to steady-state motion. It is shown that any particular core polarity combination (and therefore the spectral response of the entire system) can be deterministically preselected by tuning the excitation frequency or external magnetic field. We anticipate that this work would benefit the future development of magnonic crystals, spin-torque oscillators, magnetic storage and logic elements.

  9. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  10. Coarse graining of NN inelastic interactions up to 3 GeV: Repulsive versus structural core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Soler, P.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2017-07-01

    The repulsive short-distance core is one of the main paradigms of nuclear physics which even seems confirmed by QCD lattice calculations. On the other hand nuclear potentials at short distances are motivated by high energy behavior where inelasticities play an important role. We analyze NN interactions up to 3 GeV in terms of simple coarse grained complex and energy dependent interactions. We discuss two possible and conflicting scenarios which share the common feature of a vanishing wave function at the core location in the particular case of S waves. We find that the optical potential with a repulsive core exhibits a strong energy dependence whereas the optical potential with the structural core is characterized by a rather adiabatic energy dependence which allows one to treat inelasticity perturbatively. We discuss the possible implications for nuclear structure calculations of both alternatives.

  11. Effect on vehicle and track interaction of installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. C.; Kim, E.

    2012-01-01

    Various installation faults can occur in fasteners in the construction of a direct-fixation track using the top-down method. In extreme cases, these faults may cause excessive interaction between the train and track, compromise the running safety of the train, and cause damage to the track components. Therefore, these faults need to be kept within the allowable level through an investigation of their effects on the interactions between the train and track. In this study, the vertical dynamic stiffness of fasteners in installation faults was measured based on a dynamic stiffness test by means of an experimental apparatus that was devised to feasibly reproduce installation faults with an arbitrary shape. This study proposes an effective analytical model for a train-track interaction system in which most elements, except the nonlinear wheel-rail contact and some components that behave bilinearly, exhibit linear behavior. To investigate the effect of the behavior of fasteners in installation faults in a direct-fixation track on the vehicle and track, vehicle-track interaction analyses were carried out, targeting key review parameters such as the wheel load reduction factor, vertical rail displacement, wheel load, and mean stress of the elastomer. From the results, it was noted that it is more important for the installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track to be limited for the sake of the long-term durability of the elastomer rather than for the running safety of the train or the structural safety of the track.

  12. Deteriorated concrete from liner of WIPP waste shaft. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Poole, T.S.; Burkes, J.P.

    1992-06-01

    Samples of a fly-ash concrete were studied after 6 years in service underground. The cores studied represented a construction joint and other areas of exposure to local groundwater. Observed evidence of deterioration, relative to companion cores of nondeteriorated concrete, included softening of the paste fraction, discoloration, an extensive network of microfractures cutting through both paste and aggregates, and crystalline deposits along fractures. In laboratory studies, they sought to determine the causes of these features, by studies of phase composition, chemical composition, and microstructure. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate, gypsum, and brucite in subsamples that should have been cement paste and along fractures. They attribute the condition of the concrete to chemical alteration by interaction with magnesium-bearing groundwater, which occurs naturally in the service environment.

  13. Shock-turbulence interaction in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Zhaksylykov, Azamat; Radice, David; Berdibek, Shapagat

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear shell burning in the final stages of the lives of massive stars is accompanied by strong turbulent convection. The resulting fluctuations aid supernova explosion by amplifying the non-radial flow in the post-shock region. In this work, we investigate the physical mechanism behind this amplification using a linear perturbation theory. We model the shock wave as a one-dimensional planar discontinuity and consider its interaction with vorticity and entropy perturbations in the upstream flow. We find that, as the perturbations cross the shock, their total turbulent kinetic energy is amplified by a factor of ˜2, while the average linear size of turbulent eddies decreases by about the same factor. These values are not sensitive to the parameters of the upstream turbulence and the nuclear dissociation efficiency at the shock. Finally, we discuss the implication of our results for the supernova explosion mechanism. We show that the upstream perturbations can decrease the critical neutrino luminosity for producing explosion by several per cent.

  14. Phosphorylation state-dependent interactions of hepadnavirus core protein with host factors.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Laurie; Adams, Christina; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) are required for multiple steps of the viral life cycle. It remains unknown how the CTD phosphorylation state may modulate core protein functions but phosphorylation state-dependent viral or host interactions may play a role. In an attempt to identify host factors that may interact differentially with the core protein depending on its CTD phosphorylation state, pulldown assays were performed using the CTD of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and human hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein, either with wild type (WT) sequences or with alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at the phosphorylation sites. Two host proteins, B23 and I2PP2A, were found to interact preferentially with the alanine-substituted CTD. Furthermore, the WT CTD became competent to interact with the host proteins upon dephosphorylation. Intriguingly, the binding site on the DHBV CTD for both B23 and I2PP2A was mapped to a region upstream of the phosphorylation sites even though B23 or I2PP2A binding to this site was clearly modulated by the phosphorylation state of the downstream and non-overlapping sequences. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mode of phosphorylation-regulated protein-protein interaction and provide new insights into virus-host interactions. © 2011 Ludgate et al.

  15. Phosphorylation State-Dependent Interactions of Hepadnavirus Core Protein with Host Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Adams, Christina; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) are required for multiple steps of the viral life cycle. It remains unknown how the CTD phosphorylation state may modulate core protein functions but phosphorylation state-dependent viral or host interactions may play a role. In an attempt to identify host factors that may interact differentially with the core protein depending on its CTD phosphorylation state, pulldown assays were performed using the CTD of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and human hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein, either with wild type (WT) sequences or with alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at the phosphorylation sites. Two host proteins, B23 and I2PP2A, were found to interact preferentially with the alanine-substituted CTD. Furthermore, the WT CTD became competent to interact with the host proteins upon dephosphorylation. Intriguingly, the binding site on the DHBV CTD for both B23 and I2PP2A was mapped to a region upstream of the phosphorylation sites even though B23 or I2PP2A binding to this site was clearly modulated by the phosphorylation state of the downstream and non-overlapping sequences. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mode of phosphorylation-regulated protein-protein interaction and provide new insights into virus-host interactions. PMID:22216318

  16. AGN-ICM interaction in nearby cool core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, Aurora

    This work focuses on detailed spatial and spectral analysis of the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in clusters of galaxies, giant laboratories which allow us to probe the formation and chemical enrichment history of the Universe. These are the only objects large enough to contain a fair sample of all types of baryonic and dark matter in the Universe. The largest amount of baryons (about 80%) resides in a diuse ICM which is shock-heated during mergers associated with hierarchical large-scale structure formation to temperatures of 10^7 - 10^8 K and consequently emits mostly in the X-ray domain. This plasma permeates the entire cluster, tracing the gravitational potential dominated by the dark matter. The deep potential wells of clusters of galaxies retain all the metals produced by supernovae in the member galaxies throughout the cluster's life, therefore metal abundances in the ICM constitute a fossil record of the average chemical enrichment history of the Universe. Energetic interaction between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and the ICM is needed to heat the gas at some cluster centers where the surface brightness profile is very peaked. The energy radiated away here is so large that, if it came from thermal energy alone, the hot X-ray gas would have to cool and form copious amounts of stars, in disagreement with observations (the so-called "cooling flow" problem). Turbulence and gas motions induced by the AGN are moreover believed to be a main ingredient for transporting and distributing the metals within the ICM. I investigate features associated with AGN-ICM interaction in two bright and relatively nearby systems. M87, at the center of Virgo, the nearest galaxy cluster, is a natural choice as a first target for such detailed studies. Since it is so close, M87 is both bright enough to ensure excellent spectral statistics and enables us to resolve much smaller spatial scales than possible for any other object

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Interacts with Cellular Putative RNA Helicase

    PubMed Central

    You, Li-Ru; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Tsai, Tzung-Yuan; Mai, Ru-Tsun; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    1999-01-01

    The nucleocapsid core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to trans-act on several viral or cellular promoters. To get insight into the trans-action mechanism of HCV core protein, a yeast two-hybrid cloning system was used for identification of core protein-interacting cellular protein. One such cDNA clone encoding the DEAD box family of putative RNA helicase was obtained. This cellular putative RNA helicase, designated CAP-Rf, exhibits more than 95% amino acid sequence identity to other known RNA helicases including human DBX and DBY, mouse mDEAD3, and PL10, a family of proteins generally involved in translation, splicing, development, or cell growth. In vitro binding or in vivo coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated the direct interaction of the full-length/matured form and C-terminally truncated variants of HCV core protein with this targeted protein. Additionally, the protein’s interaction domains were delineated at the N-terminal 40-amino-acid segment of the HCV core protein and the C-terminal tail of CAP-Rf, which encompassed its RNA-binding and ATP hydrolysis domains. Immunoblotting or indirect immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the endogenous CAP-Rf was mainly localized in the nucleus and to a lesser extent in the cytoplasm, and when fused with FLAG tag, it colocalized with the HCV core protein either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Similar to other RNA helicases, this cellular RNA helicase has nucleoside triphosphatase-deoxynucleoside triphosphatase activity, but this activity is inhibited by various forms of homopolynucleotides and enhanced by the HCV core protein. Moreover, transient expression of HCV core protein in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells significantly potentiated the trans-activation effect of FLAG-tagged CAP-Rf or untagged CAP-Rf on the luciferase reporter plasmid activity. All together, our results indicate that CAP-Rf is involved in regulation of gene expression and that HCV core protein promotes the trans

  18. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  19. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  20. Interaction of structural core protein of classical swine fever virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9.

    PubMed

    Gladue, D P; O'Donnell, V; Fernandez-Sainz, I J; Fletcher, P; Baker-Branstetter, R; Holinka, L G; Sanford, B; Carlson, J; Lu, Z; Borca, M V

    2014-07-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, the osteosarcoma amplified 9 protein (OS9) was further studied. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, the OS9 binding site in the CSFV Core protein was identified, between Core residues (90)IAIM(93), near a putative cleavage site. Truncated versions of Core were used to show that OS9 binds a polypeptide representing the 12 C-terminal Core residues. Cells transfected with a double-fluorescent labeled Core construct demonstrated that co-localization of OS9 and Core occurred only on unprocessed forms of Core protein. A recombinant CSFV containing Core protein where residues (90)IAIM(93) were substituted by alanines showed no altered virulence in swine, but a significant decreased ability to replicate in cell cultures.

  1. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  2. The Core Extrusion Schema-Revised: Hiding Oneself Predicts Severity of Social Interaction Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Cheri A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Lim, Michelle H; Fernandez, Katya C

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) suggest that fear of negative evaluation is a core fear or vulnerability for SAD. However, why negative evaluation is feared is not fully understood. It is possible that core beliefs contribute to the relationship between fear of negative evaluation and SAD. One of these beliefs may be a core extrusion schema: a constellation of beliefs that one's true self will be rejected by others and therefore one should hide one's true self. In the current study (N = 699), we extended research on the Core Extrusion Schema and created a shortened and revised version of the measure called the Core Extrusion Schema-Revised The Core Extrusion Schema-Revised demonstrated good factor fit for its two subscales (Hidden Self and Rejection of the True Self) and was invariant across gender and ethnicity. The Hidden Self subscale demonstrated excellent incremental validity within the full sample as well as in participants diagnosed with generalized SAD. Specifically, the Hidden Self subscale may help explain severity of social interaction anxiety. This measure could be used with individuals diagnosed with generalized SAD to design exposures targeting these core beliefs.

  3. Investigation of deformation of elements of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures located in the soil, interacting with each other through rubber gaskets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Balafendieva, I. S.; Sachenkov, A. A.; Sekaeva, L. R.

    2017-06-01

    In work the technique of calculation of elements of three-dimensional reinforced concrete substructures located in a soil, interacting with each other through rubber linings is realized. To describe the interaction of deformable structures with the ground, special “semi-infinite” finite elements are used. A technique has been implemented that allows one to describe the contact interaction of three-dimensional structures by means of a special contact finite element with specific properties. The obtained numerical results are compared with the experimental data, their good agreement is noted.

  4. Catalytic Core of Human Topoisomerase IIα: Insights into Enzyme–DNA Interactions and Drug Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between the N-terminal gate and the catalytic core of topoisomerase II allows the proper capture, cleavage, and transport of DNA during the catalytic cycle. Because the activities of these domains are tightly linked, it has been difficult to discern their individual contributions to enzyme–DNA interactions and drug mechanism. To further address the roles of these domains, we analyzed the activity of the catalytic core of human topoisomerase IIα. The catalytic core and the wild-type enzyme both maintained higher levels of cleavage with negatively (as compared to positively) supercoiled plasmid, indicating that the ability to distinguish supercoil handedness is embedded within the catalytic core. However, the catalytic core alone displayed little ability to cleave DNA substrates that did not intrinsically provide the enzyme with a transport segment (i.e., substrates that did not contain crossovers). Finally, in contrast to interfacial topoisomerase II poisons, covalent poisons did not enhance DNA cleavage mediated by the catalytic core. This distinction allowed us to further characterize the mechanism of etoposide quinone, a drug metabolite that functions primarily as a covalent poison. Etoposide quinone retained some ability to enhance DNA cleavage mediated by the catalytic core, indicating that it still can function as an interfacial poison. These results further define the distinct contributions of the N-terminal gate and the catalytic core to topoisomerase II function. The catalytic core senses the handedness of DNA supercoils during cleavage, while the N-terminal gate is critical for capturing the transport segment and for the activity of covalent poisons. PMID:25280269

  5. Dynamics of axial torsional libration under the mantle-inner core gravitational interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this paper are (i) formulating the dynamics of the mantle-inner core gravitational (MICG) interaction in terms of the spherical-harmonic multipoles of mass density. The modeled MICG system is composed of two concentric rigid bodies (mantle and inner core) of near-spherical but otherwise heterogeneous configuration, with a fluid outer core in between playing a passive role. We derive the general equation of motion for the vector rotation but only focus on the polar component that describes the MICG axial torsional libration. The torsion constant and hence the square of the natural frequency of the libration is proportional to the product of the equatorial ellipticities of the mantle and inner-core geoid embodied in their multipoles (of two different types) of degree 2 and order 2 (such as the Large Low-Shear-Velocity Provinces above the core-mantle boundary) and (ii) studying the geophysical implications upon equating the said MICG libration to the steady 6 year oscillation that are observed in the Earth's spin rate or the length-of-day variation (ΔLOD). In particular, the MICG torsion constant is found to be Γ>˜z = CIC σz2 ≈ 6.5 × 1019 N m, while the inner core's (BIC - AIC) ≈ 1.08 × 1031 kg m2 gives the inner core triaxiality (BIC - AIC)/CIC ≈ 1.8 × 10-4, about 8 times the whole-Earth value. It is also asserted that the required inner-core ellipticity amounts to no more than 140 m in geoid height, much smaller than the sensitivity required for the seismic wave travel time to resolve the variation of the inner core.

  6. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertron, A.; Ranaivomanana, H.; Jacquemet, N.; Erable, B.; Sablayrolles, C.; Escadeillas, G.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+). The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  7. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  8. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  9. Core formation in dwarf haloes with self-interacting dark matter: no fine-tuning necessary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbert, Oliver D.; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Rocha, Miguel; Oñorbe, Jose; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effect of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the density profiles of Vmax ≃ 40km s-1 isolated dwarf dark matter haloes - the scale of relevance for the too big to fail problem (TBTF) - using very high resolution cosmological zoom simulations. Each halo has millions of particles within its virial radius. We find that SIDM models with cross-sections per unit mass spanning the range σ/m = 0.5-50 cm2 g-1 alleviate TBTF and produce constant-density cores of size 300-1000 pc, comparable to the half-light radii of M⋆ ˜ 105 - 7 M⊙ dwarfs. The largest, lowest density cores develop for cross-sections in the middle of this range, σ/m ˜ 5-10 cm2 g-1. Our largest SIDM cross-section run (σ/m = 50 cm2 g-1) develops a slightly denser core owing to mild core-collapse behaviour, but it remains less dense than the cold dark matter case and retains a constant-density core profile. Our work suggests that SIDM cross-sections as large or larger than 50 cm2 g-1 remain viable on velocity scales of dwarf galaxies (vrms ˜ 40 km s-1). The range of SIDM cross-sections that alleviate TBTF and the cusp/core problem spans at least two orders of magnitude and therefore need not be particularly fine-tuned.

  10. Scaling relations of halo cores for self-interacting dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry W.; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2016-03-01

    Using a simple analytic formalism, we demonstrate that significant dark matter self-interactions produce halo cores that obey scaling relations nearly independent of the underlying particle physics parameters such as the annihilation cross section and the mass of the dark matter particle. For dwarf galaxies, we predict that the core density ρ{sub c} and the core radius r{sub c} should obey ρ{sub c} r{sub c} ≈ 41 M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} with a weak mass dependence ∼ M{sup 0.2}. Remarkably, such a scaling relation has recently been empirically inferred. Scaling relations involving core mass, core radius, and core velocity dispersion are predicted and agree well with observational data. By calibrating against numerical simulations, we predict the scatter in these relations and find them to be in excellent agreement with existing data. Future observations can test our predictions for different halo masses and redshifts.

  11. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  12. New scenarios for hard-core interactions in a hadron resonance gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satarov, L. M.; Vovchenko, V.; Alba, P.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Stoecker, H.

    2017-02-01

    The equation of state of baryon-symmetric hadronic matter with hard-sphere interactions is studied. It is assumed that mesons M are pointlike, but baryons B and antibaryons B ¯ have the same hard-core radius rB. Three possibilities are considered: (1) the B B and B B ¯ interactions are the same; (2) baryons do not interact with antibaryons; (3) the B B ¯ , M B , and M B ¯ interactions are negligible. By choosing the parameter rB=0.3 -0.6 fm, we calculate the nucleon to pion ratio as a function of temperature and perform the fit of hadron yields measured in central Pb+Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV . New nontrivial effects in the interacting hadron resonance gas at temperatures 150 -200 MeV are found.

  13. Interaction of alkali metal cations and short chain alcohols: effect of core size on theoretical affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N. L.; Siu, F. M.; Tsang, C. W.

    2000-05-01

    The effect of core size on the calculated binding energies of alkali metal cations (Li +, Na +, K +) to methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, n-butanol, i-butanol, s-butanol, and t-butanol are evaluated using G2(MP2,SVP) protocol. The K + affinities, reported for the first time, were found to be negative if a core size larger than that of neon (2s 22p 6) was used. Given this, we suggest that the 1s 2, 2s 22p 6, and 3s 23p 6 electrons have to be included in the electron correlation treatment for Li +, Na + and K + containing species, respectively. With these core sizes, our G2(MP2,SVP) Li + and Na + affinities are in excellent agreement with values obtained from the newly developed G3 protocol. The nature of alkali metal cation-alcohol interaction is also discussed.

  14. Preferential interaction of the core histone tail domains with linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D; Vitolo, J M; Mutskov, V; Dimitrov, S; Hayes, J J

    2001-06-05

    Within chromatin, the core histone tail domains play critical roles in regulating the structure and accessibility of nucleosomal DNA within the chromatin fiber. Thus, many nuclear processes are facilitated by concomitant posttranslational modification of these domains. However, elucidation of the mechanisms by which the tails mediate such processes awaits definition of tail interactions within chromatin. In this study we have investigated the primary DNA target of the majority of the tails in mononucleosomes. The results clearly show that the tails bind preferentially to "linker" DNA, outside of the DNA encompassed by the nucleosome core. These results have important implications for models of tail function within the chromatin fiber and for in vitro structural and functional studies using nucleosome core particles.

  15. Cage-Core Interactions in Fullerenes Enclosing Metal Clusters with Multiple Scandium and Yttrium Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Liu; Hagelberg, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Pronounced stability has been reported for metallofullerenes of the form NSc3@CN (N = 68, 78) /1/. In response of these and related findings, Density Functional Theory studies have been performed on the relation between cage-core interactions and the geometry as well as stability of endofullerenes with metal impurities containing Sc and Y. Substantial electron transfer from the metal core to the fullerene cage combines with electron backdonation, involving the interaction between the occupied orbitals of the negatively charged cage and the unoccupied d orbitals of the positively charged core. The Hueckel 4n+2 rule, well established in organic chemistry, is shown to provide a valuable heuristic tool for understanding the intramolecular electron transfer and the related stability gain /1/. The usefulness of the aromaticity concept for explaining and predicting the architecture of metallofullerenes is further exemplified by the units Sc2@C84 and Y2@C84 which were analyzed in spin triplet and singlet conditions. The Sc2 core turns out to be realized by two separated ions, while Y2 forms a bound subunit. These findings are in agreement with conclusions based on the 4n + 2 rule, assisted by Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) calculations. /1/ Stevenson, S.; Fowler, P.W.; Heine, T.; Duchamp, J.C.; Rice, G.; Glass, T.; Harich, K.; Hadju, F.; Bible, R.; Dorn, H.C. Nature, 2000, 408, 427, /2/ S. S. Park, D. Liu, F. Hagelberg, J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 8865 (2005).

  16. Interactions between RNA polymerase and the "core recognition element" counteract pausing.

    PubMed

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Bird, Jeremy G; Knoblauch, Jared G; Goldman, Seth R; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2014-06-13

    Transcription elongation is interrupted by sequences that inhibit nucleotide addition and cause RNA polymerase (RNAP) to pause. Here, by use of native elongating transcript sequencing (NET-seq) and a variant of NET-seq that enables analysis of mutant RNAP derivatives in merodiploid cells (mNET-seq), we analyze transcriptional pausing genome-wide in vivo in Escherichia coli. We identify a consensus pause-inducing sequence element, G₋₁₀Y₋₁G(+1) (where -1 corresponds to the position of the RNA 3' end). We demonstrate that sequence-specific interactions between RNAP core enzyme and a core recognition element (CRE) that stabilize transcription initiation complexes also occur in transcription elongation complexes and facilitate pause read-through by stabilizing RNAP in a posttranslocated register. Our findings identify key sequence determinants of transcriptional pausing and establish that RNAP-CRE interactions modulate pausing. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends*

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. PMID:27514743

  18. Transport with hard-core interaction in a chain of asymmetric cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, G. P.; Hoyuelos, M.; Mártin, H. O.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the diffusion of particles inside a chain of asymmetric cavities. We are considering particles that interact through a hard-core potential and are driven by an external force. We show that the difference in the current when the force is applied to the left and to the right strongly depends on the concentration inside the cavity. We found that, when the concentration is high enough, the hard-core interaction vanishes and inverts the asymmetric effect of the cavity. We also introduce a new equation, a modification to the Fick- Jacobs equation, to describe this system analytically. Finally, we used numerical simulations to verify the analytic results, finding a good agreement between theory and simulations.

  19. First-order theory for Earth's inner-core anisotropy due to super-rotation and Ramachandran interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das

    2015-06-01

    Solidification mechanism at the Lehmann (inner core) boundary are postulated on the basis of Ramachandran interaction by taking the fluctuating inner core super-rotation into account. The postulates are found to be consistent with compressional or P-wave velocity obtained from seismic data analysis. We justify these postulates to be physically sound and precise, and show that the fluctuating inner core super-rotation causes significant changes to the strength of Fe-Fe Ramachandran interaction, which then leads to the observed asymmetric and anisotropic inner core. Our postulates also reliably explain that the depth-dependent anisotropic P-wave attenuation close to inner core surface (to about 100 km deep) is due to phonon excitation probability and different atomic orientation. We also discuss the consistency of our postulates with respect to asymmetric inner core anisotropy (between western and eastern inner core hemispheres).

  20. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  1. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T. R.; Parthun, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones. PMID:21965532

  2. Field evaluation of internally sealed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, R. J.; Smith, D. R.; Neal, B. F.; Woodstrom, J. H.

    1980-02-01

    Portland cement concrete containing wax beads was evaluated. Performance of the deck concrete was evaluated after a little more than three years of service. The deck was found to be badly cracked. From cores, it was determined that the cracks extended at least to the reinforcing steel, and in some cases, entirely through the 8 1/2 inch deck. It is concluded from an examination of the cracked faces of cores that cracking was probably caused by shrinkage of the fresh concrete due to some slight delay in curing. A dry wind was blowing during concrete placement, creating adverse curing conditions.

  3. Dynamics of interacting solitons in dual core Bragg gratings with dispersive reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratali, B. H.; Atai, Javid

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of in-phase and out-of-phase quiescent gap solitons in a system of two linearly-coupled Bragg gratings with dispersive reflectivity are studied. By means of systematic numerical simulations, we show that the interaction of the in-phase solitons may lead to merger, repulsion, destruction, or separation of solitons which may be symmetric or asymmetric. A key feature of the interactions is that even in the absence of dispersive reflectivity the interaction of solitons may result in the formation of two moving solitons and one quiescent one. To the best of our knowledge, such outcomes have not been observed in the standard models of gap solitons (i.e., single core Bragg gratings without dispersive reflectivity). Another interesting finding is that in the region where solitons do not have sidelobes, the outcomes of the interactions are weakly dependent on the initial separation of the solitons. On the other hand, the presence of sidelobes, which occur for larger values of dispersive reflectivity, results in more complex interactions. The π-out-of-phase solitons without sidelobes always repel each other. On the other hand, the interaction of solitons with sidelobes is affected by the initial separation. In this case, the interactions may either result in the repulsion of solitons or the formation of a temporary bound state that subsequently splits into two separating solitons.

  4. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  5. PREPACKED CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Twenty four hardened plain concrete wallettes , each 31 in. high by 25 in. wide by 6 in. thick, were sawed into various rectangular parallelepipeds...The wallettes represented three groups of prepacked concrete: reference aggregate intruded with fresh-water grout, coral aggregate with fresh-water...prismatic test specimens were involved in the program for determining the effectsof: type of mixing water, type of wiremesh cover atop the wallette form

  6. Interactions within the Yeast Sm Core Complex: from Proteins to Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Camasses, Alain; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Martin, Robert; Séraphin, Bertrand; Bordonné, Rémy

    1998-01-01

    Sm core proteins play an essential role in the formation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) by binding to small nuclear RNAs and participating in a network of protein interactions. The two-hybrid system was used to identify SmE interacting proteins and to test for interactions between all pairwise combinations of yeast Sm proteins. We observed interactions between SmB and SmD3, SmE and SmF, and SmE and SmG. For these interactions, a direct biochemical assay confirmed the validity of the results obtained in vivo. To map the protein-protein interaction surface of Sm proteins, we generated a library of SmE mutants and investigated their ability to interact with SmF and/or SmG proteins in the two-hybrid system. Several classes of mutants were observed: some mutants are unable to interact with either SmF or SmG proteins, some interact with SmG but not with SmF, while others interact moderately with SmF but not with SmG. Our mutational analysis of yeast SmE protein shows that conserved hydrophobic residues are essential for interactions with SmF and SmG as well as for viability. Surprisingly, we observed that other evolutionarily conserved positions are tolerant to mutations, with substitutions affecting binding to SmF and SmG only mildly and conferring a wild-type growth phenotype. PMID:9528767

  7. Identification of FAAP24, a Fanconi anemia core complex protein that interacts with FANCM.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Alberto; Ling, Chen; Coulthard, Rachel; Yan, Zhijiang; Xue, Yutong; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Laghmani, El Houari; Joenje, Hans; McDonald, Neil; de Winter, Johan P; Wang, Weidong; West, Stephen C

    2007-02-09

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a crucial role in a DNA damage response network with BRCA1 and BRCA2. How this complex interacts with damaged DNA is unknown, as only the FA core protein FANCM (the homolog of an archaeal helicase/nuclease known as HEF) exhibits DNA binding activity. Here, we describe the identification of FAAP24, a protein that targets FANCM to structures that mimic intermediates formed during the replication/repair of damaged DNA. FAAP24 shares homology with the XPF family of flap/fork endonucleases, associates with the C-terminal region of FANCM, and is a component of the FA core complex. FAAP24 is required for normal levels of FANCD2 monoubiquitylation following DNA damage. Depletion of FAAP24 by siRNA results in cellular hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents and chromosomal instability. Our data indicate that the FANCM/FAAP24 complex may play a key role in recruitment of the FA core complex to damaged DNA.

  8. The Dynamo's Sensitivity to Core-Mantle Thermal Interactions: Investigations of Mars and Earth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Zuber, M. T.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Parmentier, E.

    2009-12-01

    Various mechanisms can generate lateral thermal variations at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in terrestrial planets. For example on early Mars, a giant impact, magma ocean overturn, mantle viscosity variations or phase changes have been invoked to explain the hemispheric crustal dichotomy. These mechanisms would have resulted in episodes of hemispheric scale heat flux variations at the CMB. On Earth, plate tectonics governs the thermal variations at the CMB. Previous work has investigated the effects of CMB thermal variations on the core dynamo and resulting magnetic field for both Earth and Mars. The sensitivity can be dramatic, as in a single hemisphere dynamo or cessation of the dynamo in Mars, or more subtle, as in the locking of flux spots and prescribing intensities in the paleomagnetic power spectrum in Earth. Here we use dynamo models to investigate the sensitivity of the dynamo to core-mantle thermal interactions. We examine both the morphology and intensity of core-mantle thermal variations in order to place constraints on interior processes in both Mars and Earth.

  9. Au@MoS2 Core-Shell Heterostructures with Strong Light-Matter Interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Cain, Jeffrey D; Hanson, Eve D; Murthy, Akshay A; Hao, Shiqiang; Shi, Fengyuan; Li, Qianqian; Wolverton, Chris; Chen, Xinqi; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-12-14

    There are emerging opportunities to harness diverse and complex geometric architectures based on nominal two-dimensional atomically layered structures. Herein we report synthesis and properties of a new core-shell heterostructure, termed Au@MoS2, where the Au nanoparticle is snugly and contiguously encapsulated by few shells of MoS2 atomic layers. The heterostructures were synthesized by direct growth of multilayer fullerene-like MoS2 shell on Au nanoparticle cores. The Au@MoS2 heterostructures exhibit interesting light-matter interactions due to the structural curvature of MoS2 shell and the plasmonic effect from the underlying Au nanoparticle core. We observed significantly enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescence emission on these heterostructures. We attribute these enhancements to the surface plasmon-induced electric field, which simulations show to mainly localize within the MoS2 shell. We also found potential evidence for the charge transfer-induced doping effect on the MoS2 shell. The DFT calculations further reveal that the structural curvature of MoS2 shell results in a modification of its electronic structure, which may facilitate the charge transfer from MoS2 to Au. Such Au@MoS2 core-shell heterostructures have the potential for future optoelectronic devices, optical imaging, and other energy-environmental applications.

  10. Uranium (VI) and Neptunium (V) Transport Fractured, Hydrothermally Altered Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, S.L.; Beiriger, J.M.; Torretto, P.C.; Zhao, P.

    1999-11-04

    In a high level waste repository in which temperatures are elevated due to waste decay, concrete structures will be subjected to hydrothermal conditions that will alter their physical and chemical properties. Virtually no studies have examined the interaction of hydrothermally altered concrete with radionuclides. We present the results of experiments in which soluble and colloid-associated actinides, uranium (U) and neptunium (Np), were eluted into a fractured, hydrothermally altered concrete core. Although the fluid residence time in the fracture was estimated to be on the order of 1 minute, U and Np were below detection (10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} M) in the effluent from the core, for both soluble and colloid-associated species. Inorganic colloids and latex microspheres were similarly immobilized within the core. Post-test analysis of the core identified the immobilized U and Np at or near the fracture surface, with a spatial distribution similar to that of the latex microspheres. Because hydrothermal alteration followed fracturing, the growth of crystalline calcium silicate hydrate and clay mineral alteration products on, and possibly across the fracture, resulted in a highly reactive fracture that was effective at capturing both soluble and colloidal radionuclides. Comparison of results from batch experiments [1] with these experiments indicate that partitioning of U and Np to the solid phase, and equilibration of the incoming fluid with the concrete, occurs rapidly in the fractured system. Transport of U through the concrete may be solubility and/or sorption limited; transport of Np appears to be limited primarily by sorption.

  11. Identification of influential spreaders in online social networks using interaction weighted K-core decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-garadi, Mohammed Ali; Varathan, Kasturi Dewi; Ravana, Sri Devi

    2017-02-01

    Online social networks (OSNs) have become a vital part of everyday living. OSNs provide researchers and scientists with unique prospects to comprehend individuals on a scale and to analyze human behavioral patterns. Influential spreaders identification is an important subject in understanding the dynamics of information diffusion in OSNs. Targeting these influential spreaders is significant in planning the techniques for accelerating the propagation of information that is useful for various applications, such as viral marketing applications or blocking the diffusion of annoying information (spreading of viruses, rumors, online negative behaviors, and cyberbullying). Existing K-core decomposition methods consider links equally when calculating the influential spreaders for unweighted networks. Alternatively, the proposed link weights are based only on the degree of nodes. Thus, if a node is linked to high-degree nodes, then this node will receive high weight and is treated as an important node. Conversely, the degree of nodes in OSN context does not always provide accurate influence of users. In the present study, we improve the K-core method for OSNs by proposing a novel link-weighting method based on the interaction among users. The proposed method is based on the observation that the interaction of users is a significant factor in quantifying the spreading capability of user in OSNs. The tracking of diffusion links in the real spreading dynamics of information verifies the effectiveness of our proposed method for identifying influential spreaders in OSNs as compared with degree centrality, PageRank, and original K-core.

  12. A miniature protein stabilized by a cation-π interaction network core

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Cho, Min-Kyu; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Bonneau, Richard; Kirshenbaum, Kent

    2016-01-01

    The design of folded miniature proteins is predicated on establishing non-covalent interactions that direct the self-assembly of discrete thermo-stable tertiary structures. In this work, we describe how a network of cation-π interactions present in proteins containing “WSXWS motifs” can be emulated to stabilize the core of a miniature protein. This 19-residue protein sequence recapitulates a set of interdigitated arginine and tryptophan residues that stabilize a distinctive β-strand:loop:PPII-helix topology. Validation of the compact fold determined by NMR was carried out by mutagenesis of the cation-π network and by comparison to the corresponding disulfide-bridged structure. These results support the involvement of a coordinated set of cation-π interactions that stabilize the tertiary structure. PMID:26812069

  13. Interaction between magnetic vortex cores in a pair of nonidentical nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnecker, J. P.; Vigo-Cotrina, H.; Garcia, F.; Novais, E. R. P.; Guimarães, A. P.

    2014-05-28

    The coupling of two nonidentical magnetic nanodisks, i.e., with different vortex gyrotropic frequencies, is studied. From the analytical approach, the interactions between the nanodisks along x and y directions (the coupling integrals) were obtained as a function of distance. From the numerical solution of Thiele's equation, we derived the eigenfrequencies of the vortex cores as a function of distance. The motion of the two vortex cores and, consequently, the time dependence of the total magnetization M(t) were derived both using Thiele's equation and by micromagnetic simulation. From M(t), a recently developed method, the magnetic vortex echoes, analogous to the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spin echoes, was used to compute the distance dependence of the magnetic coupling strength. The results of the two approaches differ by approximately 10%; using one single term, a dependence with distance found is broadly in agreement with studies employing other techniques.

  14. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  15. Effect of soft-core potentials on inverse bremsstrahlung heating during laser matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Rishi R.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Becker, Valerie R.; Barrington, Kasey; Thurston, Jeremy; Cheatham, Jonathan; Ramunno, Lora; Ackad, Edward

    2017-07-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung heating (IBH) is studied by using scattering theory for the interaction of intense lasers with matter using soft-core potentials. This involves three different kinds of interactions: (i) the interaction of the electrons with the external laser field, (ii) the electron-ion interaction, and (iii) the electron-electron interaction. In the interaction of rare-gas clusters with ultrashort laser pulses, nano-plasmas with high densities are created. A new scaling for the differential cross-section and the rate of energy absorption via IBH is derived which depends on the external laser field as well as electric field due to the other particles. When the particles are treated as charge distributions, the electric fields due to the other particles depend on a parameter of the non-Coulombic soft-core field, the potential depth, often used to avoid the Coulomb singularity. Thus, the rate of IBH also depends on the potential depth. Calculations are performed for electrons in a range of wavelength regimes from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid-infrared. The rate of energy absorption via IBH is found to increase rapidly with increases in the potential depth and then quickly becomes mostly saturated at the Coulomb value for greater depths. The rate of energy absorption via IBH is found to be non-linear with laser intensities. The differential cross-section as well as the rate of energy absorption of IBH is found to increase with increases in laser wavelength. Finally, lower laser intensities saturate more slowly, requiring a larger potential depth to saturate.

