Science.gov

Sample records for core cooling monitoring

  1. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  2. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  3. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  4. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Franklin E.

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  5. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Hallman, E. J.; Gantner, B.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  6. Beyond The Cores Of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, E. J.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    We will present the results of cosmological hydro/N-body adaptive mesh refinement simulations in a concordance LCDM cosmology with a peak resolution of approximately 16 kpc. These simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. We find that there are very significant differences between cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) galaxy clusters in their properties beyond the cores (r>100 kpc). For example, the shapes and outer slopes of the synthetic X-ray surface brightness and the temperature profiles are strikingly different between NCC and CC clusters. Beta models are poor fits for r>500 kpc in CC clusters leading to inaccurate global mass estimates and strong deviations from scaling relations in contrast to NCC clusters. We will discuss possible explanations involving differences in the local environments in which these clusters form and evolve.

  7. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, J. A.; Owen, F. N.

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  8. Formation of Cool Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Burns, Jack O.; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Bryan, Greg

    2004-05-01

    We present a new scenario for the formation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, based on results from recent high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations of large-scale structure formation. We find that cores of cool gas, material that would be identified as a classical cooling flow on the basis of its X-ray luminosity excess and temperature profile, are built from the accretion of discrete stable subclusters. Any ``cooling flow'' present is overwhelmed by the velocity field within the cluster; the bulk flow of gas through the cluster typically has speeds up to about 2000 km s-1, and significant rotation is frequently present in the cluster core. The inclusion of consistent initial cosmological conditions for the cluster within its surrounding supercluster environment is crucial when the evolution of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters is simulated. This new model for the hierarchical assembly of cool gas naturally explains the high frequency of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, despite the fact that a majority of these clusters show evidence of substructure that is believed to arise from recent merger activity. Furthermore, our simulations generate complex cluster cores in concordance with recent X-ray observations of cool fronts, cool ``bullets,'' and filaments in a number of galaxy clusters. Our simulations were computed with a coupled N-body, Eulerian, adaptive mesh refinement, hydrodynamics cosmology code that properly treats the effects of shocks and radiative cooling by the gas. We employ up to seven levels of refinement to attain a peak resolution of 15.6 kpc within a volume 256 Mpc on a side and assume a standard ΛCDM cosmology.

  9. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  10. Cooling history of Earth's core with high thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal evolution models of Earth's core constrain the power available to the geodynamo process that generates the geomagnetic field, the evolution of the solid inner core and the thermal history of the overlying mantle. Recent upward revision of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron mixtures by a factor of 2-3 has drastically reduced the estimated power available to generate the present-day geomagnetic field. Moreover, this high conductivity increases the amount of heat that is conducted out of the core down the adiabatic gradient, bringing it into line with the highest estimates of present-day core-mantle boundary heat flow. These issues raise problems with the standard scenario of core cooling in which the core has remained completely well-mixed and relatively cool for the past 3.5 Ga. This paper presents cooling histories for Earth's core spanning the last 3.5 Ga to constrain the thermodynamic conditions corresponding to marginal dynamo evolution, i.e. where the ohmic dissipation remains just positive over time. The radial variation of core properties is represented by polynomials, which gives good agreement with radial profiles derived from seismological and mineralogical data and allows the governing energy and entropy equations to be solved analytically. Time-dependent evolution of liquid and solid light element concentrations, the melting curve, and gravitational energy are calculated for an Fe-O-S-Si model of core chemistry. A suite of cooling histories are presented by varying the inner core boundary density jump, thermal conductivity and amount of radiogenic heat production in the core. All models where the core remains superadiabatic predict an inner core age of ≲ 600Myr , about two times younger than estimates based on old (lower) thermal conductivity estimates, and core temperatures that exceed present estimates of the lower mantle solidus prior to the last 0.5-1.5 Ga. Allowing the top of the core to become strongly subadiabatic in recent times

  11. Why Do Only Some Galaxy Clusters Have Cool Cores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.; Gantner, Brennan; Motl, Patrick M.; Norman, Michael L.

    2008-03-01

    Flux-limited X-ray samples indicate that about half of rich galaxy clusters have cool cores. Why do only some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological N-body + Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to address this question as we examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and noncool core (NCC) clusters. These adaptive mesh refinement simulations produce both CC and NCC clusters in the same volume. They have a peak resolution of 15.6 h-1 kpc within a (256 h-1 Mpc)3 box. Our simulations suggest that there are important evolutionary differences between CC clusters and their NCC counterparts. Many of the numerical CC clusters accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced CCs via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic CCs and produced conditions that prevented CC reformation. As a result, our simulations predict observationally testable distinctions in the properties of CC and NCC beyond the core regions in clusters. In particular, we find differences between CC versus NCC clusters in the shapes of X-ray surface brightness profiles, between the temperatures and hardness ratios beyond the cores, between the distribution of masses, and between their supercluster environs. It also appears that CC clusters are no closer to hydrostatic equilibrium than NCC clusters, an issue important for precision cosmology measurements.

  12. Probing the Physics of Gas in Cool Core Clusters: Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2010-09-01

    We recently detected high temperature gas at 10^5K associated with the low excitation 10^4K line emission filaments of M87. This is a profoundly important observation bearing on the physics of transport processes in cool core clusters. We propose to delve deeper into the physics of cool core clusters. We propose to use ACS to compare the spatial extent and morphology of the low and high temperature gas, to use the timely presence of COS to obtain a sensitive FUV spectrum of the hot gas, and, by introducing the notion of emission line polarimetry, seek a a potentially revolutionary new plasma diagnostic. The spatial distributions will reveal whether the hotter material is more spatially extended than the cooler; the FUV spectrum will permit derivation of the emission measure {essentially amount of gas} at each temperature between the 10^4K Halpha filaments and coronal gas at 10^7K. Together these strongly constrain plausible transport processes relating the hot and cool gas phases in this cool core cluster region, and hence the dominant physical processes at work. A novel ingredient is to obtain the optical images in polarimetric mode to probe emission line polarization levels, a diagnostic used in Solar physics to determine the relevance of collisional excitation processes such as electron impact polarization in thermal conduction or shocks. With this suite of straightforward, uniquely HST observations we may dramatically change the landscape of our understanding of the physics of cool core clusters

  13. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  14. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ˜ 40 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  15. The effects of aging on BWR core isolation cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.S.

    1994-10-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) system in commercial Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. The failure data from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the RCIC system. This analysis identified important components that should receive the highest priority in terms of aging management. The aging characterization provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failures causes. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also reviewed.

  16. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is widely considered to be the major heating source in cool-core galaxy clusters to prevent a classical cooling flow. Numerical simulations with AGN feedback have successfully suppressed radiative cooling, but generally fail to reproduce the right amount of cold gas and the expected cyclical AGN activities. We perform adaptive mesh simulations including both momentum-driven AGN feedback and star formation to study the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation over ~ 6.5 Gyr time in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps first cool out of the ICM due to the non-liner perturbation driven by the AGN jets. These cold clumps feed both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst which increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, which leads to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and develops multiphase gas again, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. The average star formation rate is ~40 solar mass/yr. The black hole accretion rate shows a large scatter, but the average correlates well with the star formation rate and is roughly one order of magnitude lower.

  17. Efficient cooling of superconducting fiber core via holey cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, Daniel; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary; Liang, Yongxuan

    2014-05-01

    Superconductivity has the potential to alter the entire landscape of technological advancement and innovation. Unfortunately, its true potential has been limited, in part, by the lack of conventional geometries, adequate stability, cooling efficiencies and in turn, cost. In this study, we demonstrate an optical fiber design with a superconducting core that is cooled via the flow of liquid helium in holes disposed in the fused silica cladding. The efficiently micro cooled superconducting fiber lends itself to low current electronic applications such as ultrasensitive sensing and imaging, quantum measurement instrumentation and supercomputing. Although not presently applicable for large scale applications such as high current transmission lines or motors, the basic approach may be combined with other traditional technologies to improve cooling efficiency and reliability.

  18. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  19. Modification of the Core Cooling System of TRIGA 2000 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Efrizon; Fiantini, Rosalina

    2010-06-22

    To accomplish safety requirements, a set of actions has to be performed following the recommendations of the IAEA safety series 35 applied to research reactor. Such actions are considered in modernization of the old system, improving the core cooling system and safety evaluations. Due to the complexity of the process and the difficulty in putting the apparatus in the reactor core, analytical and experimental study on the determination of flow and temperature distribution in the whole coolant channel are difficult to be done. In the present work, a numerical study of flow and temperature distribution in the coolant channel of TRIGA 2000 has been carried out using CFD package. For this study, simulations were carried out on 3-D tested model. The model consists of the reactor tank, thermal and thermalizing column, reflector, rotary specimen rack, chimney, fuel element, primary pipe, diffuser, beam tube and a part of the core are constructed by 1.50 million unstructured tetrahedral cell elements. The results show that for the initial condition (116 fuel elements in the core) and for the inlet temperature of 24 deg. C and the primary velocity of 5.6 m/s, there no boiling phenomena occur in the coolant channel. Due to this result, it is now possible to improve the core cooling system of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Meanwhile, forced flow from the diffuser system only affected the flow pattern in the outside of chimney and put on a small effect to the fluid flow's velocity in the inside of chimney.

  20. Modification of the Core Cooling System of TRIGA 2000 Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Fiantini, Rosalina

    2010-06-01

    To accomplish safety requirements, a set of actions has to be performed following the recommendations of the IAEA safety series 35 applied to research reactor. Such actions are considered in modernization of the old system, improving the core cooling system and safety evaluations. Due to the complexity of the process and the difficulty in putting the apparatus in the reactor core, analytical and experimental study on the determination of flow and temperature distribution in the whole coolant channel are difficult to be done. In the present work, a numerical study of flow and temperature distribution in the coolant channel of TRIGA 2000 has been carried out using CFD package. For this study, simulations were carried out on 3-D tested model. The model consists of the reactor tank, thermal and thermalizing column, reflector, rotary specimen rack, chimney, fuel element, primary pipe, diffuser, beam tube and a part of the core are constructed by 1.50 million unstructured tetrahedral cell elements. The results show that for the initial condition (116 fuel elements in the core) and for the inlet temperature of 24°C and the primary velocity of 5.6 m/s, there no boiling phenomena occur in the coolant channel. Due to this result, it is now possible to improve the core cooling system of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Meanwhile, forced flow from the diffuser system only affected the flow pattern in the outside of chimney and put on a small effect to the fluid flow's velocity in the inside of chimney.

  1. Hydrodynamic models of AGN feedback in cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.

    X-ray observations show that the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) in many galaxy clusters is cooling at a rapid rate, often to the point that it should have radiated away all of its energy in less than the age of the cluster. There is however a very clear lack of enough cool end products of this gas in the centers of the clusters. Energetic arguments indicate that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should be capable of heating the inner regions of clusters enough to offset the radiative cooling; truncating massive galaxy formation and solving the cooling flow problem. We present three sets of high resolution, ideal hydrodynamic simulations with the ZEUS code to test this AGN heating paradigm. For the first set of simulations, we study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves. We present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere. We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures. These simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which the energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases, a large fraction of the energy injected by the jet ends up as gravitational potential energy due to the expansion of the atmosphere. For the second set, we present three-dimensional simulations of jetted AGN that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. Finally, we

  2. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  3. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  4. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  5. Polarization diagnostics for cool core cluster emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Carswell, R. F.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Hough, J. H.; Manset, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between low-excitation gas filaments at ∼10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at ∼10{sup 7} K in the centers of galaxy clusters remains a puzzle. The presence of a strong, empirical correlation between the two gas phases is indicative of a fundamental relationship between them, though as yet of undetermined cause. The cooler filaments, originally thought to have condensed from the hot gas, could also arise from a merger or the disturbance of cool circumnuclear gas by nuclear activity. Here, we have searched for intrinsic line emission polarization in cool core galaxy clusters as a diagnostic of fundamental transport processes. Drawing on developments in solar astrophysics, direct energetic particle impact induced polarization holds the promise to definitively determine the role of collisional processes such as thermal conduction in the ISM physics of galaxy clusters, while providing insight into other highly anisotropic excitation mechanisms such as shocks, intense radiation fields, and suprathermal particles. Under certain physical conditions, theoretical calculations predict of the order of 10% polarization. Our observations of the filaments in four nearby cool core clusters place stringent upper limits (≲ 0.1%) on the presence of emission line polarization, requiring that if thermal conduction is operative, the thermal gradients are not in the saturated regime. This limit is consistent with theoretical models of the thermal structure of filament interfaces.

  6. Long-term spectropolarimetric monitoring of the cool supergiant betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedecarrax, I.; Petit, P.; Aurière, M.; Grunhut, J.; Wade, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Donati, J.-F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Perrin, G.

    2013-05-01

    We report on a long-term monitoring of the cool supergiant Betelgeuse, using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS high-resolution spectropolarimeters, respectively installed at Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi Observatory, France) and at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii). The data set, constituted of circularly polarized (Stokes V) and intensity (Stokes I) spectra, was collected between 2010 and 2012. We investigate here the temporal evolution of magnetic field, convection and temperature at photospheric level, using simultaneous measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field component, the core emission of the Ca II infrared triplet, the line-depth ratio of selected photospheric lines and the radial velocity of the star.

  7. Hypercapnia increases core temperature cooling rate during snow burial.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Colin K; Radwin, Martin I; Scholand, Mary Beth; Harmston, Chris H; Muetterties, Mark C; Bywater, Tim J

    2004-04-01

    Previous retrospective studies report a core body temperature cooling rate of 3 degrees C/h during avalanche burial. Hypercapnia occurs during avalanche burial secondary to rebreathing expired air, and the effect of hypercapnia on hypothermia during avalanche burial is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the core temperature cooling rate during snow burial under normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. We measured rectal core body temperature (T(re)) in 12 subjects buried in compacted snow dressed in a lightweight clothing insulation system during two different study burials. In one burial, subjects breathed with a device (AvaLung 2, Black Diamond Equipment) that resulted in hypercapnia over 30-60 min. In a control burial, subjects were buried under identical conditions with a modified breathing device that maintained normocapnia. Mean snow temperature was -2.5 +/- 2.0 degrees C. Burial time was 49 +/- 14 min in the hypercapnic study and 60 min in the normocapnic study (P = 0.02). Rate of decrease in T(re) was greater with hypercapnia (1.2 degrees C/h by multiple regression analysis, 95% confidence limits of 1.1-1.3 degrees C/h) than with normocapnia (0.7 degrees C/h, 95% confidence limit of 0.6-0.8 degrees C/h). In the hypercapnic study, the fraction of inspired carbon dioxide increased from 1.4 +/- 1.0 to 7.0 +/- 1.4%, minute ventilation increased from 15 +/- 7 to 40 +/- 12 l/min, and oxygen saturation decreased from 97 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 6% (P < 0.01). During the normocapnic study, these parameters remained unchanged. In this study, T(re) cooling rate during snow burial was less than previously reported and was increased by hypercapnia. This may have important implications for prehospital treatment of avalanche burial victims. PMID:14660514

  8. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  9. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  10. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  11. Rapid planetesimal cooling after core formation: Pallasite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibbin, Seann; Ireland, Trevor; O'Neill, Hugh; Holden, Peter; Mallmann, Guilherme; Claeys, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Pallasite meteorites consist of olivine-metal mixtures and accessory minerals (chromite, sulfide, phosphide, phosphate, phosphoran olivine) and represent core-mantle interaction zones in early differentiated planetesimals. They can be linked to five distinct planetesimals, indicating that they are default differentiation products, but their formation modes (deep, shallow, and impact environments) and age are elusive. Using new trace element, Cr isotope, and previously published datasets, we re-interpret some Main-group pallasites (low-MnO and high-FeO subgroups, e.g. Brenham and Springwater types respectively) as samples of core-mantle reaction zones. These meteorites host rounded olivine and near-solidus phosphate minerals, which record back-reaction of metal and silicate reservoirs during decreasing temperature after core formation and removal of primitive silicate melts. These phosphates form via late oxidation of phosphorus, which is siderophile at high temperature but lithophile at low temperature. Mn-Cr dates this event to before ~2.5 to 4 Myr after Solar System formation (range is model-dependent). Importantly, this is in agreement with Hf-W ages for very early metal-silicate (i.e. core-mantle) separation, but also indicates rapid planetesimal cooling within a few million years. Near-solidus silico-phosphate melts probably formed before most known planetesimal crusts (eucrite and angrite meteorites) and are among the earliest evolved planetary silicates. Similar phosphates in non-Main-Group pallasites from other parent bodies also suggest that core-mantle reaction zones are generic, datable features of differentiation. The absence of near-solidus phosphates in common cluster pallasites suggests that these were quenched from high temperature and are mechanical mixtures, rather than samples of genuine core-mantle boundaries.

  12. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-20

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  13. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul; Ismail,

    2010-12-23

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this

  14. AIRBORNE MONITORING OF COOLING TOWER EFFLUENTS. VOLUME I. TECHNICAL SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MRI conducted an airborne plume monitoring program as part of the Chalk Point Cooling Tower Project. Plume measurement included: temperature, dew point, visibility, turbulence, droplet size distribution and concentration, liquid water content, sodium chloride concentration (NaCl)...

  15. Comparing Cool Cores in the Planck SZ Selected Samples of Clusters of Galaxies with Cool Cores in X-ray Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Santos, Felipe A.; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Arnaud, Monique; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Churazov, Eugene; Ferrari, Chiara; Borgani, Stefano; Chandra-Planck Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The Planck mission provided a representative sample of clusters of galaxies over the entire sky. With completed Chandra observations of 165 Planck ESZ and cosmology sample clusters at z<0.35, we can now characterize each cluster in terms of its X-ray luminosity, gas temperature, gas mass, total mass, gas entropy, gas central cooling time, presence of active AGN, gas cavities, radio emission, and cluster morphology. In this presentation we compare the percentages of cool core and non-cool core clusters in the Planck-selected clusters with the percentages in X-ray selected cluster samples. We find a significantly smaller percentage of cool core clusters in the Planck sample than in X-ray selected cluster samples. We will discuss the primary reasons for this smaller percentage of cool-core clusters in the Planck-selected cluster sample than in X-ray-selected samples.

  16. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas reservoirs whose physical properties are regulated by ongoing star formation and an unknown, non-stellar heating mechanism. We present a doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the

  17. TEST PLAN FOR MONITORING COOLING COILS IN A LABORATORY SETTING

    SciTech Connect

    Don B. Shirey, III

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research project is to understand and quantify the moisture removal performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. The project will include a comprehensive literature review, detailed measurement of cooling coil performance in a laboratory facility, monitoring cooling systems at several field test sites, and development/validation of engineering models that can be used in energy calculations and building simulations. This document contains the detailed test plan for monitoring cooling coil performance in a laboratory setting. Detailed measurements will be taken on up to 10 direct expansion (DX) and chilled water cooling coils in various configurations to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation.