  16. The influence of inelastic neutrino interactions with light clusters on core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light clusters in hot nuclear matter on core-collapse supernova simulations. These interactions have been neglected in most hydrodynamical supernova simulations. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged- current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ~ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light clusters have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light clusters, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  17. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  18. Do Core Interpersonal and Affective Traits of PCL-R Psychopathy Interact with Antisocial Behavior and Disinhibition to Predict Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennealy, Patrick J.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Walters, Glenn D.; Camp, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The utility of psychopathy measures in predicting violence is largely explained by their assessment of social deviance (e.g., antisocial behavior; disinhibition). A key question is whether social deviance "interacts" with the core interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy to predict violence. Do core psychopathic traits multiply the (already…

  19. Do Core Interpersonal and Affective Traits of PCL-R Psychopathy Interact with Antisocial Behavior and Disinhibition to Predict Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennealy, Patrick J.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Walters, Glenn D.; Camp, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The utility of psychopathy measures in predicting violence is largely explained by their assessment of social deviance (e.g., antisocial behavior; disinhibition). A key question is whether social deviance "interacts" with the core interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy to predict violence. Do core psychopathic traits multiply the (already…

  20. Surface Interaction of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals "Slipping on a Banana Peel"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias Gonzalez, Wilder G.

    The main emphasis and focus of this talk revolves around liquid crystalline molecules with frustrated symmetry, molecules with a kink in the core resembling the shape of a banana. These novel materials are not only suitable and interesting for the common liquid crystal display field as fast switching candidates, but for a whole wide range of potential applications, such as: power generation, microscale actuators, optical storage devices, to name a few. Understanding surface interactions of these mesogens is a key factor in controlling and unveiling the vast potential capabilities of such liquid crystals.

  1. Salt-induced conformation and interaction changes of nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed Central

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2002-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to follow changes in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration C(s). The maximal extension (D(max)) of the NCP (145 +/- 3-bp DNA) increases from 137 +/- 5 A to 165 +/- 5 A when C(s) rises from 10 to 50 mM and remains constant with further increases of C(s) up to 200 mM. In view of the very weak increase of the R(g) value in the same C(s) range, we attribute this D(max) variation to tail extension, a proposal confirmed by simulations of the entire I(q) curves, considering an ideal solution of particles with tails either condensed or extended. This tail extension is observed at higher salt values when particles contain longer DNA fragments (165 +/- 10 bp). The maximal extension of the tails always coincides with the screening of repulsive interactions between particles. The second virial coefficient becomes smaller than the hard sphere virial coefficient and eventually becomes negative (net attractive interactions) for NCP(145). Addition of salt simultaneously screens Coulombic repulsive interactions between NCP and Coulombic attractive interactions between tails and DNA inside the NCP. We discuss how the coupling of these two phenomena may be of biological relevance. PMID:11751321

  2. Ms1, a novel sRNA interacting with the RNA polymerase core in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Jirát Matějčková, Jitka; Šiková, Michaela; Pospíšil, Jiří; Halada, Petr; Pánek, Josef; Krásný, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are molecules essential for a number of regulatory processes in the bacterial cell. Here we characterize Ms1, a sRNA that is highly expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis during stationary phase of growth. By glycerol gradient ultracentrifugation, RNA binding assay, and RNA co-immunoprecipitation, we show that Ms1 interacts with the RNA polymerase (RNAP) core that is free of the primary sigma factor (σA) or any other σ factor. This contrasts with the situation in most other species where it is 6S RNA that interacts with RNAP and this interaction requires the presence of σA. The difference in the interaction of the two types of sRNAs (Ms1 or 6S RNA) with RNAP possibly reflects the difference in the composition of the transcriptional machinery between mycobacteria and other species. Unlike Escherichia coli, stationary phase M. smegmatis cells contain relatively few RNAP molecules in complex with σA. Thus, Ms1 represents a novel type of small RNAs interacting with RNAP. PMID:25217589

  3. A comprehensive Plasmodium falciparum protein interaction map reveals a distinct architecture of a core interactome

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Adams, John H.; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    We derive a map of protein interactions in the parasite P. falciparum from conserved interactions in S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and E. coli and pool them with experimental interaction data. The application of a clique-percolation algorithm allows us to find overlapping clusters, strongly correlated with yeast specific conserved protein complexes. Such clusters contain core activities that govern gene expression, largely dominated by components of protein production and degradation processes as well as RNA metabolism. A critical role of protein hubs in the interactome of P. falciparum is supported by their appearance in multiple clusters and the tendencies of their interactions to reach into many distinct protein clusters. Parasite proteins with a human ortholog tend to appear in single complexes. Annotating each protein with the stage where it is maximally expressed we observe a high level of cluster integrity in the ring stage. While we find no signal in the trophozoite phase, expression patterns are reversed in the schizont phase, implying a preponderance of parasite specific functions in this late, invasive schizont stage. As such, the inference of potential protein interactions and their analysis contributes to our understanding of the parasite, indicating basic pathways and processes as unique targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19333996

  4. SN2012ca: a stripped envelope core-collapse SN interacting with dense circumstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Scalzo, R.; Fraser, M.; Pastorello, A.; Childress, M.; Pignata, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kotak, R.; Benetti, S.; Della Valle, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Smith, K.; Sullivan, M.; Valenti, S.; Yaron, O.; Young, D.; Reichart, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report optical and near-infrared observations of SN2012ca with the Public ESO Spectroscopy Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO), spread over one year since discovery. The supernova (SN) bears many similarities to SN1997cy and to other events classified as Type IIn but which have been suggested to have a thermonuclear origin with narrow hydrogen lines produced when the ejecta impact a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Our analysis, especially in the nebular phase, reveals the presence of oxygen, magnesium and carbon features. This suggests a core-collapse explanation for SN2012ca, in contrast to the thermonuclear interpretation proposed for some members of this group. We suggest that the data can be explained with a hydrogen- and helium-deficient SN ejecta (Type I) interacting with a hydrogen-rich CSM, but that the explosion was more likely a Type Ic core-collapse explosion than a Type Ia thermonuclear one. This suggests that two channels (both thermonuclear and stripped envelope core-collapse) may be responsible for these SN 1997cy-like events.

  5. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (<~10e4 K) and star formation in cooling cores will be described. The implications for the energetics of radio jets and the cooling of the X-ray gas are discussed. The minimum-energy or equipartition pressures of the radio plasma in the radio lobes are generally much lower than is required to inflate the bubbles. The nature of the primary form of energy and pressure in the bubbles will be discussed, and arguments will be given suggesting that the lobes are dominated by thermal pressure from very hot gas (>10 keV).

  6. Emergence of rotational bands in ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, Mark A.; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of rotational bands has recently been observed in no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for p-shell nuclei, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, electromagnetic moments, and electromagnetic transitions. Yrast and low-lying excited bands are found. The results demonstrate the possibility of well-developed rotational structure in NCCI calculations, using realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, and within finite, computationally-accessible configuration spaces. This talk will focus on results for rotation in both the even-mass and odd-mass Be isotopes (7 <= A <= 12). Supported by US DOE (DE-FG02-95ER-40934, DESC0008485 SciDAC/NUCLEI, DE-FG02-87ER40371), US NSF (0904782), and Research Corporation for Science Advancement (Cottrell Scholar Award). Computational resources provided by NERSC (US DOE DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  7. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations Using Realistic Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Forssen, C; Caurier, E

    2004-11-30

    There has been significant progress in the ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. One such method is the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM). Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions this method can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications. We highlight our study of the parity inversion in {sup 11}Be, for which calculations were performed in basis spaces up to 9{Dirac_h}{Omega} (dimensions reaching 7 x 10{sup 8}). We also present our latest results for the p-shell nuclei using the Tucson-Melbourne TM three-nucleon interaction with several proposed parameter sets.

  8. Ab initio calculations in the symplectic no-core configuration interaction framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anna; Caprio, Mark; Dytrych, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in quantitatively predicting nuclear structure directly from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, i.e., ab initio, arises due to an explosion in the dimension of the traditional Slater determinant basis as the number of nucleons and included shells increases. The need for including highly excited configurations arises, in large part, because the kinetic energy induces strong coupling across shells. However, the kinetic energy conserves symplectic symmetry. By combining this symplectic symmetry with the no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) framework, we reduce the size of basis necessary to obtain accurate results for p-shell nuclei. Supported by the US DOE under Grants DE-AC05-06OR23100 and DE-FG02-95ER-40934, and the Czech Science Foundation under Grant No. 16-16772S.

  9. COREMAP: Graphical user interface for displaying reactor core data in an interactive hexagon map

    SciTech Connect

    Muscat, F.L.; Derstine, K.L.

    1995-06-01

    COREMAP is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to assist users read and check reactor core data from multidimensional neutronic simulation models in color and/or as text in an interactive 2D planar grid of hexagonal subassemblies. COREMAP is a complete GEODST/RUNDESC viewing tool which enables the user to access multi data set files (e.g. planes, moments, energy groups ,... ) and display up to two data sets simultaneously, one as color and the other as text. The user (1) controls color scale characteristics such as type (linear or logarithmic) and range limits, (2) controls the text display based upon conditional statements on data spelling, and value. (3) chooses zoom features such as core map size, number of rings and surrounding subassemblies, and (4) specifies the data selection for supplied popup subwindows which display a selection of data currently off-screen for a selected cell, as a list of data and/or as a graph. COREMAP includes a RUNDESC file editing tool which creates ``proposed`` Run-description files by point and click revisions to subassembly assignments in an existing EBRII Run-description file. COREMAP includes a fully automated printing option which creates high quality PostScript color or greyscale images of the core map independent of the monitor used, e.g. color prints can be generated with a session from a color or monochrome monitor. The automated PostScript output is an alternative to the xgrabsc based printing option. COREMAP includes a plotting option which creates graphs related to a selected cell. The user specifies the X and Y coordinates types (planes, moment, group, flux ,... ) and a parameter, P, when displaying several curves for the specified (X, Y) pair COREMAP supports hexagonal geometry reactor core configurations specified by: the GEODST file and binary Standard Interface Files and the RUNDESC ordering.

  10. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-09-23

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  12. Dependence of weak interaction rates on the nuclear composition during stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influences of the nuclear composition on the weak interaction rates of heavy nuclei during the core collapse of massive stars. The nuclear abundances in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) are calculated by some equation of state (EOS) models including in-medium effects on nuclear masses. We systematically examine the sensitivities of electron capture and neutrino-nucleus scattering on heavy nuclei to the nuclear shell effects and the single-nucleus approximation. We find that the washout of the shell effect at high temperatures brings significant change to weak rates by smoothing the nuclear abundance distribution: the electron capture rate decreases by ˜20 % in the early phase and increases by ˜40 % in the late phase at most, while the cross section for neutrino-nucleus scattering is reduced by ˜15 % . This is because the open-shell nuclei become abundant instead of those with closed neutron shells as the shell effects disappear. We also find that the single-nucleus description based on the average values leads to underestimations of weak rates. Electron captures and neutrino coherent scattering on heavy nuclei are reduced by ˜80 % in the early phase and by ˜5 % in the late phase, respectively. These results indicate that NSE like EOS accounting for shell washout is indispensable for the reliable estimation of weak interaction rates in simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  13. Cathepsin D propeptide: mechanism and regulation of its interaction with the catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Mása, Martin; Maresová, Lucie; Vondrásek, Jirí; Horn, Martin; Jezek, Jan; Mares, Michael

    2006-12-26

    Propeptide blocks the active site in the inactive zymogen of cathepsin D and is cleaved off during zymogen activation. We have designed a set of peptidic fragments derived from the propeptide structure and evaluated their inhibitory potency against mature cathepsin D using a kinetic assay. Our mapping of the cathepsin D propeptide indicated two domains in the propeptide involved in the inhibitory interaction with the enzyme core: the active site "anchor" domain and the N-terminus of the propeptide. The latter plays a dominant role in propeptide inhibition (nanomolar Ki), and its high-affinity binding was corroborated by fluorescence polarization measurements. In addition to the inhibitory domains of propeptide, a fragment derived from the N-terminus of mature cathepsin D displayed inhibition. This finding supports its proposed regulatory function. The interaction mechanisms of the identified inhibitory domains were characterized by determining their modes of inhibition as well as by spatial modeling of the propeptide in the zymogen molecule. The inhibitory interaction of the N-terminal propeptide domain was abolished in the presence of sulfated polysaccharides, which interact with basic propeptide residues. The inhibitory potency of the active site anchor domain was affected by the Ala38pVal substitution, a propeptide polymorphism reported to be associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. We infer that propeptide is a sensitive tethered ligand that allows for complex modulation of cathepsin D zymogen activation.

  14. Effect of subdomain interactions on methyl group dynamics in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Do, Tien; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqianq

    2014-01-01

    Thermostable villin headpiece protein (HP67) consists of the N-terminal subdomain (residues 10–41) and the autonomously folding C-terminal subdomain (residues 42–76) which pack against each other to form a structure with a unified hydrophobic core. The X-ray structures of the isolated C-terminal subdomain (HP36) and its counterpart in HP67 are very similar for the hydrophobic core residues. However, fine rearrangements of the free energy landscape are expected to occur because of the interactions between the two subdomains. We detect and characterize these changes by comparing the µs-ms time scale dynamics of the methyl-bearing side chains in isolated HP36 and in HP67. Specifically, we probe three hydrophobic side chains at the interface of the two subdomains (L42, V50, and L75) as well as at two residues far from the interface (L61 and L69). Solid-state deuteron NMR techniques are combined with computational modeling for the detailed characterization of motional modes in terms of their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The effect of interdomain interactions on side chain dynamics is seen for all residues but L75. Thus, changes in dynamics because of subdomain interactions are not confined to the site of perturbation. One of the main results is a two-to threefold increase in the value of the activation energies for the rotameric mode of motions in HP67 compared with HP36. Detailed analysis of configurational entropies and heat capacities complement the kinetic view of the degree of the disorder in the folded state. PMID:24243806

  15. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play

    PubMed Central

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors. PMID:27899885

  16. Interacting Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Core Control Adolescent Social Play.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Antonia; Lassalle, Olivier; Sepers, Marja; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kieffer, Brigitte; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana; Manzoni, Olivier J J

    2016-01-01

    Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) or mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC). Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  17. CORE-Net: exploiting prior knowledge and preferential attachment to infer biological interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, F; Cosentino, C; Amato, F

    2010-09-01

    The problem of reverse engineering in the topology of functional interaction networks from time-course experimental data has received considerable attention in literature, due to the potential applications in the most diverse fields, comprising engineering, biology, economics and social sciences. The present work introduces a novel technique, CORE-Net, which addresses this problem focusing on the case of biological interaction networks. The method is based on the representation of the network in the form of a dynamical system and on an iterative convex optimisation procedure. A first advantage of the proposed approach is that it allows to exploit qualitative prior knowledge about the network interactions, of the same kind as typically available from biological literature and databases. A second novel contribution consists of exploiting the growth and preferential attachment mechanisms to improve the inference performances when dealing with networks which exhibit a scale-free topology. The technique is first assessed through numerical tests on in silico random networks, subsequently it is applied to reverse engineering a cell cycle regulatory subnetwork in Saccharomyces cerevisiae from experimental microarray data. These tests show that the combined exploitation of prior knowledge and preferential attachment significantly improves the predictions with respect to other approaches.

  18. Isoscalar-vector interaction and hybrid quark core in massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, G. Y.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, B.

    2013-05-01

    The hadron-quark phase transition in the core of massive neutron stars is studied with a newly constructed two-phase model. For nuclear matter, a nonlinear Walecka type model with general nucleon-meson and meson-meson couplings, recently calibrated by Steiner, Hemper and Fischer, is taken. For quark matter, a modified Polyakov-Nambu—Jona-Lasinio model, which gives consistent results with lattice QCD data, is used. Most importantly, we introduce an isoscalar-vector interaction in the description of quark matter, and we study its influence on the hadron-quark phase transition in the interior of massive neutron stars. With the constraints of neutron star observations, our calculation shows that the isoscalar-vector interaction between quarks is indispensable if massive hybrids star exist in the universe, and its strength determines the onset density of quark matter, as well as the mass-radius relations of hybrid stars. Furthermore, as a connection with heavy-ion-collision experiments we give some discussions about the strength of isoscalar-vector interaction and its effect on the signals of hadron-quark phase transition in heavy-ion collisions, in the energy range of the NICA at JINR-Dubna and FAIR at GSI-Darmstadt facilities.

  19. Structural properties of fluids interacting via piece-wise constant potentials with a hard core.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; de Haro, Mariano López; Bárcenas, Mariana; Orea, Pedro

    2013-08-21

    The structural properties of fluids whose molecules interact via potentials with a hard core plus two piece-wise constant sections of different widths and heights are presented. These follow from the more general development previously introduced for potentials with a hard core plus n piece-wise constant sections [A. Santos, S. B. Yuste, and M. Lopez de Haro, Condens. Matter Phys. 15, 23602 (2012)] in which use was made of a semi-analytic rational-function approximation method. The results of illustrative cases comprising eight different combinations of wells and shoulders are compared both with simulation data and with those that follow from the numerical solution of the Percus-Yevick and hypernetted-chain integral equations. It is found that the rational-function approximation generally predicts a more accurate radial distribution function than the Percus-Yevick theory and is comparable or even superior to the hypernetted-chain theory. This superiority over both integral equation theories is lost, however, at high densities, especially as the widths of the wells and/or the barriers increase.

  20. Interaction of core self-evaluations and perceived organizational support on work-to-family enrichment.

    PubMed

    McNall, Laurel A; Masuda, Aline D; Shanock, Linda Rhoades; Nicklin, Jessica M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to offer an empirical test of J. H. Greenhaus and G. N. Powell's (2006) model of work-family enrichment by examining dispositional (i.e., core self-evaluations; CSEs) and situational (i.e., perceived organizational support; POS) factors associated with work-to-family enrichment (WFE) and whether these variables interact in predicting WFE. In a survey of 220 employed adults, our hierarchical regression analysis revealed that in highly supportive work environments, individuals reported high WFE regardless of CSE. However, when POS was low, individuals high in CSEs reported higher WFE than those low in CSEs, in support of conservation of resources theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002). Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  1. Meaningful timescales from Monte Carlo simulations of particle systems with hard-core interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Liborio I.

    2016-12-01

    A new Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for simulating the dynamics of particle systems characterized by hard-core interactions is introduced. In contrast to traditional Kinetic Monte Carlo approaches, where the state of the system is associated with minima in the energy landscape, in the proposed method, the state of the system is associated with the set of paths traveled by the atoms and the transition probabilities for an atom to be displaced are proportional to the corresponding velocities. In this way, the number of possible state-to-state transitions is reduced to a discrete set, and a direct link between the Monte Carlo time step and true physical time is naturally established. The resulting rejection-free algorithm is validated against event-driven molecular dynamics: the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard disks converge to the exact results with decreasing displacement size.

  2. Meaningful timescales from Monte Carlo simulations of particle systems with hard-core interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Liborio I.

    2016-12-01

    A new Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for simulating the dynamics of particle systems characterized by hard-core interactions is introduced. In contrast to traditional Kinetic Monte Carlo approaches, where the state of the system is associated with minima in the energy landscape, in the proposed method, the state of the system is associated with the set of paths traveled by the atoms and the transition probabilities for an atom to be displaced are proportional to the corresponding velocities. In this way, the number of possible state-to-state transitions is reduced to a discrete set, and a direct link between the Monte Carlo time step and true physical time is naturally established. The resulting rejection-free algorithm is validated against event-driven molecular dynamics: the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard disks converge to the exact results with decreasing displacement size.

  3. Core drug-drug interaction alerts for inclusion in pediatric electronic health records with computerized prescriber order entry.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marvin B; Longhurst, Christopher A; McGuire, Troy L; Tarrago, Rod; Desai, Bimal R; Patterson, Al

    2014-03-01

    The study aims to develop a core set of pediatric drug-drug interaction (DDI) pairs for which electronic alerts should be presented to prescribers during the ordering process. A clinical decision support working group composed of Children's Hospital Association (CHA) members was developed. CHA Pharmacists and Chief Medical Information Officers participated. Consensus was reached on a core set of 19 DDI pairs that should be presented to pediatric prescribers during the order process. We have provided a core list of 19 high value drug pairs for electronic drug-drug interaction alerts to be recommended for inclusion as high value alerts in prescriber order entry software used with a pediatric patient population. We believe this list represents the most important pediatric drug interactions for practical implementation within computerized prescriber order entry systems.

  4. Study of interaction of hot core plasma sources and micro-shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Leela; Bagchi, Suman; Paturi, Prem Kiran

    2013-10-01

    Laser Induced Shockwaves (LISWs) have many applications from material processing to therapeutics. In almost all the processes and applications, understanding the conversion of laser energy to kinetic energy propagating as a shockwave (SW) is essential. We present the results on interaction of multiple plasma sources leading to SWs generated using Nd:YAG laser pulses (532 nm, 7 ns) (a) in atmospheric air and (b) from 1-D periodic structured surfaces (PSS) of 30 μm depth and 240 +/- 20 μm diameter having 25 and 64 lpi (lines per inch). Using time resolved shadowgraphy the novel aspects of (1) the presence of two distinct sources of ionization along the laser propagation direction modifying the nature of SWs around the focal plane and (2) the interaction of these two sources leading to the transition of hot core plasma in air analogous to that of a cavitation bubble in fluids are presented. Analogous phenomena of modification SW nature were observed from 1-D PSS. The effect of surface modulation on the SW and Contact Front dynamics was compared from that of a flat surface (FS). The initial studies in two different media indicate the possibility to control the SWs, either accelerate or decelerate by varying the plasma dynamics. Defence Research and Development Organization, India.

  5. Accelerating Convergence by Change of Basis for No-Core Configuration Interaction Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Abraham R.; Caprio, Mark A.; Constantinou, Chrysovalantis

    2016-09-01

    Ab initio no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations attempt to describe the structure of nuclei using realistic internucleon interactions. However, we can only describe these many-body systems within the limits of our computational power. As the number of nucleons increases, the calculations require more memory and processing power to reach convergence. Being able to accelerate convergence is crucial in extending the reach of NCCI calculations. Convergence can be obtained through a change of basis, for which we need to compute the overlaps of the radial functions for the new basis with those for the old basis. A large number of overlaps must be computed in order to accurately transform the many-body problem. Using alternative bases also requires the calculation of the one-body matrix elements for operators such as r2 and p2 in the new basis. We report a computer code that uses cubic spline interpolation to compute radial overlaps and radial integrals. This code facilitates using new bases to accelerate the convergence of NCCI calculations. Supported by the US NSF under Grant NSF-PHY05-52843 the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  6. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures.

  7. Estimation of Concrete's Porosity by Ultrasounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benouis, A.; Grini, A.

    Durability of concrete depends strongly on porosity; this conditions the intensity of the interactions of the concrete with the aggressive agents. The pores inside the concrete facilitate the process of damage, which is generally initiated on the surface. The most used measurement is undoubtedly the measurement of porosity accessible to water. The porosimetry by intrusion with mercury constitutes a tool for investigation of the mesoporosity. The relationship between concrete mixtures, porosity and ultrasonic velocity of concrete samples measured by ultrasonic NDT is investigated. This experimental study is interested in the relations between the ultrasonic velocity measured by transducers of 7.5 mm and 49.5 mm diameter and with 54 kHz frequency. Concrete specimens (160 mm diameter and 320 mm height) are fabricated with concrete of seven different mixtures (various W/C and S/S + G ratios), which gave porosities varying between 7% and 16%. Ultrasonic velocities in concrete were measured in longitudinal direction. Finally the results showed the influence of ratio W/C, where the porosity of the concretes of a ratio W/C _0,5 have correctly estimated by ultrasonic velocity. The integration of the concretes of a lower ratio, in this relation, caused a great dispersion. Porosity estimation of concretes with a ratio W/C lower than 0,5 became specific to each ratio.

  8. Atomic Interaction Networks in the Core of Protein Domains and Their Native Folds

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S.; Sasisekharan, V.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Vastly divergent sequences populate a majority of protein folds. In the quest to identify features that are conserved within protein domains belonging to the same fold, we set out to examine the entire protein universe on a fold-by-fold basis. We report that the atomic interaction network in the solvent-unexposed core of protein domains are fold-conserved, extraordinary sequence divergence notwithstanding. Further, we find that this feature, termed protein core atomic interaction network (or PCAIN) is significantly distinguishable across different folds, thus appearing to be “signature” of a domain's native fold. As part of this study, we computed the PCAINs for 8698 representative protein domains from families across the 1018 known protein folds to construct our seed database and an automated framework was developed for PCAIN-based characterization of the protein fold universe. A test set of randomly selected domains that are not in the seed database was classified with over 97% accuracy, independent of sequence divergence. As an application of this novel fold signature, a PCAIN-based scoring scheme was developed for comparative (homology-based) structure prediction, with 1–2 angstroms (mean 1.61A) Cα RMSD generally observed between computed structures and reference crystal structures. Our results are consistent across the full spectrum of test domains including those from recent CASP experiments and most notably in the ‘twilight’ and ‘midnight’ zones wherein <30% and <10% target-template sequence identity prevails (mean twilight RMSD of 1.69A). We further demonstrate the utility of the PCAIN protocol to derive biological insight into protein structure-function relationships, by modeling the structure of the YopM effector novel E3 ligase (NEL) domain from plague-causative bacterium Yersinia Pestis and discussing its implications for host adaptive and innate immune modulation by the pathogen. Considering the several high-throughput, sequence

  9. Interaction of mitoxantrone, as an anticancer drug, with chromatin proteins, core histones and H1, in solution.

    PubMed

    Hajihassan, Zahra; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, for the first time we have investigated the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with histone H1 and core histone proteins in solution using fluorescence, UV/Vis, CD spectroscopy and thermal denaturation techniques. The results showed that mitoxantrone reduced the absorbencies of H1 and core histone proteins at 210 nm (hypochromicity) and fluorescence emission intensity was decreased in a dose dependent. Binding of mitoxantrone changed secondary structures of the proteins as circular dichroism analysis confirmed it. Also, mitoxantrone increased the melting temperature of core histones at the final step of denaturation. The results suggest higher affinity of mitoxantrone to histone H1 compared to core histones providing histone proteins as a new target for mitoxantrone action at the chromatin level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Core-sigma interaction: probing the interaction of the bacteriophage T4 gene 55 promoter recognition protein with E.coli RNA polymerase core.

    PubMed Central

    Léonetti, J P; Wong, K; Geiduschek, E P

    1998-01-01

    The bacterial RNA polymerase sigma subunits are key participants in the early steps of RNA synthesis, conferring specificity of promoter recognition, facilitating promoter opening and promoter clearance, and responding to diverse transcriptional regulators. The T4 gene 55 protein (gp55), the sigma protein of the bacteriophage T4 late genes, is one of the smallest and most divergent members of this family. Protein footprinting was used to identify segments of gp55 that become buried upon binding to RNA polymerase core, and are therefore likely to constitute its interface with the core enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis in two parts of this contact surface generated gene 55 proteins that are defective in polymerase-binding to different degrees. Alignment with the sequences of the sigma proteins and with a recently determined structure of a large segment of sigma70 suggests that the gp55 counterpart of sigma70 regions 2.1 and 2.2 is involved in RNA polymerase core binding, and that sigma70 and gp55 may be structurally similar in this region. The diverse phenotypes of the mutants implicate this region of gp55 in multiple aspects of sigma function. PMID:9482743

  11. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.

  12. Investigation of the mechanical interaction of the trabecular core with an external shell using rapid prototype and finite element models.

    PubMed

    Mc Donnell, P; Harrison, N; Lohfeld, S; Kennedy, O; Zhang, Y; Mc Hugh, P E

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vertebral bone have been widely studied with the ultimate goal of improving fracture risk prediction. However, the mechanical interaction between the cortical shell and the trabecular core is not well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate this interaction and to determine what effect it has on the ultimate strength of the whole bone. This objective was achieved by compression testing rapid prototype (RP) models of cylindrical trabecular bone cores, with and without an integral surrounding shell and incorporating increasing levels of artificially induced bone loss. Corresponding finite element (FE) models were generated and the load sharing of the shell and trabecular core was analysed under linear elastic loading conditions. The results of the physical RP model tests and corresponding FE analyses indicated that there was a reinforcing effect between the cortical shell and the trabecular core for all models tested and that the reinforcing effect became relatively more important to the ultimate strength of the whole bone as the bone volume fraction of the trabecular core decreased. It was found that two mechanisms contributed to the reinforcing effect: (i) load transfer from the highly stressed shell into the connecting outer trabeculae of the core for the shelled model. This did not occur for the un-shelled model where the load dropped off at the outer unsupported trabeculae; (ii) the stiffening effect on the shell due to the support provided by the connecting struts of the trabecular core, which serves to inhibit bending and buckling behaviour in the shell under compression loading. It was found that the stiffening on the shell was the more dominant contributor to the overall reinforcing effect between the shell and the trabecular core.

  13. Interactions between Hurricane Catarina (2004) and warm core rings in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianna, M. L.; Menezes, V. V.; Pezza, A. B.; Simmonds, I.

    2010-07-01

    The unexpected evolution of the first recorded South Atlantic Hurricane Catarina over waters with homogeneous sea surface temperatures (SST) of 24°C in March 2004 was a challenge to the weather forecast community. This work concentrates on a thorough data-driven comparative analysis to make reliable diagnostics of the role of the ocean in the genesis and evolution of Catarina. We used several high-resolution multisatellite-derived products, including three microwave-based SST data sets, multisatellite collinear data of sea surface height (SSH) anomalies, significant wave heights and wind speeds, four QuikSCAT ocean surface wind vector products (including the 12.5 km resolution swath data), daily fields of absolute objectively analyzed SSH and corresponding geostrophic currents, and Argo floats. The synergic use of these data sets showed that Catarina interacted strongly with four warm core rings (WCRs), forcing upwelling of isotherms and mixed layer waters. These interactions minimized the known negative SST feedback, as attested by the SST differences being less than 1.2°C. Although the SST in the region was around 24°C, below the Palmén threshold, the surface air temperatures were 14°C which still furnished a large air-sea temperature gradient capable of extracting large enthalpy fluxes from the WCRs influenced by Ekman pumping. It is shown here that Catarina achieved category 1 over the ocean on 26 March with its maximum intensity of 34 m/s seen in the 12.5 km swath winds.

  14. Double-Core-Hole States in Neon: Lifetime, Post-Collision Interaction, and Spectral Assignment.

    PubMed

    Goldsztejn, G; Marchenko, T; Püttner, R; Journel, L; Guillemin, R; Carniato, S; Selles, P; Travnikova, O; Céolin, D; Lago, A F; Feifel, R; Lablanquie, P; Piancastelli, M N; Penent, F; Simon, M

    2016-09-23

    Using synchrotron radiation and high-resolution electron spectroscopy, we have directly observed and identified specific photoelectrons from K^{-2}V states in neon corresponding to simultaneous 1s ionization and 1s→valence excitation. The natural lifetime broadening of the K^{-2}V states and the relative intensities of different types of shakeup channels have been determined experimentally and compared to ab initio calculations. Moreover, the high-energy Auger spectrum resulting from the decay of Ne^{2+}K^{-2} and Ne^{+}K^{-2}V states as well as from participator Auger decay from Ne^{+}K^{-1}L^{-1}V states, has been measured and assigned in detail utilizing the characteristic differences in lifetime broadenings of these core hole states. Furthermore, post collision interaction broadening of Auger peaks is clearly observed only in the hypersatellite spectrum from K^{-2} states, due to the energy sharing between the two 1s photoelectrons which favors the emission of one slow and one fast electron.

  15. Pattern formation with repulsive soft-core interactions: Discrete particle dynamics and Dean-Kawasaki equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Ollivier, Hélène; López, Cristóbal; Blasius, Bernd; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2016-10-01

    Brownian particles interacting via repulsive soft-core potentials can spontaneously aggregate, despite repelling each other, and form periodic crystals of particle clusters. We study this phenomenon in low-dimensional situations (one and two dimensions) at two levels of description: by performing numerical simulations of the discrete particle dynamics and by linear and nonlinear analysis of the corresponding Dean-Kawasaki equation for the macroscopic particle density. Restricting to low dimensions and neglecting fluctuation effects, we gain analytical insight into the mechanisms of the instability leading to clustering which turn out to be the interplay among diffusion, the intracluster forces, and the forces between neighboring clusters. We show that the deterministic part of the Dean-Kawasaki equation provides a good description of the particle dynamics, including width and shape of the clusters and over a wide range of parameters, and analyze with weakly nonlinear techniques the nature of the pattern-forming bifurcation in one and two dimensions. Finally, we briefly discuss the case of attractive forces.

  16. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  17. Interaction of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein with Janus Kinase Is Required for Efficient Production of Infectious Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choongho

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein plays not only a structural role in the virion morphogenesis by encapsidating a virus RNA genome but also a non-structural role in HCV-induced pathogenesis by blocking innate immunity. Especially, it has been shown to regulate JAK-STAT signaling pathway through its direct interaction with Janus kinase (JAK) via its proline-rich JAK-binding motif (79PGYPWP84). However, little is known about the physiological significance of this HCV core-JAK association in the context of the virus life cycle. In order to gain an insight, a mutant HCV genome (J6/JFH1-79A82A) was constructed to express the mutant core with a defective JAK-binding motif (79AGYAWP84) using an HCV genotype 2a infectious clone (J6/JFH1). When this mutant HCV genome was introduced into hepatocarcinoma cells, it was found to be severely impaired in its ability to produce infectious viruses in spite of its robust RNA genome replication. Taken together, all these results suggest an essential requirement of HCV core-JAK protein interaction for efficient production of infectious viruses and the potential of using core-JAK blockers as a new anti-HCV therapy. PMID:24009866

  18. Fiber reinforced concrete: Characterization of flexural toughness and some studies on fiber-matrix bond-slip interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ashish

    One major problem associated with the testing of fiber reinforced concrete specimens under flexural loading is that the measured post-cracking response is severely affected by the stiffness of the testing machine. As a consequence, misleading results are obtained when such a flexural response is used for the characterization of composite toughness. An assessment of a new toughness characterization technique termed the Residual Strength Test Method (RSTM) has been made. In this technique, a stable narrow crack is first created in the specimen by applying a flexural load in parallel with a steel plate under controlled conditions. The plate is then removed, and the specimen is tested in a routine manner in flexure to obtain the post-crack load versus displacement response. Flexural response for a variety of fiber reinforced cementitious composites obtained using the Residual Strength Test Method has been found to correlate very well with those obtained with relatively stiffer test configurations such as closed-loop test machines. The Residual Strength Test Method is found to be effective in differentiating between different fiber types, fiber lengths, fiber configurations, fiber volume fractions, fiber geometries and fiber moduli. In particular, the technique has been found to be extremely useful for testing cement-based composites containing fibers at very low dosages (<0.5% by volume). An analytical model based on shear lag theory is introduced to study the problem of fiber pullout in fiber reinforced composites. The proposed model eliminates limitations of many earlier models and captures essential features of pullout process, including progressive interfacial debonding, Poisson's effect, and variation in interfacial properties during the fiber pullout process. Interfacial debonding is modeled using an interfacial shear strength criterion. Influence of normal contact stress at the fiber-matrix interface is considered using shrink-fit theory, and the interfacial

  19. The core planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo to promote sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Mrkusich, Eli M; Flanagan, Dustin J; Whitington, Paul M

    2011-10-01

    The atypical cadherin Drosophila protein Flamingo and its vertebrate homologues play widespread roles in the regulation of both dendrite and axon growth. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that underpin these functions. Whereas flamingo interacts with a well-defined group of genes in regulating planar cell polarity, previous studies have uncovered little evidence that the other core planar cell polarity genes are involved in regulation of neurite growth. We present data in this study showing that the planar cell polarity gene prickle interacts with flamingo in regulating sensory axon advance at a key choice point - the transition between the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system. The cytoplasmic tail of the Flamingo protein is not required for this interaction. Overexpression of another core planar cell polarity gene dishevelled produces a similar phenotype to prickle mutants, suggesting that this gene may also play a role in regulation of sensory axon advance.