  18. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  19. Motion sickness potentiates core cooling during immersion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Tipton, Michael J; Gennser, Mikael; Eiken, Ola

    2001-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that motion sickness affects thermoregulatory responses to cooling in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent three separate head-out immersions in 28 °C water after different preparatory procedures. In the ‘control’ procedure immersion was preceded by a rest period. In the ‘motion sickness’ procedure immersion was preceded by provocation of motion sickness in a human centrifuge. This comprised rapid and repeated alterations of the gravitational (G-) stress in the head-to-foot direction, plus a standardized regimen of head movements at increased G-stress. In the ‘G-control’ procedure, the subjects were exposed to similar G-stress, but without the motion sickness provocation. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and 3rd digit of the right hand (ΔTforearm-fingertip), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception, thermal comfort and level of motion sickness discomfort at regular intervals. No differences were observed in any of the variables between control and G-control procedures. In the motion sickness procedure, the ΔTforearm-fingertip response was significantly attenuated, indicating a blunted vasoconstrictor response, and rectal temperature decreased at a faster rate. No other differences were observed. Motion sickness attenuates the vasoconstrictor response to skin and core cooling, thereby enhancing heat loss and the magnitude of the fall in deep body temperature. Motion sickness may predispose individuals to hypothermia, and have significant implications for survival time in maritime accidents. PMID:11533150

  20. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

  1. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  2. ATP technology, a tool for monitoring microbes in cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Czechowski, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    Rapid and accurate measurement of microbes is important for controlling the formation of troublesome microbial slimes in cooling water systems. One method for accomplishing this involves the measurement of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), a compound used to store and transfer energy in microbial cells. Cellular ATP is determined by chemically rupturing cells, which releases ATP that reacts with a luciferase reagent (the firefly enzyme). This reaction produces light which can be detected by a sensitive luminometer/photometer. The amount of light produced is proportional to the amount of ATP in the cell. A quantitative indication of biological activity is obtained in minutes, compared to traditional plating methods which often require days of incubation. The use of ATP for microbial detection has been available for many years; however, industrial usage was limited because the ATP procedure was neither easy to perform nor was it cost effective. Recently, advances in instrument technology, extractant chemistry and enzyme stability have made ATP detection more practical and less expensive. ATP technology can be used for determining microbial content in cooling water systems, predicting biocide effectiveness, and monitoring efficacy of biocides in cooling systems. A good correlation (0.85) was found between microbial ATP values and bacterial Colony Forming Units (CFU) in cooling waters. ATP technology was used to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of a biocide in a test system within 1 hour after biocide addition. Test results accurately predicted the biocide efficacy in the cooling tower. Effectiveness of other biocides in cooling systems were monitored with results being obtained within minutes after sampling. These findings indicate the potential for ATP technology to be an effective tool in monitoring microbes in cooling water systems.

  3. Application of the gamma thermometer to BWR core monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) core monitoring systems rely on in-core instrumentation to help determine the precise axial and radial power distribution of the core. Recently, it has been proposed to replace the existing traversing in-core probe (TIP) system with a system based on fixed in-core gamma thermometers. In this paper, the author describes the type of gamma thermometer (GT) that could be used in the proposed system and provides results from an ongoing implant test program.

  4. A Chandra Study of the Image Power Spectra of 41 Cool Core and Non-cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenhao; Xu, Haiguang; Zhu, Zhenghao; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Gu, Liyi; Zhang, Zhongli; Liu, Chengze; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose a new diagnostic to segregate cool core (CC) clusters from non-CC (NCC) clusters by studying the two-dimensional power spectra of the X-ray images observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our sample contains 41 members (z=0.01{--}0.54) which are selected from the Chandra archive when a high photon count, an adequate angular resolution, a relatively complete detector coverage, and coincident CC–NCC classifications derived with three traditional diagnostics are simultaneously guaranteed. We find that in the log–log space the derived image power spectra can be well represented by a constant model component at large wavenumbers, while at small wavenumbers a power excess beyond the constant component appears in all clusters, with a clear tendency that the excess is stronger in CC clusters. By introducing a new CC diagnostic parameter, i.e., the power excess index (PEI), we classify the clusters in our sample and compare the results with those obtained with three traditional CC diagnostics. We find that the results agree with each other very well. By calculating the PEI values of the simulated clusters, we find that the new diagnostic works well at redshifts up to 0.5 for intermediately sized and massive clusters with a typical Chandra or XMM-Newton pointing observation. The new CC diagnostic has several advantages over its counterparts, e.g., it is free of the effects of the commonly seen centroid shift of the X-ray halo caused by merger event, and the corresponding calculation is straightforward, almost irrelevant to the complicated spectral analysis.

  5. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-08-16

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous 'cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these 'cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 10(45) erg s(-1)) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers. PMID:22895340

  6. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Foley, R. J.; Ruel, J.; Sullivan, P.; Veilleux, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bazin, G.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Egami, E.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Rawle, T. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Rex, M.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Simcoe, R.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; Šuhada, R.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2012-08-01

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous `cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these `cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 1045 erg s-1) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers.

  7. Geomagnetic superchrons and time variations in the cooling rate of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos are used to explore the relationship between geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, and time variations in the rate of the cooling of the core. We develop a parameterization of the average reversal frequency from numerical dynamos in terms of the core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit of this parameterization to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic GPTS imply a core heat flux approximately 20% higher than at present-day. Low heat flux and slow cooling of the core inferred during the Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchron is qualitatively consistent with predictions from mantle global circulation models (mantle GCMs) that show a reduction in mantle convective activity during the time of Pangea, whereas these same mantle GCMs and most plate motion reconstructions predict fast core cooling during the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Superchron, suggesting that the cooling rate of the core is not generally in phase with variations in plate motions.

  8. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Henry W.; McDonald, Michael; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the Southmore » Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01%–10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster (i.e., decreasing redshift, increasing mass). We provide quantitative estimates of the bias in the SZ signal as a function of a gas density cuspiness parameter, redshift, mass, and the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central AGN. Based on this work, we estimate that, for the Phoenix cluster (one of the strongest cool cores known), the presence of a cool core is biasing the SZ significance high by ~6%. The ubiquity of radio galaxies at the centers of cool core clusters will offset the cool core bias to varying degrees« less

  9. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry W.; McDonald, Michael; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the South Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01%–10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster (i.e., decreasing redshift, increasing mass). We provide quantitative estimates of the bias in the SZ signal as a function of a gas density cuspiness parameter, redshift, mass, and the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central AGN. Based on this work, we estimate that, for the Phoenix cluster (one of the strongest cool cores known), the presence of a cool core is biasing the SZ significance high by ~6%. The ubiquity of radio galaxies at the centers of cool core clusters will offset the cool core bias to varying degrees

  10. Emergency core cooling during an SRS reactor LOPA

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.K.; Burge, D.A.; Reeves, K.K.; Herman, D.T. )

    1993-01-01

    The loss-of-pumping accident (LOPA) is a Savannah River site (SRS) reactor design-basis accident. The most limiting LOPA is caused by a double-ended guillotine break in a secondary cooling system inlet header and is the topic of this discussion. Upon break detection, the reactor scrams and the secondary cooling water pumps and alternating-current (ac) primary pump motors trip off. The direct-current (dc) motors continue to drive the primary pumps at about one-third capacity. Gravity flow through the broken header continues flooding the building after the cooling pumps are off. The emergency cooling system (ECS) is activated prior to flood-out of the dc motors. The design-basis accident reactor power limit ensures the reactor will shut down safely should a LOPA occur. The simulated LOPA has five phases: steady state, ac coastdown, dc flow, dc coastdown, and fully developed ECS flow. Analyses of LOPAs have shown that ECS is the most limiting phase of the accident. This paper concentrates on the role of ECS in LOPA limits.

  11. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  12. The thermal structure of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The SZ-selected cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z~0.56 (the Phoenix cluster) shows for the first time a hint of a massive cooling-flow-induced starburst, suggesting that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling may not yet be fully established. We propose to robustly estimate the emission measure distribution of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster, and its temperature and abundance profiles out to 500 kpc, with a medium-deep (210 ks) EPIC observation, in order to investigate the actual structure of the cool core. The proposed study will provide secure science results with a relatively modest exposure, paving the way to an eventual deeper observation of this exceptional and puzzling source.

  13. Investigations on sump cooling after core melt down

    SciTech Connect

    Knebel, J.U.

    1995-09-01

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase and two-phase natural circulation flow. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The above results are applied to the SUCO program that is performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The SUCO program is a three-step series of scaled model experiments investigating the possibility of an optional sump cooling concept for the European Pressurized Water Reactor EPR. This concept is entirely based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens dimensional SUCOS-2D test facility. The experimental results of the model geometry are transformed to prototypic conditions.

  14. Feasibility of monitoring the strength of HTGR core support graphite: Part III

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.C.; Davis, T.J.; Thomas, M.T.

    1983-02-01

    Methods are being developed to monitor, in-situ, the strength changes of graphite core-support components in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The results reported herein pertain to the development of techniques for monitoring the core-support blocks; the PGX graphite used in these studies is the grade used for the core-support blocks of the Fort St. Vrain HTGR, and is coarser-grained than the grades used in our previous investigations. The through-transmission ultrasonic velocity technique, developed for monitoring strength of the core-support posts, is not suitable for use on the core-support blocks. Eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques have been shown to be capable of measuring the density-depth profile in oxidized PGX and, combined with a correlation of strength versus density, could yield an estimate of the strength-depth profile of in-service HTGR core support blocks. Correlations of strength versus density and other properties, and progress on the development of the eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques are reported.

  15. Validation of PARET for the modeling of heat transfer under natural convection core cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, J.K.; Kassim, M.S.; Mohammed, F.

    1995-12-31

    The PARET code is a one-dimensional, coupled thermal-hydraulic and point-kinetics code, which was originally developed for the analysis of SPERT-I transients and later adapted for the analysis of transient behavior in research reactors. Due to its ease of transportability and relative simplicity of input preparation, it is widely used internationally and is particularly attractive for research reactors with limited computational facilities. The thermal-hydraulic modeling of the current version of PARET accounts for buoyancy forces in the core and external pressure gradients that may arise from density differences between the core inlet and outlet. This feature of PARET makes it a useful tool for the analysis of research reactors cooled by natural convection as well as those cooled by forced convection. Since PARET has been applied to the analysis of the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores for protected and unprotected transients and also for the analysis of SPERT-I transients, its forced convection heat-removal model is reliable. However, there has been little experience with the capability of PARET to model heat removal in cores cooled by natural convection. This paper reports the results of some experiments performed at the Malaysian PUSPATI reactor to compare PARET predictions for power increases under natural convection core cooling to measured data.

  16. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep (280 ks) Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second-brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT~1 keV in the core to kT~9 keV at r~30 kpc. Beyond r~30 kpc the intra-cluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The sloshing is the result of the strongly perturbed gravitational potential in the cluster core, with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) being displaced southward from the global center of mass. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r~280 kpc. The cluster also harbors a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ~100 km/s. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r~120 kpc to the southeast of the cluster center. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger and not a result of an extraordinary active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the AGN only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets, indicating that currently it may be largely dormant. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  17. Microchip transponder thermometry for monitoring core body temperature of antelope during capture.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Lease, Hilary M; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia is described as the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with capture, immobilization and restraint of wild animals. Therefore, accurately determining the core body temperature of wild animals during capture is crucial for monitoring hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. We investigated if microchip thermometry can accurately reflect core body temperature changes during capture and cooling interventions in the springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), a medium-sized antelope. Subcutaneous temperature measured with a temperature-sensitive microchip was a weak predictor of core body temperature measured by temperature-sensitive data loggers in the abdominal cavity (R(2)=0.32, bias >2 °C). Temperature-sensitive microchips in the gluteus muscle, however, provided an accurate estimate of core body temperature (R(2)=0.76, bias=0.012 °C). Microchips inserted into muscle therefore provide a convenient and accurate method to measure body temperature continuously in captured antelope, allowing detection of hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. PMID:26724197

  18. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  19. Alcohol lowers the vasoconstriction threshold in humans without affecting core cooling rate during mild cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C E; Bristow, G K; Elias, D A; Giesbrecht, G G

    1996-01-01

    Elevated blood alcohol levels are often seen in hypothermia and hyperthermia related deaths, leading to the belief that alcohol renders humans poikilothermic. We examined the core temperature (Tco) thresholds for sweating, vasoconstriction and shivering as well as core cooling rates of seven subjects immersed in 28 degrees C water. On two separate days, subjects exercised on an underwater cycle ergometer to elevate Tco above the sweating threshold. They then rested and cooled until they shivered vigorously. Subjects drank orange juice (7 ml.kg-1) prior to immersion during the control trial and 1 ml.kg-1 absolute ethanol, added to orange juice in a 1:6 ratio, during the alcohol trial. Mean blood alcohol concentration (breath analysis) was 0.097 +/- 0.010 g% at the start of cooling and 0.077 +/- 0.008 g% at the end of the cooling period. Alcohol lowered the vasoconstriction threshold by 0.32 +/- 0.2 degrees C and elevated finger tip blood flow, but had no effect on thresholds for sweating and shivering or core cooling rate. Considering these minor effects it is unlikely that moderate alcohol consumption predisposes individuals to hypothermia or hyperthermia via impaired thermoregulation, but rather likely due to behavioral factors. PMID:8897037

  20. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT ˜ 1 keV in the core to kT ˜ 9 keV at r ˜ 30 kpc. Beyond r ˜ 30 kpc, the intracluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing-induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r ˜ 280 kpc. The cluster also harbours a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ˜100 km s-1. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r ˜ 120 kpc to the south-east of the cluster centre. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  1. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxies—the ones at the centers of galaxy clusters—depends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the Hα properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  2. Health monitoring of cooling fan bearings based on wavelet filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Miao, Qiang; Azarian, Michael; Pecht, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a vibration-based health monitoring approach for cooling fans is proposed using a wavelet filter for early detection of faults in fan bearings and for the assessment of fault severity. To match the wavelet filter to the fault characteristic signal, a fuzzy rule is introduced to maximize the amplitudes of bearing characteristic frequencies (BCFs), which are an indicator of bearing faults. The sum of the amplitudes of BCFs and their harmonics (SABCF) is used as an index to capture the bearing degradation trend. A comparative study is conducted with commonly used time-domain indices in the degradation assessment, and performance is quantified by three measures, i.e., monotonicity, prognosability, and trendability. The analysis results of the experimental data show that the proposed method can effectively detect incipient defects and can better capture the degradation trend of fan bearings than traditional time-domain indices in vibration analysis.

  3. Heat transfer and core neutronics considerations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Determan, W. R.; Lewis, Brian

    The authors summarize the results of detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) reactor design, identify its key design attributes, and quantify its performance characteristics. The HPTI core uses modular, liquid-metal core heat transfer assemblies to replace the liquid-metal heat transport loop employed by in-core thermionic reactor designs of the past. The nuclear fuel, power conversion, heat transport, and heat rejection functions are all combined into a single modular unit. The reactor/converter assembly uses UN fuel pins to obtain a critical core configuration with in-core safety rods and reflector controls added to complete the subassembly. By thermally bonding the core heat transfer assemblies during the reactor core is coupled neutronically, thermally, and electrically into a modular assembly of individual power sources with cross-tied architecture. A forward-facing heat pipe radiator assembly extends from the reactor head in the shape of a frustum of a cone on the opposite side of the power system from the payload. Important virtues of the concept are the absence of any single-point failures and the ability of the core to effectively transfer the TFE waste heat load laterally to other in-core heat transfer assemblies in the event of multiple failures in either in-core and radiator heat pipes.

  4. Heat transfer and core neutronics considerations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, W. R.; Lewis, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The authors summarize the results of detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) reactor design, identify its key design attributes, and quantify its performance characteristics. The HPTI core uses modular, liquid-metal core heat transfer assemblies to replace the liquid-metal heat transport loop employed by in-core thermionic reactor designs of the past. The nuclear fuel, power conversion, heat transport, and heat rejection functions are all combined into a single modular unit. The reactor/converter assembly uses UN fuel pins to obtain a critical core configuration with in-core safety rods and reflector controls added to complete the subassembly. By thermally bonding the core heat transfer assemblies during the reactor core is coupled neutronically, thermally, and electrically into a modular assembly of individual power sources with cross-tied architecture. A forward-facing heat pipe radiator assembly extends from the reactor head in the shape of a frustum of a cone on the opposite side of the power system from the payload. Important virtues of the concept are the absence of any single-point failures and the ability of the core to effectively transfer the TFE waste heat load laterally to other in-core heat transfer assemblies in the event of multiple failures in either in-core and radiator heat pipes.

  5. An exceptionally powerful AGN outburst in the low-luminosity non-cool-core group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan

    2013-10-01

    The shallow potentials of galaxy groups make them vulnerable to heating and gas loss caused by powerful AGN outbursts. Theoretical models suggest that feedback at z~2 must have ejected gas from groups, reducing their baryon content, but a lack of identified nearby non-cool-core (NCC) groups makes it difficult to determine whether AGN continue to have such a significant impact on the structure of the intra-group medium (IGM). We propose a deep observation of HCG 15, a disturbed non-cool-core group which appears to have undergone an exceptionally powerful AGN outburst ~190-330 Myr ago. We will search for cavities, make a more accurate estimate of the outburst power, examine the IGM for evidence of outward gas transport, and determine whether the AGN has disrupted the group core.

  6. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  7. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  8. How unusual is the cool-core radio halo cluster CL1821+643?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Ruta; Parekh, Viral

    2016-07-01

    Massive galaxy clusters with cool cores typically host diffuse radio sources called mini-haloes, whereas, those with non-cool cores host radio haloes. We attempt to understand the unusual nature of the cool-core galaxy cluster CL1821+643, which hosts a megaparsec-scale radio halo, using new radio observations and morphological analysis of its intra-cluster medium. We present the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 610-MHz image of the radio halo. The spectral index α, defined as S ∝ ν-α, of the radio halo is 1.0 ± 0.1 over the frequency range of 323-610-1665 MHz. Archival Chandra X-ray data were used to make surface brightness and temperature maps. The morphological parameters Gini, M20 and concentration (C) were calculated on X-ray surface brightness maps by including and excluding the central quasar (H1821+643) in the cluster. We find that the cluster CL1821+643, excluding the quasar, is a non-relaxed cluster as seen in the morphological parameter planes. It occupies the same region as other merging radio halo clusters in the temperature versus morphology parameter plane. We conclude that this cluster has experienced a non-core-disruptive merger.

  9. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  10. Experimental Study on the Performance of IIST Passive Core Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Jang Chang; Chien-Hsiung Lee; Wen-Tan Hong; Wang, Lance L.C.

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to conduct the experiments at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) Integral System Test (IIST) facility for evaluation of the performance of the passive core cooling system (PCCS) during the cold-leg small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs). Five experiments were performed with (1) three different break sizes, 2%, 0.5%, and 0.2% (approximately corresponding to 1 1/4'', 2'', and 4'' breaks for Maanshan nuclear power plant), and (2) 0.2% and 0.5% without actuation of the first-stage and third-stage automatic depressurization valve (ADS-1 and ADS-3) to initiate PCCS for assessing its capacity in accident management. The detailed descriptions of general system response and the interactions of core makeup tanks (CMTs), accumulators (ACCs), automatic depressurization system (ADS), passive residual heat Removal (PRHR), and in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) on the core heat removal are included. The results show: (1) core long term cooling can be maintained for all cases following the PCCS procedures, (2) the core can be covered for the cases of the 0.2% and 0.5% breaks without actuation of ADS-1 and ADS-3. (authors)

  11. Development concept for a small, split-core, heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, E.; Breitwieser, R.; Niederauer, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    There have been two main deterrents to the development of semiportable nuclear reactors. One is the high development costs; the other is the inability to satisfy with assurance the questions of operational safety. This report shows how a split-core, heat-pipe cooled reactor could conceptually eliminate these deterrents, and examines and summarizes recent work on split-core, heat-pipe reactors. A concept for a small reactor that could be developed at a comparatively low cost is presented. The concept would extend the technology of subcritical radioisotope thermoelectric generators using 238 PuO2 to the evolution of critical space power reactors using 239 PuO2.

  12. Kinetic AGN feedback effects on cluster cool cores simulated using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Paramita; Murante, Giuseppe; Borgani, Stefano; Gaspari, Massimo; Granato, Gian Luigi; Monaco, Pierluigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2016-09-01

    We implement novel numerical models of AGN feedback in the SPH code GADGET-3, where the energy from a supermassive black hole (BH) is coupled to the surrounding gas in the kinetic form. Gas particles lying inside a bi-conical volume around the BH are imparted a one-time velocity (10 000 km s-1) increment. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of isolated cluster (total mass 1014 h-1 M⊙), which is initially evolved to form a dense cool core, having central T ≤ 106 K. A BH resides at the cluster centre, and ejects energy. The feedback-driven fast wind undergoes shock with the slower moving gas, which causes the imparted kinetic energy to be thermalized. Bipolar bubble-like outflows form propagating radially outward to a distance of a few 100 kpc. The radial profiles of median gas properties are influenced by BH feedback in the inner regions (r < 20-50 kpc). BH kinetic feedback, with a large value of the feedback efficiency, depletes the inner cool gas and reduces the hot gas content, such that the initial cool core of the cluster is heated up within a time 1.9 Gyr, whereby the core median temperature rises to above 107 K, and the central entropy flattens. Our implementation of BH thermal feedback (using the same efficiency as kinetic), within the star formation model, cannot do this heating, where the cool core remains. The inclusion of cold gas accretion in the simulations produces naturally a duty cycle of the AGN with a periodicity of 100 Myr.

  13. On the nature of local instabilities in rotating galactic coronae and cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  14. On the Nature of Local Instabilities in Rotating Galactic Coronae and Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  15. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bay, R.C.; Bramall, N.E.; Price, P.B.; Clow, G.D.; Hawley, R.L.; Udisti, R.; Castellano, E.

    2006-01-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo pattern recognition analysis of the coincidence between three regional volcanic histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies in Greenland and East Antarctica determined by continuous core chemistry, together with West Antarctic volcanic ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic record of volcanism correlates with Glacial abrupt climate change at a 95% to >99.8% (???3??) significance level and that volcanic depositions at the three locations match at levels exceeding 3??, likely indicating that many common horizons represent single eruptive events which dispersed material world wide. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden intensifications of millennial cold periods. The striking agreement between sites implies that the consistency of current timescales obtained by isotopic and glaciological dating methods is better than estimated. Copyright 2006 by the American Geogphysical Union.

  16. A 3.55 keV line from DM → a → γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.powell2@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  17. Effect of a Cooling Vest on Core Temperature in Athletes With and Without Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Trbovich, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well accepted that persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) have impaired ability to regulate core temperature due to impaired vasomotor and sudomotor activity below their level of injury. Impaired heat dissipation puts SCI athletes at great risk of exercise-induced hyperthermia (EIH) (>37.8°C). There is minimal evidence for efficacy of any specific cooling method in SCI athletes in a thermoneutral sport-specific setting. Objective: To evaluate the extent of EIH in persons with and without SCI and subsequently examine the effect of a cooling vest to attenuate rise in core body temperature (Tc). Methods: SCI (n = 17) and able-bodied (AB; n = 19) athletes participated in a 60-minute intermittent sprinting exercise in a thermoneutral (21.1°C-23.9°C) environment. Participants were separated according to their level of injury: tetraplegia defined as above T1 (TP; n = 6), high paraplegia defined as T5 through T1 (HP; n = 5), low paraplegia defined as T6 and below (LP; n = 6), and AB (n = 19). Tc was recorded at 15-minute intervals using an ingestible thermometer pill. This protocol was completed with a cooling vest (V) and without a cooling vest (NV). Results: All SCI and most AB athletes experienced EIH. After 60 minutes, Tc of TP athletes was significantly increased compared to HP (P = .03) and AB athletes (P = .007). There was no significant effect of the vest on Tc over time for any group. Conclusions: TP athletes have the highest risk of exercise-induced hyperthermia. The cooling vest does not significantly attenuate rise in Tc in SCI or AB athletes. PMID:24574824

  18. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  19. Donor core-cooling provides improved static preservation for heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C D; Tamura, F; Adachi, H; Kontos, G J; Brawn, J; Hutchins, G M; Borkon, A M; Reitz, B A; Baumgartner, W A

    1988-03-01

    Twenty-three dairy calves underwent heart-lung allotransplantation after donor organs were procured using either donor core-cooling through cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or pulmonary artery flush (PAF) to assess which method provides optimal graft preservation. In Groups 1 (control) and 2, donors were cooled to 15 degrees C on CPB and organs were either immediately transplanted (Group 1) or stored in saline solution (4 degrees C) for 4 hours (Group 2) prior to transplantation. In Group 3, donors were pretreated with prostaglandin E1 prior to PAF with modified Euro-Collins solution. Organs were stored in saline solution (4 degrees C) for 4 hours and were then transplanted. Acute cardiopulmonary function following transplantation was assessed by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension, extravascular lung water (EVLW), lung compliance, arterial oxygenation, and lung biopsy. Cardiac function after the transplantation procedure was similar in all groups, but EVLW values and lung biopsy scores were worse after PAF. Arterial O2 tension appeared lower after PAF, but not significantly so. Core-cooling provides superior static preservation and thus improved graft function in the acute bovine model. PMID:3126721

  20. Cooling neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant: evidence for superfluidity in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Patnaude, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    According to recent results of Ho & Heinke, the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant contains a young (≈330-yr-old) neutron star (NS) which has carbon atmosphere and shows notable decline of the effective surface temperature. We report a new (2010 November) Chandra observation which confirms the previously reported decline rate. The decline is naturally explained if neutrons have recently become superfluid (in triplet state) in the NS core, producing a splash of neutrino emission due to Cooper pair formation (CPF) process that currently accelerates the cooling. This scenario puts stringent constraints on poorly known properties of NS cores: on density dependence of the temperature Tcn(ρ) for the onset of neutron superfluidity [Tcn(ρ) should have a wide peak with maximum ≈ (7-9) × 108 K]; on the reduction factor q of CPF process by collective effects in superfluid matter (q > 0.4) and on the intensity of neutrino emission before the onset of neutron superfluidity (30-100 times weaker than the standard modified Urca process). This is serious evidence for nucleon superfluidity in NS cores that comes from observations of cooling NSs.

  1. Heimdal monitoring. 1: Establishing feasibility from cores and logs

    SciTech Connect

    Jizba, D.L.; Marion, D.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a method that uses core and log measurements to quantify the influence of saturation changes on elastic properties at core, log, and seismic scales in order to investigate the feasibility of using seismic measurements to monitor gas production on the Heimdal North Sea field. In the first part, laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities, porosity, density, and mineralogy are used to determined the influence of partial saturation on elastic parameters. These measurement are compared with theoretical predictions using Gassmann`s model. Second, the authors invert from logs, the rock parameters that are necessary to simulate the impact of water rise on elastic properties at log scale. Third, the well logs are modelled at seismic scales of resolution and are used to identify the effect of fluid movement on the seismic response. Finally, the results are compared to repetitive seismic measurements.

  2. Fuel performance models for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.; Simon, W.A.; Baxter, A.M.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanistic fuel performance models are used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design and licensing to predict failure and fission product release. Fuel particles manufactured with defective or missing SiC, IPyC, or fuel dispersion in the buffer fail at a level of less than 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction. These failed particles primarily release metallic fission products because the OPyC remains intact on 90% of the particles and retains gaseous isotopes. The predicted failure of particles using performance models appears to be conservative relative to operating reactor experience.

  3. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris.

  4. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bajcsy, M.; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, V.; Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Peyronel, T.; Liang, Q.; Vuletic, V.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of {approx}30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of {approx}180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth in this system.

  5. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136. Use the same method for both entrance and exit samples. You may validate 40 CFR part 136 methods for the HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart according... monitored substance in the cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136, as long as the...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136. Use the same method for both entrance and exit samples. You may validate 40 CFR part 136 methods for the HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart according... monitored substance in the cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136, as long as the...

  7. Development of a feed monitor system for a helium-cooled Michelson intererometer for the Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essenwanger, P.

    1980-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer feed monitor system developed for Spacelab is described. The device is helium cooled and is to be used to measure far infrared radiation sources in space. Performance data and development sequence are presented.

  8. Core on-line monitoring and computerized procedures systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, W.C.

    1986-04-01

    The availability of operating nuclear power plants has been affected significantly by the difficulty people have in coping with the complexity of the plants and the operating procedures. Two ways to use modern computer technology to ease the burden of coping are discussed in this paper, an on-line core monitoring system with predictive capability and a computerized procedures system using live plant data. These systems reduce human errors by presenting information rather than simply data, using the computer to manipulate the data, but leaving the decisions to the plant operator.

  9. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S and 4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respect0011ive.

  10. Do radio mini-halos and gas heating in cool-core clusters have a common origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravi, L.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a study of the central regions of cool-core clusters hosting radio mini-halos, which are diffuse synchrotron sources extended on cluster-scales surrounding the radio-loud brightest cluster galaxy. We aim to investigate the interplay between the thermal and non-thermal components in the intracluster medium in order to get more insights into these radio sources, whose nature is still unclear. It has recently been proposed that turbulence plays a role for heating the gas in cool cores. By assuming that mini-halos are powered by the same turbulence, we expect that the integrated radio luminosity of mini-halos, νPν, depends on the cooling flow power, PCF, which in turn constrains the energy available for the non-thermal components and emission in the cool-core region. We carried out a homogeneous re-analysis of X-ray Chandra data of the largest sample of cool-core clusters hosting radio mini-halos currently available (˜20 objects), finding a quasi-linear correlation, ν P_{ν } ∝ P_CF^{0.8}. We show that the scenario of a common origin of radio mini-halos and gas heating in cool-core clusters is energetically viable, provided that mini-halos trace regions where the magnetic field strength is B ≫ 0.5 μG.

  11. Investigations of Alternative Steam Generator Location and Flatter Core Geometry for Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Tucek, Kamil; Wider, Hartmut

    2006-07-01

    This paper concerns two independent safety investigations on critical and sub-critical heavy liquid metal cooled fast reactors using simple flow paths. The first investigation applies to locating the steam generators in the risers instead of the down-comers of a simple flow path designed sub-critical reactor of 600 MW{sub th} power. This was compared to a similar design, but with the steam generators located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were Total-Loss-of-Power and unprotected Loss-Of-Flow. It is shown that this reactor peaks at 1041 K after 29 hours during a Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. The difference between locating the steam generators in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. During an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow accident at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above nominal outlet temperature. The second investigation concerns a 1426 MW{sub th} critical reactor where the influence of the core height versus the core outlet temperature is studied during an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow and Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. A pancake type core geometry of 1.0 m height and 5.8 m diameter, is compared to a compact core of 2 m height and 4.5 m diameter. Moderators, like BeO and hydrides, and their influence on safety coefficients and burnup swings are also presented. Both cores incinerate transuranics from spent LWR fuel with minor actinide fraction of 5%. We show that LFRs can be designed both to breed and burn transuranics from LWRs. It is shown that the hydrides lead to the most favorable reactivity feedbacks, but the poorest reactivity swing. The computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CD was used for all thermal hydraulic calculations, and the MCNP and MCB for neutronics, and burn-up calculations. (authors)

  12. Chandra Observations of the Galaxy Group AWM 5: Cool Core Reheating and Thermal Conduction Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Nulsen, P.; David, L.; Kraft, R.; Simionescu, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present an analysis of a 40 ks Chandra observation of the galaxy group AWM 5. It has a small (~8 kpc) dense cool core with a temperature of ~1.2 keV and the temperature profile decreases at larger radii, from ~3.5 keV just outside the core to ~2 keV at ~300 kpc from the center. The abundance distribution shows a "hole" in the central ~10 kpc, where the temperature declines sharply. An abundance of at least a few times solar is observed ~15-20 kpc from the center. The deprojected electron density profile shows a break in slope at ~13 kpc and can be fit by two β models, with β = 0.72+0.16 -0.11 and rc = 5.7+1.8 -1.5 kpc, for the inner part, and β = 0.34 ± 0.01 and rc = 31.3+5.8 -5.5 kpc, for the outer part. The mass fraction of hot gas is fairly flat in the center and increases for r > 30 kpc up to a maximum of ~6.5% at r ~ 380 kpc. The gas cooling time within the central 30 kpc is smaller than a Hubble time, although the temperature only declines in the central ~8 kpc region. This discrepancy suggests that an existing cooling core has been partially reheated. In particular, thermal conduction could have been a significant source of reheating. In order for heating due to conduction to balance cooling due to emission of X-rays, conductivity must be suppressed by a large factor (at least ~100). Past active galactic nuclei activity (still visible as a radio source in the center of the group) is, however, the most likely source that reheated the central regions of AWM 5. We also studied the properties of the ram pressure stripped tail in the group member NGC 6265. This galaxy is moving at M ≈ 3.4+0.5 -0.6 (v ~ 2300 km s-1) through the hot group gas. The physical length of the tail is ~42 kpc and its mass is 2.1 ± 0.2 × 109 M sun.

  13. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Optoacoustic laser monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, I. V.; Motamedi, M.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues, cells, and other biological objects with a high spatial and time resolution, which is necessary for selective destruction of cancer and benign tumours during cryotherapy, as well as for preventing any damage to the structure and functioning of biological objects in cryobiology, is considered. The optoacoustic method, based on the measurement and analysis of acoustic waves induced by short laser pulses, is proposed for monitoring the cooling and freezing of the tissue. The effect of cooling and freezing on the amplitude and time profile of acoustic signals generated in real tissues and in a model object is studied. The experimental results indicate that the optoacoustic laser technique can be used for real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of biological objects with a submillimeter spatial resolution and a high contrast.

  14. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  15. Sloshing of the Magnetized Cool Gas in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations of many clusters of galaxies reveal the presence of edges in surface brightness and temperature, known as "cold fronts". In relaxed clusters with cool cores, these edges have been interpreted as evidence for the "sloshing" of the core gas in the cluster's gravitational potential. The smoothness of these edges has been interpreted as evidence for the stabilizing effect of magnetic fields "draped" around the front surfaces. To check this hypothesis, we perform high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetized gas sloshing in galaxy clusters initiated by encounters with subclusters. We go beyond previous works on the simulation of cold fronts in a magnetized intracluster medium by simulating their formation in realistic, idealized mergers with high resolution ((Delta)x approx. 2 kpc). Our simulations sample a parameter space of plausible initial magnetic field strengths and field configurations. In the simulations, we observe strong velocity shears associated with the cold fronts amplifying the magnetic field along the cold front surfaces, increasing the magnetic field strength in these layers by up to an order of magnitude, and boosting the magnetic pressure up to near-equipartition with thermal pressure in some cases. In these layers, the magnetic field becomes strong enough to stabilize the cold fronts against Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, resulting in sharp, smooth fronts as those seen in observations of real clusters. These magnetic fields also result in strong suppression of mixing of high and low-entropy gas in the cluster, seen in our simulations of mergers in the absence of a magnetic field. As a result, the heating of the core due to sloshing is very modest and is unable to stave off a cooling catastrophe.

  16. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  17. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  18. On-line performance monitoring of the natural draft cooling tower at Cardinal Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michell, F.L.; Miller, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    The paper will provide an overview of the on-line performance monitoring system recently installed on the 630MW coal fired Unit 3 at the Cardinal Plant. Experience with using the on-line monitor to optimize performance of the major circulating water system components including the pumps, condensers and cooling tower will be discussed in the paper.

  19. A 100 MWe advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R. N.

    2012-07-01

    An Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) was developed targeting a small electrical grid to be transportable to the plant site and operable for a long time without frequent refueling. The reactor power rating was strategically decided to be 100 MWe, and the core barrel diameter was limited to 3.0 m for transportability. The design parameters were determined by relaxing the peak fast fluence limit and bulk coolant outlet temperature to beyond irradiation experience assuming that advanced cladding and structural materials developed under US-DOE programs would be available when the AFR-100 is deployed. With a de-rated power density and U-Zr binary metallic fuel, the AFR-100 can maintain criticality for 30 years without refueling. The average discharge burnup of 101 MWd/kg is comparable to conventional design values, but the peak discharge fast fluence of {approx}6x10{sup 23} neutrons/cm{sup 2} is beyond the current irradiation experiences with HT-9 cladding. The evaluated reactivity coefficients provide sufficient negative feedbacks and the reactivity control systems provide sufficient shutdown margins. The integral reactivity parameters obtained from quasi-static reactivity balance analysis indicate that the AFR-100 meets the sufficient conditions for acceptable asymptotic core outlet temperature following postulated unprotected accidents. Additionally, the AFR-100 has sufficient thermal margins by grouping the fuel assemblies into eight orifice zones. (authors)

  20. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  1. Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

    2004-07-01

    Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

  2. An ultrasensitive fouling monitoring system for cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Nohata, Y.; Taguchi, H.

    1995-03-01

    Fouling in industrial water has been a serious problem for many years. For example, the deterioration of the efficiency of heat exchangers and the occurrence of corrosion can cause cooling water leakage into the process streams. Biocides, dispersants, and filtration systems typically are used to prevent these problems. However, if these treatment programs are started too late, the early stages of fouling can occur. Here, a simple method for assessing fouling and chemical treatment efficiency is described. An ultrasensitive fouling sensor that uses piezoelectric quartz crystals was developed which detects fouling in the early stages.

  3. Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Fred E.; Cash, Robert J.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

  4. Powering of cool filaments in cluster cores by buoyant bubbles - I. Qualitative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churazov, E.; Ruszkowski, M.; Schekochihin, A.

    2013-11-01

    Cool-core clusters (e.g. Perseus or M87) often possess a network of bright gaseous filaments, observed in radio, infrared, optical and X-ray bands. We propose that these filaments are powered by the reconnection of the magnetic field in the wakes of buoyant bubbles. Active galactic nucleus (AGN)-inflated bubbles of relativistic plasma rise buoyantly in the cluster atmosphere, stretching and amplifying the field in the wake to values of β = 8πPgas/B2 ˜ 1. The field lines in the wake have opposite directions and are forced together as the bubble motion stretches the filament. This setup bears strong similarity to the coronal loops on the Sun or to the Earth's magnetotail. The reconnection process naturally explains both the required level of local dissipation rate in filaments and the overall luminosity of filaments. The original source of power for the filaments is the potential energy of buoyant bubbles, inflated by the central AGN.