  20. Steering the magnetic properties of Ni/NiO/CoO core-shell nanoparticle films: The role of core-shell interface versus interparticle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Anna M.; Capetti, Elena; Spadaro, Maria Chiara; Bertoni, Giovanni; Grillo, Vincenzo; Luches, Paola; Valeri, Sergio; D'Addato, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Supported core-shell Ni/NiO/CoO nanoparticle (NP) films were obtained by deposition of preformed and mass-selected Ni NPs on a buffer layer of CoO, followed by a top CoO layer. The resulting NPs have core/shell morphology, with a McKay icosahedral Ni core and a partially crystalline CoO shell. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidenced the presence of a thin NiO layer, which was shown to be between the Ni core and the CoO shell by elemental TEM mapping. CoO and NiO shells with different thickness values were obtained, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the magnetic properties of the NP assemblies as a function of the oxide shell thickness. Both exchange-coupling and magnetostatic interactions significantly contribute to the magnetic behavior of Ni/NiO/CoO NP films. After the Ni/NiO/CoO NPs are cooled in a weak magnetic field, they have blocking temperature higher than room temperature because of strong magnetostatic interactions, which support the formation of a spin-glass-like state below ˜250 K . Exchange coupling dominates the magnetic behavior after the NPs are cooled in a strong magnetic field. The exchange bias (EB) is in the 0.17-2.35 kOe range and strongly depends on the CoO thickness (0.4-2.7 nm), showing the onset of the EB at the few-nanometer scale. The switching field distribution showed that the EB opposes the magnetization reversal from the direction along the cooling field but it does not significantly ease the opposite process. The EB depends on tCoO only for tNiO≤0.5 nm , but when NiO is 0.7 nm thick it strongly interacts with CoO and a large increase of the EB and coercivity is observed.

  1. Ab initio no-core properties of 7Li and 7Be with the JISP16 and chiral NNLOopt interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Taihua; Vary, James P.; Maris, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the properties of 7Li with the JISP16 and chiral NNLOopt at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) nucleon-nucleon interactions and 7Be with the JISP16 interaction in the ab initio no-core full configuration approach. We calculate selected observables that include energy spectra, point proton root-mean-square radii, electromagnetic moments, and transitions. We compare our results with experimental results, where available, as well as with results obtained using nucleon-nucleon plus three-nucleon interactions. We obtain reasonable agreement between theory and experiment for low-lying states that are dominated by p -shell configurations.

  2. Chemical Interactions and Consequences for Stable Stratification at the Top of the Core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffett, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Transfer of mass across the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is a consequence of chemical disequilibrium. Departures from equilibrium are set by core formation during the early accretion of the planet. Abundances of moderately siderophile elements in the mantle and light elements in the core are compatible with conditions expected at the bottom of a mid-mantle magma ocean (P 50 GPa and T 3300 K). Geochemical constraints also permit a small fraction of core material to experience higher temperatures, allowing more lithophile elements, like Mg and Al, to enter the core. Subsequent cooling shifts the chemical equilibrium and promotes mass transfer across the CMB. Present-day estimates of temperature and pressure at the CMB suggests that O and/or Si are substantially undersaturated in the core. Transport of O and Si into the core is inhibited by solid-state diffusion through mantle, although a small amount of partial melt should remove this barrier. Diffusion of O or Si into the core produces a 60-km to 120-km stratified layer over the age of the Earth. By comparison, an oversaturation of Mg promotes convection and tends to erase stratification. We distinguish between these possibilities at the present time by looking for the influence of fluid stratification on flow at the top of the core. Recent evidence for MAC waves supports the existence of a 130-km stratified layer. The strength of stratification is broadly consistent with a thermal origin, although a compositional origin is also possible if transport into the core is limited by diffusion through the mantle. The thickness of the stratified layer is most compatible with a compositional origin if O is the light element that enters the core.

  3. Discussion on Microwave-Matter Interaction Mechanisms by In Situ Observation of "Core-Shell" Microstructure during Microwave Sintering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenchao; Xu, Feng; Li, Yongcun; Hu, Xiaofang; Dong, Bo; Xiao, Yu

    2016-02-23

    This research aims to deepen the understanding of the interaction mechanisms between microwave and matter in a metal-ceramic system based on in situ synchrotron radiation computed tomography. A special internal "core-shell" microstructure was discovered for the first time and used as an indicator for the interaction mechanisms between microwave and matter. Firstly, it was proved that the microwave magnetic field acted on metal particles by way of inducing an eddy current in the surface of the metal particles, which led to the formation of a "core-shell" microstructure in the metal particles. On this basis, it was proposed that the ceramic particles could change the microwave field and open a way for the microwave, thereby leading to selective heating in the region around the ceramic particles, which was verified by the fact that all the "core-shell" microstructure was located around ceramic particles. Furthermore, it was indicated that the ceramic particles would gather the microwaves, and might lead to local heating in the metal-ceramic contact region. The focusing of the microwave was proved by the quantitative analysis of the evolution rate of the "core-shell" microstructure in a different region. This study will help to reveal the microwave-matter interaction mechanisms during microwave sintering.

  4. Discussion on Microwave-Matter Interaction Mechanisms by In Situ Observation of “Core-Shell” Microstructure during Microwave Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenchao; Xu, Feng; Li, Yongcun; Hu, Xiaofang; Dong, Bo; Xiao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to deepen the understanding of the interaction mechanisms between microwave and matter in a metal-ceramic system based on in situ synchrotron radiation computed tomography. A special internal “core-shell” microstructure was discovered for the first time and used as an indicator for the interaction mechanisms between microwave and matter. Firstly, it was proved that the microwave magnetic field acted on metal particles by way of inducing an eddy current in the surface of the metal particles, which led to the formation of a “core-shell” microstructure in the metal particles. On this basis, it was proposed that the ceramic particles could change the microwave field and open a way for the microwave, thereby leading to selective heating in the region around the ceramic particles, which was verified by the fact that all the “core-shell” microstructure was located around ceramic particles. Furthermore, it was indicated that the ceramic particles would gather the microwaves, and might lead to local heating in the metal-ceramic contact region. The focusing of the microwave was proved by the quantitative analysis of the evolution rate of the “core-shell” microstructure in a different region. This study will help to reveal the microwave-matter interaction mechanisms during microwave sintering. PMID:28773247

  5. Setting the stage for circumstellar interaction in core-collapse supernovae. II. Wave-driven mass loss in supernova progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shiode, Joshua H.; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) powered by interaction with circumstellar material provide evidence for intense stellar mass loss during the final years before core collapse. We have argued that during and after core neon burning, internal gravity waves excited by core convection can tap into the core fusion power and transport a super-Eddington energy flux out to the stellar envelope, potentially unbinding ∼1 solar mass of material. In this work, we explore the internal conditions of SN progenitors using the MESA one-dimensional stellar evolution code in search of those most susceptible to wave-driven mass loss. We focus on simple, order of magnitude considerations applicable to a wide range of progenitors. Wave-driven mass loss during core neon and oxygen fusion happens preferentially in either lower mass (∼20 solar mass zero-age main sequence) stars or massive, sub-solar metallicity stars. Roughly 20% of the SN progenitors we survey can excite 10{sup 46-48} erg of energy in waves that can potentially drive mass loss within a few months to a decade of core collapse. This energy can generate circumstellar environments with 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses reaching 100 AU before explosion. We predict a correlation between the energy associated with pre-SN mass ejection and the time to core collapse, with the most intense mass loss preferentially occurring closer to core collapse. During silicon burning, wave energy may inflate 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses of the envelope to 10-100 s of solar radii. This suggests that some nominally compact SN progenitors (Type Ibc progenitors) will have a significantly different SN shock breakout signature than traditionally assumed.

  6. Inhibitory Control Interacts with Core Knowledge in Toddlers' Manual Search for an Occluded Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sara T.; Gjersoe, Nathalia L.; Sibielska-Woch, Kasia; Leslie, Alan M.; Hood, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Core knowledge theories advocate the primacy of fundamental principles that constrain cognitive development from early infancy. However, there is concern that core knowledge of object properties does not constrain older preschoolers' reasoning during manual search. Here we address in detail both failure and success on two well-established search…

  7. Inhibitory Control Interacts with Core Knowledge in Toddlers' Manual Search for an Occluded Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sara T.; Gjersoe, Nathalia L.; Sibielska-Woch, Kasia; Leslie, Alan M.; Hood, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Core knowledge theories advocate the primacy of fundamental principles that constrain cognitive development from early infancy. However, there is concern that core knowledge of object properties does not constrain older preschoolers' reasoning during manual search. Here we address in detail both failure and success on two well-established search…

  8. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. W.; Yoo, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction) and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete) models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  9. Osmium-187 enrichment in some plumes: Evidence for core-mantle interaction?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Horan, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations with data for asteroidal cores indicate that Earth's outer core may have a rhenium/osmium ratio at least 20 percent greater than that of the chondritic upper mantle, potentially leading to an outer core with an osmium-187/osmium-188 ratio at least 8 percent greater than that of chondrites. Because of the much greater abundance of osmium in the outer core relative to the mantle, even a small addition of metal to a plume ascending from the D??? layer would transfer the enriched isotopic signature to the mixture. Sources of certain plume-derived systems seem to have osmium-187/osmium-188 ratios 5 to 20 percent greater than that for chondrites, consistent with the ascent of a plume from the core-mantle boundary.

  10. Osmium-187 Enrichment in Some Plumes: Evidence for Core-Mantle Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard J.; Morgan, John W.; Horan, Mary F.

    1995-08-01

    Calculations with data for asteroidal cores indicate that Earth's outer core may have a rhenium/osmium ratio at least 20 percent greater than that of the chondritic upper mantle, potentially leading to an outer core with an osmium-187/osmium-188 ratio at least 8 percent greater than that of chondrites. Because of the much greater abundance of osmium in the outer core relative to the mantle, even a small addition of metal to a plume ascending from the D'' layer would transfer the enriched isotopic signature to the mixture. Sources of certain plume-derived systems seem to have osmium-187/osmium-188 ratios 5 to 20 percent greater than that for chondrites, consistent with the ascent of a plume from the core-mantle boundary.

  11. No-core configuration-interaction model for the isospin- and angular-momentum-projected states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satuła, W.; Båczyk, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Konieczka, M.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Single-reference density functional theory is very successful in reproducing bulk nuclear properties like binding energies, radii, or quadrupole moments throughout the entire periodic table. Its extension to the multireference level allows for restoring symmetries and, in turn, for calculating transition rates. Purpose: We propose a new variant of the no-core-configuration-interaction (NCCI) model treating properly isospin and rotational symmetries. The model is applicable to any nucleus irrespective of its mass and neutron- and proton-number parity. It properly includes polarization effects caused by an interplay between the long- and short-range forces acting in the atomic nucleus. Methods: The method is based on solving the Hill-Wheeler-Griffin equation within a model space built of linearly dependent states having good angular momentum and properly treated isobaric spin. The states are generated by means of the isospin and angular-momentum projection applied to a set of low-lying (multi)particle-(multi)hole deformed Slater determinants calculated using the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach. Results: The theory is applied to calculate energy spectra in N ≈Z nuclei that are relevant from the point of view of a study of superallowed Fermi β decays. In particular, a new set of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections to these decays is given. Conclusions: It is demonstrated that the NCCI model is capable of capturing main features of low-lying energy spectra in light and medium-mass nuclei using relatively small model space and without any local readjustment of its low-energy coupling constants. Its flexibility and a range of applicability makes it an interesting alternative to the conventional nuclear shell model.

  12. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  13. Metal-Sulfur Valence Orbital Interaction Energies in Metal–Dithiolene Complexes: Determination of Charge and Overlap Interaction Energies by Comparison of Core and Valence Ionization Energy Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelhaus, Nicholas J.; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Klein, Eric L.; Lockett, L. Tori; Lichtenberger, Dennis L.; Enemark, John H.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic interactions between metals and dithiolenes are important in the biological processes of many metalloenzymes as well as in diverse chemical and material applications. Of special note is the ability of the dithiolene ligand to support metal centers in multiple coordination environments and oxidation states. To better understand the nature of metal-dithiolene electronic interactions, new capabilities in gas-phase core photoelectron spectroscopy for molecules with high sublimation temperatures have been developed and applied to a series of molecules of the type Cp2M(bdt) (Cp = η5-cyclopentadienyl, M = Ti, V, Mo, and bdt = benzenedithiolato). Comparison of the gas-phase core and valence ionization energy shifts provides a unique quantitative energy measure of valence orbital overlap interactions between the metal and sulfur orbitals that is separated from the effects of charge redistribution. The results explain the large amount of sulfur character in the redox-active orbitals and the ‘leveling’ of oxidation state energies in metal-dithiolene systems. The experimentally-determined orbital interaction energies reveal a previously unidentified overlap interaction of the predominantly sulfur HOMO of the bdt ligand with filled π orbitals of the Cp ligands, suggesting that direct dithiolene interactions with other ligands bound to the metal could be significant for other metal-dithiolene systems in chemistry and biology. PMID:21988484

  14. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  15. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-23

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  16. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications. PMID:27004738

  17. Rubrene: The Interplay between Intramolecular and Intermolecular Interactions Determines the Planarization of Its Tetracene Core in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Christopher; Marshall, Michael S; Sherrill, C David; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-15

    Rubrene is one of the most studied molecular semiconductors; its chemical structure consists of a tetracene backbone with four phenyl rings appended to the two central fused rings. Derivatization of these phenyl rings can lead to two very different solid-state molecular conformations and packings: One in which the tetracene core is planar and there exists substantive overlap among neighboring π-conjugated backbones; and another where the tetracene core is twisted and the overlap of neighboring π-conjugated backbones is completely disrupted. State-of-the-art electronic structure calculations show for all isolated rubrene derivatives that the twisted conformation is more favorable (by -1.7 to -4.1 kcal mol(-1)), which is a consequence of energetically unfavorable exchange-repulsion interactions among the phenyl side groups. Calculations based on available crystallographic structures reveal that planar conformations of the tetracene core in the solid state result from intermolecular interactions that can be tuned through well-chosen functionalization of the phenyl side groups and lead to improved intermolecular electronic couplings. Understanding the interplay of these intramolecular and intermolecular interactions provides insight into how to chemically modify rubrene and similar molecular semiconductors to improve the intrinsic materials electronic properties.

  18. Constraints on magma-wall rock thermal interaction during explosive eruptions from textural analysis of cored bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Palladino, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Cored bombs, a kind of pyroclast consisting of a lithic core surrounded by a chilled shell of juvenile material, record the thermal interaction of magma with wall rocks. We performed textural analysis of cored bombs, solid-melt heat-transfer theoretical modelling, and high-temperature coating experiments to put temporal and intensity constraints on the thermal interaction of potassic magma feeder systems with carbonate wall rocks during explosive eruptions in the Quaternary, Colli Albani Volcanic District (Roman Province). It appears that the degree of thermal alteration of lithic cores records the duration of magma-core heat transfer, whereas the core/shell size ratio records the initial entrainment temperature of the lithic fragment. Both parameters appear to vary significantly with the eruptive style, magnitude and vent location. Specifically, small-scale (~ 0.1-1 km 3 DRE) hydromagmatic eruptions show magma-core heat-transfer durations of 0.1-10 s and entrainment temperatures in the range of 100-300 °C in the case of a monogenetic maar located in the Colli Albani peripheral area, while entrainment temperature is as high as to 800 °C for a polygenetic maar in a high-enthalpy geothermal system at the margins of the main Colli Albani magma chamber. A large-scale (~ 30 km 3 DRE) caldera-forming explosive event shows magma-core heat-transfer duration in the order of 10 2-10 3 s and temperature of 100-500 °C at the initial magma-wall rock contact. On these grounds, we derived the cooling rate of magmas as a function of the initial temperature, mass and size distribution of lithic clasts entrained. Magma cooling by lithic entrainment may have occurred on the same time-scale as that of eruptive pulses (seconds to hours), implying that lithic entrainment may effect changes in magma physico-chemical properties on a short time-scale and, consequently, affect eruptive conduit dynamics.

  19. Interactions between core and matrix thalamocortical projections in human sleep spindle synchronization.

    PubMed

    Bonjean, Maxime; Baker, Tanya; Bazhenov, Maxim; Cash, Sydney; Halgren, Eric; Sejnowski, Terrence

    2012-04-11

    Sleep spindles are bursts of 11-15 Hz that occur during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Spindles are highly synchronous across the scalp in the electroencephalogram (EEG) but have low spatial coherence and exhibit low correlation with the EEG when simultaneously measured in the magnetoencephalogram (MEG). We developed a computational model to explore the hypothesis that the spatial coherence spindles in the EEG is a consequence of diffuse matrix projections of the thalamus to layer 1 compared with the focal projections of the core pathway to layer 4 recorded in the MEG. Increasing the fanout of thalamocortical connectivity in the matrix pathway while keeping the core pathway fixed led to increased synchrony of the spindle activity in the superficial cortical layers in the model. In agreement with cortical recordings, the latency for spindles to spread from the core to the matrix was independent of the thalamocortical fanout but highly dependent on the probability of connections between cortical areas.

  20. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems.

    PubMed

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-08

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter [Formula: see text]. In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  1. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  2. Size dependence of inter- and intra-cluster interactions in core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Yao, Qi; Qiang, You

    2012-06-15

    The room temperature magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters (NCs) synthesized by a cluster deposition system have been investigated, and their dependence on mean cluster size has been discussed. In this study, the surface/boundary spins of clusters were not frozen and were thermally activated during the measurements. The inter-cluster interactions between clusters and intra-cluster interactions between the iron core (ferromagnetic) and iron oxide shell (ferrimagnetic) have been investigated by field dependent isothermal remanent magnetization and dc demagnetization measurements at room temperature. The Henkel plot and delta M plot support the existence of dipolar inter-cluster interactions which become stronger with the growth of cluster size. The derivative of the initial magnetization curve implies that smaller clusters require less field and time than the bigger ones to overcome various energy barriers before aligning along the field direction. Coercive field and magnetization are also correlated with the interaction parameters. To compare the room temperature magnetic results, one system was studied at low temperature, where exchange coupling at the interface between the oxide and metallic phases was observed through bias effect and anisotropy enhancement.

  3. Do core interpersonal and affective traits of PCL-R psychopathy interact with antisocial behavior and disinhibition to predict violence?

    PubMed

    Kennealy, Patrick J; Skeem, Jennifer L; Walters, Glenn D; Camp, Jacqueline

    2010-09-01

    The utility of psychopathy measures in predicting violence is largely explained by their assessment of social deviance (e.g., antisocial behavior; disinhibition). A key question is whether social deviance interacts with the core interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy to predict violence. Do core psychopathic traits multiply the (already high) risk of violence among disinhibited individuals with a dense history of misbehavior? This meta-analysis of 32 effect sizes (N = 10,555) tested whether an interaction between the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 2003) Interpersonal-Affective and Social Deviance scales predicted violence beyond the simple additive effects of each scale. Results indicate that Social Deviance is more uniquely predictive of violence (d = .40) than Interpersonal-Affective traits (d = .11), and these two scales do not interact (d = .00) to increase power in predicting violence. In fact, Social Deviance alone would predict better than the Interpersonal-Affective scale and any interaction in 81% and 96% of studies, respectively. These findings have fundamental practical implications for risk assessment and theoretical implications for some conceptualizations of psychopathy.

  4. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case.

  5. Genome-wide annotation, expression profiling, and protein interaction studies of the core cell-cycle genes in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju; Lien, Yi-Chen; Li, Huang-Hsien; Ko, Swee-Suak; Liu, Zin-Huang; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2014-01-01

    Orchidaceae is one of the most abundant and diverse families in the plant kingdom and its unique developmental patterns have drawn the attention of many evolutionary biologists. Particular areas of interest have included the co-evolution of pollinators and distinct floral structures, and symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal flora. However, comprehensive studies to decipher the molecular basis of growth and development in orchids remain scarce. Cell proliferation governed by cell-cycle regulation is fundamental to growth and development of the plant body. We took advantage of recently released transcriptome information to systematically isolate and annotate the core cell-cycle regulators in the moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Our data verified that Phalaenopsis cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA) is an evolutionarily conserved CDK. Expression profiling studies suggested that core cell-cycle genes functioning during the G1/S, S, and G2/M stages were preferentially enriched in the meristematic tissues that have high proliferation activity. In addition, subcellular localization and pairwise interaction analyses of various combinations of CDKs and cyclins, and of E2 promoter-binding factors and dimerization partners confirmed interactions of the functional units. Furthermore, our data showed that expression of the core cell-cycle genes was coordinately regulated during pollination-induced reproductive development. The data obtained establish a fundamental framework for study of the cell-cycle machinery in Phalaenopsis orchids.

  6. Expansion dynamics in a one-dimensional hard-core boson model with three-body interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jie; Wu, Yin-Zhong; Xu, Xue-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Using the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method, we numerically investigate the expansion dynamics of bosons in a one-dimensional hard-core boson model with three-body interactions. It is found that the bosons expand ballistically with weak interaction, which are obtained by local density and the radius Rn. It is shown that the expansion velocity V, obtained from Rn = Vt, is dependent on the number of bosons. As a prominent result, the expansion velocity decreases with the enhancement of three-body interaction. We further study the dynamics of the system, which quenches from the ground state with two-thirds filling, the results indicate the expansion is also ballistic in the gapless phase regime. It could help us detect the phase transition in the system. PMID:26435319

  7. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  8. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  9. Lunar concrete for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Keller, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    This report summarizes the state of the art of sulfur concrete . Sulfur concrete is created by mixing molten sulfur with aggregate and allowing the...and many organic compounds. It works well as a rapid runway repair material. Sulfur concrete also has unfavorable properties. It has poor durability

  11. Sensitivity of the geomagnetic axial dipole to thermal core-mantle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    2000-05-01

    Since the work of William Gilbert in 1600 (ref. 1), it has been widely believed that the Earth's magnetic field, when suitably time-averaged, is that of a magnetic dipole positioned at the Earth's centre and aligned with the rotational axis. This `geocentric axial dipole' (GAD) hypothesis has been the central model for the study of the Earth's magnetic field-it underpins almost all interpretations of palaeomagnetic data, whether for studies of palaeomagnetic secular variation, for plate tectonic reconstructions, or for studies of palaeoclimate. Although the GAD hypothesis appears to provide a good description of the Earth's magnetic field over at least the past 100Myr (ref. 2), it is difficult to test the hypothesis for earlier periods, and there is some evidence that a more complicated model is required for the period before 250Myr ago. Kent and Smethurst suggested that this additional complexity might be because the inner core would have been smaller at that time. Here I use a numerical geodynamo model and find that reducing the size of the inner core does not significantly change the character of the magnetic field. I also consider an alternative process that could lead to the breakdown of the GAD hypothesis on this timescale, the evolution of heat-flux variations at the core-mantle boundary, induced by mantle convection. I find that a simple pattern of heat-flux variations at the core-mantle boundary, which is plausible for times before the Mesozoic era, results in a strong octupolar contribution to the field, consistent with previous findings.

  12. Sensitivity of the geomagnetic axial dipole to thermal core-mantle interactions

    PubMed

    Bloxham

    2000-05-04

    Since the work of William Gilbert in 1600 (ref. 1), it has been widely believed that the Earth's magnetic field, when suitably time-averaged, is that of a magnetic dipole positioned at the Earth's centre and aligned with the rotational axis. This 'geocentric axial dipole' (GAD) hypothesis has been the central model for the study of the Earth's magnetic field--it underpins almost all interpretations of palaeomagnetic data, whether for studies of palaeomagnetic secular variation, for plate tectonic reconstructions, or for studies of palaeoclimate. Although the GAD hypothesis appears to provide a good description of the Earth's magnetic field over at least the past 100 Myr (ref. 2), it is difficult to test the hypothesis for earlier periods, and there is some evidence that a more complicated model is required for the period before 250 Myr ago. Kent and Smethurst suggested that this additional complexity might be because the inner core would have been smaller at that time. Here I use a numerical geodynamo model and find that reducing the size of the inner core does not significantly change the character of the magnetic field. I also consider an alternative process that could lead to the breakdown of the GAD hypothesis on this timescale, the evolution of heat-flux variations at the core-mantle boundary, induced by mantle convection. I find that a simple pattern of heat-flux variations at the core-mantle boundary, which is plausible for times before the Mesozoic era, results in a strong octupolar contribution to the field, consistent with previous findings.

  13. Synthesis of core-shell gold coated magnetic nanoparticles and their interaction with thiolated DNA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ian; Tung, Le D; Maenosono, Shinya; Wälti, Christoph; Thanh, Nguyen T K

    2010-12-01

    Core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have received significant attention recently and are actively investigated owing to their large potential for a variety of applications. Here, the synthesis and characterization of bimetallic nanoparticles containing a magnetic core and a gold shell are discussed. The gold shell facilitates, for example, the conjugation of thiolated biological molecules to the surface of the nanoparticles. The composite nanoparticles were produced by the reduction of a gold salt on the surface of pre-formed cobalt or magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and super-conducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The spectrographic data revealed the simultaneous presence of cobalt and gold in 5.6±0.8 nm alloy nanoparticles, and demonstrated the presence of distinct magnetite and gold phases in 9.2±1.3 nm core-shell magnetic nanoparticles. The cobalt-gold nanoparticles were of similar size to the cobalt seed, while the magnetite-gold nanoparticles were significantly larger than the magnetic seeds, indicating that different processes are responsible for the addition of the gold shell. The effect on the magnetic properties by adding a layer of gold to the cobalt and magnetite nanoparticles was studied. The functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated through the conjugation of thiolated DNA to the gold shell.

  14. Transcription factor modularity in a gene-centered C. elegans core neuronal protein–DNA interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Vermeirssen, Vanessa; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Hidalgo, César A.; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B.; Sequerra, Reynaldo; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Barabási, Albert-László; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Transcription regulatory networks play a pivotal role in the development, function, and pathology of metazoan organisms. Such networks are comprised of protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their target genes. An important question pertains to how the architecture of such networks relates to network functionality. Here, we show that a Caenorhabditis elegans core neuronal protein–DNA interaction network is organized into two TF modules. These modules contain TFs that bind to a relatively small number of target genes and are more systems specific than the TF hubs that connect the modules. Each module relates to different functional aspects of the network. One module contains TFs involved in reproduction and target genes that are expressed in neurons as well as in other tissues. The second module is enriched for paired homeodomain TFs and connects to target genes that are often exclusively neuronal. We find that paired homeodomain TFs are specifically expressed in C. elegans and mouse neurons, indicating that the neuronal function of paired homeodomains is evolutionarily conserved. Taken together, we show that a core neuronal C. elegans protein–DNA interaction network possesses TF modules that relate to different functional aspects of the complete network. PMID:17513831

  15. Drosophila sperm surface alpha-L-fucosidase interacts with the egg coats through its core fucose residues.

    PubMed

    Intra, Jari; Concetta, Veltri; Daniela, De Caro; Perotti, Maria Elisa; Pasini, Maria Enrica

    2015-08-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between egg's glycoproteins and sperm surface receptors. Protein-carbohydrate complementarities in gamete recognition have observed in cases throughout the whole evolutionary scale. Sperm-associated α-L-fucosidases have been identified in various organisms. Their wide distribution and known properties reflect the hypothesis that fucose and α-L-fucosidases have fundamental function(s) during gamete interactions. An α-L-fucosidase has been detected as transmembrane protein on the surface of spermatozoa of eleven species across the genus Drosophila. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that the protein is localized in the sperm plasma membrane over the acrosome and the tail, in Drosophila melanogaster. In the present study, efforts were made to analyze with solid phase assays the oligosaccharide recognition ability of fruit fly sperm α-L-fucosidase with defined carbohydrate chains that can functionally mimic egg glycoconjugates. Our results showed that α-L-fucosidase bound to fucose residue and in particular it prefers N-glycans carrying core α1,6-linked fucose and core α1,3-linked fucose in N-glycans carrying only a terminal mannose residue. The ability of sperm α-L-fucosidase to bind to the micropylar chorion and to the vitelline envelope was examined in in vitro assays in presence of α-L-fucosidase, either alone or in combination with molecules containing fucose residues. No binding was detected when α-L-fucosidase was pre-incubated with fucoidan, a polymer of α-L-fucose and the monosaccharide fucose. Furthermore, egg labeling with anti-horseradish peroxidase, that recognized only core α1,3-linked fucose, correlates with α-L-fucosidase micropylar binding. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis of the potential role of this glycosidase in sperm-egg interactions in Drosophila.

  16. Low-amplitude magnetic vortex core reversal by non-linear interaction between azimuthal spin waves and the vortex gyromode

    SciTech Connect

    Sproll, Markus; Noske, Matthias; Kammerer, Matthias; Dieterle, Georg; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Bauer, Hans; Gangwar, Ajay; Woltersdorf, Georg; Back, Christian H.

    2014-01-06

    We show, by experiments and micromagnetic simulations in vortex structures, that an active “dual frequency” excitation of both the sub-GHz vortex gyromode and multi-GHz spin waves considerably changes the frequency response of spin wave mediated vortex core reversal. Besides additional minima in the switching threshold, a significant broadband reduction of the switching amplitudes is observed, which can be explained by non-linear interaction between the vortex gyromode and the spin waves. We conclude that the well known frequency spectra of azimuthal spin waves in vortex structures are altered substantially, when the vortex gyromode is actively excited simultaneously.

  17. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). This paper reviews the state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  18. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, T. M.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). The state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete is reviewed. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  19. Concrete-Water-Interaction and Ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) Precipitation in a Man-Made River Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, R.; Dietzel, M.; Reichl, P.; Leis, A.; Pölt, P.; Baldermann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Centimetre-thick, beige-colored and soft crusts were observed shortly after construction of a man-made river bed, i.e. a small natural river was bypassed flowing through a new bed lined with concrete and blocks. Hydrochemical investigations during wintertime - when water temperatures dropped down close to freezing - showed surprisingly high pH values up to 13.0 and elevated Ca2+ concentrations up to 200 mg/l. Both, the artifical and natural (downstream) section of the river bed were affected by the anomalous hydrochemistry and formation of prominent secondary precipitates. In order to better understand the particular and rapid water-rock-interaction, a hydrochemical monitoring program was launched and several of the delicate precipitates were recovered in refrigerator boxes in their original solution. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory within a few hours after sampling and stored at 1 °C. XRD and FT-IR patterns clearly revealed the predominant occurrence of "ikaite" in the crusts next to minor amounts of other carbonates (calcite, aragonite, vaterite) and detrital minerals. Ikaite - calcium carbonate hexahydrate - is a worldwide rarely documented carbonate mineral. This mineral is metastable and needs particular and narrow conditions in order to precipitate from solutions, i.e. a very limited water-temperature range between 0 and 4 °C (with ambient-pressure and low-salinity), highly alkaline pH conditions, high supersaturation values, and in many cases carbonate precipitation inhibitors (e.g. phosphates). Outside these conditions it disintegrates into calcite and water within minutes to hours. The few places of ikaite formation include Ikka Fjord in Greenland, Arctic- and Antarctic sea-ice and some sites of water mixing at Mono Lake, California. Combining detailed field monitoring results, solid-phase analyses and regional meteorological data (rainfall, water discharge, temperature) with hydrogeochemical modeling allows constraining the mechanisms of

  20. Synthesis of core-shell gold coated magnetic nanoparticles and their interaction with thiolated DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Tung, Le D.; Maenosono, Shinya; Wälti, Christoph; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.

    2010-12-01

    Core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have received significant attention recently and are actively investigated owing to their large potential for a variety of applications. Here, the synthesis and characterization of bimetallic nanoparticles containing a magnetic core and a gold shell are discussed. The gold shell facilitates, for example, the conjugation of thiolated biological molecules to the surface of the nanoparticles. The composite nanoparticles were produced by the reduction of a gold salt on the surface of pre-formed cobalt or magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and super-conducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The spectrographic data revealed the simultaneous presence of cobalt and gold in 5.6 +/- 0.8 nm alloy nanoparticles, and demonstrated the presence of distinct magnetite and gold phases in 9.2 +/- 1.3 nm core-shell magnetic nanoparticles. The cobalt-gold nanoparticles were of similar size to the cobalt seed, while the magnetite-gold nanoparticles were significantly larger than the magnetic seeds, indicating that different processes are responsible for the addition of the gold shell. The effect on the magnetic properties by adding a layer of gold to the cobalt and magnetite nanoparticles was studied. The functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated through the conjugation of thiolated DNA to the gold shell.Core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have received significant attention recently and are actively investigated owing to their large potential for a variety of applications. Here, the synthesis and characterization of bimetallic nanoparticles containing a magnetic core and a gold shell are discussed. The gold shell facilitates, for example, the conjugation of thiolated biological molecules to the surface of the nanoparticles. The composite

  1. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  2. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions.

  3. Atomistic simulations of screw dislocations in bcc tungsten: From core structures and static properties to interaction with vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke; Niu, Liang-Liang; Jin, Shuo; Shu, Xiaolin; Xie, Hongxian; Wang, Lifang; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Atomistic simulations have been used to investigate the core structures, static properties of isolated 1/2 <1 1 1> screw dislocations, and their interaction with vacancies in bcc tungsten (W) based on three empirical interatomic potentials. Differential displacement maps show that only one embedded atom method potential is able to reproduce the compact non-degenerate core as evidenced by ab initio calculations. The obtained strain energy and stress distribution from atomistic simulations are, in general, consistent with elasticity theory predictions. In particular, one component of the calculated shear stress, which is not present according to elasticity theory, is non-negligible in the core region of our dislocation model. The differences between the results calculated from three interatomic potentials are in details, such as the specific value and the symmetry, but the trend of spatial distributions of static properties in the long range are close to each other. By calculating the binding energies between the dislocations and vacancies, we demonstrate that the dislocations act as vacancy sinks, which may be important for the nucleation and growth of hydrogen bubbles in W under irradiation.