  5. New Detections of Radio Minihalos in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Venturi, Tiziana; Clarke, Tracy E.; Cassano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio minihalos. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146,RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations.The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 102325 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck.We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  6. New detections of radio minihalos in cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Clarke, Tracy E.; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2014-01-20

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio 'minihalos'. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146, RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations. The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 10{sup 23-25} W Hz{sup –1} at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40-160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck. We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  7. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z < 0.3) cool core brightest cluster galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope imaging of far-ultraviolet continuum emission from young (≲10 Myr), massive (≳5 M⊙) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Lyα, narrow-band Hα, broad-band optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  8. Generation IV nuclear energy system initiative. Pin core subassembly designfor the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Hoffman, E. A.; Pfeiffer, P. F.; Therios, I. U.

    2006-07-31

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of six systems selected for viability assessment in the Generation IV program. It features a closed nuclear fuel cycle, consisting of a high-temperature helium-cooled fast spectrum reactor, coupled to a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity production. The GFR combines the advances of fast spectrum systems with those of high-temperature systems. It was clear from the very beginning that GFR design should be driven by the objective to offer a complementary approach to liquid metal cooling. On this basis, CEA and the US DOE decided to collaborate on the pre-conceptual design of a GFR. This reactor design will provide a high level of safety and full recycling of the actinides, and will also be highly proliferation resistant and economically attractive. The status of this collaborative project is that two unit sizes, 600 MWt and 2400 MWt were selected as the focus of the design and safety studies. Researchers studied fuel forms, fuel assembly/element designs, core configurations, primary and balance-of-plant layouts, and safety approaches for both of these unit sizes. Results regarding the feasibility of this GFR design are encouraging. For example, sustainability and non-proliferation goals can be met and the proposed concept has attractive safety features. These features take advantage of the helium in terms of its neutronic quasi-transparency as well as the enhanced Doppler effect in connection with candidate fuel and structural materials. The current design trend is to consider high unit power for the GFR (2400 MWt), an attractive level for the power density (100 MW/m{sup 3}), and the implementation of an innovative plate type fuel or pin type sub-assembly with carbide-based actinide compounds and SiC-based structural materials. Work is still needed to refine the safety approach, to select the main system options, and to more definitively establish economic parameters.

  9. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  10. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  11. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... include the rupture opening. (3) Maximum hydrogen generation. The calculated total amount of...

  12. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, A.

    1984-07-20

    The invention provides improved means for detecting the water levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting the density of the water in these regions. The invention utilizes a plurality of exterior gamma radiation detectors and a collimator technique operable to sense separate regions of the reactor vessel to give respectively, unique signals for these regions, whereby comparative analysis of these signals can be used to advise of the presence and density of cooling water in the vessel.

  13. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  14. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  15. Subsystem design package for the on-site monitor at solar heating and cooling sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The on-site monitor is a portable device which can be easily connected to a Site Data Acquisition Subsystem to allow readouts of realtime sensor data in voltage or engineering units at instrumented solar heating and cooling sites. The design package consists of the performance specification, performance requirements cross reference, and the acceptance test procedure.

  16. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Systems and Waste Operations Monitoring Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems § 63.1086 How must I... cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136. Use the same method for both entrance and exit samples. You may validate 40 CFR part 136 methods for the HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Systems and Waste Operations Monitoring Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems § 63.1086 How must I... cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136. Use the same method for both entrance and exit samples. You may validate 40 CFR part 136 methods for the HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Systems and Waste Operations Monitoring Requirements for Heat Exchange Systems § 63.1086 How must I... cooling water using any method listed in 40 CFR part 136. Use the same method for both entrance and exit samples. You may validate 40 CFR part 136 methods for the HAP listed in Table 1 to this subpart...

  19. Operations manual: On Site Monitor (OSM), solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The on-site monitor is a portable device which, when connected to a solar system site data acquisition subsystem; allows readouts of clock and sensor data in voltage or engineering units at instrumented solar heating and cooling sites. The unit is described and procedures for its proper operation are presented.

  20. MHTGR [modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor] core physics validation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, A.; Hackney, R.

    1988-01-01

    This document contains the verification and validation (V&V) plan for analytical methods utilized in the nuclear design for normal and off-normal conditions within the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). Regulations, regulatory guides, and industry standards have been reviewed and the approach for V&V has been developed. MHTGR core physics methods are described and the status of previous V&V is summarized within this document. Additional work required to verify and validate these methods is identified. The additional validation work includes comparison of calculations with available experimental data, benchmark comparison of calculations with available experimental data, benchmark comparisons with other validated codes, results from a cooperative program now underway at the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchs-Reaktor GmbH (AVR) facility in Germany, results from a planned series of experiments on the Compact Nuclear Power Source (CNPS) facility at Los Alamos, and detailed documentation of all V&V studies. In addition, information will be obtained from planned international cooperative agreements to provide supplemental data for V&V. The regulatory technology development plan will be revised to include these additional experiments. A work schedule and cost estimate for completing this plan is also provided. This work schedule indicates the timeframe in which major milestones must be performed in order to complete V&V tasks prior to the issuance of preliminary design approval from the NRC. The cost to complete V&V tasks for core physics computational methods is estimated to be $2.2M. 41 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Observation of the core of the Perseus cluster with the Einstein solid state spectrometer: Cooling gas and elemental abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.; Smith, B. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Solid State Spectrometer observations of the core of the Perseus cluster have resulted in the detection of X-ray emission lines due to Si, S, and Fe. Analysis of the spectrum indicates that the X-ray emission has at least two characteristic temperatures. This is interpreted in the framework of radiative accretion in the core of the cluster. The derived parameters are a cooling time tc less than 2 x 109 yrs for the low temperature gas, a mass accretion rate of approximately 300 Mo/yr and a characteristic size of 10 to 20 Kpc for the cool gas. The Fe abundance in the core, approximately 0.4, is similar to the Fe abundance averaged over the whole cluster indicating that Fe emission is not strongly concentrated about NGC 1275. The Si and S abundances are consistent with solar values.

  2. MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

  3. Application of reliability-centered maintenance to boiling water reactor emergency core cooling systems fault-tree analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.A.; Feltus, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) methods are applied to boiling water reactor plant-specific emergency core cooling system probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault trees. The RCM is a technique that is system function-based, for improving a preventive maintenance (PM) program, which is applied on a component basis. Many PM programs are based on time-directed maintenance tasks, while RCM methods focus on component condition-directed maintenance tasks. Stroke time test data for motor-operated valves (MOVs) are used to address three aspects concerning RCM: (a) to determine if MOV stroke time testing was useful as a condition-directed PM task; (b) to determine and compare the plant-specific MOV failure data from a broad RCM philosophy time period compared with a PM period and, also, compared with generic industry MOV failure data; and (c) to determine the effects and impact of the plant-specific MOV failure data on core damage frequency (CDF) and system unavailabilities for these emergency systems. The MOV stroke time test data from four emergency core cooling systems [i.e., high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI), reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC), low-pressure core spray (LPCS), and residual heat removal/low-pressure coolant injection (RHR/LPCI)] were gathered from Philadelphia Electric Company`s Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3 between 1980 and 1992. The analyses showed that MOV stroke time testing was not a predictor for eminent failure and should be considered as a go/no-go test. The failure data from the broad RCM philosophy showed an improvement compared with the PM-period failure rates in the emergency core cooling system MOVs. Also, the plant-specific MOV failure rates for both maintenance philosophies were shown to be lower than the generic industry estimates.

  4. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE FORMATION OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS AND COOL CORES IN GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-04-10

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and H{alpha} study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of H{alpha} filaments in groups versus clusters over the mass range 10{sup 13} < M{sub 500} < 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. The detection frequency of H{alpha} emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of H{alpha} filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) intracluster medium (ICM) entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The H{alpha} filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The H{alpha} filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather than radio bubbles. The ICM cooling efficiency, defined as the X-ray cooling rate per unit gas mass, is shown to correlate with the total system mass, indicating that groups are more efficient at cooling than clusters. This result implies that, in systems with cool cores, active galactic nucleus feedback scales with the total mass of the system, in agreement with earlier suggestions.

  5. X-ray observations of complex temperature structure in the cool-core cluster A85

    SciTech Connect

    Schenck, David E.; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Sam

    2014-07-01

    X-ray observations were used to examine the complex temperature structure of A85, a cool-core galaxy cluster. Temperature features can provide evidence of merging events which shock heat the intracluster gas. Temperature maps were made from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The combination of a new, long-exposure XMM observation and an improved temperature map binning technique produced the highest fidelity temperature maps of A85 to date. Hot regions were detected near the subclusters to the south and southwest in both the Chandra and XMM temperature maps. The presence of these structures implies A85 is not relaxed. The hot regions may indicate the presence of shocks. The Mach numbers were estimated to be ∼1.9 at the locations of the hot spots. Observational effects will tend to systematically reduce temperature jumps, so the measured Mach numbers are likely underestimated. Neither temperature map showed evidence for a shock in the vicinity of the presumed radio relic near the southwest subcluster. However, the presence of a weak shock cannot be ruled out. There was tension between the temperatures measured by the two instruments.

  6. Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

  7. Searching for Cooling Signatures in Strong Lensing Galaxy Clusters: Evidence Against Baryons Shaping the Matter Distribution in Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Peter; Bayliss, M.; McDonald, M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing number of galaxy clusters being discovered which exhibit strong gravitational lensing, the process by which the mass density profile of these clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. If this were the case, one would expect to observe signatures of strong ICM cooling (e.g., steep X-ray cores, optical emission line nebulae, star formation) in and around the central brightest cluster galaxy. In this work, we search for such evidence of ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of strong lensing selected galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.6. Based on the known correlations between cooling rate and both optical emission line luminosity and specific star formation, as traced by [OII]λλ3727 emission and the 4000 angstrom break strength, respectively, we measure the fraction of clusters that have cooling signatures in a new sample of hundreds of strong lensing clusters, and compare this result to that in a control sample of thousands of optically-selected galaxy clusters. Our results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in strong lensing cross-sections. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. Casting core for a cooling arrangement for a gas turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Heneveld, Benjamin E

    2015-01-20

    A ceramic casting core, including: a plurality of rows (162, 166, 168) of gaps (164), each gap (164) defining an airfoil shape; interstitial core material (172) that defines and separates adjacent gaps (164) in each row (162, 166, 168); and connecting core material (178) that connects adjacent rows (170, 174, 176) of interstitial core material (172). Ends of interstitial core material (172) in one row (170, 174, 176) align with ends of interstitial core material (172) in an adjacent row (170, 174, 176) to form a plurality of continuous and serpentine shaped structures each including interstitial core material (172) from at least two adjacent rows (170, 174, 176) and connecting core material (178).

  9. An analytical study of volatile metallic fission product release from very high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel and core

    SciTech Connect

    Mitake, S.; Okamoto, F.

    1988-04-01

    Release characteristics of volatile metallic fission products from the coated fuel particle and the reactor core for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor during its power operation has been studied using numerical analysis. A computer code FORNAX, based on Fick's diffusion law and the evaporation mass transfer relation, has been developed, which considers, in particular, distribution and time histories of power density, fuel temperature, and failed and degraded fuel particle fractions in the core. Applicability of the code to evaluate the core design has been shown and the following have been indicated on the release of cesium from the reactor: 1. The release from the intact fuel particles by diffusion through their intact coatings shows larger contribution in the total core release at higher temperature. 2. The diffusion release from the intact particle is governed not only by the diffusion in the silicon carbide layer but also by that in the fuel kernel.

  10. Core flows and heat transfer induced by inhomogeneous cooling with sub- and supercritical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Hori, K.; Wicht, J.

    2016-02-01

    The amount and spatial pattern of heat extracted from cores of terrestrial planets is ultimately controlled by the thermal structure of the lower rocky mantle. Using the most common model to tackle this problem, a rapidly rotating and differentially cooled spherical shell containing an incompressible and viscous liquid is numerically investigated. To gain the physical basics, we consider a simple, equatorial symmetric perturbation of the CMB heat flux shaped as a spherical harmonic Y11 . The thermodynamic properties of the induced flows mainly depend on the degree of nonlinearity parametrised by a horizontal Rayleigh number Rah =q∗ Ra , where q∗ is the relative CMB heat flux anomaly amplitude and Ra is the Rayleigh number which controls radial buoyancy-driven convection. Depending on Rah we identify and characterise three distinctive flow regimes through their spatial patterns, heat transport and flow speed scalings: in the linear conductive regime the radial inward flow is found to be phase shifted 90° eastwards from the maximal heat flux as predicted by a linear quasi-geostrophic model for rapidly rotating spherical systems. The advective regime is characterised by an increased Rah where nonlinearities become significant, but is still subcritical to radial convection. There the upwelling is dispersed and the downwelling is compressed by the thermal advection into a spiralling jet-like structure. As Rah becomes large enough for the radial convection to set in, the jet remains identifiable on time-average and significantly alters the global heat budget in the convective regime. Our results suggest, that the boundary forcing not only introduces a net horizontal heat transport but also suppresses the convection locally to such an extent, that the net Nusselt number is reduced by up to 50%, even though the mean CMB heat flux is conserved. This also implies that a planetary core will remain hotter under a non-homogeneous CMB heat flux and is less well mixed. A

  11. THE GROWTH OF COOL CORES AND EVOLUTION OF COOLING PROPERTIES IN A SAMPLE OF 83 GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0.3 < z < 1.2 SELECTED FROM THE SPT-SZ SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M. W.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; De Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner {approx}100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z {approx} 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed ''entropy floor'' at {approx}10 keV cm{sup 2}. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density ({rho}{sub g,0}/{rho}{sub crit}) increasing by an order of magnitude from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, {approx}150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm{sup 2} and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z{sub cool}=1.0{sup +1.0}{sub -0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z {approx}> 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as ''cooling flows'' (low central entropy, cooling time) but not

  12. The Growth of Cool Cores and Evolution of Cooling Properties in a Sample of 83 Galaxy Clusters at 0.3 < z < 1.2 Selected from the SPT-SZ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Bleem, L. E.; de Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M. W.; Bayliss, M.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z ~ 0 to z ~ 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner ~100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z ~ 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed "entropy floor" at ~10 keV cm2. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density (ρ g, 0/ρcrit) increasing by an order of magnitude from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, ~150 M ⊙ yr-1 cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm2 and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z_{cool}=1.0^{+1.0}_{-0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z >~ 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as "cooling flows" (low central entropy, cooling time) but not "cool cores" (cuspy surface brightness profile), meaning that care must be taken when classifying these high-z systems

  13. Central mass profiles of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters Hydra A and A478

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, N.; Umetsu, K.; Tamura, T.; Fujita, Y.; Takizawa, M.; Matsushita, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Futamase, T.; Kawaharada, M.; Miyazaki, S.; Mochizuki, Y.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ota, N.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, K.; Tam, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a weak-lensing study of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, Hydra A (z = 0.0538) and A478 (z = 0.0881), of which the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) host the powerful activities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For each cluster, the observed tangential shear profile is described well by either a single Navarro-Frenk-White model or a two-component model including the BCG as an unresolved point mass. For A478, we determine the BCG and its host-halo masses from a joint fit to weak-lensing and stellar photometry measurements. We find that the choice of initial mass functions (IMFs) can introduce a factor of 2 uncertainty in the BCG mass, whereas the BCG host-halo mass is constrained well by data. We perform a joint analysis of the weak-lensing and stellar kinematics data available for the Hydra A cluster, which allows us to constrain the central mass profile without assuming specific IMFs. We find that the central mass profile (r < 300 kpc) determined from the joint analysis is in excellent agreement with those from independent measurements, including dynamical masses estimated from the cold gas disc component, X-ray hydrostatic total mass estimates, and the central stellar mass estimated with the Salpeter IMF. The observed dark matter fraction around the BCG for Hydra A is found to be smaller than those predicted by adiabatic contraction models, suggesting the importance of other physical processes, such as AGN feedback and/or dissipationless mergers.

  14. Simultaneous monitoring the real and imaginary parts of the analyte refractive index using liquid-core photonic bandgap Bragg fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous monitoring of the real and imaginary parts of the liquid analyte refractive index by using a hollow-core Bragg fiber. We apply this two-channel fiber sensor to monitor concentrations of various commercial cooling oils. The sensor operates using spectral monitoring of the fiber bandgap center wavelength, as well as monitoring of the fiber transmission amplitude at mid-bandgap position. The sensitivity of the fiber sensor to changes in the real part of the core refractive index is found to be 1460nm/Refractive index unit (RIU). By using spectral modality and effective medium theory, we determine the concentrations of the two commercial fluids from the measured refractive indices with an accuracy of ~0.57% for both low- and high-loss oils. Moreover, using an amplitude-based detection modality allows determination of the oil concentration with accuracy of ~1.64% for low-loss oils and ~2.81% for the high-loss oils. PMID:26368402

  15. Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Srubar, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    An all electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consisted of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000 gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500 gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25 ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment was installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating served as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes are given.

  16. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  17. Analysis and monitoring of ozone in cooling water systems: A state of the art paper

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, W.K.

    1994-12-31

    This is a State of the Art paper. This paper includes an overview of the current techniques for liquid and gas phase ozone monitoring. The paper also includes specific techniques for Ozone monitoring, a list of ozone monitor manufacturers, and a bibliography. This paper presents and overview of the current techniques for liquid and gas phase ozone monitoring. If the ozone concentration in cooling water is too high, ozone induced corrosion or off-gassing of ozone can occur. If the dissolved ozone concentration is too low, biological growth can develop. The paper includes an appendix which contains the following summaries: Calibration method for residual ozone by the oxidation of nitrite; Colorimetric method for the determination of residual ozone in water (Indigo-trisulfonate method and ACVK method); Colorimetric method for the determination of traces of ozone in water; Electrochemical method for continuous measurement of residual ozone in water; and Photometric measurement of low ozone concentration in the gas phase.

  18. Development of micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for near-core and in-core neutron flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin F.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, J. Kenneth; Whaley, P. Michael; Ahmed, A. S. M. Sabbir; Bolinger, Clayton C.; Pinsent, Tracy C.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturized Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) are under investigation as real-time neutron flux monitors. The devices are capable of performing near-core and in-core reactor power measurements. The basic design utilizes neutron reactive material confined within a miniaturized gas pocket, similar to that of a fission chamber. Device size ranges from 500 microns to a few millimeters thick, thereby allowing them to be inserted directly between fuel elements of a reactor core. Fabricated from inexpensive ceramic materials, the detectors can be fashioned into a linear array to facilitate 3-D mapping of a reactor core neutron flux profile in "real-time". Initial tests have shown these devices to be extremely radiation hard and potentially capable of operating in a neutron fluence exceeding 1016 n cm-2 without noticeable degradation.

  19. HIGH-REDSHIFT COOL-CORE GALAXY CLUSTERS DETECTED VIA THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, D. R.; Suhada, R.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg{sup 2} observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (>3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}{sub 70}) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (c{sub SB}) and cuspiness ({alpha}). We find that c{sub SB} is better constrained. We measure c{sub SB} for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4{sigma} level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z c{sub SB} distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.

  20. High-redshift Cool-core Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the South Pole Telescope Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semler, D. R.; Šuhada, R.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg2 observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (>3 × 1014 M ⊙ h -1 70) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (c SB) and cuspiness (α). We find that c SB is better constrained. We measure c SB for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4σ level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z c SB distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.

  1. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators

  2. AGN feedback and delivery methods for simulations of cool-core galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meece, Gregory Robert, Jr.

    Galaxy clusters are filled with a hot plasma called the intracluster medium, or ICM. In roughly half of clusters, the radiative cooling time is much shorter than the age of the cluster, meaning that the ICM should have had plenty of time to cool and form stars. Instead, observations show little cold gas in these clusters and star formation rates at least an order of magnitude below what is predicted. This dissertation explores a theory known as the Precipitation-regulated Feedback Hypothesis. As the ICM cools, thermal instability leads the formation of cold clouds that accrete onto a supermassive black hole, powering active galactic nuclei (AGN) that reheat the cluster. This feedback loop balances cooling and keeps the cluster in a rough state of thermal equilibrium.

  3. Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

  4. A no-flush, core-cooling technique for successful cardiopulmonary preservation in heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kontos, G J; Adachi, H; Borkon, M A; Cameron, D E; Baumgartner, W A; Hutchins, G M; Brawn, J; Reitz, B A

    1987-12-01

    In order to determine whether a no-flush, core-cooling technique could provide extended heart-lung preservation, we placed donor calves on cardiopulmonary bypass and instituted rapid cooling to 15 degrees C during the continuous infusion of isoproterenol. The heart and lungs were harvested after the administration of a cardioplegic solution through the aortic root. In the control group (N = 5), heart and lungs were orthotopically allotransplanted immediately. In the preserved group (N = 5), heart and lungs were similarly excised but were stored in a normal saline bath at 4 degrees C for approximately 4 hours and then transplanted. Both groups received isoproterenol during reperfusion and were studied for 6 hours after implantation. A load independent analysis of myocardial function was done by determining with a sonomicrometer the ratio of the end-systolic pressure to the end-systolic dimension. Pulmonary preservation was evaluated by measurement of extravascular lung water with a double-indicator dilution method, arterial oxygenation on 100% inspired oxygen, and serial lung biopsies. Myocardial and pulmonary function after 4 hours of static preservation was found to be similar to controls. No-flush, core-cooling with cardiopulmonary bypass provides adequate cardiorespiratory function after acute bovine heart-lung allotransplantation. With the use of this technique, successful extended cold ischemic cardiopulmonary preservation for heart-lung transplantation may be achieved. PMID:3119946

  5. Superficial cooling does not decrease core body temperature before, during, or after exercise in an American football uniform.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rebecca M; Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of superficial cooling on thermoregulatory responses while exercising in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform. Nine male and female subjects wore a superficial cooling garment while in a cooling (CS) experimental condition or a no cooling (NCS) control condition during an exercise task consisting of warm-up (WU), exercise (EX), and recovery (R). The exercise task simulated an American football conditioning session with subjects wearing a full American football uniform and performing anaerobic and aerobic exercises in a hot humid environment. Subjects were allowed to drink water ad libitum during rest breaks. During the WU, EX, and R periods, core body temperature (T(c)) was measured to assess the effect of the cooling garment. Neither baseline resting before warm-up T(c) nor after warm-up T(c) was significantly different between trials. No significant differences in exercise T(c) between conditions were found. Time to return to baseline T(c) revealed no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions. The authors found that the volume of fluid consumed was 34% less in the experimental condition (711.1 ± 188.0 ml) compared with the control condition (1,077.8 ± 204.8 ml). The findings indicate that the cooling garment was not effective in blunting the rise in T(c) during warm-up, attenuating a rise in T(c) during intermittent exercise, or in increasing a return to baseline T(c) during a resting recovery period in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform. PMID:23007493

  6. Simultaneous corrosion and fouling monitoring under heat transfer in cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.A.; Stokes, P.S.N.; Nichols, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion and fouling in cooling water systems can potentially reduce heat-transfer capability, increase maintenance costs, reduce plant availability, and contaminate process lines. Conventional monitoring systems have measured corrosion and fouling separately. Fouling monitors alone are not able to indicate real-time corrosion activity beneath surface deposits. Traditionally, corrosion information has been derived from destructive evaluation of heat exchanger tubes, weight loss coupons, and probes under nonheat flux conditions. To overcome these shortcomings, a monitoring system has been developed that measures corrosion and fouling simultaneously. By using electrochemical noise measurement technology, the system is particularly sensitive to detecting localized corrosion beneath a fouled surface, a major and frequent mode of corrosion failure in heat exchangers. Development of the system has progressed from field trials with a prototype unit to a commercially available system. This paper reports and discusses the most recent evaluation of the system at Amoco`s Corporate Research facility in Naperville, Illinois, focusing on the sensitivity of electrochemical noise measurement in detecting localized corrosion (pitting and so forth) on a heat transfer surface in a cooling water environment.

  7. SEARCHING FOR COOLING SIGNATURES IN STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: EVIDENCE AGAINST BARYONS SHAPING THE MATTER DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Peter K.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; McDonald, Michael; Dahle, Hakon; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Mushotzky, Richard

    2013-07-20

    The process by which the mass density profile of certain galaxy clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing (SL) cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. In this work, we search for evidence of ongoing ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of SL selected galaxy clusters in the range 0.1 < z < 0.6. Based on known correlations between the ICM cooling rate and both optical emission line luminosity and star formation, we measure, for a sample of 89 SL clusters, the fraction of clusters that have [O II]{lambda}{lambda}3727 emission in their brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We find that the fraction of line-emitting BCGs is constant as a function of redshift for z > 0.2 and shows no statistically significant deviation from the total cluster population. Specific star formation rates, as traced by the strength of the 4000 A break, D{sub 4000}, are also consistent with the general cluster population. Finally, we use optical imaging of the SL clusters to measure the angular separation, R{sub arc}, between the arc and the center of mass of each lensing cluster in our sample and test for evidence of changing [O II] emission and D{sub 4000} as a function of R{sub arc}, a proxy observable for SL cross-sections. D{sub 4000} is constant with all values of R{sub arc}, and the [O II] emission fractions show no dependence on R{sub arc} for R{sub arc} > 10'' and only very marginal evidence of increased weak [O II] emission for systems with R{sub arc} < 10''. These results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling associated with cool core activity in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in SL cross-sections.

  8. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOL CORE CLUSTERS: KINEMATICS, REDDENING, AND SOURCES OF IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2012-02-20

    We have obtained deep, high spatial and spectral resolution, long-slit spectra of the H{alpha} nebulae in the cool cores of nine galaxy clusters. This sample provides a wealth of information on the ionization state, kinematics, and reddening of the warm gas in the cool cores of galaxy clusters. We find evidence for only small amounts of reddening in the extended, line-emitting filaments, with the majority of filaments having E(B - V) < 0.2. We find, in agreement with previous works, that the optical emission in cool core clusters has elevated low-ionization line ratios. The combination of [O III]/H{beta}, [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [O I]/H{alpha} allow us to rule out collisional ionization by cosmic rays, thermal conduction, and photoionization by intracluster medium (ICM) X-rays and active galactic nuclei as strong contributors to the ionization in the bulk of the optical line-emitting gas in both the nuclei and filaments. The data are adequately described by a composite model of slow shocks and star formation. This model is further supported by an observed correlation between the line widths and low-ionization line ratios which becomes stronger in systems with more modest star formation activity based on far-ultraviolet observations. We find that the more extended, narrow filaments tend to have shallower velocity gradients and narrower line widths than the compact filamentary complexes. We confirm that the widths of the emission lines decrease with radius, from FWHM {approx}600 km s{sup -1} in the nuclei to FWHM {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the most extended filaments. The variation of line width with radius is vastly different than what is measured from stellar absorption lines in a typical giant elliptical galaxy, suggesting that the velocity width of the warm gas may in fact be linked to ICM turbulence and, thus, may provide a glimpse into the amount of turbulence in cool cores. In the central regions (r < 10 kpc) of several systems the warm gas

  9. AGN-driven perturbations in the intracluster medium of the cool-core cluster ZwCl 2701

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagshette, Nilkanth D.; Sonkamble, Satish S.; Naik, Sachindra; Patil, Madhav K.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results obtained from a total of 123 ks X-ray (Chandra) and 8 h of 1.4 GHz radio (Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope - GMRT) observations of the cool-core cluster ZwCl 2701 (z = 0.214). These observations of ZwCl 2701 showed the presence of an extensive pair of ellipsoidal cavities along the east and west directions within the central region < 20 kpc. Detection of bright rims around the cavities suggested that the radio lobes displaced X-ray-emitting hot gas forming shell-like structures. The total cavity power (mechanical power) that directly heated the surrounding gas and cooling luminosity of the cluster were estimated to be ˜2.27 × 1045 erg s-1 and 3.5 × 1044 erg s-1 , respectively. Comparable values of cavity power and cooling luminosity of ZwCl 2701 suggested that the mechanical power of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) outburst is large enough to balance the radiative cooling in the system. The star formation rate derived from the Hα luminosity was found to be ˜0.60 M⊙ yr-1, which is about three orders of magnitude lower than the cooling rate of ˜196 M⊙ yr-1. Detection of the floor in entropy profile of ZwCl 2701 suggested the presence of an alternative heating mechanism at the centre of the cluster. Lower value of the ratio (˜10-2) between black hole mass accretion rate and Eddington mass accretion rate suggested that launching of jet from the super massive black hole is efficient in ZwCl 2701. However, higher value of ratio (˜103) between black hole mass accretion rate and Bondi accretion rate indicated that the accretion rate required to create cavities is well above the Bondi accretion rate.

  10. Neutron flux measurements in the side-core region of Hunterston B advanced gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.A.; Shaw, S.E.; Huggon, A.P.; Steadman, R.J.; Thornton, D.A.; Whiley, G.S.

    2011-07-01

    The core restraints of advanced gas-cooled reactors are important structural components that are required to maintain the geometric integrity of the cores. A review of neutron dosimetry for the sister stations Hunterston B and Hinkley Point B identified that earlier conservative assessments predicted high thermal neutron dose rates to key components of the restraint structure (the restraint rod welds), with the implication that some of them may be predicted to fail during a seismic event. A revised assessment was therefore undertaken [Thornton, D. A., Allen, D. A., Tyrrell, R. J., Meese, T. C., Huggon, A.P., Whiley, G. S., and Mossop, J. R., 'A Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor,' Proceedings of the 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry (ISRD-13, May 2008), World Scientific, River Edge, NJ, 2009, W. Voorbraak, L. Debarberis, and P. D'hondt, Eds., pp. 679-687] using a detailed 3D model and a Monte Carlo radiation transport program, MCBEND. This reassessment resulted in more realistic fast and thermal neutron dose recommendations, the latter in particular being much lower than had been thought previously. It is now desirable to improve confidence in these predictions by providing direct validation of the MCBEND model through the use of neutron flux measurements. This paper describes the programme of work being undertaken to deploy two neutron flux measurement 'stringers' within the side-core region of one of the Hunterston B reactors for the purpose of validating the MCBEND model. The design of the stringers and the determination of the preferred deployment locations have been informed by the use of detailed MCBEND flux calculations. These computational studies represent a rare opportunity to design a flux measurement beforehand, with the clear intention of minimising the anticipated uncertainties and obtaining measurements that are known to be representative of the neutron fields to which the vulnerable steel

  11. In-core coolant flow monitoring of pressurized water reactors using temperature and neutron noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Shieh, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Noise measurements were performed at the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) and Sequoyah-1 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in order to investigate the possibility of inferring in-core coolant velocities from cross-power spectral density (CPSD) phases of core-exit thermocouple and in-core neutron detector signals. These noise measurements were used to investigate the effects of inlet coolant temperature, core flow, reactor power, and random heat transfer fluctuations on the noise-inferred coolant velocities. The effect on the inferred velocities of varying in-core neutron detector and core-exit thermocouple locations was also investigated. Theoretical models of temperature noise were developed, and the results were used to interpret the experimental measurements. Results of these studies indicate that the neutron detector/thermocouple phase is useful for monitoring core flow in PWRs. Results show that the interpretation of the phase between these signals depends on the source of temperature noise, the response times and locations of the sensors, and the neutron dynamics of the reactor. At Sequoyah-1 we found that the in-core neutron detector/core-exit thermocouple phase can be used to infer in-core coolant velocities, provided that the measurements are corrected for the thermocouple response time.

  12. Roadside automobile emission monitoring with Peltier-cooled diode laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joachim F.; Sassenscheid, Karsten; Halford, B.; Lambrecht, Armin; Tacke, Maurus

    1997-05-01

    The use of catalytic converters in cars with gasoline engine results in a tremendous reduction of the emission of pollutant gases. The optimal operation of the exhaust treatment systems is being checked and maintained periodically, but there is always a significant percentage of cars with a malfunction of the catalytic converter causing a substantial percentage of the total emission. Roadside emission monitoring of individual cars in the running traffic could be used to indicate these gross polluters, arrange maintenance of their vehicles and thus reduce total emission. Present monitoring systems use non- dispersive IR spectroscopy. Other systems are based on mid- IR diode laser spectroscopy offering a higher signal to noise ratio, higher selectivity for detection of specific compounds and better optical quality for long open path measurements, but these systems depend on liquid nitrogen cooling. In this work a compact mid-IR (MIR) laser diode system for roadside measurements will be presented, that is cooled thermoelectrically using a Peltier element. Sensitivity and time resolution of the system have been determined and found to be suitable for detection of single gross polluters in the running traffic. The presented system demonstrates the feasibility of high sensitive, selective and fast field MIR laser diode spectroscopy together with ruggedness and low maintenance expense.

  13. A monitoring of breathing using a hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, S.; Seki, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-04-01

    A monitoring human breath has been seen as an important source of factor for vital status for emergency medical service. The monitoring of breathing has been tested and evaluated in a possible breath condition of a person to be monitored. A hetero-core optical fiber humidity sensor was developed for in order to monitor relative humidity in a medial mask. Elements for determent breath condition were extracted from the light intensity changing at some human breath condition, which were Breath depth, Breath cycle, Breath time and Check breathing. It is found that the elements had differences relative to normal breathing.

  14. Long-Term Multiwaveband Monitoring of Selected Blazars (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The investigators request RXTE time to continue their long-term monitoring of the blazars 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, BL Lac, and 3C 273 2-3 times per week at radio, mm, IR, optical, X-ray, and, with the advent of GLAST, gamma-ray wavelengths. These, plus an added 5th object, CTA102, include blazars bright enough to detect strongly with RXTE and GLAST as well as to measure polarization on 7 mm VLBA images and at optical bands. By matching polarized features on VLBA images with variable polarization at optical bands and by associating X-ray and gamma-ray flares with similar events at these longer wavelengths, the investigators will locate where in the jet the emission occurs at all these wavebands. The relative timing of flares as a function of wavelength will overconstrain emission models.

  15. AN HST/WFC3-UVIS VIEW OF THE STARBURST IN THE COOL CORE OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Benson, Bradford; Veilleux, Sylvain; Reichardt, Christian L.

    2013-03-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations of the core of the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243) in five broadband filters spanning rest-frame 1000-5500 A. These observations reveal complex, filamentary blue emission, extending for >40 kpc from the brightest cluster galaxy. We observe an underlying, diffuse population of old stars, following an r {sup 1/4} distribution, confirming that this system is somewhat relaxed. The spectral energy distribution in the inner part of the galaxy, as well as along the extended filaments, is a smooth continuum and is consistent with that of a star-forming galaxy, suggesting that the extended, filamentary emission is not due to the central active galactic nucleus, either from a large-scale ionized outflow or scattered polarized UV emission, but rather a massive population of young stars. We estimate an extinction-corrected star formation rate of 798 {+-} 42 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, consistent with our earlier work based on low spatial resolution ultraviolet, optical, and infrared imaging. The lack of tidal features and multiple bulges, combine with the need for an exceptionally massive (>10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) cold gas reservoir, suggest that this star formation is not the result of a merger of gas-rich galaxies. Instead, we propose that the high X-ray cooling rate of {approx}2700 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} is the origin of the cold gas reservoir. The combination of such a high cooling rate and the relatively weak radio source in the cluster core suggests that feedback has been unable to halt cooling in this system, leading to this tremendous burst of star formation.

  16. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  17. High-dose diazepam facilitates core cooling during cold saline infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Northington, William E; Callaway, Clifton W

    2009-08-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, cardiac arrest, or exertional heat illness. While infusion of cold normal saline is a simple and inexpensive method for reducing core temperature, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesized that intravenous administration of diazepam during a rapid infusion of 30 mL.kg-1 of cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline to healthy subjects would be more comfortable and reduce core body temperature more than the administration of cold saline alone. Fifteen subjects received rapidly infused cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive, intravenously, 20 mg diazepam (HIGH), 10 mg diazepam (LOW), or placebo (CON). Main outcomes were core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption. Data for the main outcomes were analyzed with generalized estimating equations to identify differences in group, time, or a group x time interaction. Core temperature decreased in all groups (CON, 1.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C; LOW, 1.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C; HIGH, 1.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), while skin temperature was unchanged. Mean (95% CI) oxygen consumption was 315.3 (253.8, 376.9) mL.kg-1.min-1 in the CON group, 317.9 (275.5, 360.3) in the LOW group, and 226.1 (216.4, 235.9) in the HIGH group. Significant time and group x time interaction was observed for core temperature and oxygen consumption (p < 0.001). Administration of high-dose diazepam resulted in decreased oxygen consumption during cold saline infusion, suggesting that 20 mg of intravenous diazepam may reduce the shivering threshold without compromising respiratory or cardiovascular function. PMID:19767791

  18. Monitoring of Building Heating and Cooling Systems Based on Geothermal Heat Pump in Galicia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Franco, D.

    2012-10-01

    In November 2009 was signed an agreement between Galicia's Government and EnergyLab to develop a project related with the geothermal heatpumps (hereafter, GSHP) technology. That project consisted in replacing the existing thermal equipment generators (diesel boilers and air-water heat pumps) by GSHP systems in representative public buildings: two nursery schools, a university library, a health centre and a residential building. This new systems will reach the demands of existing heating, cooling and domestic hot water (hereafter, DHW). These buildings can serve as examples of energy and economic savings that can offer this technology. We will show detailed analysis of the GSHP facilities monitored, since the starting-up of them. Which includes: COP's, EER's, energy consumption, operating costs, operation hours of the system, economic and emissions comparative, geothermal exchange evolution graphs, environmental conditions evolution graphs (temperature and demands), etc. The results presented show an example of the important benefits of the GSHP technology and the significant savings that can offer its implementation for heating, cooling and DHW production. Note to the reader: The article number has been corrected on web pages on November 22, 2013.

  19. Monitoring of bread cooling by statistical analysis of laser speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, Tanya; Stoykova, Elena; Nacheva, Elena; Ivanov, Branimir; Panchev, Ivan; Sainov, Ventseslav

    2013-03-01

    The phenomenon of laser speckle can be used for detection and visualization of physical or biological activity in various objects (e.g. fruits, seeds, coatings) through statistical description of speckle dynamics. The paper presents the results of non-destructive monitoring of bread cooling by co-occurrence matrix and temporal structure function analysis of speckle patterns which have been recorded continuously within a few days. In total, 72960 and 39680 images were recorded and processed for two similar bread samples respectively. The experiments proved the expected steep decrease of activity related to the processes in the bread samples during the first several hours and revealed its oscillating character within the next few days. Characterization of activity over the bread sample surface was also obtained.