  4. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  5. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions. PMID:26319711

  6. Hybrid carbon nanoparticles modified core-shell silica: a high efficiency carbon-based phase for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed E A; Wahab, M Farooq; Lucy, Charles A

    2014-04-11

    Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a fast growing separation technique for hydrophilic and polar analytes. In this work, we combine the unique selectivity of carbon surfaces with the high efficiency of core-shell silica. First, 5 μm core-shell silica is electrostatically coated with 105 nm cationic latex bearing quaternary ammonium groups. Then 50 nm anionic carbon nanoparticles are anchored onto the surface of the latex coated core-shell silica particles to produce a hybrid carbon-silica phase. The hybrid phase shows different selectivity than ten previously classified HILIC column chemistries and 36 stationary phases. The hybrid HILIC phase has shape selectivity for positional isomeric pairs (phthalic/isophthalic and 1-naphthoic/2-naphthoic acids). Fast and high efficiency HILIC separations of biologically important carboxylates, phenols and pharmaceuticals are reported with efficiencies up to 85,000 plates m(-1). Reduced plate height of 1.9 (95,000 plates m(-1)) can be achieved. The hybrid phase is stable for at least 3 months of usage and storage under typical HILIC eluents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  8. Aliphatic peptides show similar self-assembly to amyloid core sequences, challenging the importance of aromatic interactions in amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Cheong, Daniel W.; Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of abnormally folded proteins into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of many debilitating diseases, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson diseases to prion-related disorders and diabetes type II. However, the fundamental mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains poorly understood. Core sequences of four to seven amino acids within natural amyloid proteins that form toxic fibrils have been used to study amyloidogenesis. We recently reported a class of systematically designed ultrasmall peptides that self-assemble in water into cross-β–type fibers. Here we compare the self-assembly of these peptides with natural core sequences. These include core segments from Alzheimer’s amyloid-β, human amylin, and calcitonin. We analyzed the self-assembly process using circular dichroism, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, rheology, and molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the designed aliphatic peptides exhibited a similar self-assembly mechanism to several natural sequences, with formation of α-helical intermediates being a common feature. Interestingly, the self-assembly of a second core sequence from amyloid-β, containing the diphenylalanine motif, was distinctly different from all other examined sequences. The diphenylalanine-containing sequence formed β-sheet aggregates without going through the α-helical intermediate step, giving a unique fiber-diffraction pattern and simulation structure. Based on these results, we propose a simplified aliphatic model system to study amyloidosis. Our results provide vital insight into the nature of early intermediates formed and suggest that aromatic interactions are not as important in amyloid formation as previously postulated. This information is necessary for developing therapeutic drugs that inhibit and control amyloid formation. PMID:23267112

  9. Self-propelled particles with soft-core interactions: patterns, stability, and collapse.

    PubMed

    D' Orsogna, M R; Chuang, Y L; Bertozzi, A L; Chayes, L S

    2006-03-17

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion.

  10. Moon-magnetosphere interaction and estimates of possible lunar core size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that estimates of the size of a possible lunar core are negligibly affected by currents due to a directed plasma flux toward the moon. A theory for the compression of an induced lunar dipole by an incoming sub-Alfvenic flux of cold plasma is presented for the time-independent case where the external magnetic field, induced dipole moment, and plasma velocity vector are all aligned, and it is demonstrated that, at very long time periods, effects due to the inertia of an incoming flow of cold plasma can be ignored. A theory for time-dependent fluctuations in a stationary plasma is modified to include the effects of incoming flux.

  11. Evidence of exchange bias effect originating from the interaction between antiferromagnetic core and spin glass shell

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. K. Yuan, J. J.; Yu, H. J.; Zhu, X. R.; Xie, Y. M.; Tang, S. L.; Xu, L. Q.

    2014-07-14

    Spin glass behavior and exchange bias effect have been observed in antiferromagnetic SrMn{sub 3}O{sub 6−x} nanoribbons synthesized via a self-sacrificing template process. The magnetic field dependence of thermoremanent magnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization shows that the sample is good correspondence to spin glass and diluted antiferromagnetic system for the applied field H < 2 T and H > 2 T, respectively. By detailed analysis of training effect using Binek's model, we argue that the observed exchange bias effect in SrMn{sub 3}O{sub 6−x} nanoribbons arises entirely from an interface exchange coupling between the antiferromagnetic core and spin glass shell. The present study is useful for understanding the nature of shell layer and the origin of exchange bias effect in other antiferromagnetic nanosystems as well.

  12. Edge-core interaction of ITG turbulence in Tokamaks: Is the Tail Wagging the Dog?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    A full-f XGC1 gyrokinetic simulation of ITG turbulence, together with the neoclassical dynamics without scale separation, has been performed for the whole-volume plasma in realistic diverted DIII-D geometry. The simulation revealed that the global structure of the turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas results from a synergy between edge-driven inward propagation of turbulence intensity and the core-driven outward heat transport. The global ion confinement and the ion temperature gradient then self-organize quickly at turbulence propagation time scale. This synergy results in inward-outward pulse scattering leading to spontaneous production of strong internal shear layers in which the turbulent transport is almost suppressed over several radial correlation lengths. Co-existence of the edge turbulence source and the strong internal shear layer leads to radially increasing turbulence intensity and ion thermal transport profiles.

  13. Different precore/core mutations of hepatitis B interact with, limit, or favor liver fibrosis severity.

    PubMed

    Ducancelle, Alexandra; Pivert, Adeline; Bertrais, Sandrine; Boursier, Jérôme; Balan, Viorica; Veillon, Pascal; le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Thibault, Vincent; Castelain, Sandrine; Roquebert, Bénédicte; Coste-Burel, Marianne; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Larrat, Sylvie; Maylin, Sarah; Alain, Sophie; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Gordien, Emmanuel; Gozlan, Joël; Brodard, Véronique; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Calès, Paul; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise

    2016-10-01

    The impact of basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) mutants of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) on liver disease severity remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to screen BCP and PC mutations in 252 HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive carriers in France and to assess relationships between these mutations and severe fibrosis. Direct sequencing of the precore/core gene was used to detect A1762T/G1764A and G1757A mutations in the BCP and G1896A and G1899A mutations in the PC region. The prevalences of A1762T/G1764A, G1757A, G1896A, and G1899A mutations were 34.1%, 38.7%, 54.9%, and 29.3% (P < 0.001), respectively. The independent predictors of severe fibrosis (≥F3 Metavir) were older age (P < 0.001), male gender (P = 0.012), elevated alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.001), and the double A1762T/G1764A mutant with no other mutations (P = 0.011). Interestingly, the association of the G1899A mutation with the double A1762T/G1764A mutant significantly counteracted the deleterious effect of the sole double A1762T/G1764A mutant (odds ratio [OR] = 0.28 vs. OR = 3.55, respectively, P = 0.028). Patients with the A1762T/G1764A mutation have a higher risk of severe fibrosis. The G1899A mutation is a protective factor against severe fibrosis that counteracted the deleterious effect of the A1762T/G1764A mutation. Finally, host phenotypic and HBV genotypic markers independently predict fibrosis severity. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Interaction of the hepatitis B core antigen and the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung O; Tucker, Amy; Frelin, Lars; Sallberg, Matti; Jones, Joyce; Peters, Cory; Hughes, Janice; Whitacre, David; Darsow, Bryan; Peterson, Darrell L; Milich, David R

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the primary APCs for the hepatitis B core Ag (HBcAg) were B cells and not dendritic cells (DC). We now report that splenic B1a and B1b cells more efficiently present soluble HBcAg to naive CD4(+) T cells than splenic B2 cells. This was demonstrated by direct HBcAg-biotin-binding studies and by HBcAg-specific T cell activation in vitro in cultures of naive HBcAg-specific T cells and resting B cell subpopulations. The inability of DC to function as APCs for exogenous HBcAg relates to lack of uptake of HBcAg, not to processing or presentation, because HBcAg/anti-HBc immune complexes can be efficiently presented by DC. Furthermore, HBcAg-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell priming with DNA encoding HBcAg does not require B cell APCs. TLR activation, another innate immune response, was also examined. Full-length (HBcAg(183)), truncated (HBcAg(149)), and the nonparticulate HBeAg were screened for TLR stimulation via NF-kappaB activation in HEK293 cells expressing human TLRs. None of the HBc/HBeAgs activated human TLRs. Therefore, the HBc/HBeAg proteins are not ligands for human TLRs. However, the ssRNA contained within HBcAg(183) does function as a TLR-7 ligand, as demonstrated at the T and B cell levels in TLR-7 knockout mice. Bacterial, yeast, and mammalian ssRNA encapsidated within HBcAg(183) all function as TLR-7 ligands. These studies indicate that innate immune mechanisms bridge to and enhance the adaptive immune response to HBcAg and have important implications for the use of hepadnavirus core proteins as vaccine carrier platforms.

  15. Intra- and inter-nucleosome interactions of the core histone tail domains in higher-order chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Pepenella, Sharon; Murphy, Kevin J; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a hierarchical collection of nucleoprotein structures that package DNA to form chromosomes. The initial levels of packaging include folding of long strings of nucleosomes into secondary structures and array-array association into higher-order tertiary chromatin structures. The core histone tail domains are required for the assembly of higher-order structures and mediate short- and long-range intra- and inter-nucleosome interactions with both DNA and protein targets to direct their assembly. However, important details of these interactions remain unclear and are a subject of much interest and recent investigations. Here, we review work defining the interactions of the histone N-terminal tails with DNA and protein targets relevant to chromatin higher-order structures, with a specific emphasis on the contributions of H3 and H4 tails to oligonucleosome folding and stabilization. We evaluate both classic and recent experiments determining tail structures, effect of tail cleavage/loss, and posttranslational modifications of the tails on nucleosomes and nucleosome arrays, as well as inter-nucleosomal and inter-array interactions of the H3 and H4 N-terminal tails.

  16. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    López-Buendía, Angel M.; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Climent, Verónica

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of thick concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight A.

    2015-03-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) due to three primary properties: its low cost, structural strength, and ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants include the containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Use in these structures has made concrete's long-term performance crucial for the safe operation of commercial NPPs. Extending LWR operating period to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. New mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. This creates the need to be able to nondestructively evaluate the current subsurface concrete condition of aging concrete material in NPP structures. The size and complexity of NPP containment structures and heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. Specially designed and fabricated test specimens can provide realistic flaws that are similar to actual flaws in terms of how they interact with a particular nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique. Artificial test blocks allow the isolation of certain testing problems as well as the variation of certain parameters. Representative large heavily reinforced concrete specimens would allow for comparative testing to evaluate the state-of-the-art NDE in this area and to identify additional developments necessary to address the challenges potentially found in NPPs.

  18. METAMORPHOSIS OF SN 2014C: DELAYED INTERACTION BETWEEN A HYDROGEN POOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA AND A NEARBY CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kamble, A.; Patnaude, D. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Challis, P.; Drout, M. R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Miller, G. F.; Parrent, J. T.; Sanders, N. E.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fong, W.; Bietenholz, M.; Chornock, R.; Fransson, C.; Fesen, R. A.; Mackey, J.; and others

    2015-12-20

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star’s stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf–Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Hα absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 that hosted the progenitor system. By comparing the emission properties of the source with stellar population models that incorporate interacting binary stars we estimate the age of the host cluster to be 30–300 Myr, and favor ages closer to 30 Myr in light of relatively strong Hα emission. SN 2014C is the best observed member of a class of core-collapse supernovae that fill the gap between events that interact strongly with dense, nearby environments immediately after explosion and those that never show signs of interaction. Better understanding of the frequency and nature of this intermediate population can contribute valuable information about the poorly understood final stages of stellar evolution.

  19. Metamorphosis of SN 2014C: Delayed Interaction between a Hydrogen Poor Core-collapse Supernova and a Nearby Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kamble, A.; Patnaude, D. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fong, W.; Bietenholz, M.; Challis, P.; Chornock, R.; Drout, M. R.; Fransson, C.; Fesen, R. A.; Grindlay, J. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Mackey, J.; Miller, G. F.; Parrent, J. T.; Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Zauderer, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star’s stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf-Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Hα absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 that hosted the progenitor system. By comparing the emission properties of the source with stellar population models that incorporate interacting binary stars we estimate the age of the host cluster to be 30-300 Myr, and favor ages closer to 30 Myr in light of relatively strong Hα emission. SN 2014C is the best observed member of a class of core-collapse supernovae that fill the gap between events that interact strongly with dense, nearby environments immediately after explosion and those that never show signs of interaction. Better understanding of the frequency and nature of this intermediate population can contribute valuable information about the poorly understood final stages of stellar evolution.

  20. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques and 4D computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolder, F.; Mäder, U.; Jenni, A.; Schwendener, N.

    Deep geological storage of radioactive waste foresees cementitious materials as reinforcement of tunnels and as backfill. Bentonite is proposed to enclose spent fuel drums, and as drift seals. The emplacement of cementitious material next to clay material generates an enormous chemical gradient in pore water composition that drives diffusive solute transport. Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling predict significant mineral alteration at and near interfaces, mainly resulting in a decrease of porosity in bentonite. The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the cement/bentonite skin effects spatially and temporally in laboratory experiments. A newly developed mobile X-ray transparent core infiltration device was used, which allows performing X-ray computed tomography (CT) periodically without interrupting a running experiment. A pre-saturated cylindrical MX-80 bentonite sample (1920 kg/m3 average wet density) is subjected to a confining pressure as a constant total pressure boundary condition. The infiltration of a hyperalkaline (pH 13.4), artificial OPC (ordinary Portland cement) pore water into the bentonite plug alters the mineral assemblage over time as an advancing reaction front. The related changes in X-ray attenuation values are related to changes in phase densities, porosity and local bulk density and are tracked over time periodically by non-destructive CT scans. Mineral precipitation is observed in the inflow filter. Mineral alteration in the first millimeters of the bentonite sample is clearly detected and the reaction front is presently progressing with an average linear velocity that is 8 times slower than that for anions. The reaction zone is characterized by a higher X-ray attenuation compared to the signal of the pre-existing mineralogy. Chemical analysis of the outflow fluid showed initially elevated anion and cation concentrations compared to the infiltration fluid due to anion exclusion effects related to compaction of

  1. Reinforced Concrete Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    AFWL-TR-82-9 AFWL-TR-82-9 REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING H. L. Schreyer J. W. Jeter, Jr. New Mexico Engineering Reseprch Institute University of New...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING Final Report 6. PERFORMING OtG. REPORT NUMBER NMERI TA8-9 7. AUTHORg) S...loading were identified and used to evaluate current concrete models . Since the endochronic and viscoplastic models provide satisfactory descriptions

  2. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  3. Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Takahiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Kachi, Hirokazu; Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Maruyama, Noriko; Murase, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter—defined as microbial virulence types—differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies. PMID:27499042

  4. From the pore scale to the core scale: How to model the spatial interactions in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Patricia; Pot, Valerie; Monga, Oivier; Chenu, Claire; Vieuble-Gonod, Laurent; Vogel, Laure; Nunan, Naoise; Otten, Wilfried; Baveye, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, innovative modeling tools have been developed to describe the physico-chemical processes occurring in soil pores at scales directly relevant to microorganisms. Modelling efforts have attempted to understand how microbial processes such as decomposition or competition among species are affected by diffusion in 2-D or 3-D environments. Most of these models use a virtual representative pore network that can have the same features as soil pores with regular lattice grid. The most recent and innovative of these models use real images of soil structure from binarized 3D images. These models are able to simulate microbial degradation although microorganisms and organic matter are placed at different locations in the pore space. Then, the encounter of nutrients and microorganisms is achieved through the implementation of the diffusion process of the soluble substrates in the connected water-filled space. The high computational demand of this type of approach restricts its applicability to small-scale systems, typically in the order of micrometers or millimeters. The numerical techniques used to solve the equations include the lattice Boltzmann method, algorithmic methods and finite element methods. Most of these models have not yet been tested with experimental data because of the difficulties of investigating such small scales. On the other hand, many experimental results developed at the core scale have showed the importance of soil microbial habitat and especially how physical characteristics (pore sizes, connectivity) control the decomposition of organic substrates via their accessibility by microorganisms. The general question we have now to answer is whether information on the spatial heterogeneity of soils at the microscale can be used to predict the processes observed at the macroscale in soils

  5. Interaction of phosphine with Si(100) from core-level photoemission and real-time scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Deng-Sung; Ku, Tsai-Shuan; Chen, Ru-Ping

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of phosphine (PH3) on the Si(100)-2×1 surface at temperatures between 635 and 900 K. The hydrogen desorption, growth mode, surface morphology, and chemical composition and ordering of the surface layer are examined by synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission and real-time high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The P 2p core-level spectra indicate that decomposition of PHn is complete above ~550 K and the maximum P coverage is strongly influenced by the growth temperature, which governs the coverage of H-terminated sites. The scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken at real time during PH3 exposure indicate that a surface phosphorus atom readily and randomly displaces one Si atom from the substrate. The ejected Si diffuses, nucleates, and incorporates itself into islands or step edges, leading to similar growth behavior as that found in Si chemical vapor deposition. Line defects both perpendicular and parallel to the dimer rows are observed on the nearly P-saturated surface. Perpendicular line defects act as a strain relief mechanism. Parallel line defects result from growth kinetics. STM images also indicate that incorporating a small amount of phosphorus eliminates the line defects in the Si(100)-2×n surface.

  6. The structure of the core NuRD repression complex provides insights into its interaction with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Millard, Christopher J; Varma, Niranjan; Saleh, Almutasem; Morris, Kyle; Watson, Peter J; Bottrill, Andrew R; Fairall, Louise; Smith, Corinne J; Schwabe, John W R

    2016-04-21

    The NuRD complex is a multi-protein transcriptional corepressor that couples histone deacetylase and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling activities. The complex regulates the higher-order structure of chromatin, and has important roles in the regulation of gene expression, DNA damage repair and cell differentiation. HDACs 1 and 2 are recruited by the MTA1 corepressor to form the catalytic core of the complex. The histone chaperone protein RBBP4, has previously been shown to bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of MTA1. We show that MTA1 recruits a second copy of RBBP4. The crystal structure reveals an extensive interface between MTA1 and RBBP4. An EM structure, supported by SAXS and crosslinking, reveals the architecture of the dimeric HDAC1:MTA1:RBBP4 assembly which forms the core of the NuRD complex. We find evidence that in this complex RBBP4 mediates interaction with histone H3 tails, but not histone H4, suggesting a mechanism for recruitment of the NuRD complex to chromatin.

  7. The structure of the core NuRD repression complex provides insights into its interaction with chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Christopher J; Varma, Niranjan; Saleh, Almutasem; Morris, Kyle; Watson, Peter J; Bottrill, Andrew R; Fairall, Louise; Smith, Corinne J; Schwabe, John WR

    2016-01-01

    The NuRD complex is a multi-protein transcriptional corepressor that couples histone deacetylase and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling activities. The complex regulates the higher-order structure of chromatin, and has important roles in the regulation of gene expression, DNA damage repair and cell differentiation. HDACs 1 and 2 are recruited by the MTA1 corepressor to form the catalytic core of the complex. The histone chaperone protein RBBP4, has previously been shown to bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of MTA1. We show that MTA1 recruits a second copy of RBBP4. The crystal structure reveals an extensive interface between MTA1 and RBBP4. An EM structure, supported by SAXS and crosslinking, reveals the architecture of the dimeric HDAC1:MTA1:RBBP4 assembly which forms the core of the NuRD complex. We find evidence that in this complex RBBP4 mediates interaction with histone H3 tails, but not histone H4, suggesting a mechanism for recruitment of the NuRD complex to chromatin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13941.001 PMID:27098840

  8. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  9. Space and Time Resolved Continuum Correlation in the Post-Collision Interaction of Core-Photoionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandary, A.; Landers, A. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Osipov, T.; Hertlein, M.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Bocharova, I.; Cocke, C. L.; Jahnke, T.; Schoffler, M.; Titze, J.; Dorner, R.

    2007-06-01

    We have used the COLTRIMS^* technique to measure the momentum distribution of the photoelectron and the recoil ion produced by the core-photoionization of neon. Conservation of momentum allows us to determine the subsequent auger electron's momentum that is emitted when the Ne^+ relaxes to the Ne^2+ state. Momentum space plots of the electrons and the recoil ion are then used to resolve the three-body correlated post-collision interactions in space and time. Finally, classical calculations have been performed which corroborate our interpretation of the experimental results. ^*R. Dorner, V. Mergel, O. Jagutzki, L. Spielberger, J. Ull- rich, R. Moshammer, and H. Schmidt-B"aocking. Physics Reports, 330:96-192, 2000.

  10. Out-of-core Interactive Display of Large Meshes Using an Oriented Bounding Box-based Hardware Depth Query

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, H; Gregorski, B; Joy, K I

    2004-06-24

    In this paper we present an occlusion culling method that uses hardware-based depth queries on oriented bounding boxes to cull unseen geometric primitives efficiently. An out-of-core design enables this method to interactively display data sets that are too large to fit into main memory. During a preprocessing phase, a spatial subdivision (such as an octree or BSP tree) of a given data set is constructed where, for each node, an oriented bounding box containing mesh primitives is computed using principal component analysis (PCA). At runtime, the tree indicated by the spatial subdivision is traversed in front-to-back order, and only nodes that are determined to be visible, based on a hardware accelerated depth query, are rendered.

  11. Interacting hard-core bosons with anisotropic hopping: Checkerboard supersolid, order by disorder, and first-order phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xiao; Cui, Yong-Yong; Wang, Dali; Lv, Jian-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Using extensive quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we study a minimum model of interacting hard-core bosons on a square lattice with hoppings of different lengths, featuring nearest-neighbor hopping (t1), anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor hopping (t2'), and nearest-neighbor repulsion (V1). The paradigmatic checkerboard supersolid (CSS) phase emerges as t2' turns on, with the solid order being characterized by ordering vector q =(π ,π ) . This serves as a rare example of the CSS phase which is obtained by doping a checkerboard solid and harbors spontaneously broken gauge and translational symmetries. A first-order supersolid-to-superfluid transition is observed. Moreover, we find a solid order-by-thermal disorder behavior together with a superfluid-to-solid transition upon increasing temperature. The underlying picture of the order-by-disorder phenomenon is figured out within the framework of the entropy effect.

  12. 51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE PATIO SLAB LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTICE MINE WORKINGS BACKGROUND LEFT. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  13. The interaction of core-collapse supernova ejecta with a companion star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Tauris, T. M.; Röpke, F. K.; Moriya, T. J.; Kruckow, M.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Izzard, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The progenitors of many core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are expected to be in binary systems. After the SN explosion in a binary, the companion star may suffer from mass stripping and be shock heated as a result of the impact of the SN ejecta. If the binary system is disrupted by the SN explosion, the companion star is ejected as a runaway star, and in some cases as a hypervelocity star. Aims: By performing a series of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of the collision of SN ejecta with the companion star, we investigate how CCSN explosions affect their binary companion. Methods: We use the BEC stellar evolution code to construct the detailed companion structure at the moment of SN explosion. The impact of the SN blast wave on the companion star is followed by means of 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations using the Stellar GADGET code. Results: For main-sequence (MS) companion stars, we find that the amount of removed stellar mass, the resulting impact velocity, and the chemical contamination of the companion that results from the impact of the SN ejecta strongly increases with decreasing binary separation and increasing explosion energy. Their relationship can be approximately fitted by power laws, which is consistent with the results obtained from impact simulations of Type Ia SNe. However, we find that the impact velocity is sensitive to the momentum profile of the outer SN ejecta and, in fact, may decrease with increasing ejecta mass, depending on the modeling of the ejecta. Because most companion stars to Type Ib/c CCSNe are in their MS phase at the moment of the explosion, combined with the strongly decaying impact effects with increasing binary separation, we argue that the majority of these SNe lead to inefficient mass stripping and shock heating of the companion star following the impact of the ejecta. Conclusions: Our simulations show that the impact effects of Type Ib/c SN ejecta on the structure of MS companion

  14. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pesonen, Maiju; Musser, James M.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus). For pneumococcus we identified 5,199 putative epistatic interactions between 1,936 sites. Over three-quarters of the links were between sites within the pbp2x, pbp1a and pbp2b genes, the sequences of which are critical in determining non-susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. A network-based analysis found these genes were also coupled to that encoding dihydrofolate reductase, changes to which underlie trimethoprim resistance. Distinct from these antibiotic resistance genes, a large network component of 384 protein coding sequences encompassed many genes critical in basic cellular functions, while another distinct component included genes associated with virulence. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) data set population represents a clonal population with relatively little genetic variation and a high level of linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Despite this, we were able to pinpoint two RNA pseudouridine synthases, which were each strongly linked to a separate set of loci across the chromosome, representing biologically plausible targets of co-selection. The population genomic analysis method applied here identifies statistically significantly co-evolving locus pairs, potentially arising from fitness selection interdependence reflecting underlying protein-protein interactions, or genes whose product activities contribute to the same phenotype. This discovery approach greatly

  15. Interacting networks of resistance, virulence and core machinery genes identified by genome-wide epistasis analysis.

    PubMed

    Skwark, Marcin J; Croucher, Nicholas J; Puranen, Santeri; Chewapreecha, Claire; Pesonen, Maiju; Xu, Ying Ying; Turner, Paul; Harris, Simon R; Beres, Stephen B; Musser, James M; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus). For pneumococcus we identified 5,199 putative epistatic interactions between 1,936 sites. Over three-quarters of the links were between sites within the pbp2x, pbp1a and pbp2b genes, the sequences of which are critical in determining non-susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. A network-based analysis found these genes were also coupled to that encoding dihydrofolate reductase, changes to which underlie trimethoprim resistance. Distinct from these antibiotic resistance genes, a large network component of 384 protein coding sequences encompassed many genes critical in basic cellular functions, while another distinct component included genes associated with virulence. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) data set population represents a clonal population with relatively little genetic variation and a high level of linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Despite this, we were able to pinpoint two RNA pseudouridine synthases, which were each strongly linked to a separate set of loci across the chromosome, representing biologically plausible targets of co-selection. The population genomic analysis method applied here identifies statistically significantly co-evolving locus pairs, potentially arising from fitness selection interdependence reflecting underlying protein-protein interactions, or genes whose product activities contribute to the same phenotype. This discovery approach greatly

  16. Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates due to weak interaction processes on sd-shell nuclei in stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, Muhammad; Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates, due to weak interaction processes, on sd-shell nuclei in stellar core are calculated using the proton neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The recent extensive experimental mass compilation of Wang et al. (Chin. Phys. C 36:1603, 2012), other improved model input parameters including nuclear quadrupole deformation (Raman et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 78(1):1-128, 2001; Möller et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 109:1-204, 2016) and physical constants are taken into account in the current calculation. The purpose of this work is two fold, one is to improve the earlier calculation of weak rates performed by Nabi and Klapdor-Kleingrothaus (At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 71:149, 1999a) using the same theory. We further compare our results with previous calculations. The selected sd-shell nuclei, considered in this work, are of special interest for the evolution of O-Ne-Mg core in 8-10 M_{⊙} stars due to competitive gamma ray heating rates and cooling by URCA processes. The outcome of these competitions is to determine, whether the stars end up as a white dwarf (Nabi in Phys. Rev. C 78(4):045801, 2008b), an electron-capture supernova (Jones et al. in Astrophys. J. 772(2):150, 2013) or Fe core-collapse supernova (Suzuki et al. in Astrophys. J. 817(2):163, 2016). The selected sd-shell nuclei for calculation of associated weak-interaction rates include ^{20,23}O, ^{20,23}F, ^{20,23,24}Ne, {}^{20,23-25}Na, and {}^{23-25}Mg. The cooling and heating rates are calculated for density range (10 ≤ ρ (g cm^{-3}) ≤ 10^{11}) and temperature range (0.01× 109≤ T(K)≤ 30× 109). The calculated gamma heating rates are orders of magnitude bigger than the shell model rates (except for ^{25}Mg at low densities). At high temperatures the gamma heating rates are in reasonable agreement. The calculated cooling rates are up to an order of magnitude bigger for odd-A nuclei.

  17. HIGH-COMPRESSIVE-STRENGTH CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONCRETE , COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES), PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), AGING(MATERIALS), MANUFACTURING, STRUCTURES, THERMAL PROPERTIES, CREEP, DEFORMATION, REINFORCED CONCRETE , MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, STRESSES, MIXTURES, TENSILE PROPERTIES

  18. Properties of salt-saturated concrete and grout after six years in situ at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Weiss, C.A. Jr.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of concrete and grout were recovered from short boreholes in the repository floor at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant more than six years after the concrete and grout were placed. Plugs from the Plug Test Matrix of the Plugging and Sealing Program of Sandia National Laboratories were overcored to include a shell of host rock. The cores were analyzed at the Waterways Experiment Station to assess their condition after six years of service, having potentially been exposed to those aspects of their service environment (salt, brine, fracturing, anhydrite, etc.) that could cause deterioration. Measured values of compressive strength and pulse velocity of both the grout and the concrete equaled or exceeded values from tests performed on laboratory-tested samples of the same mixtures at ages of one month to one year after casting. The phase assemblages had changed very little. Materials performed as intended and showed virtually no chemical or physical evidence of deterioration. The lowest values for strength and pulse velocity were measured for samples taken from the Disturbed Rock Zone, indicating the influence of cracking in this zone on the properties of enclosed seal materials. There was evidence of movement of brine in the system. Crystalline phases containing magnesium, potassium, sulfate, and other ions had been deposited on free surfaces in fractures and pilot holes. There was a reaction rim in the anhydrite immediately surrounding each recovered borehole plug, suggesting interaction between grout or concrete and host rock. However, the chemical changes apparent in this reaction rim were not reflected in the chemical composition of the adjacent concrete or grout. The grout and concrete studied here showed no signs of the deterioration found to have occurred in some parts of the concrete liner of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste handling shaft.

  19. Interaction of air temperature and core temperatures in thermoregulation of the goat.

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, C

    1977-01-01

    1. The interaction between air temperature, hypothalamus temperature, and spinal cord temperature in driving heat production and respiratory evaporative heat loss has been studied in conscious goats with chronically implanted thermodes. 2. Thermoregulatory heat production could be described as being approximately proportional to the sum of two linear drives determined by hypothalamus temperature and spinal cord temperature. This was found also for respiratory evaporative heat loss except that it was not influenced by spinal cord cooling. 3. Thermoregulatory heat production could be further described as being approximately proportional to a product of linear drives determined by hypothalamus and spinal cord temperature on one hand and air temperature on the other. Respiratory evaporative heat loss was approximately proportional to the sum of drives determined by spinal cord, hypothalamus and air temperatures. 4. Sensitivity to central cooling was found to undergo long-lasting but temporary changes which interfered with the immediate effects of air temperature on thermoregulation. 5. Central threshold temperatures for heat production and respiratory evaporative heat loss were found to be differently affected by air temperature. This indicates that integrating mechanisms for heat production and respiratory evaporative heat loss are to some extent functionally independent. PMID:839469

  20. Multiphasic finite element modeling of concrete hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A. . E-mail: alain.sellier@insa-toulouse.fr; Escadeillas, G.; Turatsinze, A.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents a model predicting the development of hydration and its consequences on temperature and water content. As it considers the effects of climatic conditions, the proposed model is a promising tool to evaluate the temperature, hydric and hydration fields of structures in situ. The hydration model predicts the hydration evolution of several main species (not only clinker but also mineral additions like fly ash or silica fume for instance). For each component, the modeling considers hydration development and chemical interaction between reactions. It also takes into account temperature and water content effects on reaction kinetics through thermal and hydric activation. Hydration development in turn modifies the thermal and hydric states of material. The result is a numerical model coupling hydration, and the thermal and hydric states of cement-based material. The model was tested on a 27 m{sup 3} concrete block in situ equipped with temperature sensors situated in the core and close to the face exposed to solar radiation.

  1. A new equation of state with light nuclei and their weak interactions in core-collapse supernova simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2014-05-02

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ∼ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hands, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light nuclei, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  2. Ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations of electromagnetic observables for p-shell nuclei using natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Chrysovalantis; Caprio, Mark A.; Vary, James P.; Maris, Pieter

    2016-09-01

    The goal of ab initio nuclear theory is to provide quantitative predictions of nuclear observables, by solving the many-body problem starting from the internucleon interaction. The solution of the many-body problem involves large spaces with dimensions that grow fast with the number of nucleons and single-particle states included in the space. Convergence of nuclear observables in the employed space using an adequate set of single-particle orbitals is essential for making quantitative predictions. Long-range nuclear observables, such as the matrix elements of the E 2 operator, converge slowly when conventional oscillator single-particle orbitals are used for no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations. Natural orbitals, obtained by diagonalizing the one-body density matrix from an initial NCCI calculation in the harmonic oscillator basis, provide accelerated convergence since they are adapted to the properties of the many-body wave function of the nucleus under study. We explore the convergence of electromagnetic observables of p-shell nuclei obtained using natural orbitals for NCCI calculations. Supported by the US DOE under Grants DE-FG02-95ER-40934, DESC0008485 (SciDAC/NUCLEI), and DE-FG02-87ER40371. Computational resources provided by NERSC (supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) and the Notre Dame Center for Research Computing.

  3. A new equation of state with light nuclei and their weak interactions in core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ˜ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hands, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light nuclei, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  4. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  5. Prestressed concrete for the storage of liquefied gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeling, A.S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Both concrete and prestressing-steel materials retain their strengths at cryogenic temperatures, making them ideal for LNG storage tanks and similar structures. Prestressed concrete lends itself to a wide variety of configurations, from containment dikes to integrated tank systems in which the steel, insulation, and concrete must interact efficiently. Of major importance in building prestressed-concrete storage tanks are the design loads and load factors to be adopted, especially the so-called special loads that depend on the nature and quantity of the product to be stored, the type of installation involved, the siting of the storage facilities, and the tank construction (flexible or rigid).

  6. Durability of high performance concrete in magnesium brine

    SciTech Connect

    Tumidajski, P.J.; Chan, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    The durability of six concretes exposed to magnesium brine was monitored for 24 months. These concretes incorporated ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, and fly ash. The Young`s moduli, chloride penetrations, and median pore diameters were measured. There was a cyclic nature to these properties due to the complicated interaction of hydration with magnesium, chloride and sulfate attack. Mineral admixtures, in combination with a long initial cure, provided the most durable concrete. Concrete with 65% slag had the best overall durability to the brines tested.

  7. SARA and RNF11 interact with each other and ESCRT-0 core proteins and regulate degradative EGFR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Kostaras, E; Sflomos, G; Pedersen, N M; Stenmark, H; Fotsis, T; Murphy, C

    2013-10-31

    Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) is highly enriched on endocytic membranes via binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates through its FYVE (Fab1p-YOTB-Vps27p-EEA1) domain. SARA was originally identified as a protein that recruits non-phosphorylated SMAD2/3 to the activated TGFβ receptors for phosphorylation, but later reports suggested a regulatory role in endocytic trafficking. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase RNF11 is a SARA-interacting protein residing on early and late endosomes, as well as the fast recycling compartment. RNF11 and SARA interact with the ESCRT-0 subunits STAM2 and Eps15b, but only RNF11 associates with the core subunit Hrs. Both gain- and loss-of-function perturbation of RNF11 and SARA levels result in delayed degradation of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-activated EGF receptor (EGFR), while loss-of-function sustained/enhanced EGF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that RNF11 and SARA are functional components of the ESCRT-0 complexes. Moreover, SARA interacts with clathrin, the ESCRT-I subunit Tsg101 and ubiquitinated cargo exhibiting all the properties of Hrs concerning ESCRT-0 function, indicating that it could substitute Hrs in some ESCRT-0 complexes. These results suggest that RNF11 and SARA participate structurally and functionally in the ESCRT-dependent lysosomal degradation of receptors. As a consequence, the negative influence that perturbation of RNF11 and SARA levels exerts on the lysosomal degradation of EGFRs could underscore the reported overexpression of RNF11 in several cancers. In these cancers, deficient termination of the oncogenic signaling of mutated receptors, such as the EGFRs, through suboptimal lysosomal degradation could contribute to the process of malignant transformation.

  8. Seismic retrofitting of reinforced concrete frame structures using GFRP-tube-confined-concrete composite braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi B., Nasim S.; Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new type of structural bracing intended for seismic retrofitting use in framed structures. This special composite brace, termed glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP)-tube-confined-concrete composite brace, is comprised of concrete confined by a GFRP tube and an inner steel core for energy dissipation. Together with a contribution from the GFRP-tube confined concrete, the composite brace shows a substantially increased stiffness to control story drift, which is often a preferred feature in seismic retrofitting. An analysis model is established and implemented in a general finite element analysis program — OpenSees, for simulating the load-displacement behavior of the composite brace. Using this model, a parametric study of the hysteretic behavior (energy dissipation, stiffness, ductility and strength) of the composite brace was conducted under static cyclic loading and it was found that the area ratio of steel core to concrete has the greatest influence among all the parameters considered. To demonstrate the application of the composite brace in seismic retrofitting, a three-story nonductile reinforced concrete (RC) frame structure was retrofitted with the composite braces. Pushover analysis and nonlinear time-history analyses of the retrofitted RC frame structure was performed by employing a suite of 20 strong ground motion earthquake records. The analysis results show that the composite braces can effectively reduce the peak seismic responses of the RC frame structure without significantly increasing the base shear demand.