  20. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  1. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  2. Generation IV nuclear energy system initiative. Large GFR core subassemblydesign for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Therios, I. U.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    2006-07-31

    Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) designs are being developed to meet Gen IV goals of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection as part of an International Generation IV Nuclear Energy System Research Initiative effort. Different organizations are involved in the development of a variety of GFR design concepts. The current analysis has focused on the evaluation of low-pressure drop, pin-core designs with favorable passive cooling properties. Initial evaluation of the passive cooling safety case for the GFR during depressurized decay heat removal accidents with concurrent loss of electric power have resulted in requirements for a reduction of core power density to the 100 w/cc level and a low core pressure drop of 0.5 bars. Additional design constraints and the implementation of their constraints are evaluated in this study to enhance and passive cooling properties of the reactor. Passive cooling is made easier by a flat radial distribution of the decay heat. One goal of this study was to evaluate the radial power distribution and determine to what extent it can be flattened, since the decay heat is nearly proportional to the fission power at shutdown. In line with this investigation of the radial power profile, an assessment was also made of the control rod configuration. The layout provided a large number of control rod locations with a fixed area provided for control rods. The number of control rods was consistent with other fast reactor designs. The adequacy of the available control rod locations was evaluated. Future studies will be needed to optimize the control rod designs and evaluate the shutdown system. The case for low pressure drop core can be improved by the minimization of pressure drop sources such as the number of required fuel spacers in the subassembly design and by the details of the fuel pin design. The fuel pin design is determined by a number of neutronic, thermal-hydraulic (gas dynamics

  3. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  4. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  5. Thermohydraulics in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor primary loop during early phases of unrestricted core-heatup accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.; Colman, J.; Hsu, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    In High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) siting considerations, the Unrestricted Core Heatup Accidents (UCHA) are considered as accidents of highest consequence, corresponding to core meltdown accidents in light water reactors. Initiation of such accidents can be, for instance, due to station blackout, resulting in scram and loss of all main loop forced circulation, with none of the core auxiliary cooling system loops being started. The result is a slow but continuing core heatup, extending over days. During the initial phases of such UCHA scenarios, the primary loop remains pressurized, with the system pressure slowly increasing until the relief valve setpoint is reached. The major objectives of the work described here were to determine times to depressurization as well as approximate loop component temperatures up to depressurization.

  6. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  7. System for monitoring of energy release in the core of a boiling-water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskii, I.I.

    1988-06-01

    Results are discussed from an investigation into a system for the physical monitoring of energy release in the core of the VK-50 boiling water reactor. Movable self-powered detectors are used in this system as energy-release neutron detectors. Rhodium serves as the emitter in these detectors. A number of parameters for these detectors were experimentally measured; they include the ratio of the instantaneous current to the activation current, the coefficients of relative sensitivity of the detectors to neutrons, and the effective cross sections for the interaction of /sup 103/Rh with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Computer simulation of the system and detectors is discussed. The system can monitor absolute energy distribution in the fuel assemblies under reactor conditions. The system is independent of thermotechnical measurements with an instrument to determine energy release in the reactor core.

  8. Cosmic ray transport in galaxy clusters: implications for radio halos, gamma-ray signatures, and cool core heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, T.; Pfrommer, C.; Miniati, F.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the interplay of cosmic ray (CR) propagation and advection in galaxy clusters. Propagation in form of CR diffusion and streaming tends to drive the CR radial profiles towards being flat, with equal CR number density everywhere. Advection of CR by the turbulent gas motions tends to produce centrally enhanced profiles. We assume that the CR streaming velocity is of the order of the sound velocity. This is motivated by plasma physical arguments. The CR streaming is then usually larger than typical advection velocities and becomes comparable or lower than this only for periods with trans- and super-sonic cluster turbulence. As a consequence a bimodality of the CR spatial distribution results. Strongly turbulent, merging clusters should have a more centrally concentrated CR energy density profile with respect to relaxed ones with very subsonic turbulence. This translates into a bimodality of the expected diffuse radio and gamma-ray emission of clusters, since more centrally concentrated CR will find higher target densities for hadronic CR proton interactions, higher plasma wave energy densities for CR electron and proton re-acceleration, and stronger magnetic fields. Thus, the observed bimodality of cluster radio halos appears to be a natural consequence of the interplay of CR transport processes, independent of the model of radio halo formation, be it hadronic interactions of CR protons or re-acceleration of low-energy CR electrons. Energy dependence of the CR propagation should lead to spectral steepening of dying radio halos. Furthermore, we show that the interplay of CR diffusion with advection implies first order CR re-acceleration in the pressure-stratified atmospheres of galaxy clusters. Finally, we argue that CR streaming could be important in turbulent cool cores of galaxy clusters since it heats preferentially the central gas with highest cooling rate.

  9. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine

  10. Monitoring of heparin concentration in serum by Raman spectroscopy within hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetani, Altaf; Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Harb, Alaa; Anis, Hanan

    2011-08-01

    The feasibility of using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy has been explored for real time monitoring of heparin concentration in serum. Heparin is an important blood anti-coagulant whose precise monitoring and controlling in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and dialysis is of utmost importance. Our method of heparin monitoring offers a novel alternative to existing clinical procedures in terms of accuracy, response time and sample volume. The optical design configuration simply involves a 785-nm laser diode whose light is coupled into HC-PCF filled with heparin-serum mixtures. By non-selectively filling HC-PCF, a strong modal field overlap is obtained. Consequently, an enhanced Raman signal (>90 times) is obtained from various heparin-serum mixtures filled HC-PCFs compared to its bulk counterpart (cuvette). The present scheme has the potential to serve as a `generic biosensing tool' for diagnosing a wide range of biological samples.

  11. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  12. Applications of a rapid endospore viability assay for monitoring UV inactivation and characterizing arctic ice cores.

    PubMed

    Shafaat, Hannah S; Ponce, Adrian

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a rapid endospore viability assay (EVA) in which endospore germination serves as an indicator for viability and applied it to (i) monitor UV inactivation of endospores as a function of dose and (ii) determine the proportion of viable endospores in arctic ice cores (Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 [GISP2] cores; 94 m). EVA is based on the detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA), which is released from endospores during germination. DPA concentrations were determined using the terbium ion (Tb3+)-DPA luminescence assay, and germination was induced by L-alanine addition. The concentrations of germinable endospores were determined by comparison to a standard curve. Parallel EVA and phase-contrast microscopy experiments to determine the percentage of germinable spores yielded comparable results (54.3% +/- 3.8% and 48.9% +/- 4.5%, respectively), while only 27.8% +/- 7.6% of spores produced CFU. EVA was applied to monitor the inactivation of spore suspensions as a function of UV dose, yielding reproducible correlations between EVA and CFU inactivation data. The 90% inactivation doses were 2,773 J/m2, 3,947 J/m2, and 1,322 J/m2 for EVA, phase-contrast microscopy, and CFU reduction, respectively. Finally, EVA was applied to quantify germinable and total endospore concentrations in two GISP2 ice cores. The first ice core contained 295 +/- 19 germinable spores/ml and 369 +/- 36 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 79.9% +/- 9.3%), and the second core contained 131 +/- 4 germinable spores/ml and 162 +/- 17 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 80.9% +/- 8.8%), whereas only 2 CFU/ml were detected by culturing. PMID:17021233

  13. Determination of power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of data from in-core monitors by means of a metric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kryanev, A. V.; Udumyan, D. K.; Kurchenkov, A. Yu. Gagarinskiy, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    Problems associated with determining the power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of a neutron-physics calculation and data from in-core monitors are considered. A new mathematical scheme is proposed for this on the basis of a metric analysis. In relation to the existing mathematical schemes, the scheme in question improves the accuracy and reliability of the resulting power distribution.

  14. Wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor for initial core-loading of advanced breeder reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorenzo, J. T.; Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Rochelle, J. M.; Chiles, M. M.; Valentine, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor was developed to measure the reactivity of an advanced breeder reactor as the core is loaded for the first time to preclude an accidental critically incident. The environment is liquid sodium at a temperature of approx. 220 C, with negligible gamma or neutron radiation. With ultrasonic transmission of neutron data, no fundamental limitation was observed after tests at 230 C for 2000 h. The neutron sensitivity was approx. 1 count/s-nv, and the potential data transmission rate was approx. 10,000 counts/s.

  15. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Neclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-10-30

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume high-resolution gamma-ray detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. Three important factors affect the operation of mechanically cooled germanium detectors: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors will be studied in the laboratory at the most fundamental levels to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system. Using this knowledge, mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems will be designed and fabricated.

  16. Quantitative determination of hepatitis C core antigen in therapy monitoring for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Giovanna A; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Grandi, Barbara; Pieri, Daniela; Marsi, Ombretta; Guarducci, Isabella; Batini, Irene; Altomare, Emanuele; Antonaci, Salvatore; Capria, Alfonso; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Sacco, Rodolfo

    2011-02-01

    The correlation and kinetics of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA and HCV core antigen levels in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with pegylated interferon + ribavirin were evaluated in order to envision a combined use of the two assays in therapy monitoring. HCV core antigen levels by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (Abbott ARCHITECT) and HCV-RNA levels by branched DNA (bDNA) or real-time PCR have been evaluated on plasma specimens from 32 patients treated for chronic hepatitis C. An early virological response (undetectable levels of HCV-RNA 4 weeks after start of treatment) was found in 10/23 subjects (43.5%) followed up for 5 months or more. The response was linked to the HCV genotype (20% in genotype 1B vs. 61.5% in other genotypes; p < 0.05). HCV RNA and HCV antigen showed a good correlation (r = 0.814); HCV antigen was still detectable in 3 samples with undetectable (<615 IU/ml) RNA by bDNA, while no differences in clinical sensitivity were recorded in comparison with real-time PCR. These findings suggest that HCV-RNA and HCV antigen may be used at different time points in order to tailor therapy monitoring to individual needs. PMID:20829601

  17. Analysis of in-core dynamics in pressurized water reactors with application to parameter monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.; Shieh, D.J.; Glockler, O.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of the phase relationship between neutron flux and core-exit temperature fluctuations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is studied as a function of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (..cap alpha../sub c/). PWR operational data indicate that the neutron noise and core-exit temperature noise cross power spectrum phase is linear in a certain frequency range, and approaches -180 deg at low frequencies. Extensive modeling studies applied to the LOFT reactor show that this low frequency phase behavior changes when ..cap alpha../sub c/ is positive, approaching zero deg at low frequencies. The analysis further showed that in the LOFT reactor, coolant flow rate fluctuation is the primary driving source causing neutron noise and core-exit temperature fluctuations. This conclusion was also confirmed by independent studies. The neutron noise-coolant temperature phase behavior may be used as a single method of monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity during different stages of a PWR fuel cycle.

  18. Real-time oil-saturation monitoring in rock cores with low-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Howe, A M; Clarke, A

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful suite of tools for studying oil in reservoir core plugs at the laboratory scale. Low-field magnets are preferred for well-log calibration and to minimize magnetic-susceptibility-induced internal gradients in the porous medium. We demonstrate that careful data processing, combined with prior knowledge of the sample properties, enables real-time acquisition and interpretation of saturation state (relative amount of oil and water in the pores of a rock). Robust discrimination of oil and brine is achieved with diffusion weighting. We use this real-time analysis to monitor the forced displacement of oil from porous materials (sintered glass beads and sandstones) and to generate capillary desaturation curves. The real-time output enables in situ modification of the flood protocol and accurate control of the saturation state prior to the acquisition of standard NMR core analysis data, such as diffusion-relaxation correlations. Although applications to oil recovery and core analysis are demonstrated, the implementation highlights the general practicality of low-field NMR as an inline sensor for real-time industrial process control. PMID:25996514

  19. An In-Core Power Deposition and Fuel Thermal Environmental Monitor for Long-Lived Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller

    2004-09-28

    The primary objective of this program is to develop the Constant Temperature Power Sensor (CTPS) as in-core instrumentation that will provide a detailed map of local nuclear power deposition and coolant thermal-hydraulic conditions during the entire life of the core.

  20. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  1. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  2. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  3. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 1: Solid-vane performance and facility description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid (uncooled) version of a core engine cooled stator vane was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade, where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The solid vane, which serves as a basis for comparison with subsequent cooled tests, was tested over a range of aftermixed critical velocity ratios of 0.57 to 0.90. Overall vane aftermixed efficiencies were obtained over this critical velocity ratio range and compared with results from a two-dimensional cascade. The variation in vane efficiency and aftermixed flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained and compared with design values. Vane surface static-pressure distributions were also measured and compared with theoretical results.

  4. Free Delivery of a 30-YEAR Vegetation Product Archive by the Biopar Land Monitoring Core Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacholczyk, P.; Makhmara, H.; Lacaze, R. N.; Baret, F.; Weiss, M.; Verger, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geoland2 project is part of the GMES EU-lead initiative and intends to prepare, validate and demonstrate pre-operational service chains and products of the Land Monitoring Core Service. The BioPar Core Monitoring Service distributes through the Geoland 2 portal global products related to biophysical variables : the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of green Vegetation Cover (FCover), the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) and the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI). Long term global biophysical products are of great interest for earth science modeling applications and global change monitoring. Since end of 2011 a 12-year archive (1999-2011) of these biophysical vegetation products derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor, called GEOV1_VGT, is available and is continuously updated every ten days. Since this summer, a 20-year archive (1981-2000) of LAI, FAPAR and FCover biophysical vegetation products derived from the AVHRR long term data archive, called GEOV1_AVHRR, has been processed by CNES and is now available through the Geoland 2 portal. The LAI, FAPAR and FCover products issued from VGT and AVHRR data have the same characteristics (temporal resolution 10 days, global coverage) except for the spatial resolution (1/112° for VGT and 0.05° for AVHRR), with an overlap of two years (1999-2000). The evaluation of GEOV1_VGT and GEOV1_AVHRR archive indicates a very good agreement between the two datasets, including a similar level of accuracy in comparison with ground-based measurements made during the 1999-2000 overlap period. Despite that a more consistent 30-year global product at a lower resolution is very useful for communities studying carbon cycle, climate or water cycle. The last step, foreseen for this Autumn, is to process these two archives and to provide to the users a continuous 30-year vegetation product (called GEOV1_GCM) at 0.5° scale. Close to its end the BioPar project has provided demonstration products

  5. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  6. Reuse of refinery's tertiary-treated wastewater in cooling towers: microbiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vera Lúcia; Veiga, Andréa Azevedo; Mendonça, Rafael Silva; Alves, Andrea Lima; Pagnin, Sérgio; Santiago, Vânia M J

    2015-02-01

    The study was planned to quantify the distribution of bacteria between bulk water and biofilm formed on different materials in an industrial scale cooling tower system of an oil refinery operating with clarified and chlorinated freshwater (CCW) or chlorinated tertiary effluent (TRW) as makeup water. The sessile and planktonic heterotrophic bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa densities were significantly higher in the cooling tower supplied with clarified and chlorinated freshwater (CTCW) (p < 0.05). In the two towers, the biofilm density was higher on the surface of glass slides and stainless steel coupons than on the surface of carbon steel coupons. The average corrosion rates of carbon steel coupons (0.4-0.8 millimeters per year (mpy)) and densities of sessile (12-1.47 × 10(3) colony-forming unit (CFU) cm(-1)) and planktonic (0-2.36 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) microbiota remained below of the maximum values of reference used by water treatment companies as indicative of efficient microbial control. These data indicate that the strategies of the water treatment station (WTS) (free chlorine) and industrial wastewater treatment station (IWTS) followed by reverse electrodialysis system (RES) (free chlorine plus chloramine) were effective for the microbiological control of the two makeup water sources. PMID:25226836

  7. Optical fiber transducer for monitoring the cooling profile of iron-steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Francisco J.; Alvarez, Victor; Gonzalez, Daniel A.; Echevarria, Juan; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2002-07-01

    On the steel production industry, a mixture of selected scrap and pellets of DRI is put into the furnace according to the desired quality of steel. The quality of the iron steel bars, among other, depends on the temperature profile during the cooling and solidifying process. A new multipoint high temperature transducer based on the optical power collected by a group of multimode optical fibers has been developed for measuring the transversal cooling profile. The optic fibers are adequately sheathed by a ceramic mixture in order to achieve its mechanical and thermal protection. Besides in order to use the transducer in pollution environments, the probe is putted inside of a close chamber with a window made with a vitreous ceramic material. The use of silica fiber optic limits the spectral range to analyze, and the measured temperature range. The behavior of the transducer from the angle, the distance and the change of emissivity have been measured, and the transducer has been optimized. The transducer was calibrated in the Photonics Engineering Group laboratory and it was installed in a iron-steel bar manufacturing plant in Spain where it is working high relative humidity and high temperature environment.

  8. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Lane, Ian C.

    2016-04-01

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio 2Σ+ potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X2Σ+ state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm-1 (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm-1, while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result.

  9. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  10. Diagenesis of bank margin carbonates monitors glacio-eustacy: modeling and core study results

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.K.; Al-Saqri, K.; Frohlich, C.

    1985-01-01

    Subsiding bank margin carbonates provide a monitoring system for high frequency sea level fluctuations. When sea level rises, new reefs and skeletal sands accumulate to near high-stand sea level. When sea level falls, subaerial exposure and related meteoric and mixed water diagenesis rapidly impart their mineralogic, isotopic, chemical, and petrographic signature on the strata. The authors model the interaction of fluctuating sea level (Milankovitch frequencies) and subsiding bank margin carbonates. Characteristic diagenetic lithologies occur seemingly randomly interbedded and unrelatable to specific subaerial exposure surfaces. This is similar to the pattern observed in Eocene bank margin skeletal sands of Kirkuk Field, Iraq. Meteoric diagenesis dominates the upper 35 meters of the authors core. The next 85 meters contain randomly alternating beds of meteoric limestone, mixed water dolomite, and limestone with well-preserved skeletal grains. This sequence is consistent with rapid glacio-eustatic fluctuations of Late Eocene sea level followed by a 35 to 50 meter glacio-eustatic lowering of average sea level at or near Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  11. AN X-RAY COOLING-CORE CLUSTER SURROUNDING A LOW-POWER COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE 1321+045

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Labiano, A.

    2013-07-20

    We discovered an X-ray cluster in a Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source 1321+045 (z = 0.263). CSS sources are thought to be young radio objects at the beginning of their evolution and can potentially test the cluster heating process. 1321+045 is a relatively low-luminosity source and its morphology consists of two radio lobes on the opposite sides of a radio core with no evidence for jets or hotspots. The optical emission line ratios are consistent with an interstellar medium dominated by active galactic nucleus photoionization with a small contribution from star formation, and no contributions from shocks. Based on these ratios, we classify 1321+045 as a low excitation galaxy (LEG) and suggest that its radioactivity is in a coasting phase. The X-ray emission associated with the radio source is detected with 36.1 {+-} 8.3 counts, but the origin of this emission is highly uncertain. The current X-ray image of the cluster does not show any signatures of a radio source impact on the cluster medium. Chandra detects the cluster emission at >3{sigma} level out to {approx}60'' (240 kpc). We obtain the best-fit beta model parameters of the surface brightness profile of {beta} = 0.58 {+-} 0.2 and a core radius of 9.4{sup +1.1}{sub -0.9} arcsec. The average temperature of the cluster is equal to kT = 4.4{sup +0.5}{sub -0.3} keV, with a temperature and cooling profile indicative of a cooling core. We measure the cluster luminosity L{sub (0.5-2{sub keV)}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and mass 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun}.

  12. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  13. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  14. Mid-Cretaceous oblique rifting of West Antarctica: Emplacement and rapid cooling of the Fosdick Mountains migmatite-cored gneiss dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, R. R.; Teyssier, C.; Siddoway, C. S.; Cosca, M. A.; Fanning, C. M.

    2015-09-01

    In Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica, the Fosdick Mountains migmatite-cored gneiss dome was exhumed from mid- to lower middle crustal depths during the incipient stage of the West Antarctic Rift system in the mid-Cretaceous. Prior to and during exhumation, major crustal melting and deformation included transfer and emplacement of voluminous granitic material and numerous intrusions of mantle-derived diorite in dikes. A succession of melt- and magma-related structures formed at temperatures in excess of 665 ± 50 °C based on Ti-in-zircon thermometry. These record a transition from wrench to oblique extensional deformation that culminated in the development of the oblique South Fosdick Detachment zone. Solid-state fabrics within the detachment zone and overprinting brittle structures record translation of the detachment zone and dome to shallow levels. To determine the duration of exhumation and cooling, we sampled granite and gneisses at high spatial resolution for U-Pb zircon geochronology and 40Ar/39Ar hornblende and biotite thermochronology. U-Pb zircon crystallization ages for the youngest granites are 102 Ma. Three hornblende ages are 103 to 100 Ma and 12 biotite ages are 101 to 99 Ma. All overlap within uncertainty. The coincidence of zircon crystallization ages with 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages indicates cooling rates > 100 °C/m.y. that, when considered together with overprinting structures, indicates rapid exhumation of granite and migmatite from deep to shallow crustal levels within a transcurrent setting. Orientations of structures and age-constrained crosscutting relationships indicate counterclockwise rotation of stretching axes from oblique extension into nearly orthogonal extension with respect to the Marie Byrd Land margin. The rotation may be a result of localized extension arising from unroofing and arching of the Fosdick dome, extensional opening within a pull-apart zone, or changes in plate boundary configuration. The rapid tectonic and temperature

  15. Monitoring of NMR porosity changes in the full-size core salvage through the drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattakhov, Artur; Kosarev, Victor; Doroginitskii, Mikhail; Skirda, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Currently the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the most popular technologies in the field of borehole geophysics and core analysis. Results of NMR studies allow to calculate the values of the porosity and permeability of sedimentary rocks with sufficient reliability. All standard tools for the study of core salvage on the basis of NMR have significant limitations: there is considered only long relaxation times corresponding to the mobile formation fluid. Current trends in energy obligate to move away from conventional oil to various alternative sources of energy. One of these sources are deposits of bitumen and high-viscosity oil. In Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University (Russia) there was developed a mobile unit for the study of the full-length core salvage by the NMR method ("NMR-Core") together with specialists of "TNG-Group" (a company providing maintenance services to oil companies). This unit is designed for the study of core material directly on the well, after removing it from the core receiver. The maximum diameter of the core sample may be up to 116 mm, its length (or length of the set of samples) may be up to 1000 mm. Positional precision of the core sample relative to the measurement system is 1 mm, and the spatial resolution along the axis of the core is 10 mm. Acquisition time of the 1 m core salvage varies depending on the mode of research and is at least 20 minutes. Furthermore, there is implemented a special investigation mode of the core samples with super small relaxation times (for example, heavy oil) is in the tool. The aim of this work is tracking of the NMR porosity changes in the full-size core salvage in time. There was used a water-saturated core salvage from the shallow educational well as a sample. The diameter of the studied core samples is 93 mm. There was selected several sections length of 1m from the 200-meter coring interval. The studied core samples are being measured several times. The time interval

  16. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  17. Ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of single-core and multi-core polyaromatic hydrocarbons under variable conditions of collisional cooling: insights into the generation of molecular ions, fragments and oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Francisco; Hortal, Ana R; Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Soltwisch, Jens; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated under different background pressures of an inert gas (up to 1.2 mbar of N2) in the ion source of a hybrid, orthogonal-extracting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oTOF-MS). The study includes an ensemble of six model PAHs with isolated single polyaromatic cores and four ones with multiple cross-linked aromatic and polyaromatic cores. In combination with a weak ion extraction field, the variation of the buffer gas pressure allowed to control the degree of collisional cooling of the desorbed PAHs and, thus, to modulate their decomposition into fragments. The dominant fragmentation channels observed are related to dehydrogenation of the PAHs, in most cases through the cleavage of even numbers of C-H bonds. Breakage of C-C bonds leading to the fragmentation of rings, side chains and core linkages is also observed, in particular, at low buffer gas pressures. The precise patterns of the combined fragmentation processes vary significantly between the PAHs. The highest abundances of molecular PAH ions and cleanest mass spectra were consistently obtained at the highest buffer gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. The effective quenching of the fragmentation pathways at this elevated pressure improves the sensitivity and data interpretation for analytical applications, although the fragmentation of side chains and of bonds between (poly)aromatic cores is not completely suppressed in all cases. Moreover, these results suggest that the detected fragments are generated through thermal equilibrium processes rather than as a result of rapid photolysis. This assumption is further corroborated by a laser desorption/ionization post-source decay analysis using an axial time-of-flight MS. In line with these findings, covalent oligomers of the PAHs, which are presumably formed by association of two or more dehydrogenated fragments, are detected with higher abundances at the lower buffer gas

  18. A link between North Atlantic cooling and dry events in the core SW monsoon region in Lonar Lake, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Prasad, Sushma; Plessen, Birgit; Stebich, Martina; Anoop, Ambili; Riedel, Nils; Basavaiah, Nathani

    2014-05-01

    A sediment core from Lonar Lake in central India covers the complete Holocene and was used to reconstruct the monsoon history of the core SW-monsoon region. We compare C/N ratios, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, grain size, as well as amino acid derived degradation proxies with climatically sensitive proxies of other records from South Asia and the North Atlantic region. The comparison reveals some more or less contemporaneous climate shifts. At Lonar Lake, a general long term climate transition from wet conditions during the early Holocene to drier conditions during the late Holocene, delineating the insolation curve, can be reconstructed. Several phases of shorter term climate alteration that superimpose the general climate trend correlate with cold phases in the North Atlantic region. The most pronounced climate deteriorations indicated by our data occurred between 6.2 - 5.2, 4.65 - 3.9, and 2.05 - 0.55 cal ka BP. The strong dry phase between 4.65 - 3.9 cal ka BP at Lonar Lake corroborates the hypothesis that severe climate deterioration contributed to the decline of the Indus Civilisation about 3.9 ka BP.

  19. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly †

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  20. Nanometer quartz grains and rapid cooling melt in fault gouge during earthquake process - observed from the WFSD-1 drilling core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Drilling into active faults is an effective way to get data and materials at depth that help to understand the material properties, physical mechanisms and healing processes of the faults. The Wenchuan earthquake fault scientific drilling project (WFSD) was conducted immediately after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9). The first borehole of the project (WFSD-1) penetrates the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault with a final depth of 1201.15 m and meet the principal slip zone (PSZ) of Wenchuan earthquake at depth of 589.2 m. About 183.3 m-thick fault rocks are recognized in the WFSD-1 drilling core from 575.7 to 759 m-depth, which was confirmed as the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone with a real thickness of about 100 m due to the borehole inclination of 11°. In this research we got samples from WFSD-1 drilling core at the depth of 732.4-732.8 m, in which black gouge, gray gouge, fine-grained fault breccia and coarse-grained fault breccia layers can be distinguished clearly. Slickensides were developed in the surface of the black gouge layer. The protolith of this segment is sandstone. Based on detailed microstructural analysis using electron optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). An about 1 mm-thick amorphous material layer containing small quartz grains was observed. Circles with different densities were observed in the amorphous material indicate a melt-origin. Cracks are developed in the amorphous material, which are suggested to be caused by general volume reduction as a result of rapid cooling contraction. TEM-EDX analysis of the amorphous material indicates mainly feldspar composition, implying the melting temperature was >1230℃, while quartz grains did not melt indicating a temperature <1700℃. Nano-scale quartz grains were observed in a very small layer showing a different structure at the edge of the amorphous layer, indicating that nano quartz grains were formed by the comminution during earthquake, which

  1. Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

  2. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-10-02

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estmation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  3. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  4. Innovative optical spectrometers for ice core sciences and atmospheric monitoring at polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Roberto; Alemany, Olivier; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Desbois, Thibault; Faïn, Xavier; Kassi, Samir; Kerstel, Erik; Legrand, Michel; Marrocco, Nicola; Méjean, Guillaume; Preunkert, Suzanne; Romanini, Daniele; Triest, Jack; Ventrillard, Irene

    2015-04-01

    In this talk recent developments accomplished from a collaboration between the Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPhy) and the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement (LGGE) both in Grenoble (France), are discussed, covering atmospheric chemistry of high reactive species in polar regions and employing optical spectrometers for both in situ and laboratory measurements of glacial archives. In the framework of an ANR project, a transportable spectrometer based on the injection of a broadband frequency comb laser into a high-finesse optical cavity for the detection of IO, BrO, NO2 and H2CO has been realized.[1] The robust spectrometer provides shot-noise limited measurements for as long as 10 minutes, reaching detection limits of 0.04, 2, 10 and 200 ppt (2σ) for the four species, respectively. During the austral summer of 2011/12 the instrument has been used for monitoring, for the first time, NO2, IO and BrO at Dumont d'Urville Station at East of Antarctica. The measurements highlighted a different chemistry between East and West coast, with the halogen chemistry being promoted to the West and the OH and NOx chemistry on the East.[2] In the framework of a SUBGLACIOR project, an innovative drilling probe has been realized. The instrument is capable of retrieving in situ real-time vertical profiles of CH4 and δD of H2O trapped inside the ice sheet down to more than 3 km of depth within a single Antarctic season. The drilling probe containing an embedded OFCEAS (optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy) spectrometer will be extremely useful for (i) identify potential sites for investigating the oldest ice (aiming 1.5 Myrs BP records for resolving a major climate reorganization called the Mid-Pleistocene transition occurred around 1 Myrs ago) and (ii) providing direct access to past temperatures and climate cycles thanks to the vertical distribution of two key climatic signatures.[3] The spectrometer provides detection

  5. The Detection of Reactor Antineutrinos for Reactor Core Monitoring: an Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fallot, M.

    2014-06-15

    There have been new developments in the field of applied neutrino physics during the last decade. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has expressed interest in the potentialities of antineutrino detection as a new tool for reactor monitoring and has created an ad hoc Working Group in late 2010 to follow the associated research and development. Several research projects are ongoing around the world to build antineutrino detectors dedicated to reactor monitoring, to search for and develop innovative detection techniques, or to simulate and study the characteristics of the antineutrino emission of actual and innovative nuclear reactor designs. We give, in these proceedings, an overview of the relevant properties of antineutrinos, the possibilities of and limitations on their detection, and the status of the development of a variety of compact antineutrino detectors for reactor monitoring.

  6. Self-monitored photothermal nanoparticles based on core-shell engineering.

    PubMed

    Ximendes, Erving C; Rocha, Uéslen; Jacinto, Carlos; Kumar, Kagola Upendra; Bravo, David; López, Fernando J; Martín Rodríguez, Emma; García-Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The continuous development of nanotechnology has resulted in the actual possibility of the design and synthesis of nanostructured materials with pre-tailored functionabilities. Nanostructures capable of simultaneous heating and local thermal sensing are in strong demand as they would constitute a revolutionary solution to several challenging problems in bio-medicine, including the achievement of real time control during photothermal therapies. Several approaches have been demonstrated to achieve simultaneous heating and thermal sensing at the nanoscale. Some of them lack of sufficient thermal sensitivity and others require complicated synthesis procedures for heterostructure fabrication. In this study, we demonstrate how single core/shell dielectric nanoparticles with a highly Nd(3+) ion doped shell and an Yb(3+),Er(3+) codoped core are capable of simultaneous thermal sensing and heating under an 808 nm single beam excitation. The spatial separation between the heating shell and sensing core provides remarkable values of the heating efficiency and thermal sensitivity, enabling their application in single beam-controlled heating experiments in both aqueous and tissue environments. PMID:26786666

  7. Self-monitored photothermal nanoparticles based on core-shell engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ximendes, Erving C.; Rocha, Uéslen; Jacinto, Carlos; Kumar, Kagola Upendra; Bravo, David; López, Fernando J.; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; García-Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The continuous development of nanotechnology has resulted in the actual possibility of the design and synthesis of nanostructured materials with pre-tailored functionabilities. Nanostructures capable of simultaneous heating and local thermal sensing are in strong demand as they would constitute a revolutionary solution to several challenging problems in bio-medicine, including the achievement of real time control during photothermal therapies. Several approaches have been demonstrated to achieve simultaneous heating and thermal sensing at the nanoscale. Some of them lack of sufficient thermal sensitivity and others require complicated synthesis procedures for heterostructure fabrication. In this study, we demonstrate how single core/shell dielectric nanoparticles with a highly Nd3+ ion doped shell and an Yb3+,Er3+ codoped core are capable of simultaneous thermal sensing and heating under an 808 nm single beam excitation. The spatial separation between the heating shell and sensing core provides remarkable values of the heating efficiency and thermal sensitivity, enabling their application in single beam-controlled heating experiments in both aqueous and tissue environments.

  8. Role of National Accreditation Board of Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) core indicators monitoring in quality and safety of blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anshu; Gupta, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Certain quality indicators are mandatory in the maintenance and improvement of quality in blood transfusion. Monitoring of such indicators should be done regularly and deficiencies are to be corrected for effective blood transfusion services. Aims: To study the usefulness of monitoring of the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) core indicators in blood transfusion and in the maintenance of hemovigilance. Settings and Design: Hemovigilance is a quality process to improve quality and increase the safety of blood transfusion. It covers and surveys all activities of the blood transfusion chain from donors to recipients. Core indicators’ monitoring is a part of the hemovigilance process. Materials and Methods: A 2-year retrospective study was conducted in a blood storage unit of a NABH accredited tertiary care hospital of a metropolitan city. Four NABH core indicators in blood transfusion were observed and monitored by the clinical and blood storage unit staff of different levels. Results: It was observed that there was an improvement in quality by core indicators monitoring with decreased wastage of blood and blood components, decreased average turnaround time for issue of blood and blood components, and lesser number of transfusion reactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that monitoring of NABH core indicators results in the enhancement of quality and safety in blood transfusion services, reducing the incidence of transfusion reactions. PMID:27011668

  9. Low-temperature thermochronologic constraints on cooling and exhumation trends along conjugate margins, within core complexes and eclogite-bearing gneiss domes of the Woodlark rift system of eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, P. G.; Baldwin, S.; Bermudez, M. A.; Miller, S. R.; Webb, L. E.; Little, T.

    2012-12-01

    In eastern Papua New Guinea, active sea-floor spreading within the Woodlark Basin has been propagating westward since at least 6 Ma into heterogeneous crust of the Woodlark Rift. The seafloor spreading system divides the northern conjugate margin (Woodlark Rise) from the southern margin (Pocklington Rise). West of the seafloor spreading rift-tip are high-standing extensional gneiss domes and core complexes of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands (DEI). Domes comprise amphibolite and eclogite-facies gneisses, and Pleistocene granitoid intrusions. Flanked by mylonitic shear zone carapaces and normal faults, the domes are juxtaposed against an upper plate that includes ultramafic rocks and gabbro, correlated with the Papuan ultramafic belt. Petrologic and structural evidence from the DEI has been interpreted as evidence for diapiric ascent of the largely felsic domes, with thermo-mechanical modeling proposing (U)HP exhumation in terms of diapiric flow aided by propagating extension, with feedback between the two. Core complexes lacking evidence for diapiric-aided exhumation include the Prevost Range (eastern Normanby Island), Dayman Dome (Papuan Peninsula), and Misima Island (southern conjugate margin). Thermochronology is being applied to understand the thermal and exhumation history, and hence help constrain mechanisms of (U)HP exhumation. AFT and AHe ages from samples near sea-level along conjugate margins and DEI range from ca. 12 Ma to <1 Ma, generally decreasing from east to west, although with some localized variation. Confined track length distributions (CTLD), obtained using 252Cf implantation, generally indicate rapid cooling (means ≥~14 μm), except on Goodenough Island, the western-most and highest-standing dome. On Goodenough Island, samples from the core zone have AFT ages from ~3 - <1 Ma with age decreasing with decreasing elevation. Core zone samples have mean track lengths (7-13 μm) and are positively skewed, whereas samples from shear zones are younger (<1

  10. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  11. Monitoring HSV-TK/ganciclovir cancer suicide gene therapy using CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dan; Zeng, Qinghui; Fan, Zheng; Li, Jing; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Youlin; Li, Ou; Chen, Li; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Hong

    2012-06-01

    To be able to label a gene and monitor its migration are key important approaches for the clinical application of cancer suicide gene therapy. Photonic nanomaterials are introduced in this work. One of the most promised suicide genes - herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene - is successfully linked with CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) via EDC/NHS coupling method. From confocal microscopy it was demonstrated that plasmid TK intracellular trafficking can be effectively and distinctly traced via monitoring the luminescence of the QDs up to 96 h after transfection of QDs-TK conjugates into Hela cells. MTT results show that the QDs-TK conjugates have a high efficient cytotoxicity after adding GCV into Hela cells, whereas the QDs exert no detectable deleterious effects on the cellular processes. The apoptosis induced by QDs-TK conjugates with GCV is distinctly traced partly due to the strong luminescence of the QDs. Our results indicate that photonic nanomaterials, e.g. QDs, provide a tool for monitoring TK gene delivery and anti-cancer activity. PMID:22440046

  12. Freshwater input into the Gulf of Mexico Prior to the 8.2 cal kyr BP Cool Event in Greenland Ice Core Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodico, J. M.; Flower, B. P.; Quinn, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    The most prominent event recorded in Greenland ice core records over the past 10 calendar kiloyears before present (cal kyr BP) is an abrupt cooling at 8.2 cal kyr BP, which lasted for 300-400 yrs. It has been proposed that this climatic event was caused by a weakening of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic forced by a vast outflow of freshwater through the Hudson Strait from glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway. Sediment core MD02-2550 from Orca Basin located in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provides an early Holocene record (10 to 7 cal kyr BP) of GOM climate changes, input from the Mississippi River system and adjacent continental areas. Paired analysis of Mg/Ca, a proxy of sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and \\delta18O on the planktonic foraminifera { \\it Globigerinoides ruber } (white variety; 250 -350 μ m) sampled at 0.5 cm (providing ˜20 year resolution), indicate a large isotopic excursion of ˜ -1 ‰ \\delta18O seawater from 8.5 to 8.4 cal kyr BP, coincident with the drainage of glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway at 8.47 cal kyr BP. We consider three possible sources for this freshwater pulse: freshwater input from glacial lakes, meltwater input from the drainage of the Laurentide Ice Sheet's final dome, and/or increased precipitation in North American drainage basins. Mg/Ca-SSTs show minimal mean change across the freshwater interval and an average of ˜28 ° C from 7 to 10 cal kyr BP, which is within the current mean SSTs for GOM ( ˜28 ° C). Mg/Ca-SST and \\delta18O seawater time series contain concentrations of variance near 500, 220, 146, and 60 years, significant at the 90 % confidence level, indicating possible sensitivity to solar variations. Ongoing faunal assemblage work will provide additional assessment for SST, sea surface salinity (SSS) and nutrient changes during the early Holocene in the GOM.