  9. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  10. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  11. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  12. Effects of the interactions of classical swine fever virus core protein with proteins of SUMOylation pathway on virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nucleocapsid or Core protein serves a protective function for the viral RNA, and acts as a transcriptional regulator. However studies involving the CSFV Core protein have been limited. To gain insight into other functions of the Core protein, particularly into ...

  13. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  14. An attempt to describe a relationship between concrete deterioration quantities and bridge deck condition assessment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnavina, Aleksandra V.; Sneed, Lesley H.; Khamzin, Aleksey K.; Torgashov, Evgeniy V.; Anderson, Neil L.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a study of the performance of four techniques - visual inspection, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Ultrasonic Surface Wave (USW), and core control - that were used to assess condition of a concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck was then rehabilitated using hydrodemolition, and the concrete removed during hydrodemolition was assumed to be deteriorated. LiDAR measurements of concrete depth removal collected after hydrodemolition were used as ground truth. Comparisons of bridge deck condition assessment data and LiDAR concrete removal measurements were performed in this study. The comparisons attempt to find and describe a possible relationship between bridge deck assessment techniques and quantities of concrete deterioration.

  15. The Presence of Modifiable Residues in the Core Peptide Part of Precursor Nisin Is Not Crucial for Precursor Nisin Interactions with NisB- and NisC

    PubMed Central

    Khusainov, Rustem; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin – nisin modification enzymes interactions, since it has previously been shown that the construct containing only the nisin leader sequence is not sufficient to pull-down the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. Serines and threonines in the core peptide part are the residues that NisB specifically dehydrates, and cysteines are the residues that NisC stereospecifically couples to the dehydrated amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that increasing the number of negatively charged residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin, which are absent in wild-type nisin, does not abolish binding of precursor nisin to the modification enzymes NisB and NisC, but dramatically decreases the antimicrobial potency of these nisin mutants. An unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all serines and threonines in the core peptide part and an unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all cysteines in the core peptide part still bind the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC, suggesting that these residues are not essential for direct interactions with the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. These results are important for lantibiotic engineering studies. PMID:24040355

  16. Interaction between complement receptor gC1qR and hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits T-lymphocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kittlesen, David J.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Yao, Zhi Qiang; Braciale, Thomas J.; Hahn, Young S.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen that is remarkably efficient at establishing persistent infection. The HCV core protein is the first protein expressed during the early phase of HCV infection. Our previous work demonstrated that the HCV core protein suppresses host immune responses, including anti-viral cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in a murine model. To investigate the mechanism of HCV core-mediated immunosuppression, we searched for host proteins capable of associating with the core protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. Using the core protein as bait, we screened a human T cell–enriched expression library and identified a gene encoding the gC1q receptor (gC1qR). C1q is a ligand of gC1qR and is involved in the early host defense against infection. Like C1q, HCV core can inhibit T-cell proliferative responses in vitro. This core-induced anti–T-cell proliferation is reversed by addition of anti-gC1qR Ab in a T-cell proliferation assay. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the interaction between core and gC1qR indicates that HCV core binds the region spanning amino acids 188 to 259 of gC1qR, a site distinct from the binding region of C1q. The inhibition of T-cell responsiveness by HCV core may have important implications for HCV persistence in humans. PMID:11086025

  17. 221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, J.T.

    1998-05-28

    This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade.

  18. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  19. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-08

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  20. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  1. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  2. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  3. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  4. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  5. Lightweight polymer concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.; Reams, W.

    1985-08-01

    Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as Insulating Polymer Concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivites from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/h-ft-/sup 0/F. Compressive strengths, dependent upon the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also be sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently under way as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

  6. Emotional Intolerance and Core Features of Anorexia Nervosa: A Dynamic Interaction during Inpatient Treatment? Results from a Longitudinal Diary Study

    PubMed Central

    Stroe-Kunold, Esther; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Stadnitski, Tatjana; Wesche, Daniela; Herzog, Wolfgang; Schwab, Michael; Wild, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of emotion dysregulation with regard to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasingly discussed. It is both assumed that AN symptoms have an impact on difficulties in tolerating aversive emotions and that—conversely—emotion dysregulation influences AN. To date, such conclusions are drawn on the basis of cross-sectional data not allowing for inferences on the temporal dynamics. The current study investigates the longitudinal interaction between emotional intolerance and core AN symptoms over the course of inpatient treatment by comparing patients with high (BMI<15 kg/m2) vs. low symptom severity (HSS vs. LSS). Method The study adopted a longitudinal, process-oriented design with N = 16 analysed electronic diaries. Throughout the course of their inpatient treatment, the patients answered questions daily about emotional intolerance and their AN-specific cognitions and behaviours. The temporal dynamics between emotional intolerance and these variables were analysed using a multivariate time series approach. Results The time series of the processes under investigation adequately reflected the individual treatment courses. The majority of significant linear time trends was found for HSS patients. Most importantly, analysis revealed significant temporal interactions between emotional intolerance and AN symptoms in almost 70% of HSS patients. Thereby, up to 37% of variance in eating restraint and up to 23% in weight concern could be attributed to changes in emotional intolerance. Conclusions The findings support the notion that intolerable unpleasant emotions in severely affected AN patients influence their psychopathology. Additionally, time series analysis outlined the inter-individual heterogeneity of psychosomatic treatment courses of AN patients. PMID:27191959

  7. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  8. Precast Concrete Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    quirements. The concrete used low-weight sintered shale aggregate and high early-strength portland cement that obtained a 28-day compressive strength of...in- place concrete. Typical reasons suggested for precasting have included aggregate shortage, future pas.oment settlement or heaving, critical speed...pavements. Various devices such as dowel bars, tie bar, keyways, or aggregate interlock from sawn construction joints transfer a portion of the load

  9. Study of a model Fermi liquid interacting via a hard-core repulsive potential and an attractive tail

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Tai Kai; Singwi, K.S.

    1986-02-01

    In this paper we present an extensive microscopic study of the collective and single-particle properties of a model Fermi liquid whose particles interact via a repulsive hard-core potential and an attractive tail. The model system is intended to simulate liquid /sup 3/He. The study is based on an approximate scheme of Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjoelander (STLS) which was devised to treat correlations in Coulomb Fermi liquids. The primary aim of this study is to learn whether the model system is capable of reproducing some of the salient features observed in normal liquid /sup 3/He, and about the role of the repulsive and attractive parts of the potential. We have calculated the Landau parameters F/sub 0//sup s/ and F/sub 0//sup a/ and their variation with pressure, the wave number and pressure dependence of the spin-symmetric and spin-anti-symmetric polarization potentials, pressure dependence of the dispersion of the zero sound, the static structure factors and the quasiparticle mass. Although we make no quantitative claims when comparing our calculations with experiments in real liquid /sup 3/He, we do conclude that our model system within the framework of the STLS scheme can account qualitatively for the latter. Besides, since the theory is microscopic in nature and is parameter free, it has enabled us to understand better the role of the repulsive and the attractive parts of the bare potential in determining the properties of liquid /sup 3/He. 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Interactions of Murine Leukemia Virus Core Components: Characterization of Reverse Transcriptase Packaged in the Absence of 70S Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gerwin, Brenda I.; Levin, Judith G.

    1977-01-01

    Virions produced by cells in the presence of actinomycin D (Act D virions) contain reverse transcriptase but are deficient in 70S genomic RNA. To assess the role of genomic RNA in encapsidation of a functional reverse transcriptase and to study the interaction of the enzyme and its template in the cores of intact virions, the reverse transcriptase enzymes of normal and Act D virions were compared. The enzymes were indistinguishable by column chromatography, sedimentation velocity, or template/primer preferences. In addition, these enzymes showed equal sensitivity to inactivation by antibodies directed against Rauscher murine leukemia virus DNA polymerase. The enzymes from Act D and normal virions had similar thermal decay rates and were both protected against heat denaturation by natural and synthetic template/primers. By these criteria, the DNA polymerase molecules synthesized and assembled into virions in the absence of genomic RNA are identical to those packaged under normal conditions. Additional studies designed to measure protection of reverse transcriptase by genomic RNA were carried out by comparing the thermal lability of the enzyme in intact Act D and normal virions. The thermal decay rate of reverse transcriptase in Act D virions was identical to that in control virions. In contrast to the lability of the virion-associated enzyme, however, genomic RNA in control virions was stable to heat treatment. PMID:72160

  11. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  12. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  13. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  14. Autoinhibitory Interdomain Interactions and Subfamily-specific Extensions Redefine the Catalytic Core of the Human DEAD-box Protein DDX3.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Condon, Kendall J; Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-29

    DEAD-box proteins utilize ATP to bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes. All DEAD-box proteins share a conserved core that consists of two RecA-like domains. The core is flanked by subfamily-specific extensions of idiosyncratic function. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins is of particular interest as members function during protein translation, are essential for viability, and are frequently altered in human malignancies. Here, we define the function of the subfamily-specific extensions of the human DEAD-box protein DDX3. We describe the crystal structure of the subfamily-specific core of wild-type DDX3 at 2.2 Å resolution, alone and in the presence of AMP or nonhydrolyzable ATP. These structures illustrate a unique interdomain interaction between the two ATPase domains in which the C-terminal domain clashes with the RNA-binding surface. Destabilizing this interaction accelerates RNA duplex unwinding, suggesting that it is present in solution and inhibitory for catalysis. We use this core fragment of DDX3 to test the function of two recurrent medulloblastoma variants of DDX3 and find that both inactivate the protein in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results redefine the structural and functional core of the DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins.

  15. Autoinhibitory Interdomain Interactions and Subfamily-specific Extensions Redefine the Catalytic Core of the Human DEAD-box Protein DDX3*

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Condon, Kendall J.; Sharma, Deepak; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins utilize ATP to bind and remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes. All DEAD-box proteins share a conserved core that consists of two RecA-like domains. The core is flanked by subfamily-specific extensions of idiosyncratic function. The Ded1/DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins is of particular interest as members function during protein translation, are essential for viability, and are frequently altered in human malignancies. Here, we define the function of the subfamily-specific extensions of the human DEAD-box protein DDX3. We describe the crystal structure of the subfamily-specific core of wild-type DDX3 at 2.2 Å resolution, alone and in the presence of AMP or nonhydrolyzable ATP. These structures illustrate a unique interdomain interaction between the two ATPase domains in which the C-terminal domain clashes with the RNA-binding surface. Destabilizing this interaction accelerates RNA duplex unwinding, suggesting that it is present in solution and inhibitory for catalysis. We use this core fragment of DDX3 to test the function of two recurrent medulloblastoma variants of DDX3 and find that both inactivate the protein in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results redefine the structural and functional core of the DDX3 subfamily of DEAD-box proteins. PMID:26598523

  16. Use of cactus in mortars and concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Eklund, L.; Villarreal, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Natural polymers have been used in ancient times to improve the durability of lime-based mortars and concretes. The natural polymers used were locally available. In this work, cactus extract from Mexico has been tested in a Portland cement mortar. It is seen that cactus extract increases the plasticity of the mortar and improves water absorption and freeze-salt resistance. Calcium hydroxide produced by Portland cement hydration interacts with the components of cactus extract, polysaccharides or proteins, and forms complexes. It affects the crystallization process. Painting of the concrete with this extract has also shown improved water resistance.

  17. Adhesion mechanisms of arc-sprayed zinc on concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legoux, J. G.; Dallaire, S.

    1995-12-01

    Arc-sprayed zinc coatings can provide cathodic protection against corrosion to steel reinforcement in concrete. Because the adhesion of sprayed zinc on concrete is of major concern, the parameters related to zinc deposition and concrete preparation that affect the adhesion have been previously investigated. However, little attention has been devoted to determining which basic mechanisms are responsible for the adhesion of molten zinc on concrete. Because the interaction of molten zinc droplets with the concrete surface is considered physical, this paper is focused on the influence of surface patterns on the adhesion of arc-sprayed zinc coatings. Concrete surfaces were characterized by image analysis and profilometry techniques to ascertain which surface pattern or components could affect the adhesion of zinc. A modified root mean square (RMS) surface roughness was derived to take into account the different surface mor-phologies seen by sprayed zinc droplets. This modified RMS surface roughness was found to be directly related to the measured bond strength of arc-sprayed zinc on concrete. After the surface profile on con-crete is measured and the surface constituents are considered, the bond strength of arc-sprayed metals on concrete can be forecasted for given deposition parameters.

  18. Chemical interaction of Fe and Al(2)O3 as a source of heterogeneity at the Earth's core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinsky, L; Annersten, H; Dubrovinskaia, N; Westman, F; Harryson, H; Fabrichnaya, O; Carlson, S

    2001-08-02

    Seismological studies have revealed that a complex texture or heterogeneity exists in the Earth's inner core and at the boundary between core and mantle. These studies highlight the importance of understanding the properties of iron when modelling the composition and dynamics of the core and the interaction of the core with the lowermost mantle. One of the main problems in inferring the composition of the lowermost mantle is our lack of knowledge of the high-pressure and high-temperature chemical reactions that occur between iron and the complex Mg-Fe-Si-Al-oxides which are thought to form the bulk of the Earth's lower mantle. A number of studies have demonstrated that iron can react with MgSiO3-perovskite at high pressures and high temperatures, and it was proposed that the chemical nature of this process involves the reduction of silicon by the more electropositive iron. Here we present a study of the interaction between iron and corundum (Al(2)O3) in electrically- and laser-heated diamond anvil cells at 2,000-2,200 K and pressures up to 70 GPa, simulating conditions in the Earth's deep interior. We found that at pressures above 60 GPa and temperatures of 2,200 K, iron and corundum react to form iron oxide and an iron-aluminium alloy. Our results demonstrate that iron is able to reduce aluminium out of oxides at core-mantle boundary conditions, which could provide an additional source of light elements in the Earth's core and produce significant heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary.

  19. Investigation of Lift Bonding for Roller-Compacted Concrete with Low Normal Loads at Variable Placement Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    31  Figure B12. Concrete core in tension test machine...32  Figure B13. Concrete core after tension test was completed. ............................................................. 32  Figure C1...facility is a pug mill style mixer that uses two mixing shafts with attached angled fins to create a shearing and tumbling action to blend the

  20. A Genetic Interaction between the Core and NS3 Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Is Essential for Production of Infectious Virus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel M.; Atoom, Ali M.; Zhang, Xiaozhen; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran; Russell, Rodney S.

    2011-01-01

    By analogy to other members of the Flaviviridae family, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is presumed to oligomerize to form the viral nucleocapsid, which encloses the single-stranded RNA genome. Core protein is directed to lipid droplets (LDs) by domain 2 (D2) of the protein, and this process is critical for virus production. Domain 1 (D1) of core is also important for infectious particle morphogenesis, although its precise contribution to this process is poorly understood. In this study, we mutated amino acids 64 to 75 within D1 of core and examined the ability of these mutants to produce infectious virus. We found that residues 64 to 66 are critical for generation of infectious progeny, whereas 67 to 75 were dispensable for this process. Further investigation of the defective 64 to 66 mutant (termed JFH1T-64–66) revealed it to be incapable of producing infectious intracellular virions, suggesting a fault during HCV assembly. Furthermore, isopycnic gradient analyses revealed that JFH1T-64–66 assembled dense intracellular species of core, presumably representing nucleocapsids. Thus, amino acids 64 to 66 are seemingly not involved in core oligomerization/nucleocapsid assembly. Passaging of JFH1T-64–66 led to the emergence of a single compensatory mutation (K1302R) within the helicase domain of NS3 that completely rescued its ability to produce infectious virus. Importantly, the same NS3 mutation abrogated virus production in the context of wild-type core protein. Together, our results suggest that residues 64 to 66 of core D1 form a highly specific interaction with the NS3 helicase that is essential for the generation of infectious HCV particles at a stage downstream of nucleocapsid assembly. PMID:21957313

  1. The Use of Concrete Experiences in Early Childhood Mathematics Instruction.

    PubMed

    Baroody, Arthur J

    2017-01-01

    Addressed are four key issues regarding concrete instruction: What is concrete? What is a worthwhile concrete experience? How can concrete experiences be used effectively in early childhood mathematics instruction? Is there evidence such experiences work? I argue that concrete experiences are those that build on what is familiar to a child and can involve objects, verbal analogies, or virtual images. The use of manipulatives or computer games, for instance, does not in itself guarantee an educational experience. Such experiences are worthwhile if they target and further learning (e.g., help children extend their informal knowledge or use their informal knowledge to understand and learn formal knowledge). A crucial guideline for the effective use of concrete experience is Dewey's principle of interaction-external factors (e.g., instructional activities) need to mesh with internal factors (readiness, interest). Cognitive views of concrete materials, such as the cognitive alignment perspective and dual-representation hypothesis, provide useful guidance about external factors but do not adequately take into account internal factors and their interaction with external factors. Research on the effectiveness of concrete experience is inconclusive because it frequently overlooks internal factors. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of irradiation effects on concrete structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kontani, O.; Ishizawa, A.; Maruyama, I.; Takizawa, M.; Sato, O.

    2012-07-01

    In assessing the soundness of irradiated concrete of nuclear power plants operated for more than 30 years, reference levels are employed: 1x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} for fast neutrons and 2x10{sup 10} rad (2x10{sup 5} kGy) for gamma rays. Concrete structures are regarded as sound when the estimated irradiance levels after 60 years of operation are less than the reference levels. The reference levels were obtained from a paper by Hilsdorf. It was found, however, that the test conditions in which data were obtained by the researchers referred in that paper are very different from the irradiation and heat conditions usually found in a Light Water Reactor (LWR), and therefore aren't appropriate for assessing the soundness of irradiated concrete of an LWR. This paper investigates the interactions between radiation and concrete and presents the results of gamma ray irradiation tests on cement paste samples in order to provide a better understanding of the irradiation effects on concrete. (authors)

  3. The foundation mass concrete construction technology of Hongyun Building B tower raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Suhua; Wu, Yanli; Zhao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The foundation of Hongyun building B tower is made of raft board foundation which is 3300mm in the thickness and 2800mm beside side of the core tube. It is researched that the raft foundation mass concrete construction technology is expatiated from temperature and cracks of the raft foundation and the temperature control and monitoring of the concrete base slab construction and concrete curing.

  4. TRANS4: a computer code calculation of solid fuel penetration of a concrete barrier. [LMFBR; GCFR

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, C. M.; Kumar, R.; Fink, J. K.

    1980-07-01

    The computer code, TRANS4, models the melting and penetration of a solid barrier by a solid disc of fuel following a core disruptive accident. This computer code has been used to model fuel debris penetration of basalt, limestone concrete, basaltic concrete, and magnetite concrete. Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the importance of various properties on the rate of penetration. Comparisons were made with results from the GROWS II code.

  5. Inspection of prestressed concrete pressure pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, D. L.; Morton, K. J.; Mergelas, B. J.; Kong, X.

    2000-05-01

    A new electromagnetic technique for inspecting prestressed concrete pressure pipe (CPP) for broken prestressing wires is described. CPP is used for water supply lines, power station cooling loops and waste water force lines. The smaller lined cylinder pipes have diameters 400-1200 mm. They have a thin steel cylinder with an inner centrifugally cast concrete core 25-50 mm thick. After curing, high strength prestressing wire is spirally wound, under high tension, onto the steel cylinder. A protective mortar coating is then impacted. Embedded-cylinder pipes have diameters 1.2-7 m. Their construction is similar but they have an additional 80-130 mm layers of concrete cast outside the steel cylinder before the prestressing wire is wound on. The pitch and gage of the wire is chosen to ensure that the concrete is always under compression. The new inspection technique uses a combination of remote field eddy current and transformer coupling effects to detect broken prestressing wires. The tools can access large pipes through small diameter man holes. They can detect single or multiple breaks in the prestressing wire at any point on the circumference and are drawn through a pipe at walking speed. The principles of operation and inspection results are described.

  6. 10. CONCRETE BRIDGE, REINFORCED BEAM TYPE ON CONCRETE, SOUTH CAROLINA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CONCRETE BRIDGE, REINFORCED BEAM TYPE ON CONCRETE, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA (photocopy of drawing) - Salkehatchie Bridge, State Route No. 64 spanning Salkehatchie River, Barnwell, Barnwell County, SC

  7. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. Identification and Targeting of an Interaction between a Tyrosine Motif within Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein and AP2M1 Essential for Viral Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Av, Amotz; Gerber, Doron; Jacob, Yves; Einav, Shirit

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed against hepatitis C virus infection (HCV), a major global health problem. The current model of infectious virus production suggests that HCV virions are assembled on or near the surface of lipid droplets, acquire their envelope at the ER, and egress through the secretory pathway. The mechanisms of HCV assembly and particularly the role of viral-host protein-protein interactions in mediating this process are, however, poorly understood. We identified a conserved heretofore unrecognized YXXΦ motif (Φ is a bulky hydrophobic residue) within the core protein. This motif is homologous to sorting signals within host cargo proteins known to mediate binding of AP2M1, the μ subunit of clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), and intracellular trafficking. Using microfluidics affinity analysis, protein-fragment complementation assays, and co-immunoprecipitations in infected cells, we show that this motif mediates core binding to AP2M1. YXXΦ mutations, silencing AP2M1 expression or overexpressing a dominant negative AP2M1 mutant had no effect on HCV RNA replication, however, they dramatically inhibited intra- and extracellular infectivity, consistent with a defect in viral assembly. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis revealed that core's YXXΦ motif mediates recruitment of AP2M1 to lipid droplets and that the observed defect in HCV assembly following disruption of core-AP2M1 binding correlates with accumulation of core on lipid droplets, reduced core colocalization with E2 and reduced core localization to trans-Golgi network (TGN), the presumed site of viral particles maturation. Furthermore, AAK1 and GAK, serine/threonine kinases known to stimulate binding of AP2M1 to host cargo proteins, regulate core-AP2M1 binding and are essential for HCV assembly. Last, approved anti-cancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK not only disrupt core-AP2M1 binding, but also significantly inhibit HCV assembly and infectious virus production

  9. Performance of concrete pavements containing recycled concrete aggregate. Interim report, October 1993-October 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.J.; Cuttell, G.D.; Vandenbossche, J.M.; Yu, H.T.; Smith, K.D.

    1997-03-01

    This interim report documents the field performance of nine concrete pavement projects that incorporate recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) in the construction of the pavement. Multiple sections were evaluated on many of the nine projects, due to perceived differences in performance levels or variations in pavement design (such as the use of virgin aggregate or the inclusion of dowel bars). All told, a total of 17 sections (of which 12 contain RCA) were subjected to an extensive field testing program, consisting of pavement condition surveys, drainage surveys, falling weight deflectometer (FWD) testing, coring, and serviceability assessments. A minimum of eight cores were retrieved from each section for laboratory evaluation of compressive strength, split tensile strength, dynamic elastic modulus, static elastic modulus, and thermal coefficient of expansion, as well as for volumetric surface testing and petrographic analyses.

  10. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  11. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  12. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGH-DENSITY CORE IN TAURUS: DYNAMICAL GAS INTERACTION AT THE POSSIBLE SITE OF A MULTIPLE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Saigo, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akiko; Fukui, Yasuo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomida, Kengo

    2014-07-01

    Starless dense cores eventually collapse dynamically, forming protostars inside them, and the physical properties of the cores determine the nature of the forming protostars. We report ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward MC27 or L1521F, which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which has a very high density of ∼10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, within a region of several hundred AU around a very low-luminosity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The molecular line observation shows several cores with an arc-like structure, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures revealed in the present observations suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as the formation of multiple stars and the origin of the initial mass function of stars.

  13. Retrofitting the AutoBayes Program Synthesis System with Concrete Syntax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Visser, Eelco

    2004-01-01

    AutoBayes is a fully automatic, schema-based program synthesis system for statistical data analysis applications. Its core component is a schema library. i.e., a collection of generic code templates with associated applicability constraints which are instantiated in a problem-specific way during synthesis. Currently, AutoBayes is implemented in Prolog; the schemas thus use abstract syntax (i.e., Prolog terms) to formulate the templates. However, the conceptual distance between this abstract representation and the concrete syntax of the generated programs makes the schemas hard to create and maintain. In this paper we describe how AutoBayes is retrofitted with concrete syntax. We show how it is integrated into Prolog and describe how the seamless interaction of concrete syntax fragments with AutoBayes's remaining legacy meta-programming kernel based on abstract syntax is achieved. We apply the approach to gradually mitigate individual schemas without forcing a disruptive migration of the entire system to a different First experiences show that a smooth migration can be achieved. Moreover, it can result in a considerable reduction of the code size and improved readability of the code. In particular, abstracting out fresh-variable generation and second-order term construction allows the formulation of larger continuous fragments.

  14. X-ray absorption near-edge structure in alpha-quartz and stishovite: Ab initio calculation with core--hole interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Shang-Di; Ching, W. Y.

    2001-06-11

    Ab initio calculation of the XANSE/ELNES spectra for {alpha} quartz and stishovite were carried out using a large-supercell approach that includes the electron--core--hole interaction. Excellent agreements with experimental spectra were obtained for Si--K, Si--L{sub 2,3}, and O--K edges. The usual interpretation using orbital-resolved local density of states in the conduction band is unsatisfactory.

  15. X-ray absorption near-edge structure in alpha-quartz and stishovite: Ab initio calculation with core{endash}hole interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Shang-Di; Ching, W. Y.

    2001-06-11

    Ab initio calculation of the XANSE/ELNES spectra for {alpha} quartz and stishovite were carried out using a large-supercell approach that includes the electron{endash}core{endash}hole interaction. Excellent agreements with experimental spectra were obtained for Si{endash}K, Si{endash}L{sub 2,3}, and O{endash}K edges. The usual interpretation using orbital-resolved local density of states in the conduction band is unsatisfactory. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Synthesis of biotin-labelled core glycans of GPI anchors and their application in the study of GPI interaction with pore-forming bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Zhifang; Guo, Jiatong; Guo, Zhongwu

    2017-06-06

    A convergent strategy was developed for the first-time synthesis of biotin-labeled GPI core glycans. These GPI conjugates are useful for various biological studies showcased by their application in the scrutiny of pore-forming bacterial toxin-GPI interaction, revealing that the phosphate group at the GPI inositol 1-O-position had a significant impact on GPI-toxin binding.

  17. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  18. Stability of concrete dam: case history

    SciTech Connect

    Stelle, W.W.; Rubin, D.I.; Buhac, H.J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of Claytor Dam was reevaluated under probable maximum flood conditions. The structure is a concrete gravity dam with a gated spillway. The foundation is karstic limestone that was treated before construction. The anchor wall at the upstream face of the dam plays an important role in the stability of the structure. The pressure relief wells' efficiency is examined in detail as well as the hydraulic conditions used in the stability analyses. Drilling and laboratory test results of rock and concrete including direct tensile tests of the critical core-rock interface are described. Stability analysis using two different uplift assumptions are discussed and a method of determining the increase head above tailwater level at the line of drains caused by flooding conditions are given.

  19. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  20. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  1. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui; Zhu, Hongjun

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  2. Micromechanics of Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-25

    reflects the dispersion of the coarse aggregates on the mesoscale. Specifically, the experimental measure- ments indicate ( Mindess and Young 1981, Zaitsev...Mecanique des Materiaux Solides, Dunod, Paris. Mindess , S. and J. Young (1981), Concrete, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Mura, T. (1982

  3. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  4. Heidrun concrete TLP: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Munkejord, T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper gives a summary of the Heidrun substructure including tethers and foundations. The focus will although be on the concrete substructure. The Heidrun Field is located in 345 m water depth in the northern part of the Haltenbanken area, approximately 100N miles from the west coast of mid-Norway. The field is developed by means of a concrete Tension Leg Platform (TLP) by Conoco Norway Inc. The TLP will be moored by 16 steel tethers, arranged in groups of four per corner, which secure the substructure (hull) to the concrete foundations. A general view of the TLP is shown. The Heidrun TLP will be the northern most located platform in the North Sea when installed at Haltenbanken in 1995. Norwegian Contractors a.s (NC) is undertaking the Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation (EPCI) contract for the Heidrun TLP substructure. This comprises the complete delivery of the hull with two module support beams (MSB), including all mechanical outfitting. Furthermore, NC will perform all marine operations related to the substructure. For the concrete foundations NC has performed the detailed engineering work and has been responsible for the two to field and installation of the foundations.

  5. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of {sup 99}Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying <400 V and <1 A for 1--3 h (energy consumption of 0.4--12 kWh/ft{sup 2}).

  6. Concrete Forms; Carpentry: 901890.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in planning, laying out, and building various type forms for concrete. The course contains seven blocks of study totaling 135 hours in length. The student will be expected to have mastered basic construction skills and basic mathematics. Upon completing the course, the student will have an…

  7. Forterra Concrete Products, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Forterra Concrete Products, Inc., a business located at 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX, 75062, for alleged violations at its facility located at 23600 W. 40th St

  8. Biochemical mapping of interactions within the intraflagellar transport (IFT) B core complex: IFT52 binds directly to four other IFT-B subunits.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Vetter, Melanie; Morawetz, Michaela; Lorentzen, Esben

    2011-07-29

    Cilia and flagella are complex structures emanating from the surface of most eukaroytic cells and serve important functions including motility, signaling, and sensory reception. A process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) is of central importance to ciliary assembly and maintenance. The IFT complex is required for this transport and consists of two distinct multisubunit subcomplexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. Despite the importance of the IFT complex, little is known about its overall architecture. This paper presents a biochemical dissection of the molecular interactions within the IFT-B core complex. Two stable subcomplexes consisting of IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25 were recombinantly co-expressed and purified. We identify a novel interaction between IFT70/52 and map the interaction domains between IFT52 and the other subunits within the IFT88/70/52/46 complex. Additionally, we show that IFT52 binds directly to the IFT81/74/27/25 complex, indicating that it could mediate the interaction between the two subcomplexes. Our data lead to an improved architectural map for the IFT-B core complex with new interactions as well as domain resolution mapping for several subunits.

  9. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  10. The 57Fe hyperfine interactions in human liver ferritin and its iron-polymaltose analogues: the heterogeneous iron core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Human liver ferritin and its iron-polymaltose pharmaceutical analogues Ferrum Lek, Maltofer® and Ferrifol® were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy at 295 and 90 K. The Mössbauer spectra were fitted on the basis of a new model of heterogeneous iron core structure using five quadrupole doublets. These components were related to the corresponding more or less close-packed iron core layers/regions demonstrating some variations in the 57Fe hyperfine parameters for the studied samples.

  11. Long-range interactions in the effective low-energy Hamiltonian of Sr2IrO4 : A core-to-core resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrestini, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Moretti Sala, M.; Hu, Z.; Kasinathan, D.; Ko, K.-T.; Glatzel, P.; Rossi, M.; Cafun, J.-D.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Matsumoto, A.; Takayama, T.; Takagi, H.; Tjeng, L. H.; Haverkort, M. W.

    2017-05-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of Sr2IrO4 using core-to-core resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The experimental spectra can be well reproduced using ab initio density functional theory based multiplet ligand field theory calculations, thereby validating these calculations. We found that the low-energy, effective Ir t2 g orbitals are practically degenerate in their crystal-field energy. We uncovered that Sr2IrO4 and iridates in general are negative charge transfer systems with large covalency and a substantial oxygen ligand hole character in the Ir t2 g Wannier orbitals. This has far reaching consequences, as not only the on-site crystal-field energies are determined by the long-range crystal structure, but, more significantly, magnetic exchange interactions will have long-range distance dependent anisotropies in the spin direction. These findings set constraints and show pathways for the design of d5 materials that can host compasslike magnetic interactions.

  12. Gamma radiation shielding analysis of lead-flyash concretes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwaldeep; Singh, Sukhpal; Dhaliwal, A S; Singh, Gurmel

    2014-11-04

    Six samples of lead-flyash concrete were prepared with lead as an admixture and by varying flyash content - 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% (by weight) by replacing cement and keeping constant w/c ratio. Different gamma radiation interaction parameters used for radiation shielding design were computed theoretically and measured experimentally at 662keV, 1173keV and 1332keV gamma radiation energy using narrow transmission geometry. The obtained results were compared with ordinary-flyash concretes. The radiation exposure rate of gamma radiation sources used was determined with and without lead-flyash concretes.

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation of a Possible S···S Interaction in the [Cu3S2]3+ Core

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Ritimukta; Yang, Lei; Winikoff, Stuart G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J.; Tolman, William B.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the [Cu3S2]3+ core of [(LCu)3(S)2]3+ (L = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-2R,3R-cyclohexanediamine) is investigated using a combination of Cu and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and calculations at the density functional and multireference second-order perturbation levels of theory. The results show that the [Cu3S2]3+ core is best described as having all copper centers close to, but more oxidized than, Cu2+, while the charge on the S2 fragment is between that of a sulfide (S2−) and a subsulfide (S23−) species. The [Cu3S2]3+ core thus is different from a previously described, analogous [Cu3O2]3+ core, which has a localized [(Cu3+Cu2+Cu2+)(O2−)2]3+ electronic structure. The difference in electronic structure between the two analogues is attributed to increased covalent overlap between the Cu 3d and S 3p orbitals and the increased radial distribution function of the S 3p orbital (relative to O 2p). These features result in donation of electron density from the S-S σ* to the Cu and result in some bonding interaction between the two S atoms at ~ 2.69 Å in [Cu3S2]3+, stabilizing a delocalized S=1 ground state. PMID:21923178

  14. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of core functional bacteria and their synergetic and competitive interactions in denitrifying sulfur conversion-assisted enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Mei; Guo, Jianhua; Wu, Di; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Chen, Guang-Hao; Lu, Hui

    2017-09-07

    Denitrifying sulfur conversion-assisted enhanced biological phosphorus removal (DS-EBPR) has recently been developed for simultaneously removing nitrogen and phosphorus from saline sewage with minimal sludge production. This novel process could potentially enable sustainable wastewater treatment. Yet, the core functional bacteria and their roles are unknown. Here, we used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing coupled with principal coordinates analysis and ANOVA with Tukey's test to unravel the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of functional bacteria and their synergetic and competitive interactions. We did not find any obvious spatial heterogeneity within the bacterial population in different size-fractionated sludge samples, but the main functional bacteria varied significantly with operation time. Thauera was enriched (9.26~13.63%) as become the core functional genus in the DS-EBPR reactors and links denitrifying phosphorus removal to sulfide oxidation. The other two functional genera were sulfate-reducing Desulfobacter (4.31~12.85%) and nitrate-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing Thiobacillus (4.79~9.92%). These bacteria cooperated in the DS-EBPR process: Desulfobacter reduced sulfate to sulfide for utilization by Thiobacillus, while Thauera and Thiobacillus competed for nitrate and sulfide as well as Thauera and Desulfobacter competed for acetate. This study is the first to unravel the interactions among core functional bacteria in DS-EBPR, thus improving our understanding of how this removal process works.

  15. An Advanced Coarse-Grained Nucleosome Core Particle Model for Computer Simulations of Nucleosome-Nucleosome Interactions under Varying Ionic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K+), divalent (Mg2+) or trivalent (Co(NH3)63+) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K+, to partial aggregation with Mg2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  16. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  17. Application of microorganisms in concrete: a promising sustainable strategy to improve concrete durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Ersan, Yusuf Cagatay; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2016-04-01

    The beneficial effect of microbially induced carbonate precipitation on building materials has been gradually disclosed in the last decade. After the first applications of on historical stones, promising results were obtained with the respect of improved durability. An extensive study then followed on the application of this environmentally friendly and compatible material on a currently widely used construction material, concrete. This review is focused on the discussion of the impact of the two main applications, bacterial surface treatment and bacteria based crack repair, on concrete durability. Special attention was paid to the choice of suitable bacteria and the metabolic pathway aiming at their functionality in concrete environment. Interactions between bacterial cells and cementitious matrix were also elaborated. Furthermore, recommendations to improve the effectiveness of bacterial treatment are provided. Limitations of current studies, updated applications and future application perspectives are shortly outlined.

  18. Penetration of concrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Cargile, J.D.; Tzou, R.D.Y.

    1993-08-01

    We developed penetration equations for ogive-nosed projectiles that penetrated concrete targets after normal impact. Our penetration equations predict axial force on the projectile nose, rigid-body motion, and final penetration depth. For target constitutive models, we conducted triaxial material experiments to confining pressures of 600 MPa and curve-fit these data with a linear pressure-volumetric strain relation and with a linear Mohr-Coulomb, shear strength-pressure relation. To verify our penetration equations, we conducted eleven penetration experiments with 0.90 kg, 26.9-mm-diameter, ogive-nosed projectiles into 1.37-m-diameter concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths between 32-40 MPa. Predictions from our penetration equation are compared with final penetration depth measurements for striking velocities between 280--800 m/s.

  19. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  20. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  1. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  2. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  3. Dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member under axial compression considering creep effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Dai, C. H.; Ding, M.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element model of concrete-filled steel tubular member was established by the numerical analysis software considering material nonlinearity to analyze concrete creep effect on the dynamic responses of the member under axial compression and lateral impact. In the model, the constitutive model of core concrete is the plastic damage model, that of steel is the Von Mises yield criterion and kinematic hardening model, and the creep effect at different ages is equivalent to the change of concrete elastic modulus. Then the dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member considering creep effects was simulated, and the effects of creep on contact time, impact load, deflection, stress and strain were discussed. The fruits provide a scientific basis for the design of the impact resistance of concrete filled steel tubular members.

  4. Blunt-crack band propagation in finite-element analysis for concrete structures. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Bazant, Z.P.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The knowledge of concrete fracture is needed in nuclear reactor safety. The question of safety arises from the potential of concrete to crack under thermal loading. It has been postulated that structural concrete could be exposed to very high temperature, which may result from hot reactor coolant or even core debris coming in direct contact with the concrete. The utilization of the blunt crack approach for simulating concrete cracking in a general-purpose code is explored. The difficulties encountered in establishing the proper direction of crack propagation in an arbitrary discretization are described. Crack propagation is considered within the context of two types of solution techniques: (1) implicit solution of the static crack advance, and (2) explicit time integration using a dynamic relaxation technique to simulate the static crack advance. Also, in both solution techniques an elastic model is used to characterize the concrete.

  5. Mechanics of Concrete II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-18

    diffusivity of undamaged concrete is a problem in itself since the diffusivity of the thin transition zones (at the aggregate- cement matrix interface...C3A anhydride remains in the cement after the hydration. Assuming that the amount of gypsum added to portland cement3 clinker is 4% of Mcm (Biczok 1972...enables establishment of rational relationships between the chemical composition of the hardened cement paste, morphology of the pore system, and defect

  6. Nondestructive Concrete Characterization System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), Impact-Echo, Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo, Ultrasonic Attenuation, STTR Report Aldo... ultrasonic testing in conjunction with the resonance frequency. All results were within the specified tolerance of ±1 ft. The compressive strength of the...concrete blocks was measured by measuring the P-wave and S-wave time of travel with the pitch-catch method of ultrasonic testing. All results were

  7. Tonsil concretions and tonsilloliths.

    PubMed

    Pruet, C W; Duplan, D A

    1987-05-01

    Although infrequently seen in many clinical practices, tonsillar concretions can be the source of both fetor oris and physical and social concern for the patient. Though stones rarely form in the tonsil or peritonsillar area, the findings of calcified objects or stones anywhere within the body has long been a subject of interest. The salient features of these entities and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed in this article.

  8. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  9. P20A inhibits HIV-1 fusion through its electrostatic interaction with the distal region of the gp41 fusion core.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shushu; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2015-09-01

    We previously identified an HIV-1 fusion inhibitor P20A targeting HIV-1 gp41 6-HB fusion core. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we investigated the effect of 6-HB surface residue mutations on the binding affinity between P20A and 6-HB. Substitution of positively or negatively charged residues in the distal region of 6-HB with alanines resulted in significant decrease or increase of its binding affinity to P20A, respectively. The 6-HB with E630K, D632K, or E634K mutation exhibited enhanced binding affinity with P20A, suggesting that P20A blocks HIV-1 fusion through electrostatic interaction with the positively charged residues in the distal region of the gp41 fusion core.

  10. Magnetic field assisted self-assembly of ferrite-ferroelectric core-shell nanofibers and studies on magneto-electric interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, G.; Zhang, Ru; Sharma, K.; Janes, C.; Mukundan, A.; Srinivasan, G.; Popov, Maksym

    2014-02-03

    Core-shell nanofibers of nickel ferrite and lead zirconate titanate have been synthesized by electrospinning, assembled into superstructure in uniform or non-uniform magnetic fields, and have been characterized in terms of ferroic order parameters and strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) coupling. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Studies on magnetic field induced polarization P in assembled samples showed a decrease or increase in P, depending on the nature of fibers and strengthening of ME coupling with change in remnant-P as high as 32%. Strong ME interactions were evident from H-induced variation in permittivity at 20–22 GHz.

  11. Unliganded HIV-1 gp120 core structures assume the CD4-bound conformation with regulation by quaternary interactions and variable loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Young Do; Finzi, Andrés; Wu, Xueling; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Lee, Lawrence K.; Moore, Lucas R.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Vicic, David A.; Debnath, Asim K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Bewley, Carole A.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2013-03-04

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike (gp120{sub 3}/gp41{sub 3}) undergoes considerable structural rearrangements to mediate virus entry into cells and to evade the host immune response. Engagement of CD4, the primary human receptor, fixes a particular conformation and primes Env for entry. The CD4-bound state, however, is prone to spontaneous inactivation and susceptible to antibody neutralization. How does unliganded HIV-1 maintain CD4-binding capacity and regulate transitions to the CD4-bound state? To define this mechanistically, we determined crystal structures of unliganded core gp120 from HIV-1 clades B, C, and E. Notably, all of these unliganded HIV-1 structures resembled the CD4-bound state. Conformational fixation with ligand selection and thermodynamic analysis of full-length and core gp120 interactions revealed that the tendency of HIV-1 gp120 to adopt the CD4-bound conformation was restrained by the V1/V2- and V3-variable loops. In parallel, we determined the structure of core gp120 in complex with the small molecule, NBD-556, which specifically recognizes the CD4-bound conformation of gp120. Neutralization by NBD-556 indicated that Env spikes on primary isolates rarely assume the CD4-bound conformation spontaneously, although they could do so when quaternary restraints were loosened. Together, the results suggest that the CD4-bound conformation represents a 'ground state' for the gp120 core, with variable loop and quaternary interactions restraining unliganded gp120 from 'snapping' into this conformation. A mechanism of control involving deformations in unliganded structure from a functionally critical state (e.g., the CD4-bound state) provides advantages in terms of HIV-1 Env structural diversity and resistance to antibodies and inhibitors, while maintaining elements essential for entry.

  12. Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

  13. The agricultural history of human-nitrogen interactions as recorded in ice core δ15N-NO3-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, J. David; Elliott, Emily M.

    2013-04-01

    The advent and industrialization of the Haber Bosch process in the early twentieth century ushered in a new era of reactive nitrogen distributions on Earth. Since the appearance of the first commercial scale Haber Bosch fertilizer plants, fertilizer application rates have greatly increased in the U.S. While the contributions of fertilizer runoff to eutrophication and anoxic dead zones in coastal regions have been well-documented, the potential influences of increased fertilizer applications on air quality and precipitation chemistry are poorly constrained. Here we combine a 255-year record of precipitation nitrate isotopes preserved in a Greenland ice core, historical reconstructions of fertilizer application rates, and field characterization of the isotopic composition of nitrogen oxides produced biogenically in soils, to provide new constraints on the contributions of biogenic emissions to North American NOx inventories. Our results indicate that increases in twentieth century commercial fertilizer use led to large increases in soil NO, a byproduct released during nitrification and denitrification reactions. These large shifts in soil NO production are evidenced by sharp declines in ice core δ15N-NO3- values. Further, these results suggest that biogenic NOx emissions are underestimated by two to four fold in the U.S. NOx emission inventories used to construct global reactive nitrogen budgets. These results demonstrate that nitrate isotopes in ice cores, coupled with newly constrained δ15N-NOx values for NOx emission sources, provide a novel means for estimating contemporary and historic contributions from individual NOx emission sources to deposition.

  14. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases: hDIS3 and hDIS3L

    PubMed Central

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken S; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Larsen, Katja M; Szczesny, Roman J; Drazkowska, Karolina; Pastula, Agnieszka; Andersen, Jens S; Stepien, Piotr P; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a ribonucleolytic complex involved in RNA processing and turnover. It consists of a nine-subunit catalytically inert core that serves a structural function and participates in substrate recognition. Best defined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enzymatic activity comes from the associated subunits Dis3p (Rrp44p) and Rrp6p. The former is a nuclear and cytoplasmic RNase II/R-like enzyme, which possesses both processive exo- and endonuclease activities, whereas the latter is a distributive RNase D-like nuclear exonuclease. Although the exosome core is highly conserved, identity and arrangements of its catalytic subunits in different vertebrates remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the association of two different Dis3p homologs—hDIS3 and hDIS3L—with the human exosome core. Interestingly, these factors display markedly different intracellular localizations: hDIS3 is mainly nuclear, whereas hDIS3L is strictly cytoplasmic. This compartmental distribution reflects the substrate preferences of the complex in vivo. Both hDIS3 and hDIS3L are active exonucleases; however, only hDIS3 has retained endonucleolytic activity. Our data suggest that three different ribonucleases can serve as catalytic subunits for the exosome in human cells. PMID:20531386

  15. Investigating phosphorus interactions with bed sediments in a fluvial environment using a recirculating flume and intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Kirsten; Nash, David; Grayson, Rodger

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus uptake by bed sediments in surface drains can reduce phosphorus exports from irrigated land. This paper reports on an investigation into the effects of velocity and water depth on phosphorus uptake by bed sediments, which consisted of eight sequential flow events conducted in a recirculating flume as well as a concurrent experiment using sediment cores. For the heavy clay bed sediment discussed in this paper, velocity and depth of water column had no significant effect on net phosphorus uptake and the rates of phosphorus uptake in either the cores or the recirculating flume. The most significant factor affecting phosphorus uptake was the experiment number which represented the sequential nature of experiments within the flume and increasing phosphorus saturation of the surface sediments. Of the kinetic equations used to describe phosphorus uptake (Elovich, boundary layer and diffusion) the Elovich equation provided the best representation of the results, both in terms of the adj-R2 values and the absence of systematic errors in the residuals. Results suggest that intact soil cores may be used to parameterise rate equations such as the Elovich equation for use in process-based mathematical models of phosphorus transport in fluvial systems.

  16. Constitutive Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Frp Confined Concrete Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitha, Gopinath; Ramachandramurthy, Avadhanam; Nagesh, Ranganatha Iyer; Shahulhameed, Eduvammal Kunhimoideen

    2014-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are generally used for the seismic retrofit of concrete members to enhance their strength and ductility. In the present work, the confining effect of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite layers has been investigated by numerical simulation. The numerical simulation has been carried out using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the response behaviour of CFRP-wrapped concrete cylinders. The nonlinear behaviour of concrete in compression and the linear elastic behaviour of CFRP has been modeled using an appropriate constitutive relationship. A cohesive model has been developed for modeling the interface between the concrete and CFRP. The interaction and damage failure criteria between the concrete to the cohesive element and the cohesive element to the CFRP has also been accounted for in the modeling. The response behaviour of the wrapped concrete specimen has been compared with the proposed interface model and with a perfectly bonded condition. The results obtained from the present study showed good agreement with the experimental load-displacement response and the failure pattern in the literature. Further, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out to study the effect of the number of layers of CFRP on the concrete specimens. It has been observed that wrapping with two layers was found to be the optimum, beyond which the response becomes flexible but with a higher load-carrying capacity

  17. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  18. Fiber reinforced concrete solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A. J.; Newgard, P. J.

    1985-05-07

    A solar collector is disclosed comprising a glass member having a solar selective coating thereon, and a molded, glass-reinforced concrete member bonded to the glass member and shaped to provide a series of passageways between the glass member and the fiber-reinforced concrete member capable of carrying heat exchanging fluid therethrough. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may be formed by spraying a thin layer of concrete and chopped fibers such as chopped glass fibers onto a mold to provide an inexpensive and lightweight, thin-walled member. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may have a lightweight cellular concrete backing thereon for insulation purposes. The collector is further characterized by the use of materials which have substantially matching thermal coefficients of expansion over the temperature range normally encountered in the use of solar collectors.

  19. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  20. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  1. Fire Resistance of Geopolymer Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-21

    1 Project report – Grant FA23860814096, "Fire resistance of geopolymer concretes" – J. Provis, University of Melbourne 1. Background and...experimental program This project provided funding for us to carry out fire testing of geopolymer concrete specimens and associated laboratory...testing. The focus of this report will be the outcomes of the series of pilot-scale (4’×4’×6”) tests on geopolymer concrete panels, which were conducted

  2. Optimization and influence of parameter affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate: using full factorial design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Thulasirajan; Purushothaman, Revathi

    2017-07-01

    There are several parameters that influence the properties of geopolymer concrete, which contains recycled concrete aggregate as the coarse aggregate. In the present study, the vital parameters affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate are analyzedby varying four parameters with two levels using full factorial design in statistical software Minitab® 17. The objective of the present work is to gain an idea on the optimization, main parameter effects, their interactions and the predicted response of the model generated using factorial design. The parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (8M and 12M), curing time (6hrs and 24 hrs), curing temperature (60°C and 90°C) and percentage of recycled concrete aggregate (0% and 100%) are considered. The results show that the curing time, molarity of sodium hydroxide and curing temperature were the orderly significant parameters and the percentage of Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was statistically insignificant in the production of geopolymer concrete. Thus, it may be noticeable that the RCA content had negligible effect on the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The expected responses from the generated model showed a satisfactory and rational agreement to the experimental data with the R2 value of 97.70%. Thus, geopolymer concrete comprising recycled concrete aggregate can solve the major social and environmental concerns such as the depletion of the naturally available aggregate sources and disposal of construction and demolition waste into the landfill.

  3. Cationic Ionic Liquids Organic Ligands Based Metal-Organic Frameworks for Fabrication of Core-Shell Microspheres for Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qian; Ma, Junqian; Ma, Siqi; Wang, Shengyu; Li, Lijun; Zhu, Xianghui; Qiao, Xiaoqiang

    In this study, new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) nanocrystals modified SiO2 core-shell microspheres were designed with cationic ionic liquids (ILs) 1,3-bis(4-carboxybutyl)imidazolium bromide (ILI) as organic ligands. By further adjustment the growth cycles, the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase was facilely fabricated. The developed stationary phase was respectively characterized via element analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Because the introduction of cationic imidazolium-based ILs ILI for fabrication of the MOFs nanocrystals shell, the new stationary phase exhibits the retention mechanism of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Many polar samples, such as amides, vitamins, nucleic acid bases, and nucleosides, were utilized to investigate the performance of the prepared ILI-01@SiO2 column. Compared to the conventional aminosilica column, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column displays high separation selectivity in a shorter separation time. Furthermore, the new ILI-01@SiO2 column was also used for detection of illegal melamine addition in the baby formula. All the above results demonstrate the new ILI-01@SiO2 core-shell stationary phase is of good potentials for high-selectivity separation the polar samples.

  4. Use of the acoustic method for checking the quality of concrete of hydroelectric and pumped storage stations

    SciTech Connect

    Filonidov, A.M.; Lyubinskii, V.Yu.

    1987-09-01

    This article describes acoustic methods used in the in-service inspection of the dams and peripheral concrete structures of the Toktogul, Kurpsai, and Bratsk hydroelectric and pumped storage plants. The tests were conducted to assess the compression strength, elasticity, and tensile strength of the concretes. Comparative evaluations against drill core studies proved the acoustic methods to be sufficiently accurate in predicting aging behavior and loss of mechanical and physical integrity in the concretes.

  5. Tunable Magnetic Exchange Interactions in Manganese-Doped Inverted Core-Shell ZnSe-CdSe Nanocrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    interaction. c, A diagram showing the relative energies of quantum -confined electron and hole levels in the nanocrystal (Ee and Eh) and the occupied...Nano Lett. 4, 1485–1488 (2004). 8. Bacher, G. et al. Optical spectroscopy on individual CdSe/ZnMnSe quantum dots . Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 524–527 (2001...route towards magnetically active quantum dots . With a view towards enhancing carrier/paramagnetic ion spin interactions, colloidal nanocrystals

  6. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  7. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, P. A. Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  8. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, C F

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined.

  9. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  10. The SufE sulfur-acceptor protein contains a conserved core structure that mediates interdomain interactions in a variety of redox protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Kuzin, Alexandre; Edstrom, William C; Benach, Jordi; Shastry, Ritu; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Honig, Barry; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2004-11-19

    The isc and suf operons in Escherichia coli represent alternative genetic systems optimized to mediate the essential metabolic process of iron-sulfur cluster (Fe-S) assembly under basal or oxidative-stress conditions, respectively. Some of the proteins in these two operons share strong sequence homology, e.g. the cysteine desulfurases IscS and SufS, and presumably play the same role in the oxygen-sensitive assembly process. However, other proteins in these operons share no significant homology and occur in a mutually exclusive manner in Fe-S assembly operons in other organisms (e.g. IscU and SufE). These latter proteins presumably play distinct roles adapted to the different assembly mechanisms used by the two systems. IscU has three invariant cysteine residues that function as a template for Fe-S assembly while accepting a sulfur atom from IscS. SufE, in contrast, does not function as an Fe-S assembly template but has been suggested to function as a shuttle protein that uses a persulfide linkage to a single invariant cysteine residue to transfer a sulfur atom from SufS to an alternative Fe-S assembly template. Here, we present and analyze the 2.0A crystal structure of E.coli SufE. The structure shows that the persulfide-forming cysteine occurs at the tip of a loop with elevated B-factors, where its side-chain is buried from solvent exposure in a hydrophobic cavity located beneath a highly conserved surface. Despite the lack of sequence homology, the core of SufE shows strong structural similarity to IscU, and the sulfur-acceptor site in SufE coincides with the location of the cysteine residues mediating Fe-S cluster assembly in IscU. Thus, a conserved core structure is implicated in mediating the interactions of both SufE and IscU with the mutually homologous cysteine desulfurase enzymes present in their respective operons. A similar core structure is observed in a domain found in a variety of Fe-S cluster containing flavoenzymes including xanthine dehydrogenase

  11. Resonant core spectroscopies of the charge transfer interactions between C60 and the surfaces of Au(111), Ag(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Temperton, Robert H.; Handrup, Karsten; O'Shea, James N.

    2017-03-01

    Charge transfer interactions between C60 and the metal surfaces of Ag(111), Cu(111), Au(111) and Pt(111) have been studied using synchrotron-based photoemission, resonant photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. By placing the X-ray absorption and valence band spectra on a common binding energy scale, the energetic overlap of the unoccupied molecular orbitals with the density of states of the underlying metal surface have been assessed in the context of possible charge transfer pathways. Resonant photoemission and resonant Auger data, measuring the valence region as a function of photon energy for C60 adsorbed on Au(111) reveals three constant high kinetic energy features associated with Auger-like core-hole decay involving an electron transferred from the surface to the LUMO of the molecule and electrons from the three highest occupied molecular orbitals, respectively and in the presence of ultra-fast charge transfer of the originally photoexcited molecule to the surface. Data for the C60/Ag(111) surface reveals an additional Auger-like feature arising from a core-hole decay process involving more than one electron transferred from the surface into the LUMO. An analysis of the relative abundance of these core-hole decay channels estimates that on average 2.4 ± 0.3 electrons are transferred from the Ag(111) surface into the LUMO. A core-hole clock analysis has also been applied to assess the charge transfer coupling in the other direction, from the molecule to the Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Resonant photoemission and resonant Auger data for C60 molecules adsorbed on the Pt(111) and Cu(111) surfaces are shown to exhibit no super-Auger features, which is attributed to the strong modification of the unoccupied molecular orbitals arising from stronger chemical coupling of the molecule to the surface.

  12. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Inhibits Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)-mediated Lipid Mobilization and Enhances the ATGL Interaction with Comparative Gene Identification 58 (CGI-58) and Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V.; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F.; Roddy, Thomas P.; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL−/− mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  14. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  15. Panel zone behavior of moment connections between rectangular concrete-filled steel tubes and wide flange beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Bradley Donald

    2000-10-01

    During the 1990s, guidelines for the detailing of composite joints for seismic safety have been proposed and adopted. Such guidelines were based on the testing of composite joint subassemblies under cyclic loads. The role of the confined concrete core in composite joints has been documented and quantified for systems using steel shapes encased in concrete, as well as for other mixtures of reinforced concrete and structural steel. The need to understand the role of the concrete core in moment connections utilizing concrete-fined tube (CFT) columns still exists. In this research program, the split-tee through-bolted moment connection between wide-flange steel beams and concrete-filled tubes was studied. The aim of the study was to understand the role of the confined concrete core in transferring forces through the joint. Fifteen half-scale panel-zone specimens were designed and tested to model the shear behavior of the split-tee connection. Following an analysis of the results of the panel-zone tests, six fun-scale moment connections were designed and tested. Variables studied were: concrete compressive strength, the b/t ratio (slenderness) of the steel tube walls, and the split-tee contact area against the steel tube. Following an analysis of the test data, design criteria for the concrete contribution to the joint strength are presented, and recommendations are made for the inclusion of CFT systems in the design recommendations for composite joints. Suggestions are made for further research.

  16. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells.

  17. Terminal Ballistics of Concrete-Polymer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    in Portland Cement Concrete 19 8. Effects of Butyl Acrylate on Cratering 20 9. Penetiation of LMC Made with CE1-P 22 10. Cratering in Latex -Modified...Penetration Craterlng Liquid Monomers Concrete Reinforcing Patterns Terminal Ballistics Concrete Cracking Latex -Modified Concrete 20 ABSTRACT...polymerization; (3) latex modified concrete which differed from portland cement concrete only in the sub- stitution of latex emulsion for portions of the

  18. Electron-acoustic-phonon interaction in core/shell Ge/Si and Si/Ge nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Pérez, Darío G.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Marques, G. E.

    2017-04-01

    General expressions for the electron- and hole-acoustic-phonon deformation potential Hamiltonians (HE-DP) are derived for the case of Ge/Si and Si/Ge core/shell nanowire structures (NWs) with circular cross section. Based on the short-range elastic continuum approach and on derived analytical results, the spatial confinement effects on the phonon displacement vector, the phonon dispersion relation and the electron- and hole-phonon scattering amplitudes are analyzed. It is shown that the acoustic displacement vector, phonon frequencies and HE-DP present mixed torsional, axial, and radial components depending on the angular momentum quantum number and phonon wave vector under consideration. The treatment shows that bulk group velocities of the constituent materials are renormalized due to the spatial confinement and intrinsic strain at the interface. The role of insulating shell on the phonon dispersion and electron-phonon coupling in Ge/Si and Si/Ge NWs are discussed.

  19. High-temperature water-rock interactions and hydrothermal environments in the chondrite-like core of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Postberg, Frank; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Mori, Megumi; Hong, Peng K; Yoshizaki, Motoko; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti

    2015-10-27

    It has been suggested that Saturn's moon Enceladus possesses a subsurface ocean. The recent discovery of silica nanoparticles derived from Enceladus shows the presence of ongoing hydrothermal reactions in the interior. Here, we report results from detailed laboratory experiments to constrain the reaction conditions. To sustain the formation of silica nanoparticles, the composition of Enceladus' core needs to be similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites. We show that the presence of hydrothermal reactions would be consistent with NH3- and CO2-rich plume compositions. We suggest that high reaction temperatures (>50 °C) are required to form silica nanoparticles whether Enceladus' ocean is chemically open or closed to the icy crust. Such high temperatures imply either that Enceladus formed shortly after the formation of the solar system or that the current activity was triggered by a recent heating event. Under the required conditions, hydrogen production would proceed efficiently, which could provide chemical energy for chemoautotrophic life.

  20. High-temperature water–rock interactions and hydrothermal environments in the chondrite-like core of Enceladus

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Postberg, Frank; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Mori, Megumi; Hong, Peng K.; Yoshizaki, Motoko; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that Saturn's moon Enceladus possesses a subsurface ocean. The recent discovery of silica nanoparticles derived from Enceladus shows the presence of ongoing hydrothermal reactions in the interior. Here, we report results from detailed laboratory experiments to constrain the reaction conditions. To sustain the formation of silica nanoparticles, the composition of Enceladus' core needs to be similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites. We show that the presence of hydrothermal reactions would be consistent with NH3- and CO2-rich plume compositions. We suggest that high reaction temperatures (>50 °C) are required to form silica nanoparticles whether Enceladus' ocean is chemically open or closed to the icy crust. Such high temperatures imply either that Enceladus formed shortly after the formation of the solar system or that the current activity was triggered by a recent heating event. Under the required conditions, hydrogen production would proceed efficiently, which could provide chemical energy for chemoautotrophic life. PMID:26506464

  1. External magnetic field dependent shift of superparamagnetic blocking temperature due to core/surface disordered spin interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwan; Jang, Jung-tak; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Paek, Sun Ha; Bae, Seongtae

    2017-02-01

    Although the blocking temperature of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNPs) is crucial for various spintronics and biomedical applications, the precise determination of the blocking temperature is still not clear. Here, we present ‘intrinsic’ and ‘extrinsic’ characteristics of the blocking temperature in SPNP systems. In zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC-FC) curves, there was no shift of ‘intrinsic blocking temperature’ at different applied external (excitation) magnetic fields. However, ‘extrinsic blocking temperature’ shift is clearly dependent on the external (excitation) magnetic field. According to our newly proposed physical model, the ‘intermediate spin layer’ located between the core and surface disordered spin layers is primarily responsible for the physical nature of the shift of extrinsic blocking temperature. Our new findings offer possibilities for characterizing the thermally induced physical properties of SPNPs. Furthermore, these findings provide a new empirical approach to indirectly estimate the qualitative degree of the disordered surface spin status in SPNPs.

  2. External magnetic field dependent shift of superparamagnetic blocking temperature due to core/surface disordered spin interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan; Jang, Jung-Tak; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Paek, Sun Ha; Bae, Seongtae

    2017-02-17

    Although the blocking temperature of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNPs) is crucial for various spintronics and biomedical applications, the precise determination of the blocking temperature is still not clear. Here, we present 'intrinsic' and 'extrinsic' characteristics of the blocking temperature in SPNP systems. In zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC-FC) curves, there was no shift of 'intrinsic blocking temperature' at different applied external (excitation) magnetic fields. However, 'extrinsic blocking temperature' shift is clearly dependent on the external (excitation) magnetic field. According to our newly proposed physical model, the 'intermediate spin layer' located between the core and surface disordered spin layers is primarily responsible for the physical nature of the shift of extrinsic blocking temperature. Our new findings offer possibilities for characterizing the thermally induced physical properties of SPNPs. Furthermore, these findings provide a new empirical approach to indirectly estimate the qualitative degree of the disordered surface spin status in SPNPs.

  3. Characterization and radionuclide retention properties of heat-treated concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzler, B.; Borkel, C.; Finck, N.; Heck, S.; Hilpp, S.; Schlieker, M.; Metz, V.; Plaschke, M.; Soballa, E.; Cron, T.; Miassoedov, A.

    This study was performed to obtain insight into the characteristics of contaminated cementitious materials which may result from a light water reactor core melt down accident. Such material arose in a huge amount from the Fukushima disaster. We analyzed the elemental and mineralogical composition of similar, heat-treated material and investigated its radionuclide retention properties. We present the radionuclide retention properties of concrete samples which originally were part of an experiment using a thick-walled concrete recipient that had been heated by simulating a reactor melt down. Batch sorption experiments have been performed with the elements Cs(I), Co(II), and Eu(III) in seawater under aerobic conditions. Sorption coefficients were measured: Rs(Eu) ∼5800 ml g-1 and Rs(Co) ∼110 ml g-1. A tentative value for Cs was determined, adulterated by the relatively high release of Cs from the concrete itself.

  4. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  5. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  6. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  7. Concrete Masonry Designs: Educational Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Randi, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This special journal issue addresses concrete masonry in educational facilities construction. The issue's feature articles are: (1) "It Takes a Village To Construct a Massachusetts Middle School," describing a middle school constructed almost entirely of concrete masonry and modeled after a typical small New England village; (2)…

  8. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  9. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  10. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  11. Interaction between southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus minor core protein P8 and a rice zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Nian-Jun; Xue, Jin; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2017-01-25

    The fijivirus southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) causes one of the most serious viral diseases of rice in China and Vietnam. To better understand the molecular basis of SRBSDV infection, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a rice cDNA library was carried out using P8, a minor core protein of SRBSDV, as the bait. A rice Cys2His2-type zinc finger protein (OsZFP) was found to interact with SRBSDV P8. A strong interaction between SRBSDV P8 and OsZFP was then confirmed by pull-down assays, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that the in vivo interaction was specifically localized in the nucleus of plant cells. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was shown that both the NTP-binding region of P8 and the first two zinc fingers of OsZFP were crucial for their interaction in plant cells. The localization in the nucleus and activation of transcription in yeast supports the notion that OsZFP is a transcription factor. SRBSDV P8 may play an important role in fijiviral infection and symptom development by interfering with the host transcription activity of OsZFP.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  13. New attempts to identify core-mantle interactions in plume-derived materials using ultra-high precision tungsten isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, M.; Puchtel, I. S.; Walker, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Some mantle plume derived materials show coupled 187,186Os enrichments relative to upper-mantle materials that have been interpreted by some to reflect core-mantle interaction (Brandon et al., 1999, 2003, Puchtel et al., 2005). In addition to osmium, tungsten is another element whose isotopic composition can potentially be used to trace core-mantle interactions. Tungsten has one radiogenic isotope, 182W, a decay product of 182Hf, with a half-life of ~9 Myr. Like Os, W is siderophile, under reducing conditions, and, hence, is preferentially incorporated into Earth’s core, whereas Hf is lithophile and is retained in the mantle. Fractionation of Hf from W during core formation is predicted to have led to large differences in 182W/184W between the core and mantle. The use of W isotopes as tracers of core-mantle interaction has been hampered by limitations in the ability to measure W isotopic ratios at the level of ± 10 ppm or better. Within analytical uncertainty, MC-ICP-MS measurements of terrestrial rocks investigated so far show no resolvable 182W anomalies (Scherstén et al., 2004). Over the past year, we have developed a new ultra-high precision 182W/184W measurement protocol using a Triton thermal ionization mass spectrometer, allowing us to resolve 182W anomalies at a ± 6 ppm level (2σ, n=40). All W isotope measurements are performed in a negative ionization mode (WO3-) using a dynamic acquisition scheme. This precision improvement allows us to more rigorously interrogate the W isotopic compositions of materials with potentially deep mantle origins. A major problem in this application of W isotopes is the acquisition of mantle-derived materials that have not been contaminated with crustal W. Here we present W abundances, measured using isotope dilution, and corresponding ultra-high precision W isotopic composition measurements of Archean komatiites from the Kostomuksha greenstone belt (Baltic Shield), for which coupled 186Os-187Os enrichment has been

  14. Interactive Writing in the Disciplines: A Common Core Approach to Disciplinary Writing in Middle and High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael; Dostal, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    In this article we argue that interactive writing (IW), an approach to writing instruction, is uniquely supportive of secondary content-area teachers working to integrate meaningful writing instruction without sacrificing time or attention to content. Drawing on research and our experiences with IW in middle school settings, we explain the roots…

  15. Interactive Writing in the Disciplines: A Common Core Approach to Disciplinary Writing in Middle and High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael; Dostal, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    In this article we argue that interactive writing (IW), an approach to writing instruction, is uniquely supportive of secondary content-area teachers working to integrate meaningful writing instruction without sacrificing time or attention to content. Drawing on research and our experiences with IW in middle school settings, we explain the roots…

  16. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  17. BUILDING MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION USING A CONCRETE FLOOR AND WALL CONTAMINATION PROFILING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Dr. S.,; Charters, G.; Thacker, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    Certain radioisotopes can penetrate concrete and contaminate the concrete well below the surface. The challenge is to determine the extent and magnitude of the contamination problem in real-time. The concrete profiling technology, TRUPROSM in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the material being sampled. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk. Performing a volumetric concrete or metal characterization safer and faster (without lab intervention) is the objective of this characterization technology. This way of determining contamination can save considerable time and money. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilizes or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the area around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated. The goal is to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release.

  18. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete

    PubMed Central

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Barbudo, Auxiliadora; De Brito, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results) from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content. PMID:28787892

  19. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete.

    PubMed

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Barbudo, Auxiliadora; De Brito, Jorge

    2016-02-02

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results) from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  20. Fault-related Fe-oxide concretions and Liesegang bands in sandstones: insights into advective versus diffusive fluid flow in deforming porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, F.; Bezerra, F. H. R.; Vieira, M. M.; Storti, F.

    2012-04-01

    In this contribution we describe the occurrence and geometry of different types of iron oxide deposits in conjunction with the structural architecture and petrophysical-mineralogical properties of segmented strike-slip fault zone developed in poorly lithified, quartz-dominated, heterolithic sandy sediments in the Paraíba Basin, NE Brazil. Development of highly-permeable damage zones surrounding low-permeable mixed zones and fault cores promotes physical mixing of advective Fe2+-rich waters and oxygenated groundwater, favoring iron oxide precipitation as m-scale sand impregnations, cm- to dm-scale concretions, and well cemented dm- to m-thick mineral masses. The formation of hydraulically isolated compartments along segmented strike-slip fault system promotes (i) development of Liesegang bands by pore-water molecular diffusion of O2 into Fe2+-rich stagnant water in a m-thick reaction zone, and (ii) precipitation of iron oxide impregnations and concretions in the fault core-mixed zone boundaries. This study support the role of fault zone architecture and geometry in determining the dominant mode of solutions interaction in porous media, thus leading to the formation of either Fe-Liesegang bands and Fe-concretions in diffusion-dominated and diffusion + advection systems, respectively.

  1. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Prabir; Labbe, Pierre; Naus, Dan

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  2. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  3. Global MHD simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with coupled planetary interior: Induction effect of the planetary conducting core on the global interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Slavin, James A.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Toth, Gabor; Holst, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Mercury's comparatively weak intrinsic magnetic field and its close proximity to the Sun lead to a magnetosphere that undergoes more direct space-weathering interactions than other planets. A unique aspect of Mercury's interaction system arises from the large ratio of the scale of the planet to the scale of the magnetosphere and the presence of a large-size core composed of highly conducting material. Consequently, there is strong feedback between the planetary interior and the magnetosphere, especially under conditions of strong external forcing. Understanding the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-interior interaction at Mercury requires not only analysis of observations but also a modeling framework that is both comprehensive and inclusive. We have developed a new global MHD model for Mercury in which the planetary interior is modeled as layers of different electrical conductivities that electromagnetically couple to the surrounding plasma environment. This new modeling capability allows us to characterize the dynamical response of Mercury to time-varying external conditions in a self-consistent manner. Comparison of our model results with observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft shows that the model provides a reasonably good representation of the global magnetosphere. To demonstrate the capability to model induction effects, we have performed idealized simulations in which Mercury's magnetosphere is impacted by a solar wind pressure enhancement. Our results show that due to the induction effect, Mercury's core exerts strong global influences on the way Mercury responds to changes in the external environment, including modifying the global magnetospheric structure and affecting the extent to which the solar wind directly impacts the surface. The global MHD model presented here represents a crucial step toward establishing a modeling framework that enables self-consistent characterization of Mercury

  4. A mutation in the yeast mitochondrial core RNA polymerase, Rpo41, confers defects in both specificity factor interaction and promoter utilization.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Michio; Jaehning, Judith A

    2004-01-16

    The yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is composed of the core RNAP, Rpo41, and the mitochondrial transcription factor, Mtf1. Both are required for mitochondrial transcription, but how the two proteins interact to create a functional, promoter-selective holoenzyme is still unknown. Rpo41 is similar to the single polypeptide bacteriophage T7RNAP, which does not require additional factors for promoter-selective initiation but whose activity is modulated during infection by association with T7 lysozyme. In this study we used the co-crystal structure of T7RNAP and T7 lysozyme as a model to define a potential Mtf1 interaction surface on Rpo41, making site-directed mutations in Rpo41 at positions predicted to reside at the same location as the T7RNAP/T7 lysozyme interface. We identified Rpo41 mutant E1224A as having reduced interactions with Mtf1 in a two-hybrid assay and a temperature-sensitive petite phenotype in vivo. Although the E1224A mutant has full activity in a non-selective in vitro transcription assay, it is temperature-sensitive for selective transcription from linear DNA templates containing the 14S rRNA, COX2, and tRNAcys mitochondrial promoters. The tRNAcys promoter defect can be rescued by template supercoiling but not by addition of a dinucleotide primer. The fact that mutation of Rpo41 results in selective transcription defects indicates that the core RNAP, like T7RNAP, plays an important role in promoter utilization.

  5. ADS-J1 inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry by interacting with the gp41 pocket region and blocking fusion-active gp41 core formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Qi, Zhi; Guo, Angi; Mao, Qinchao; Lu, Hong; An, Xiuli; Xia, Chenglai; Li, Xiaojuan; Debnath, Asim K; Wu, Shuguang; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-12-01

    We previously identified a small-molecule anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) compound, ADS-J1, using a computer-aided molecular docking technique for primary screening and a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a secondary screening method. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADS-J1 is an HIV-1 entry inhibitor, as determined by a time-of-addition assay and an HIV-1-mediated cell fusion assay. Further mechanism studies confirmed that ADS-J1 does not block gp120-CD4 binding and exhibits a marginal interaction with the HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4. However, ADS-J1 inhibited the fusion-active gp41 core formation mimicked by peptides derived from the viral gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR), as determined by ELISA, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism analysis. Moreover, using a surface plasmon resonance assay, we found that ADS-J1 could bind directly to IQN17, a trimeric peptide containing the gp41 pocket region, resulting in the conformational change of IQN17 and the blockage of its interaction with a short D peptide, PIE7. The positively charged residue (K574) located in the gp41 pocket region is critical for the binding of ADS-J1 to NHR. These results suggest that ADS-J1 may bind to the viral gp41 NHR region through its hydrophobic and ionic interactions with the hydrophobic and positively charged resides located in the pocket region, subsequently blocking the association between the gp41 NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion-active gp41 core, thereby inhibiting HIV-1-mediated membrane fusion and virus entry.

  6. Fluid-rock interactions in seismic faults: Implications from the structures and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of drilling cores from the rupture of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Ma, Shengli; Chen, Jianye; Chen, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    We describe the structural features and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the fault rocks recovered from boreholes at the Golden River site on the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, which activated and slipped along a 240 km-long main surface rupture zone during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The fault, which accommodated co-seismic slip, cuts granitic rocks from the Pengguan complex, in which this earthquake most likely nucleated. Fault rocks, including cohesive cataclasite, unconsolidated breccia and three fault gouges with distinct colors, were identified from the drilling cores. On-going uplift and erosion in the area means that the fault rocks, formed at different depth, were exhumed to the shallow surface during the uplift history of the Longmenshan fault zone. A clear change from fracturing and comminution in the cataclasites and breccia to more pervasive shear/formation of fine grained materials in the gouges has been observed. The gouges are distinct and have accommodated significant displacement in multiple increments of shear. Furthermore, fault rocks recovered from the boreholes display numerous features indicative of fluid infiltration and fluid-rock interaction. Toward the fault core, clay minerals have replaced feldspars. The element enrichment/depletion patterns of the fault rocks show general fluid infiltration trends, such as 1) mobile elements are generally depleted in the fault rocks, 2) the microstructural, mineralogical and geochemical results of the fault rocks consistently indicate that pervasive fluid infiltration and fluid-rock interactions altered feldspars and mafic minerals to clay minerals. The fluid was Mg2 +- and Fe2 +-rich, facilitating formation of chlorite. Isocon analyses further reveal that a large rock volume has been lost, which is attributed to the removal of mobile elements associated with fluid infiltration and perhaps enhanced by pressure solution. These results reflect the accumulated effects of cataclasis and fluid

  7. Magnetic field directed assembly of superstructures of ferrite-ferroelectric core-shell nanoparticles and studies on magneto-electric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Sreenivasulu, G.; Benoit, Crystal; Petrov, V. M.; Chavez, F.

    2015-05-01

    Composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric are of interest for studies on mechanical strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) interactions and for useful technologies. Here, we report on magnetic-field-assisted-assembly of barium titanate (BTO)-nickel ferrite (NFO) core-shell particles into linear chains and 2D/3D arrays and measurements of ME effects in such assemblies. First, we synthesized the core-shell nano-particles with 50-600 nm BTO and 10-200 nm NFO by chemical self-assembly by coating the ferroic particles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst via the "click" reaction. The core-shell structure was confirmed with electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. We obtained superstructure of the core-shell particles by subjecting them to a magnetic field gradient that exerts an attractive force on the particles and align them toward the regions of high field strengths. At low particle concentration, linear chains were formed and they evolved into 2D and 3D arrays at high particle concentrations. Magnetoelectric characterization on unassembled films and assembled arrays has been performed through measurements of low-frequency ME voltage coefficient (MEVC) by subjecting the sample to a bias magnetic field and an ac magnetic field. The MEVC is higher for field-assembled samples than for unassembled films and is found to be sensitive to field orientation with a higher MEVC for magnetic fields parallel to the array direction than for magnetic fields perpendicular to the array. A maximum MEVC of 20 mV/cm Oe, one of the highest reported for any bulk nanocomposite, is measured across the array thickness. A model is provided for ME coupling in the superstructures of BTO-NFO particulate composites. First, we estimated the MEVC for a free-standing BTO-NFO core-shell particle and then extended the model to include an array of linear chains of the particles. The theoretical estimates are in qualitative

  8. Magnetic field directed assembly of superstructures of ferrite-ferroelectric core-shell nanoparticles and studies on magneto-electric interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Sreenivasulu, G.; Benoit, Crystal; Petrov, V. M.; Chavez, F.

    2015-05-07

    Composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric are of interest for studies on mechanical strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) interactions and for useful technologies. Here, we report on magnetic-field-assisted-assembly of barium titanate (BTO)-nickel ferrite (NFO) core-shell particles into linear chains and 2D/3D arrays and measurements of ME effects in such assemblies. First, we synthesized the core-shell nano-particles with 50–600 nm BTO and 10–200 nm NFO by chemical self-assembly by coating the ferroic particles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst via the “click” reaction. The core-shell structure was confirmed with electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. We obtained superstructure of the core-shell particles by subjecting them to a magnetic field gradient that exerts an attractive force on the particles and align them toward the regions of high field strengths. At low particle concentration, linear chains were formed and they evolved into 2D and 3D arrays at high particle concentrations. Magnetoelectric characterization on unassembled films and assembled arrays has been performed through measurements of low-frequency ME voltage coefficient (MEVC) by subjecting the sample to a bias magnetic field and an ac magnetic field. The MEVC is higher for field-assembled samples than for unassembled films and is found to be sensitive to field orientation with a higher MEVC for magnetic fields parallel to the array direction than for magnetic fields perpendicular to the array. A maximum MEVC of 20 mV/cm Oe, one of the highest reported for any bulk nanocomposite, is measured across the array thickness. A model is provided for ME coupling in the superstructures of BTO-NFO particulate composites. First, we estimated the MEVC for a free-standing BTO-NFO core-shell particle and then extended the model to include an array of linear chains of the particles. The theoretical estimates are in

  9. Multiscale Constitutive Modeling of Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Benjamin Shane

    found that the maximum aggregate size of the FAM is mixture dependent, but consistent with a gradation parameter from the Baily Method of mixture design. Mechanistic modeling of these different length scales reveals that although many consider asphalt concrete to be a LVE material, it is in fact only quasi-LVE because it shows some tendencies that are inconsistent with LVE theory. Asphalt FAM and asphalt mastic show similar nonlinear tendencies although the exact magnitude of the effect differs. These tendencies can be ignored for damage modeling in the mixture and FAM scales as long as the effects are consistently ignored, but it is found that they must be accounted for in mastic and binder damage modeling. The viscoelastic continuum damage (VECD) model is used for damage modeling in this research. To aid in characterization and application of the VECD model for cyclic testing, a simplified version (S-VECD) is rigorously derived and verified. Through the modeling efforts at each scale, various factors affecting the fundamental and engineering properties at each scale are observed and documented. A microstructure association model that accounts for particle interaction through physico-chemical processes and the effects of aggregate structuralization is developed to links the moduli at each scale. This model is shown to be capable of upscaling the mixture modulus from either the experimentally determined mastic modulus or FAM modulus. Finally, an initial attempt at upscaling the damage and nonlinearity phenomenon is shown.

  10. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While ongoing progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wave function or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, where the noninteracting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the ground state in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of universal properties including ground-state degeneracy, edge excitations, and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way to finding an interaction-induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases.

  11. Ductility of nonmetallic hybrid fiber composite reinforcement for concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfers, R.; Tamužs, V.; Apinis, R.; Vilks, U.; Modniks, J.

    1996-03-01

    Reinforcing units, FRP, of unidirectional fiber composites for concrete have elastic behavior up to tensile failure. For safety reasons an elongation of 3% at maximum load is usually required for the reinforcement. Ductile behavior with the necessary elongation and stress hardening could be obtained with braided fiber strands around a core of foam plastic, thin glass fiber cylindrical shell, or unidirectional carbon fibers. Braids around a porous core reveal the ductility when epoxy resin breaks up and collapse of core enables the braids to rotate. The same seems to happen at that cross section, where carbon fiber core breaks in tension. The best result is obtained using a cylindrical glass fiber reinforced core shell surrounded with aramid fiber braid.

  12. Investigation on Wall Panel Sandwiched With Lightweight Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmikandhan, K. N.; Harshavardhan, B. S.; Prabakar, J.; Saibabu, S.

    2017-08-01

    The rapid population growth and urbanization have made a massive demand for the shelter and construction materials. Masonry walls are the major component in the housing sector and it has brittle characteristics and exhibit poor performance against the uncertain loads. Further, the structure requires heavier sections for carrying the dead weight of masonry walls. The present investigations are carried out to develop a simple, lightweight and cost effective technology for replacing the existing wall systems. The lightweight concrete is developed for the construction of sandwich wall panel. The EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) beads of 3 mm diameter size are mixed with concrete and developed a lightweight concrete with a density 9 kN/m3. The lightweight sandwich panel is cast with a lightweight concrete inner core and ferrocement outer skins. This lightweight wall panel is tested for in-plane compression loading. A nonlinear finite element analysis with damaged plasticity model is carried out with both material and geometrical nonlinearities. The experimental and analytical results were compared. The finite element study predicted the ultimate load carrying capacity of the sandwich panel with reasonable accuracy. The present study showed that the lightweight concrete is well suitable for the lightweight sandwich wall panels.

  13. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-02-23

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  15. Effect of Concrete Waste Form Properties on Radionuclide Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Skinner, De'Chauna J.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2009-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation) the mechanism of contaminant release, the significance of contaminant release pathways, how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. Numerous sets of tests were initiated in fiscal years (FY) 2006-2009 to evaluate (1) diffusion of iodine (I) and technetium (Tc) from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, (2) I and rhenium (Re) diffusion from contaminated soil into fractured concrete, (3) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, (4) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell, (5) the reactivity and speciation of uranium (VI) (U(VI)) compounds in concrete porewaters, (6) the rate of dissolution of concrete monoliths, and (7) the diffusion of simulated tank waste into concrete.

  16. Active hematite concretion formation in modern acid saline lake sediments, Lake Brown, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Brenda Beitler; Benison, K. C.; Oboh-Ikuenobe, F. E.; Story, S.; Mormile, M. R.

    2008-04-01

    Concretions can provide valuable records of diagenesis and fluid-sediment interactions, however, reconstruction of ancient concretion-forming conditions can be difficult. Observation of modern hematite concretion growth in a natural sedimentary setting provides a rare glimpse of conditions at the time of formation. Spheroidal hematite-cemented concretions are actively precipitating in shallow subsurface sediments at Lake Brown in Western Australia. Lake Brown is a hypersaline (total dissolved solids up to 23%) and acidic (pH ˜ 4) ephemeral lake. The concretion host sediments were deposited between ˜ 1 and 3 ka, based on dating of stratigraphically higher and lower beds. These age constraints indicate that the diagenetic concretions formed < 3 ka, and field observations suggest that some are currently forming. These modern concretions from Lake Brown provide an example of very early diagenetic formation in acid and saline conditions that may be analogous to past conditions on Mars. Previously, the hematite concretions in the Burns formation on Mars have been interpreted as late stage diagenetic products, requiring long geologic time scales and multiple fluid flow events to form. In contrast, the Lake Brown concretions support the possibility of similar syndepositional to very early diagenetic concretion precipitation on Mars.

  17. Contrasting graded effects of semantic similarity and association across the concreteness spectrum.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Jackson, Ella C

    2011-07-01

    Evidence from healthy individuals and neuropsychological patients with deep dyslexia or semantic refractory access dysphasia suggests that abstract and concrete concepts have different dependencies upon associative and similarity-based representational frameworks. However, the importance of information about semantic similarity for concepts that lie across the full concreteness spectrum has not been investigated. Here we report the performance of healthy individuals on an odd-one-out task involving semantically related word triplets that showed continuous variation for the key variables of concreteness, similarity strength, and association strength. In addition, data from a stroke aphasic patient tested on a matching-to-sample task based on the same abstract, middle-concreteness, and concrete stimuli are also presented. The effects of similarity and association strength upon performance were both shown to interact significantly with concreteness, but in opposite directions. The effect of semantic similarity increased with concreteness but the effect of association decreased with concreteness. This research provides further evidence for the proposal that abstract and concrete words have different dependencies upon associative and similarity-based information. It also develops the proposal by providing data that are consistent with a graded and not binary or ungraded model of the relationship between concreteness and these two forms of semantic relationship.

  18. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  19. Core brain networks interactions and cognitive control in internet gaming disorder individuals in late adolescence/early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Qin, Wei; Yu, Dahua; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Jin, Chenwang; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Regardless of whether it is conceptualized as a behavioral addiction or an impulse-control disorder, internet gaming disorder (IGD) has been speculated to be associated with impaired cognitive control. Efficient cognitive behavior involves the coordinated activity of large-scale brain networks, however, whether the interactions among these networks during resting state modulated cognitive control behavior in IGD adolescents remain unclear. Twenty-eight IGD adolescents and twenty-five age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in our study. Stroop color-word task was conducted to evaluate the cognitive control deficits in IGD adolescents. Functional connectivity and Granger Causal Analysis were employed to investigate the functional and effective connections within and between the salience, central executive, and default mode networks. Meanwhile, diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess the structural integrity of abnormal network connections. The abnormal functional connectivity within central executive networks and effective connectivity within salience network in IGD adolescents were detected. Moreover, the inefficient interactions between these two brain networks were observed. In addition, we identified reduced fractional anisotropy in salience network, right central executive network tracts, and between-network (the anterior cingulate cortex-right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex tracts) pathways in IGD individuals. Notably, we observed a significant correlation between the effective and structural connection from salience network to central executive network and the number of errors during incongruent condition in Stroop task in both IGD and control subjects. Our results suggested that impaired cognitive control in IGD adolescents is likely to be mediated through the abnormal interactions and structural connection between intrinsic large-scale brain networks.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo study of hard-core bosons in a pyrochlore lattice with six-site ring-exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieman, Catherine; Rousseau, Valery

    Highly frustrated quantum systems on lattices can exhibit a wide variety of phases. In addition to the usual Mott insulating and superfluid phases, these systems can also produce some so-called ``exotic phases'', such as super-solid and valence-bond-solid phases. An example of particularly frustrated lattice is the pyrochlore structure, which is formed by corner-sharing tetrahedrons. Many real materials adopt this structure, for instance the crystal Cd2 Re2O7 , which exhibits superconducting properties. However, the complex structure of these materials combined with the complexity of the dominant interactions that describe them makes their analytical study difficult. Also, approximate methods, such as mean-field theory, fail to give a correct description of these systems. In this work, we report on the first exact quantum Monte Carlo study of a model of hard-core bosons in a pyrochlore lattice with six-site ring-exchange interactions, using the Stochastic Green Function (SGF) algorithm. We analyze the superfluid density and the structure factor as functions of the filling and ring-exchange interaction strength, and we map out the ground state phase diagram.

  1. Zasp52, a Core Z-disc Protein in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscles, Interacts with α-Actinin via an Extended PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo An; González-Morales, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    Z-discs are organizing centers that establish and maintain myofibril structure and function. Important Z-disc proteins are α-actinin, which cross-links actin thin filaments at the Z-disc and Zasp PDZ domain proteins, which directly interact with α-actinin. Here we investigate the biochemical and genetic nature of this interaction in more detail. Zasp52 is the major Drosophila Zasp PDZ domain protein, and is required for myofibril assembly and maintenance. We show by in vitro biochemistry that the PDZ domain plus a C-terminal extension is the only area of Zasp52 involved in the interaction with α-actinin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of 5 amino acid residues in the N-terminal part of the PDZ domain, within the PWGFRL motif, abolish binding to α-actinin, demonstrating the importance of this motif for α-actinin binding. Rescue assays of a novel Zasp52 allele demonstrate the crucial importance of the PDZ domain for Zasp52 function. Flight assays also show that a Zasp52 mutant suppresses the α-actinin mutant phenotype, indicating that both proteins are core structural Z-disc proteins required for optimal Z-disc function. PMID:27783625

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    PubMed

    Batra, Jyotica; Soares, Alexei S; Mehner, Christine; Radisky, Evette S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  3. Imagining the truth and the moon: an electrophysiological study of abstract and concrete word processing.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Mitra, Priya; Coch, Donna

    2013-05-01

    Previous event-related potential studies have indicated that both a widespread N400 and an anterior N700 index differential processing of concrete and abstract words, but the nature of these components in relation to concreteness and imagery has been unclear. Here, we separated the effects of word concreteness and task demands on the N400 and N700 in a single word processing paradigm with a within-subjects, between-tasks design and carefully controlled word stimuli. The N400 was larger to concrete words than to abstract words, and larger in the visualization task condition than in the surface task condition, with no interaction. A marked anterior N700 was elicited only by concrete words in the visualization task condition, suggesting that this component indexes imagery. These findings are consistent with a revised or extended dual coding theory according to which concrete words benefit from greater activation in both verbal and imagistic systems.

  4. Rapid determination of cocamidopropyl betaine impurities in cosmetic products by core-shell hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Perry G; Zhou, Wanlong

    2016-08-26

    Cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) is a common surfactant widely used in personal care products. Dimethylaminopropylamine (DMAPA) and lauramidopropyldimethylamine (LAPDMA) are two chemicals present as impurities in CAPB and have been reported as skin sensitizers. A rapid and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method, using a core shell hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) column, has been developed to quantify DMAPA and LAPDMA in cosmetic products. Corresponding stable isotopically labeled analogues of the above native compounds were used as internal standards to compensate for matrix effect and for loss of recovery. Each sample was first screened to determine whether the sample needed to be diluted to minimize matrix effects as well as to fit the calibration range. The concept of matrix effect factor (MEF) was introduced to quantitatively evaluate each sample with a unique matrix using the internal standards. Recoveries at three spiking levels of low, medium, and high concentrations ranged from 98.4 to 112% with RSDs less than 5%. This method has been validated and is the first UHPLC-MS/MS method, which uses core shell HILIC column and stable isotopically labeled internal standards to simultaneously determine these two CAPB impurities in cosmetic products. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Electrical modulation of weak-antilocalization and spin-orbit interaction in dual gated Ge/Si core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Yao, J.; Lieber, C. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic transport of holes in Ge/Si core/shell nanowires (NWs) is investigated under the control of dual electrical gating. The strength of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) is analyzed from the weak-antilocalization (WAL) of the magnetoconductance (MC) as a function of a perpendicular magnetic field. By superimposing a small alternating signal on the voltage offset of both gates the universal conductance fluctuations are largely removed from the averaged MC traces, enabling a good fitting to WAL theory models. The tuning of both spin lifetime and the SOI strength is observed in the NWs with dual gating while the carrier density is kept constant. We observe an enhancement of spin lifetime with the mean free path due to the effect of geometrical confinement. The measured SOI energy of 1-6 meV may arise from the dipole coupled Rashba SOI, which is predicted to be one order of magnitude larger than the conventional Rashba coefficient in the Ge/Si core/shell NW system. A clear electrostatic modulation of SOI strength by a factor of up to three implies that Ge/Si NWs are a promising platform for the study of helical states, Majorana fermions and spin-orbit qubits.

  6. Evolution of the liquid-vapor coexistence of the hard-core Yukawa fluid as a function of the interaction range.

    PubMed

    El Mendoub, E B; Wax, J-F; Jakse, N

    2010-04-28

    The present work is devoted to the study of the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of hard-core Yukawa fluids for range parameter lambda, going from 0.5 to 7 by means of an integral equation approach. Both binodal and spinodal lines are computed and compared to available simulation data, and the integral equation used appears to be accurate. We also compare two methods for determining the coordinates of the critical point. The first one, using the rectilinear diameter law, appears to be less accurate than the second one based on the heat capacity at constant volume. It is found that the critical temperature decreases as the range of the interactions increases and that the liquid-vapor coexistence disappears for lambda greater than 6.

  7. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs. PMID:26607036

  8. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  9. Stiffening of short small-size circular composite steel–concrete columns with shear connectors

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Sherif M.; Ramadan, Hazem M.; Mourad, Sherif A.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the effect of shear connectors’ distribution and method of load application on load–displacement relationship and behavior of thin-walled short concrete-filled steel tube (CFT) columns when subjected to axial load. The study focused on the compressive strength of the CFT columns and the efficiency of the shear stud in distribution of the load between the concrete core and steel tube. The study showed that the use of shear connectors enhanced slightly the axial capacity of CFT columns. It is also shown that shear connectors have a great effect on load distribution between the concrete and steel tubes. PMID:27222757

  10. Composition, Alteration, and Texture of Fault-Related Rocks from Safod Core and Surface Outcrop Analogs: Evidence for Deformation Processes and Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Davis, Colter R.; Shervais, John W.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Evans, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the fine-scale variations in mineralogical composition, geochemical alteration, and texture of the fault-related rocks from the Phase 3 whole-rock core sampled between 3,187.4 and 3,301.4 m measured depth within the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole near Parkfield, California. This work provides insight into the physical and chemical properties, structural architecture, and fluid-rock interactions associated with the actively deforming traces of the San Andreas Fault zone at depth. Exhumed outcrops within the SAF system comprised of serpentinite-bearing protolith are examined for comparison at San Simeon, Goat Rock State Park, and Nelson Creek, California. In the Phase 3 SAFOD drillcore samples, the fault-related rocks consist of multiple juxtaposed lenses of sheared, foliated siltstone and shale with block-in-matrix fabric, black cataclasite to ultracataclasite, and sheared serpentinite-bearing, finely foliated fault gouge. Meters-wide zones of sheared rock and fault gouge correlate to the sites of active borehole casing deformation and are characterized by scaly clay fabric with multiple discrete slip surfaces or anastomosing shear zones that surround conglobulated or rounded clasts of compacted clay and/or serpentinite. The fine gouge matrix is composed of Mg-rich clays and serpentine minerals (saponite ± palygorskite, and lizardite ± chrysotile). Whole-rock geochemistry data show increases in Fe-, Mg-, Ni-, and Cr-oxides and hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, and C-rich material, with a total organic content of >1 % locally in the fault-related rocks. The faults sampled in the field are composed of meters-thick zones of cohesive to non-cohesive, serpentinite-bearing foliated clay gouge and black fine-grained fault rock derived from sheared Franciscan Formation or serpentinized Coast Range Ophiolite. X-ray diffraction of outcrop samples shows that the foliated clay gouge is composed primarily of saponite and serpentinite, with localized

  11. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  12. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  13. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  14. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  15. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  16. Microstructural investigations on aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, N.; Ramamurthy, K.

    2000-03-01

    Aerated concrete is characterized by the presence of large voids deliberately included in its matrix to reduce the density. This study reports the investigations conducted on the structure of cement-based autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) and non-AAC with sand or fly ash as the filler. The reasons for changes in compressive strength and drying shrinkage are explained with reference to the changes in the microstructure. Compositional analysis was carried out using XRD. It was observed that fly ash responds poorly to autoclaving. The process of pore refinement in fly ash mixes is discussed with reference to the formation of Hadley grains as well as fly ash hydration. The paste-void interface in aerated concrete investigated in relation to the paste-aggregate interface in normal concrete revealed the existence of an interfacial transition zone.

  17. Essential role of BAF complex interacting with Pax6 in establishment of a core cross-regulatory neurogenic network

    PubMed Central

    Ninkovic, Jovica; Steiner-Mezzadri, Andrea; Jawerka, Melanie; Akinci, Umut; Masserdotti, Giacomo; Petricca, Stefania; Fischer, Judith; von Holst, Alexander; Beckers, Johanes; Lie, Chichung D.; Petrik, David; Miller, Erik; Tang, Jiong; Wu, Jiang; Lefebvre, Veronique; Demmers, Jeroen; Eisch, Amelia; Metzger, Daniel; Crabtree, Gerald; Irmler, Martin; Poot, Raymond; Götz, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of neurogenic fate determination are of particular importance in light of the need to regenerate neurons. Here we define the mechanisms of installing neurogenic fate by the transcription factor Pax6 acting together with the Brg1-containing BAF chromatin remodeling complex. We show that Pax6 physically interacts with Brg1-containing BAF complex and genetic deletion of either Pax6 or Brg1, in the neural stem cells in the adult mouse subependymal zone results in a strikingly similar fate conversion from neuronal progenitors to glia. The Pax6-BAF complex drives neurogenesis by directly activating transcription factors Sox11, Nfib and Pou3f4, which form a cross-regulatory network that maintains neurogenic fate downstream of the Pax6-BAF complex in neuroblasts. Our work identifies a novel concept of stratification in neural fate commitment with a strikingly specific role of the Pax6-BAF complex in initiating a cross-regulatory network essential for maintenance of the neurogenic lineage in the adult brain. PMID:23933087

  18. Rapid Testing of Fresh Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    Board (1962), pp 1-29. 18 Lorman, W. R., "Plastic Concrete Quality Control," Technical Note N-395 (U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, 1961...Fresh Concrete, Presented at the 54th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board , Washington, D.C., January, 1975. 11 30 solution Is...the 54th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board , Washington, D.C., January, 1975. 12 Chadda, L. R., "The Rapiri Determination of

  19. Concrete Construction Using Slipform Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    is a type of extrusion process. Plastic concrete is placed or pumped into moving forms which shape and hold the concrete until it is self-supporting...Various methods of moving and lifting sectional forms were tried, but all had the same defect of leaving numerous horizontal and vertical joints in the...skid-mounted box equipped with a vibrator and extrusion e plate. This machine was pulled by the ready-mix trucks or transit 6 trucks which supplied the

  20. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  1. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  2. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  3. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests.

  4. Self Healing in Concrete Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.; Yang, En-Hua

    The phenomenon of self healing in concrete has been known for many years. It has been observed that some cracks in old concrete structures are lined with white crystalline material suggesting the ability of concrete to self-seal the cracks with chemical products by itself, perhaps with the aid of rainwater and carbon dioxide in air. Later, a number of researchers [1, 2] in the study of water flow through cracked concrete under a hydraulic gradient, noted a gradual reduction of permeability over time, again suggesting the ability of the cracked concrete to self-seal itself and slow the rate of water flow. The main cause of self-sealing was attributed to the formation of calcium carbonate, a result of reaction between unhydrated cement and carbon dioxide dissolved in water [1]. Thus, under limited conditions, the phenomenon of self-sealing in concrete is well established. Self-sealing is important to watertight structures and to prolonging service life of infrastructure.

  5. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  6. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  7. The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstone, Robert L.; Son, Ji Y.

    2005-01-01

    Participants in 2 experiments interacted with computer simulations designed to foster understanding of scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems. The quality of participants' transportable understanding was measured by the amount of transfer between 2 simulations governed by the same principle. The perceptual concreteness of the…

  8. Magneto-controlled bioelectronics for the antigen-antibody interaction based on magnetic-core/gold-shell nanoparticles functionalized biomimetic interface.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dianping; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2008-02-01

    A new protein assay system for the antigen-antibody interaction was developed by immobilization of carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) onto magnetic-core/gold-shell nanoparticles-functionalized biomimetic interface on multiporous polythionine modified magnetic carbon paste electrodes (MCPE). Differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) technique was employed to investigate the antigen-antibody interaction in pH 6.8 acetate acid buffer solution after incubation with various CEA samples for 50 min at room temperature. The peak currents decreased with increased CEA concentration, and were proportional to the CEA concentration in the range of 1.5-60 ng/ml with a detection limit of 0.3 ng/ml at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Moreover, the selectivity, reproducibility and stability of the proposed immunoassay system were acceptable. Compared with the conventional immunoassays, the developed immunoassay system was simple and rapid without multiple labeling and separation steps. Importantly, the proposed methodology would be valuable for diagnosis and monitoring of carcinoma and its metastasis.

  9. Mn2+-Doped CdSe/CdS Core/Multishell Colloidal Quantum Wells Enabling Tunable Carrier-Dopant Exchange Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delikanli, Savas; Scrace, Thomas; Murphy, Joseph; Barman, Biblop; Tsai, Yutsung; Zhang, Peiyao; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Christodoulides, Joseph; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Petrou, Athos; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    We report the manifestations of carrier-dopant exchange interactions in colloidal Mn2+-doped CdSe/CdS core/multishell quantum wells. In our solution-processed quantum well heterostructures, Mn2+ was incorporated by growing a Cd0.985Mn0:015S monolayer shell on undoped CdSe nanoplatelets using the colloidal atomic layer deposition technique. The carrier-magnetic ion exchange interaction effects are tunable through wave function engineering. This is realized by controlling the spatial overlap between the carrier wave functions with the manganese ions through adjusting the location, composition, and number of the CdSe, Cd1-xMnxS, and CdS layers. Our colloidal quantum wells, which exhibit magneto-optical properties analogous to those of epitaxially grown quantum wells, offer new opportunities for solution-processed spin-based semiconductor devices. H.V.D. acknowledges support from EU-FP7 Nanophotonics4Energy NoE, TUBITAK, NRF-CRP-6-2010-02 and A*STAR of Singapore. Work at the University at Buffalo was supported by NSF DMR 1305770.

  10. Core-Shell Structure and Interaction Mechanism of γ-MnO2 Coated Sulfur for Improved Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lubin; Wu, Zhen; Zhao, Gangjin; Sun, Chunyu; Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, XiangXiang; Diao, Guowang

    2017-01-30

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted worldwide interest due to their high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh g(-1) and low cost. However, the practical applications are hampered by capacity decay, mainly attributed to the polysulfide shuttle. Here, the authors have fabricated a solid core-shell γ-MnO2 -coated sulfur nanocomposite through the redox reaction between KMnO4 and MnSO4 . The multifunctional MnO2 shell facilitates electron and Li(+) transport as well as efficiently prevents polysulfide dissolution via physical confinement and chemical interaction. Moreover, the γ-MnO2 crystallographic form also provides one-dimensional (1D) tunnels for the Li(+) incorporation to alleviate insoluble Li2 S2 /Li2 S deposition at high discharge rate. More importantly, the MnO2 phase transformation to Mn3 O4 occurs during the redox reaction between polysulfides and γ-MnO2 is first thoroughly investigated. The S@γ-MnO2 composite exhibits a good capacity retention of 82% after 300 cycles (0.5 C) and a fade rate of 0.07% per cycle over 600 cycles (1 C). The degradation mechanism can probably be elucidated that the decomposition of the surface Mn3 O4 phase is the cause of polysulfide dissolution. The recent work thus sheds new light on the hitherto unknown surface interaction mechanism and the degradation mechanism of Li-S cells.

  11. Identification of distinct SET/TAF-Iβ domains required for core histone binding and quantitative characterisation of the interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karetsou, Zoe; Emmanouilidou, Anastasia; Sanidas, Ioannis; Liokatis, Stamatis; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Politou, Anastasia S; Papamarcaki, Thomais

    2009-01-01

    Background The assembly of nucleosomes to higher-order chromatin structures is finely tuned by the relative affinities of histones for chaperones and nucleosomal binding sites. The myeloid leukaemia protein SET/TAF-Iβ belongs to the NAP1 family of histone chaperones and participates in several chromatin-based mechanisms, such as chromatin assembly, nucleosome reorganisation and transcriptional activation. To better understand the histone chaperone function of SET/TAF-Iβ, we designed several SET/TAF-Iβ truncations, examined their structural integrity by circular Dichroism and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively the histone binding properties of wild-type protein and mutant forms using GST-pull down experiments and fluorescence spectroscopy-based binding assays. Results Wild type SET/TAF-Iβ binds to histones H2B and H3 with Kd values of 2.87 and 0.15 μM, respectively. The preferential binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to histone H3 is mediated by its central region and the globular part of H3. On the contrary, the acidic C-terminal tail and the amino-terminal dimerisation domain of SET/TAF-Iβ, as well as the H3 amino-terminal tail, are dispensable for this interaction. Conclusion This type of analysis allowed us to assess the relative affinities of SET/TAF-Iβ for different histones and identify the domains of the protein required for effective histone recognition. Our findings are consistent with recent structural studies of SET/TAF-Iβ and can be valuable to understand the role of SET/TAF-Iβ in chromatin function. PMID:19358706

  12. A case study on changes of petrophysical properties of Werkendam well-cores due to interaction with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nover, Georg; Hbib, Nasser; Mansfeld, Arne

    2017-04-01

    Changes of porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity and E-modul were studied on sandstones from the Werkendam drillings WED2 (CO2-free) and WED3 (CO2-rich) (The Netherlands). WED2 and WED3 are separated by a fault. Porosities of the untreated samples range from <0.3% up to 16.5%, permeabilities from<0.01 mD up to >160 mD. Significant differences of samples from the WED2 and WED3 well were not detected. The petrophysical properties of the whole set of samples was measured prior to any experiment, then in total 8 samples from WED2 and WED3 were selected for the following experiments with supercritical CO2 (scCO2). These were performed at pressures of 10-12 MPa and temperatures ranging from 100 up to 120°C. The pores were partially saturated with brine (0.1 M NaCl). In a first step the autoclave experiments lasted about 45 days and were then extended in a second series up to 120 days total reaction time. An increase in porosity, permeability and electrical conductivity was measured after each experimental series with scCO2. Two of the samples failed along fractures due to dissolution and thereby caused loss of stability. The frequency dependent complex conductivity was measured in the frequency range 10-3 Hz up to 45 kHz thus having access to fluid/solid interactions at the inner surface of the pores. In a final sequence the uniaxial compressive strength and E-modul were measured on untreated and processed samples. Thus we could get an estimate on weakening of the mechanical stability caused by scCO2-treatment.

  13. Resin systems for producing polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1988-09-01

    When plastics are combined with mixtures of inorganic materials, high-strength, durable, fast-setting composites are produced. These materials are used in structural engineering and other applications, and as a result of the many commercial successes that have been achieved, considerable research and development work is in progress throughout the world. One family of polymer-based composites receiving considerable attention is called polymer concrete. Work in this area is directed toward developing new high-strength durable materials by combining cement and concrete technology with that of polymer chemistry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the types of resins that can be used to form polymer concretes. Resin selection is normally based upon the desired properties for the composite and cost. However, the physical and chemical properties of the resins before and during curing are also important, particularly for field-applied materials. Currently, for normal temperature (0/degree/ to 30/degree/C) applications, epoxy resins, vinyl monomers such as polyester-styrene, methylmethacrylate, furfuryl alcohol, furan derivatives, urethane, and styrene, are being used. Styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) mixtures and styrene-acrylamide-TMPTMA mixtures yield composites with excellent hydrothermal stability at temperatures up to 150/degree/ and 250/degree/C, respectively, and organosiloxane resins have been successfully tested at 300/degree/C. Of equal importance is the selection of the composition of the inorganic phase of the composite, since chemical interactions between the two phases can significantly enhance the final properties. Further work to elucidate the mechanisms of these interactions is needed. 6 refs.

  14. Abstract concepts require concrete models: why cognitive scientists have not yet embraced nonlinearly coupled, dynamical, self-organized critical, synergistic, scale-free, exquisitely context-sensitive, interaction-dominant, multifractal, interdependent brain-body-niche systems.

    PubMed

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; van der Maas, Han L J; Farrell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    After more than 15 years of study, the 1/f noise or complex-systems approach to cognitive science has delivered promises of progress, colorful verbiage, and statistical analyses of phenomena whose relevance for cognition remains unclear. What the complex-systems approach has arguably failed to deliver are concrete insights about how people perceive, think, decide, and act. Without formal models that implement the proposed abstract concepts, the complex-systems approach to cognitive science runs the danger of becoming a philosophical exercise in futility. The complex-systems approach can be informative and innovative, but only if it is implemented as a formal model that allows concrete prediction, falsification, and comparison against more traditional approaches.

  15. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  16. Concrete Durability in Harsh Environmental Conditions Exposed to Freeze Thaw Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamze, Youssef

    Under line Pathology of Materials; one of the environmental causes of damage effects on concrete is freeze thaw cycles, which deteriorate the concrete exposed to water in cold weather. An example of old concrete is a dam project that was built in Canada, in the early 1909-1913. This project was reconstructed in 1932, 1934 and 1972, and required renovation due to the ice abrasion with the freeze/thaw cycles. Before completing any renovation, it is required to analyze the structural stability and the concrete failures of this dam. An investigation was conducted to determine the quality of the concrete in the Piers and in the Bridge Deck Slab. It was also required to determine the basic materials' properties that constitute this project. This will improve the analysis of its stability [10]. Core samples were examined and used as test samples, for the Alkali-Silica reactivity test samples, as well as the compressive strength test, the Chloride Ion test, and the freeze thaw testing which was performed on two sets of 12 concrete core samples that were taken from different locations in the project. These locations are the representations of the age of the concrete. Thus, the age difference between the samples' two sets is four decades. Testing was performed on prisms cut from cores. ASTM C-666 procedure (A) was applied using an automatic test system [6]. It was suggested that a plan for renovation of this project should be performed after the analysis is undertaken to assess the conditions estimating the remaining life of the concrete in this project [15].

  17. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  18. Sodium Exposure Tests on Limestone Concrete Used as Sacrificial Protection Layer in FBR

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, F.C.; Das, S.K.; Sharma, A.K.; Rao, P.M.; Ramesh, S.S.; Somayajulu, P.A.; Malarvizhi, B.; Kasinathan, N.

    2006-07-01

    Hot sodium coming in contact with structural concrete in case of sodium leak in FBR system cause damage as a result of thermo-chemical attack by burning sodium. In addition, release of free and bound water from concrete leads to generation of hydrogen gas, which is explosive in nature. Hence limestone concrete, as sacrificial layer on the structural concrete in FBR, needs to be qualified. Four concrete blocks of dimension 600 mm x 600 mm x 300 mm with 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm cavity were cast and subjected to controlled sodium exposure tests. They have composition of ordinary portland cement, water, fine and coarse aggregate of limestone in the ratio of 1: 0.58: 2.547: 3.817. These blocks were subjected to preliminary inspection by ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and rebound hammer tests. Each block was exposed for 30 minutes to about 12 kg of liquid sodium ({approx} 120 mm liquid column) at 550 deg. C in open air, after which sodium was sucked back from the cavity of the concrete block into a sodium tank. On-line temperature monitoring was carried out at strategic locations of sodium pool and concrete block. After removing sodium from the cavity and cleaning the surfaces, rebound hammer testing was carried out on each concrete block at the same locations where data were taken earlier at pre-exposed stage. The statistical analysis of rebound hammer data revealed that one of the concrete block alone has undergone damage to the extent of 16%. The loss of mass occurred for all the four blocks varied from 0.6 to 2.4% due to release of water during the test duration. Chemical analysis of sodium in concrete samples collected from cavity floor of each block helped in generation of depth profiles of sodium monoxide concentration for each block. From this it is concluded that a bulk penetration of sodium up to 30 mm depth has taken place. However it was also observed that at few local spots, sodium penetrated into concrete up to 50 mm. Cylindrical core samples of 50 mm

  19. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  20. Revealing the core-shell interactions of a giant strain relaxor ferroelectric 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Acosta, Matias; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Bai-Xiang; Stark, Robert W.; Dietz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lead-free relaxor ferroelectrics that feature a core-shell microstructure provide an excellent electromechanical response. They even have the potential to replace the environmentally hazardous lead-zirconia-titanate (PZT) in large strain actuation applications. Although the dielectric properties of core-shell ceramics have been extensively investigated, their piezoelectric properties are not yet well understood. To unravel the interfacial core-shell interaction, we studied the relaxation behaviour of field-induced ferroelectric domains in 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3 (BNT-25ST), as a typical core-shell bulk material, using a piezoresponse force microscope. We found that after poling, lateral domains emerged at the core-shell interface and propagated to the shell region. Phase field simulations showed that the increased electrical potential beneath the core is responsible for the in-plane domain evolution. Our results imply that the field-induced domains act as pivotal points at the coherent heterophase core-shell interface, reinforcing the phase transition in the non-polar shell and thus promoting the giant strain. PMID:27841299

  1. Revealing the core-shell interactions of a giant strain relaxor ferroelectric 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Acosta, Matias; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Bai-Xiang; Stark, Robert W.; Dietz, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Lead-free relaxor ferroelectrics that feature a core-shell microstructure provide an excellent electromechanical response. They even have the potential to replace the environmentally hazardous lead-zirconia-titanate (PZT) in large strain actuation applications. Although the dielectric properties of core-shell ceramics have been extensively investigated, their piezoelectric properties are not yet well understood. To unravel the interfacial core-shell interaction, we studied the relaxation behaviour of field-induced ferroelectric domains in 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3 (BNT-25ST), as a typical core-shell bulk material, using a piezoresponse force microscope. We found that after poling, lateral domains emerged at the core-shell interface and propagated to the shell region. Phase field simulations showed that the increased electrical potential beneath the core is responsible for the in-plane domain evolution. Our results imply that the field-induced domains act as pivotal points at the coherent heterophase core-shell interface, reinforcing the phase transition in the non-polar shell and thus promoting the giant strain.

  2. Electrical resistance of carbon-nanofiber concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Di; Sturm, Mariel; Mo, Y. L.

    2009-09-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material, and carbon nanofibers have many advantages in both mechanical and electrical properties such as high strength, high Young's modulus and high conductivity. In this paper, the mechanical and electrical properties of concrete containing carbon nanofibers (CNF) are experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the compressive strength and per cent reduction in electrical resistance while loading concrete containing CNF are much greater than those of plain concrete. Finally, a reasonable concentration of CNF is obtained for use in concrete which not only enhances compressive strength, but also improves the electrical properties required for strain monitoring, damage evaluation and self-health monitoring of concrete.

  3. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  4. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  5. An Automated Image Processing System for Concrete Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Cave, S.P.; Linder, K.E.

    1998-11-23

    AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) was asked to perform a proof-of-concept study for the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department (MHTD), Research Division, in June 1997. The goal of this proof-of-concept study was to ascertain if automated scanning and imaging techniques might be applied effectively to the problem of concrete evaluation. In the current evaluation process, a concrete sample core is manually scanned under a microscope. Voids (or air spaces) within the concrete are then detected visually by a human operator by incrementing the sample under the cross-hairs of a microscope and by counting the number of "pixels" which fall within a void. Automation of the scanning and image analysis processes is desired to improve the speed of the scanning process, to improve evaluation consistency, and to reduce operator fatigue. An initial, proof-of-concept image analysis approach was successfully developed and demonstrated using acquired black and white imagery of concrete samples. In this paper, the automated scanning and image capture system currently under development will be described and the image processing approach developed for the proof-of-concept study will be demonstrated. A development update and plans for future enhancements are also presented.

  6. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  8. Investigation of rectangular concrete columns reinforced or prestressed with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars or tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ching Chiaw

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in concrete construction. This research focused on the behavior of concrete columns reinforced with FRP bars, or prestressed with FRP tendons. The methodology was based the ultimate strength approach where stress and strain compatibility conditions and material constitutive laws were applied. Axial strength-moment (P-M) interaction relations of reinforced or prestressed concrete columns with FRP, a linearly-elastic material, were examined. The analytical results identified the possibility of premature compression and/or brittle-tension failure occurring in FRP reinforced and prestressed concrete columns where sudden and explosive type failures were expected. These failures were related to the rupture of FRP rebars or tendons in compression and/or in tension prior to concrete reaching its ultimate strain and strength. The study also concluded that brittle-tension failure was more likely to occur due to the low ultimate tensile strain of FRP bars or tendons as compared to steel. In addition, the failures were more prevalent when long term effects such as creep and shrinkage of concrete, and creep rupture of FRP were considered. Barring FRP failure, concrete columns reinforced with FRP, in some instances, gained significant moment resistance. As expected the strength interaction of slender steel or FRP reinforced concrete columns were dependent more on column length rather than material differences between steel and FRP. Current ACI minimum reinforcement ratio for steel (rhomin) reinforced concrete columns may not be adequate for use in FRP reinforced concrete columns. Design aids were developed in this study to determine the minimum reinforcement ratio (rhof,min) required for rectangular reinforced concrete columns by averting brittle-tension failure to a failure controlled by concrete crushing which in nature was a less catastrophic and more gradual type failure. The proposed method using rhof

  9. Relating damage evolution of concrete cooled to cryogenic temperatures to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Rahman, Syeda; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, 9% Ni steel is used for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Utilization of concrete in place of 9% Ni steel for primary containment would lead to significant cost savings. Hence, this study investigates changes in the microstructure of concrete due to cryogenic freezing that would affect its relevant engineering properties for containment. The study also evaluates the effect of aggregate type on the damage potential of concrete subjected to cryogenic freezing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies to produce damage-resistant cryogenic concrete. The study employed four concrete mixture designs involving river sand as fine aggregate, and coarse aggregates with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. Specifically, the coarse aggregates were limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate. Concrete cubes were cured under water for at least 28 days and thereafter frozen from ambient (20 °C) to cryogenic temperature (-165 °C). Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during freezing. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) was employed to study the microstructure of concrete cores, before and after cryogenic freezing. The impact of the microstructural evolution thus obtained from AE and XRCT on relevant engineering properties was determined via water and chloride permeability tests. Microcrack propagation determined from AE correlated with changes in permeability. There were no observable cracks in majority of the concrete mixtures after freezing. This implies that microcracks detected via AE and increased permeability was very well distributed and smaller than the XRCT's resolution. Damage (microcracking) resistance of the concrete with different aggregates was in the order limestone ⩾ trap rock ≫ lightweight aggregate ⩾ sandstone.

  10. Secretory carrier membrane protein SCAMP2 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate interactions in the regulation of dense core vesicle exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Haini; Ellena, Jeff; Liu, Lixia; Szabo, Gabor; Cafiso, David; Castle, David

    2007-09-25

    Secretory carrier membrane protein 2 (SCAMP2) functions in late steps of membrane fusion in calcium-dependent granule exocytosis. A basic/hydrophobic peptide segment within SCAMP2 (SCAMP2 E: CWYRPIYKAFR) has been implicated in this function and shown to bind and sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] within membranes through an electrostatic mechanism. We now show that alanine substitution of tryptophan W2 within SCAMP2 E substantially weakens peptide binding to negatively charged liposomes; other substitutions for arginine R4 and lysine K8 have only limited effects on binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of liposomes containing spin-labeled PIP2 shows that R4 but not K8 is critical for SCAMP E binding to PIP2. The interfacial locations of SCAMP E and its structural variants within lipid bicelles measured by oxygen enhancement of nuclear relaxation are all similar. Corresponding point mutations within full-length SCAMP2 (SC2-R204A, SC2-K208A, and SC2-W202A) have been analyzed for biological effects on dense core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine PC12 cells. With the same level of overexpression, SC2-R204A but not SC2-K208A inhibited secretion of cotransfected human growth hormone and of noradrenalin. Inhibition by SC2-R204A was the same as or greater than previously observed for SC2-W202A. Analysis of noradrenalin secretion by amperometry showed that inhibitory mutants of SCAMP2 decrease the probability of fusion pore opening and the stability of initially opened but not yet expanded fusion pores. The strong correlation between SCAMP2 E interactions with PIP2 and inhibition of exocytosis, particularly by SC2-R204A, led us to propose that SCAMP2 interaction with PIP2 within the membrane interface regulates fusion pore formation during exocytosis.

  11. Potato lectin activates basophils and mast cells of atopic subjects by its interaction with core chitobiose of cell-bound non-specific immunoglobulin E

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, S N; Venkatesh, Y P; Mahesh, P A

    2007-01-01

    A major factor in non-allergic food hypersensitivity could be the interaction of dietary lectins with mast cells and basophils. Because immunoglobulin E (IgE) contains 10–12% carbohydrates, lectins can activate and degranulate these cells by cross-linking the glycans of cell-bound IgE. The present objective focuses on the effect of potato lectin (Solanum tuberosum agglutinin; STA) for its ability to release histamine from basophils in vitro and mast cells in vivo from non-atopic and atopic subjects. In this study, subjects were selected randomly based on case history and skin prick test responses with food, pollen and house dust mite extracts. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with STA at 100 µg/ml concentration. Histamine release was performed using leucocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects and rat peritoneal exudate cells. SPT on 110 atopic subjects using STA showed 39 subjects positive (35%); however, none showed STA-specific IgE; among 20 non-atopic subjects, none were positive by SPT. Maximal histamine release was found to be 65% in atopic subjects (n = 7) compared to 28% in non-atopic subjects (n = 5); the release was inhibited specifically by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine and correlates well with serum total IgE levels (R2 = 0·923). Binding of STA to N-linked glycoproteins (horseradish peroxidase, avidin and IgG) was positive by dot blot and binding assay. As potato lectin activates and degranulates both mast cells and basophils by interacting with the chitobiose core of IgE glycans, higher intake of potato may increase the clinical symptoms as a result of non-allergic food hypersensitivity in atopic subjects. PMID:17362264

  12. New sacrificial material for ex-vessel core catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlev, Andrei A.; Almjashev, Vyacheslav I.; Bechta, Sevostian V.; Khabensky, Vladimir B.; Granovsky, Vladimir S.; Gusarov, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    A new functional (sacrificial) material has been developed in the Fe2O3-SrO-Al2O3-CaO system based on strontium hexaferrite ceramic in concrete matrix. The method of producing SM has been advanced technologically; this technological effectiveness allows the SM to be used in ex-vessel core catchers with corium spreading as well as in crucible-type core catchers. Critical properties regarding the efficiency of SM in ex-vessel core catchers, such as porosity, pycnometric density, apparent density, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and water content have been measured. Suitable fractions of SrFe12O19 and high alumina cement (HAC) were found in the SM based on thermodynamic analysis of the SM/corium interaction. The use of sacrificial steel as an additional heat adsorption component in the core catcher allowed us to increase the mass fraction range of SrFe12O19 in the SM from 0.3-0.5 to 0.3-0.85. The activation temperature of the SM/corium interaction has been shown to correspond to the liquidus temperature of the local composition at the SM/corium interface. The calculated value of this temperature was 1716 °C. Analysis of phase transformations in the SrO-Fe2O3 system revealed advantages of the SrFe12O19-based sacrificial material compared with the Fe2O3-contained material owing to the time proximity of SrFe12O19 decomposition and corium interaction activation.

  13. Iron concretions within a highly altered unit of the Berlins Porphyry, New Zealand: an abiotic or biotic story?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Toni L.; Oze, Christopher; Horton, Travis W.

    2017-04-01

    The Berlins Porphyry located on the South Island of New Zealand provides an opportunity to examine iron concretions formed in a subterranean system. Specifically, an alteration zone within the Berlins Porphyry contains iron concretions similar to sedimentary biologically-mediated iron concretions. Here, we provide evidence for two sources of dissolved Fe (II) that potentially aided in the formation of the iron concretions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for microbial involvement in the anaerobic oxidation of Fe (II) to Fe (III) to form magnetite. Evidence in support of this hypothesis includes the low concentrations of iron and sulfur in the white hydrothermally altered porphyry outcrop and concretion cores; concentrated pyrite and magnetite mineralisation surrounding the cores; and δ13C values indicative of organic carbon (averaging -26 ‰ ± 4 ‰) within the iron cement, porphyry-core-boundary and outer weathered rinds of the concretions. Overall, these unusually preserved iron concretions could represent a new environmental niche for microorganisms and a potential analogue for microbially induced iron-oxidation. More importantly, this study illustrates the many obstacles involved in analysing and interpreting potential subterranean biosignatures.

  14. Iron concretions within a highly altered unit of the Berlins Porphyry, New Zealand: an abiotic or biotic story?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Toni L.; Oze, Christopher; Horton, Travis W.

    2016-09-01

    The Berlins Porphyry located on the South Island of New Zealand provides an opportunity to examine iron concretions formed in a subterranean system. Specifically, an alteration zone within the Berlins Porphyry contains iron concretions similar to sedimentary biologically-mediated iron concretions. Here, we provide evidence for two sources of dissolved Fe (II) that potentially aided in the formation of the iron concretions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for microbial involvement in the anaerobic oxidation of Fe (II) to Fe (III) to form magnetite. Evidence in support of this hypothesis includes the low concentrations of iron and sulfur in the white hydrothermally altered porphyry outcrop and concretion cores; concentrated pyrite and magnetite mineralisation surrounding the cores; and δ13C values indicative of organic carbon (averaging -26 ‰ ± 4 ‰) within the iron cement, porphyry-core-boundary and outer weathered rinds of the concretions. Overall, these unusually preserved iron concretions could represent a new environmental niche for microorganisms and a potential analogue for microbially induced iron-oxidation. More importantly, this study illustrates the many obstacles involved in analysing and interpreting potential subterranean biosignatures.

  15. Solution structure of histone chaperone ANP32B: interaction with core histones H3-H4 through its acidic concave domain.

    PubMed

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Takashi; Munemasa, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Shin; Tsuda, Kengo; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Nagai, Ryozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-08-06

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by histone deposition onto and eviction from nucleosomes, which are mediated by several chromatin-modulating factors. Among them, histone chaperones are key factors that facilitate nucleosome assembly. Acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) belongs to the ANP32 family, which shares N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a C-terminal variable anionic region. The C-terminal region functions as an inhibitor of histone acetylation, but the functional roles of the LRR domain in chromatin regulation have remained elusive. Here, we report that the LRR domain of ANP32B possesses histone chaperone activity and forms a curved structure with a parallel beta-sheet on the concave side and mostly helical elements on the convex side. Our analyses revealed that the interaction of ANP32B with the core histones H3-H4 occurs on its concave side, and both the acidic and hydrophobic residues that compose the concave surface are critical for histone binding. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the functional mechanisms of acidic histone chaperones. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Binding kinetics of an antibody against HIV p24 core protein measured with real-time biomolecular interaction analysis suggest a slow conformational change in antigen p24.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R W; Hausdorf, G

    1996-01-16

    The interaction between HIV core protein p24 and the murine monoclonal antibody CB-4/1 or its Fab fragment showed unusual kinetics. Recombinant p24 was immobilised in a hydrophilic carboxymethyldextran matrix. At high concentration of CB-4/1 Fab the association of the antigen-antibody complex proceeds in two phases, while dissociation is mono-exponential. The antigen has a 'memory', i.e. shortly after dissociation of Fab-antigen complex the fast association phase is enhanced. Biphasic association was also found in solution. Experiments suggest a reversible change of binding properties in the epitope region with an overall time constant of about 100 s at room temperature. Intermediate steps with faster time constants must be involved. Slow conformational changes of p24 seem to be the most probable explanation. A simple model that provides a quantitative description of this process could not be found. Real-time analysis of antibody binding by surface plasmon resonance is a powerful method for studying such changes in the time domain of a few seconds to a few minutes.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and interaction of L-valine Schiff base divanadium(V) complex containing a V2O3 core with DNA and BSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiong; Li, Lianzhi; Dong, Jianfang; Liu, Hongyan; Xu, Tao; Li, Jinghong

    2013-04-01

    A divanadium(V) complex, [V2O3(o-van-val)2] (o-van-val = Schiff base derived from o-vanillin and L-valine), has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The crystal structure shows that both of the vanadium centers in the complex have a distorted octahedral coordination environment composed of tridentate Schiff base ligand. A V2O3 core in molecular structure adopts intermediate between cis and trans configuration with the O1dbnd V1⋯V1Adbnd O1A torsion angle 115.22 (28)° and the V1⋯V1A distance 3.455 Å. The binding properties of the complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, CD spectra and viscosity measurement. The results indicate that the complex binds to CT-DNA in non-classical intercalative mode. Meanwhile, the interaction of the complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectra. Results indicated that the complex can markedly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via a static quenching process, and cause its conformational change. The calculated apparent binding constant Kb was 1.05 × 106 M-1 and the binding site number n was 1.18.

  18. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  19. SOLAR INTERACTING PROTONS VERSUS INTERPLANETARY PROTONS IN THE CORE PLUS HALO MODEL OF DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AND STOCHASTIC RE-ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, L.; Laitinen, T.; Vainio, R.; Afanasiev, A.; Mursula, K.; Ryan, J. M.

    2015-06-10

    With the first observations of solar γ-rays from the decay of pions, the relationship of protons producing ground level enhancements (GLEs) on the Earth to those of similar energies producing the γ-rays on the Sun has been debated. These two populations may be either independent and simply coincident in large flares, or they may be, in fact, the same population stemming from a single accelerating agent and jointly distributed at the Sun and also in space. Assuming the latter, we model a scenario in which particles are accelerated near the Sun in a shock wave with a fraction transported back to the solar surface to radiate, while the remainder is detected at Earth in the form of a GLE. Interplanetary ions versus ions interacting at the Sun are studied for a spherical shock wave propagating in a radial magnetic field through a highly turbulent radial ray (the acceleration core) and surrounding weakly turbulent sector in which the accelerated particles can propagate toward or away from the Sun. The model presented here accounts for both the first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock front and the second-order, stochastic re-acceleration by the turbulence enhanced behind the shock. We find that the re-acceleration is important in generating the γ-radiation and we also find that up to 10% of the particle population can find its way to the Sun as compared to particles escaping to the interplanetary space.

  20. Model for T-Antigen-Dependent Melting of the Simian Virus 40 Core Origin Based on Studies of the Interaction of the Beta-Hairpin with DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuradha; Meinke, Gretchen; Reese, Danielle K.; Moine, Stephanie; Phelan, Paul J.; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bohm, Andrew; Bullock, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen (T-ag) with the viral origin has served as a model for studies of site-specific recognition of a eukaryotic replication origin and the mechanism of DNA unwinding. These studies have revealed that a motif termed the “beta-hairpin” is necessary for assembly of T-ag on the SV40 origin. Herein it is demonstrated that residues at the tip of the “beta-hairpin” are needed to melt the origin-flanking regions and that the T-ag helicase domain selectively assembles around one of the newly generated single strands in a manner that accounts for its 3′-to-5′ helicase activity. Furthermore, T-ags mutated at the tip of the “beta-hairpin” are defective for oligomerization on duplex DNA; however, they can assemble on hybrid duplex DNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) substrates provided the strand containing the 3′ extension is present. Collectively, these experiments indicate that residues at the tip of the beta-hairpin generate ssDNA in the core origin and that the ssDNA is essential for subsequent oligomerization events. PMID:17287270

  1. Mic10, a Core Subunit of the Mitochondrial Contact Site and Cristae Organizing System, Interacts with the Dimeric F1Fo-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Rampelt, Heike; Bohnert, Maria; Zerbes, Ralf M; Horvath, Susanne E; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2017-04-21

    The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is crucial for maintaining the architecture of the mitochondrial inner membrane. MICOS is enriched at crista junctions that connect the two inner membrane domains: inner boundary membrane and cristae membrane. MICOS promotes the formation of crista junctions, whereas the oligomeric F1Fo-ATP synthase is crucial for shaping cristae rims, indicating antagonistic functions of these machineries in organizing inner membrane architecture. We report that the MICOS core subunit Mic10, but not Mic60, binds to the F1Fo-ATP synthase. Mic10 selectively associates with the dimeric form of the ATP synthase and supports the formation of ATP synthase oligomers. Our results suggest that Mic10 plays a dual role in mitochondrial inner membrane architecture. In addition to its central function in sculpting crista junctions, a fraction of Mic10 molecules interact with the cristae rim-forming F1Fo-ATP synthase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ZFHX4 interacts with the NuRD core member CHD4 and regulates the glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell state.

    PubMed

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Kim, Dohoon; Zheng, Siyuan; Whyte, Warren A; Bansal, Mukesh; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Gopal, Shuba; Theisen, Matthew A; Bilodeau, Steve; Thiru, Prathapan; Muffat, Julien; Yilmaz, Omer H; Mitalipova, Maya; Woolard, Kevin; Lee, Jeongwu; Nishimura, Riko; Sakata, Nobuo; Fine, Howard A; Carpenter, Anne E; Silver, Serena J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Califano, Andrea; Young, Richard A; Ligon, Keith L; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Root, David E; Sabatini, David M; Hahn, William C; Chheda, Milan G

    2014-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) harbors subpopulations of therapy-resistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that are self-renewing and multipotent. To understand the regulation of the TIC state, we performed an image-based screen for genes regulating GBM TIC maintenance and identified ZFHX4, a 397 kDa transcription factor. ZFHX4 is required to maintain TIC-associated and normal human neural precursor cell phenotypes in vitro, suggesting that ZFHX4 regulates differentiation, and its suppression increases glioma-free survival in intracranial xenografts. ZFHX4 interacts with CHD4, a core member of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZFHX4 and CHD4 bind to overlapping sets of genomic loci and control similar gene expression programs. Using expression data derived from GBM patients, we found that ZFHX4 significantly affects CHD4-mediated gene expression perturbations, which defines ZFHX4 as a master regulator of CHD4. These observations define ZFHX4 as a regulatory factor that links the chromatin-remodeling NuRD complex and the GBM TIC state.

  3. Labeling of the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus with gold or ferric oxide-core nanoparticles highlights new capabilities for investigation of host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Surmann, Kristin; Hildebrandt, Petra; Jehmlich, Nico; Michalik, Stephan; Stanca, Sarmiza E; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Throughout the world, infections caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In order to gain some understanding of the complicated physiological link between host and pathogen, modern techniques such as confocal microscopy and sophisticated OMICs technologies are suitable. However, labeling of pathogens such as S. aureus with green fluorescent protein, for example, or the generation of a reliable antibody, which are prerequisites for the application of reproducible isolation techniques, does not always succeed. Here, we present a universal approach for monitoring pathogen traffic after internalization into host cells by fluorescence microscopy and for isolation of bacteria from host-pathogen interaction assays using gold or ferric oxide-core, poly(vinyl alcohol) coated, and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles (NP). The incubation of S. aureus HG001 with those NP had only minor effects on the bacterial growth in vitro. Quantitative proteome analysis after 24 h of NP incubation revealed that presence of NP provoked only marginal changes in the proteome pattern. The method presented enabled us to investigate the behavior of S. aureus HG001 during infection of S9 human epithelial cells by means of fluorescence microscopy and proteomics using magnetic separation or cell sorting.

  4. Fabrication of gold nanoparticle-polymer composite particles with raspberry, core-shell and amorphous morphologies at room temperature via electrostatic interactions and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kanahara, Masaaki; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Yabu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-14

    Composite particles with varying morphologies composed of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and polymers were fabricated based on a combination of electrostatic interactions between the polymer particles and Au NPs and diffusion processes. The positively charged polymer particles were prepared from amino-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) and amino-terminated 1,2-polybutadiene (PB-NH2). Adsorption of citrate-stabilized Au NPs resulted in three different distribution states of Au NPs in the polymer particles, depending on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and molecular weight of the polymer. The adsorption of Au NPs onto PS-NH2 particles produced raspberry-like composite particle morphologies, while the NPs instead diffused into the PB-NH2 particles, since the Tg of PB-NH2 is below room temperature. The diffusion of Au NPs could be controlled by varying the molecular weight of the PB-NH2 and the diameter of the NPs, and both core-shell and amorphous distributions were successfully achieved.

  5. Coniston Dam: The rehabiliation of a 50-year-old concrete dam affected by alkali aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.H.; Thomas, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the rehabilitation of the Coniston main dam in Ontario, with particular emphasis on the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) related aspects of the investigation and the influence of these on the design approach adopted, including measures taken to allow for possible future expansion of the original gravity section concrete. The rehabilitation program was primarily undertaken to increase the stability of the gravity sections and log chute which did not meet current dam safety criteria. However, all parts of the structure were found to be affected by AAR and the downstream face of the gravity sections were severely deteriorated due to the combined effects of AAR and freeze-thaw cycles. Field and laboratory investigations were undertaken to determine the extent of deterioration of the dam structures and to assess the potential for continued deterioration. Based on the findings from these studies, a rehabilitation and upgrade strategy was developed which included removal of badly deteriorated concrete, placement of reinforced concrete liners (upstream and downstream), addition of mass concrete buttresses along the length of the gravity sections, replacement of the deck and epoxy injection of the cracked sluiceway piers. Particular attention was paid to the design of the new concrete mixes (to limit the supply of alkalis to the existing concrete) and to the relief of stress between the original concrete core and new concrete liners. The new gravity section liner was debonded from the core concrete to reduce the transfer of stress due to continued expansion of the core; furthermore, the reinforcement of the liner was designed to resist tensile stresses induced by future expansion. Consideration was also given to minimizing the ingress of water to the dam core in order to reduce the degree of saturation and likelihood of further AAR and freeze-thaw action.

  6. Dynamic Increase Factors for Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Strain Rate Effects on Fracture, S. Mindess and S.P. Shah, editors, December 1985, pp. 1-13. 35. Weerheijm, J., Reinhardt, H.W., “Modelling of...Out of Anchored Reinforcing Bars,” Transactions of the Japan Concrete Institute, Vol. 15, 1994, pp. 459-466. 50. Bentur, A. S., S. Mindess and N. P...Society Symposia Proceedings Vol. 64 (S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, eds.), Pittsburgh, 1986, pp. 225-234. 51. Banthia, N. P., “Impact Resistance of Concrete

  7. Assessing the concreteness of relational representation.

    PubMed

    Rein, Jonathan R; Markman, Arthur B

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that people's ability to transfer abstract relational knowledge across situations can be heavily influenced by the concrete objects that fill relational roles. This article provides evidence that the concreteness of the relations themselves also affects performance. In 3 experiments, participants viewed simple relational patterns of visual objects and then identified these same patterns under a variety of physical transformations. Results show that people have difficulty generalizing to novel concrete forms of abstract relations, even when objects are unchanged. This suggests that stimuli are initially represented as concrete relations by default. In the 2nd and 3rd experiments, the number of distinct concrete relations in the training set was increased to promote more abstract representation. Transfer improved for novel concrete relations but not for other transformations such as object substitution. Results indicate that instead of automatically learning abstract relations, people's relational representations preserve all properties that appear consistently in the learning environment, including concrete objects and concrete relations.

  8. Thermochemical degradation of limestone aggregate concrete on exposure to sodium fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premila, M.; Sivasubramanian, K.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2008-04-01

    Limestone aggregate concrete blocks were subjected to sodium fire conforming to a realistic scenario in order to qualify them as protective sacrificial layers over structural concrete flooring in liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Mid infrared absorption measurements were carried out on these sodium fire-exposed samples as a function of depth from the affected surface. Definite signatures of thermochemical degradation indicating dehydration and structural modification of the limestone concrete have been obtained. Control runs were carried out to delineate the thermal effects of sodium fires from that of the chemical interaction effects. Measurements on limestone aggregate samples treated with fused NaOH provided direct evidence of the exact mechanism of the sodium attack on concrete. The observed degradation effects were correlated to the mechanical strength of the concrete blocks and to the intensity of the sodium fire experienced.

  9. K-Ar constraints on fluid-rock interaction and dissolution-precipitation events within the actively creeping shear zones from SAFOD cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Torgersen, T.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Cox, S. E.; Stute, M.

    2009-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled to study the physical and chemical processes responsible for faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD drill cores show multiple zones of alteration and deformation due to fluid-rock interaction in the fault rocks(Schleicher et al. 2008). In context of fluid studies in the SAFZ, noble gas and potassium measurements were performed on solid samples of sedimentary rocks obtained from drill cores across the fault (3050-4000m-MD). We used a combination of 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods on crushed samples of mudrock with variable amounts of visible slickensides to constrain the degree of resetting of the K-Ar system across the San Andreas Fault zone. 40Ar/39Ar was analyzed from small fragments (sand sized grains) while K-Ar was measured in crushed bulk rock samples (100-250 mg for Ar, and 5-10 mg for K analyses). The apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages based on single step laser fusion of small fragments corresponding to the detrital component in the coarse fraction, show varying ages ranging from the provenance age to <13Ma. Although more data are needed to make detailed comparisons, the apparent K-Ar ages of bulk samples in the fault zone are biased toward authigenic materials contained in the fine fraction, similar to the 40Ar/39Ar ages reported for mineralogical separates from very fine size fractions of samples obtained from 3065.98m-MD and 3294.89m-MD (Schleicher et al., submitted to Geology). The small samples measured for 40Ar/39Ar show scatter in the apparent ages, generally bracketing the bulk ages. However they are picked from sieved portions of the samples, and it is likely that there may be a loss of the younger (finer) material. Detrital provenance ages appear to be 50-60Ma in the Pacific Plate, and 100Ma in the North American Plate. 40Ar/39Ar ages within the SAFZ, as defined by geophysical logs (3200-3400m MD), are dominated by apparent detrital ages of ˜100Ma

  10. Prestressed Concrete Fender Piles: Final Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    analysis was based on the baseline piles from Section 4.3. Costs were determined for five key components: concrete , silica fume , prestressing strand... concrete suppliers. Baseline pile costs are shown in Table 7.1. Silica fume is a significant cost item of the pile, equal to the cost of the concrete itself... Silica fume is a very fine pozzolan which is typically added to the concrete at a rate of 10% by weight of cement to increase strength and durability

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Steel Fibrous Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Crvtaiue wi ,rerse sido it necessaty m’d Identify by block number) steel fibrous concrete corrosion cracked fibrous concrete 20 ABST RACT (Continue...dissolved gas in liq- Although chloride ions affect the rate of steel corro- uids. sion in concrete , corrosion can occur without them. Verbeck has...repcrted that steel subjected to a concrete Corrosion of steel will not occur without water. Not environment normally develops a protective oxide film

  12. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  13. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  14. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  15. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT IN AGED CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of radon generation and transport in Florida concretes sampled from 12- to 45-year-old residential slabs. It also compares measurements from old concrete samples to previous measurements on newly poured Florida residential concretes....

  16. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  17. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  18. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  19. Molecular Survey of Concrete Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several studies have shown that bacteria can deteriorate concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different microbial communities associated with concrete biofilms using 16S rRNA g...

  20. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT IN AGED CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of radon generation and transport in Florida concretes sampled from 12- to 45-year-old residential slabs. It also compares measurements from old concrete samples to previous measurements on newly poured Florida residential concretes....