  13. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  14. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I.; Anis, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  15. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  16. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region.

  17. k-t acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems. PMID:24809307

  18. k-t Acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems.

  19. Monitoring the Slow State Transitions in the Atoll 4u 1705-440 (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Of all persistent neutron star LMXBs, the atoll source 4U 1705-440 shows the largest dynamic range in count rate (~70) and the most extreme spectral changes. The long timescales and regularity with which 4U 1705-440 traverses its full spectral range allow us to study spectral state transitions in a very detailed manner. Here we propose to monitor, for the first time, two or more full state transition cycles of 4U 1705-440. We propose 168 observations at 3-day intervals to study the importance of the recent accretion history on the evolution of spectral, variability, and burst properties. In addition, our program allows us to test a new spectral model for neutron star LMXBs over a range that is unprecedented for persistent sources.

  20. Paleontology and geochronology of the Long Beach core sites and monitoring wells, Long Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, Kristin; Hillhouse, John; Powell, Charles, II; Mahan, Shannon; Wan, Elmira; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Focus on Quaternary Stratigraphy in Los Angeles (FOQUS-LA) project was a cooperative coring program between Federal, State, and local agencies. It was designed to provide a better understanding of earthquake potentials and to develop a stratigraphic model of the western Los Angeles Basin in California. The biostratigraphic, geochronologic, and paleoecologic analyses of eight wells drilled during the FOQUS-LA project are presented. These analyses are based on microfossils (benthic and planktic foraminifers), macrofossils, paleomagnetic stratigraphy, optically stimulated luminescence, thermoluminescence, radiocarbon dating, and tephrochronology. A geochronologic framework (incorporating paleomagnetism, luminescence, and tephrochronology) was used to calibrate the sequence stratigraphic units in the FOQUS-LA wells and also was used to calibrate the ages of the microfossil stage and zonal boundaries. The results of this study show that (1) the offshore California margin zones can be used in a nearshore setting, and (2) the California margin zonal scheme refines the chronostratigraphic resolution of the benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphic framework for the Pacific Coast. Benthic foraminiferal stages are modified by the recognition of an early Hallian substage, which is a faunal change recognized throughout the Los Angeles Basin. Although no detailed macrofossil zonations exist for the Quaternary of southern California, several species, whose distribution is regulated by the climatic conditions, are useful as secondary marker species in the shallower water deposits of the Los Angeles Basin.

  1. Determination of the Sensitivity of the Antineutrino Probe for Reactor Core Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Cormon, S.; Fallot, M. Bui, V.-M.; Cucoanes, A.; Estienne, M.; Lenoir, M.; Onillon, A.; Shiba, T.; Yermia, F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the use of the detection of reactor-antineutrinos (ν{sup ¯}{sub e}) for non proliferation purpose. To proceed, we have started to study different reactor designs with our simulation tools. We use a package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE), initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3 labs to study Generation IV reactors. The MURE package has been coupled to fission product beta decay nuclear databases for studying reactor antineutrino emission. This method is the only one able to predict the antineutrino emission from future reactor cores, which don't use the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu. It is also the only way to include off-equilibrium effects, due to neutron captures and time evolution of the fission product concentrations during a reactor cycle. We will present here the first predictions of antineutrino energy spectra from innovative reactor designs (Generation IV reactors). We will then discuss a summary of our results of non-proliferation scenarios involving the latter reactor designs, taking into account reactor physics constraints.

  2. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  3. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  4. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  5. Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for monitoring hepatitis C virus core protein during interferon-alpha2b and ribavirin therapy in patients with genotype 1 and high viral loads.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Masaru; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Tamori, Akihiro; Kohmoto, Modoka; Habu, Daiki; Sakaguchi, Hiroki; Takeda, Tadashi; Kawada, Norifumi; Seki, Shuichi; Shiomi, Susumu

    2005-09-01

    This study evaluated an updated chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein for monitoring viral kinetics during treatment with interferon (IFN)-alpha and ribavirin. Using the CLEIA, serum levels of HCV core protein were measured in 17 patients with genotype 1 and high baseline viral loads during the first 4 weeks of combination therapy. HCV RNA was measured by the Amplicor Monitor test for comparison. At the start of therapy, the median HCV level (interquartile range) was 700 (540-940) kIU/ml of viral RNA and 11,310 (5,528-14,238) fmol/L of core protein. HCV RNA was above the upper limit of the linear range of the Amplicor Monitor test in 13 of the 17 patients, while the core protein level was within the linear range of the CLEIA in all patients. During therapy, the proportion of patients with HCV levels below the cutoff values at each time point was less with the Amplicor Monitor test than with CLEIA. Serum HCV core protein level decreased rapidly during the first 24 hr of therapy and more slowly thereafter, with median exponential decays of 1.08 and 0.046 log10/day, respectively. In the second phase, between day 1 and 28, the median decrease in HCV core protein level was higher in four patients with sustained virologic response (0.13 log10/day) than in 13 patients with no response (0.028 log10/day, P = 0.042). The wide linear range of the HCV core protein assay is appropriate for measuring viral loads during therapy with IFN-alpha and ribavirin. PMID:16032731

  6. One-year monitoring of core biomarker and digestive enzyme responses in transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Palais, F; Dedourge-Geffard, O; Beaudon, A; Pain-Devin, S; Trapp, J; Geffard, O; Noury, P; Gourlay-Francé, C; Uher, E; Mouneyrac, C; Biagianti-Risbourg, S; Geffard, A

    2012-04-01

    A 12-month active biomonitoring study was performed in 2008-2009 on the Vesle river basin (Champagne-Ardenne, France) using the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha as a sentinel species; allochthonous mussels originating from a reference site (Commercy) were exposed at four sites (Bouy, Sept-Saulx, Fismes, Ardre) within the Vesle river basin. Selected core biomarkers (acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity, metallothionein concentration), along with digestive enzyme activities (amylase, endocellulase) and energy reserve concentrations (glycogen, lipids), were monitored throughout the study in exposed mussels. At the Fismes and Ardre sites (downstream basin), metallic and organic contamination levels were low but still high enough to elicit AChE and GST activity induction in exposed mussels (chemical stress); besides, chemical pollutants had no apparent deleterious effects on mussel condition. At the Bouy and Sept-Saulx sites (upstream basin), mussels obviously suffered from adverse food conditions which seriously impaired individual physiological state and survival (nutritional stress); food scarcity had however no apparent effects on core biomarker responses. Digestive enzyme activities responded to both chemical and nutritional stresses, the increase in energy outputs (general adaptation syndrome-downstream sites) or the decrease in energy inputs (food scarcity-upstream sites) leading to mid- or long-term induction of digestive carbohydrase activities in exposed mussels (energy optimizing strategy). Complex regulation patterns of these activities require nevertheless the use of a multi-marker approach to allow data interpretation. Besides, their sensitivity to natural confounding environmental factors remains to be precised. PMID:22252290

  7. A study on the effect of various design parameters on the natural circulation flow rate of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a study on the effect of various design parameters such as the channel gap width, heat flux distribution, down-comer pipe size and two-phase flow slip ratio on the natural circulation flow rate is performed based on a physical model for a natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of an EU-APR1400, and these effects on the natural circulation flow rate are analyzed and compared with the minimum flow rate required for the safe operation of the system. (authors)

  8. Comparison of plate counts, Petrifilm, dipslides, and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence for monitoring bacteria in cooling-tower waters.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sherry A; Anderson, James E; Kim, Byung R; Ball, James C

    2009-04-01

    Effective bacterial control in cooling-tower systems requires accurate and timely methods to count bacteria. Plate-count methods are difficult to implement on-site, because they are time- and labor-intensive and require sterile techniques. Several field-applicable methods (dipslides, Petrifilm, and adenosine triphosphate [ATP] bioluminescence) were compared with the plate count for two sample matrices--phosphate-buffered saline solution containing a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and cooling-tower water containing an undefined mixed bacterial culture. For the pure culture, (1) counts determined on nutrient agar and plate-count agar (PCA) media and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter were equivalent to those on R2A medium (p = 1.0 and p = 1.0, respectively); (2) Petrifilm counts were not significantly different from R2A plate counts (p = 0.99); (3) the dipslide counts were up to 2 log units higher than R2A plate counts, but this discrepancy was not statistically significant (p = 0.06); and (4) a discernable correlation (r2 = 0.67) existed between ATP readings and plate counts. For cooling-tower water samples (n = 62), (1) bacterial counts using R2A medium were higher (but not significant; p = 0.63) than nutrient agar and significantly higher than tryptone-glucose yeast extract (TGE; p = 0.03) and PCA (p < 0.001); (2) Petrifilm counts were significantly lower than nutrient agar or R2A (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not statistically different from TGE, PCA, and dipslides (p = 0.55, p = 0.69, and p = 0.91, respectively); (3) the dipslide method yielded bacteria counts 1 to 3 log units lower than nutrient agar and R2A (p < 0.001), but was not significantly different from Petrifilm (p = 0.91), PCA (p = 1.00) or TGE (p = 0.07); (4) the differences between dipslides and the other methods became greater with a 6-day incubation time; and (5) the correlation between ATP readings and plate counts varied from system to system, was poor

  9. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  10. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with on-line cooling inlet for real-time monitoring H2S concentration in sewer gas.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-06-01

    Malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas often exists in the sewer system and associates with the problems of releasing the dangerous odor to the atmosphere and causing sewer pipe to be corroded. A simple method is in demand for real-time measuring H2S level in the sewer gas. In this paper, an innovated method based on dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DANP-IMS) with on-line semiconductor cooling inlet was put forward and successfully applied for the real-time measurement of H2S in sewer gas. The influence of moisture was effectively reduced via an on-line cooling method and a non-equilibrium dilution with drift gas. The limits of quantitation for the H2S in ≥60% relative humidity air could be obtained at ≤79.0ng L(-1) with linear ranges of 129-2064ng L(-1). The H2S concentration in a sewer manhole was successfully determined while its product ions were identified by an ion-mobility time-of-fight mass spectrometry. Finally, the correlation between sewer H2S concentration and the daily routines and habits of residents was investigated through hourly or real-time monitoring the variation of sewer H2S in manholes, indicating the power of this DANP-IMS method in assessing the H2S concentration in sewer system. PMID:27130121

  11. Self-monitoring of lower leg skin temperature: accuracy of self-reported data and adherence to a cooling protocol for the prevention of venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Madisetti, Mohan; Mueller, Martina; Dooley, Mary; Prentice, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background For intervention studies that require the use of participant self-reports, the quality and accuracy of recorded data and variability in participant adherence rates to the treatment can cause significant outcome bias. Purpose To assess the quality and accuracy of participant documentation of daily self-monitoring of leg skin temperature, adherence to a graduated cooling treatment protocol to prevent venous leg ulcers, and the potential for bias in treatment effect in a randomized controlled trial that included a population with chronic venous disease. Methods Individuals were randomized to a leg cooling intervention or placebo treatment group to daily self-monitor and record lower leg skin temperature over a 9-month period on monthly paper study logs. Returned study logs for the first 100 completed participants (n=54 cooling intervention, n=46 control) were reviewed for quality and accuracy. Adherence was determined from evaluating the accuracy of participant documentation. To examine potential outcome bias in treatment effect, mean between group and within group comparisons of the before and after treatment differences were conducted using an intention-to-treat (ITT) versus a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) analysis approach with an 85% accuracy cut-off rate. Data were collected in 2011–2014. Results Of the expected 900 study logs, 91.8% (826/900) were returned and 8.2% (74/900) were not. Non-mutually exclusive main error types in returned documentation included: 59.2% (489/826) white-outs, cross-off and/or overwrites, 34.9% (288/826) entries omitted, 29.4% (243/826) no performance of daily self-monitoring, 28.7% (237/826) no performance of the treatment intervention per the prescribed protocol regime, 26.8% (221/826) extraneous data, 8.6% (71/826) suspected fabrication, and 7.6% (63/826) questionable validity. Under ITT analysis, 38.4% (346/900) of all returned logs were <85% accurate, 25.0% (225/900) were 85%–99% accurate, and 36.6% (329

  12. Monitoring antibody titers to recombinant Core-NS3 fusion polypeptide is useful for evaluating hepatitis C virus infection and responses to interferon-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Y M; Byun, B H; Choi, J Y; Bae, S H; Kim, B S; So, H S; Ryu, W S

    1999-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility of the antibody titer against a chimeric polypeptide (named Core 518), in which a domain of Core and NS3 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was fused, ELISA was performed in a total of 76 serum samples. Each serum was serially diluted using two-fold dilution method with distilled water into 10 concentrations. They were all positive for second generation anti-HCV assay (HCV EIA II; Abbott Laboratories). Genotyping RT-PCR, quantitative competitive RT-PCR, and RIBA (Lucky Confirm; LG Biotech) were also assayed. Anti-Core 518 antibody was detected in x 12800 or higher dilutions of sera from 35 of 43 chronic hepatitis C (81.4%) and nine of 16 hepatocellular carcinoma sera (56.3%), one of four cirrhosis (25%), 0 of four acute hepatitis C, and one of nine healthy isolated anti-HCV-positive subjects (p=0.0000). The anti-Core 518 antibody titers were well correlated with the presence of HCV RNA in serum (p=0.002). The anti-Core 518 antibody titers decreased significantly in nine of ten responders to IFN-alpha treatment. Monitoring anti-Core 518 titers may be helpful not only for differentiating the status of HCV infection among patients with various type C viral liver diseases, but also for predicting responses to IFN-alpha treatment. PMID:10331562

  13. Core Angular Momentum and the IERS Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. Part 1; Core Angular Momentum and Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xia-Dong; Chao, Benjamin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The part of the grant was to use recordings of seismic waves travelling through the earth's core (PKP waves) to study the inner core rotation and constraints on possible density anomalies in the fluid core. The shapes and relative arrival times of such waves associated with a common source were used to reduce the uncertainties in source location and excitation and the effect of unknown mantle structure. The major effort of the project is to assemble historical seismograms with long observing base lines. We have found original paper records of SSI earthquakes at COL between 1951 and 1966 in a warehouse of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Golden, Colorado, extending the previous measurements at COL by Song and Richards [1996] further back 15 years. Also in Alaska, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI) has been operating the Alaskan Seismic Network with over 100 stations since the late 1960s. Virtually complete archives of seismograms are still available at UAFGI. Unfortunately, most of the archives are in microchip form (develocorders), for which the use of waveforms is impossible. Paper seismograms (helicorders) are available for a limited number of stations, and digital recordings of analog signals started around 1989. Of the paper records obtained, stations at Gilmore Dome (GLM, very close to COL), Yukon (FYU), McKinley (MCK), and Sheep Creek Mountain (SCM) have the most complete continuous recordings.

  14. On the cooling of a deep terrestrial magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, J.; Andrault, D.; Samuel, H.

    2016-08-01

    Several episodes of complete melting have probably occurred during the first stages of the Earth's evolution. We have developed a numerical model to monitor the thermal and melt fraction evolutions of a cooling and crystallizing magma ocean from an initially fully molten mantle. For this purpose, we numerically solve the heat equation in 1D spherical geometry, accounting for turbulent heat transfer, and integrating recent and strong experimental constraints from mineral physics. We have explored different initial magma ocean viscosities, compositions, thermal boundary layer thicknesses and initial core temperatures. We show that the cooling of a thick terrestrial magma ocean is a fast process, with the entire mantle becoming significantly more viscous within 20 kyr. Due to the slope difference between the adiabats and the melting curves, the solidification of the molten mantle occurs from the bottom up. In the meantime, a crust forms due to the high surface radiative heat flow, the last drop of fully molten silicate is restricted to the upper mantle. Among the studied parameters, the magma ocean lifetime is primarily governed by its viscosity. Depending on the thermal boundary layer thickness at the core-mantle boundary, the thermal coupling between the core and magma ocean can either insulate the core during the magma ocean solidification and favor a hot core or drain the heat out of the core simultaneously with the cooling of the magma ocean. Reasonable thickness for the thermal boundary layer, however, suggests rapid core cooling until the core-mantle boundary temperature results in a sluggish lowermost mantle. Once the crystallization of the lowermost mantle becomes significant, the efficiency of the core heat loss decreases. Since a hotter liquidus favors crystallization at hotter temperatures, a hotter deep mantle liquidus favors heat retention within the core. In the context of an initially fully molten mantle, it is difficult to envision the formation of a

  15. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  16. Relations between the photospheric magnetic field and the emission from the outer atmospheres of cool stars. I - The solar Ca II K line core emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Cote, J.; Zwaan, C.; Saar, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of a solar active region complex and its surroundings are used to establish a quantitative relation between the Ca II K line core intensity and magnetic flux density. The Ca II K line core intensity is transformed to a Ca II H + K line core flux density to facilitate a comparison of solar and stellar data. A new absolute calibration for the Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes for G-type dwarfs is derived. The minimum Ca II K flux, found in the centers of supergranulation cells in quiet regions on the sun, is identical to the minimum flux that is observed for solar-type stars. An expression is presented for the nonlinear trend between the Ca II H + K line core excess flux density and the absolute value of the magnetic flux density. Models that explain the nonlinearity of the mean trend and the large intrinsic scatter about it are discussed. The solar data define a relation that is similar to the relation between stellar hemisphere-average magnetic flux densities and Ca II H + K excess flux densities.

  17. Cooling rates and the depth of detachment faulting at oceanic core complexes: Evidence from zircon Pb/U and (U-Th)/He ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, Craig B.; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Reiners, P.W.; Wooden, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic detachment faulting represents a distinct mode of seafloor spreading at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, but many questions persist about the thermal evolution and depth of faulting. We present new Pb/U and (U-Th)/He zircon ages and combine them with magnetic anomaly ages to define the cooling histories of gabbroic crust exposed by oceanic detachment faults at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) holes 1270D and 1275D near the 15??20???N Transform, and Atlantis Massif at 30??N). Closure temperatures for the Pb/U (???800??C-850??C) and (U-Th)/He (???210??C) isotopic systems in zircon bracket acquisition of magnetic remanence, collectively providing a temperature-time history during faulting. Results indicate cooling to ???200??C in 0.3-0.5 Myr after zircon crystallization, recording time-averaged cooling rates of ???1000??C- 2000??C/Myr. Assuming the footwalls were denuded along single continuous faults, differences in Pb/U and (U-Th)/He zircon ages together with independently determined slip rates allow the distance between the ???850??C and ???200??C isotherms along the fault plane to be estimated. Calculated distances are 8.4 ?? 4.2 km and 5.0 2.1 km from holes 1275D and 1270D and 8.4 ?? 1.4 km at Atlantis Massif. Estimating an initial subsurface fault dip of 50 and a depth of 1.5 km to the 200??C isotherm leads to the prediction that the ???850??C isotherm lies ???5-7 km below seafloor at the time of faulting. These depth estimates for active fault systems are consistent with depths of microseismicity observed beneath the hypothesized detachment fault at the TAG hydrothermal field and high-temperature fault rocks recovered from many oceanic detachment faults. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  19. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  20. GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

    1958-06-10

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

  1. Perspective of Using the Results of Monitoring and Modeling of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant's Cooling Pond as Analogue for the US DOE Contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Voitsekhovich, O. V.; Bugay, D.; Skalskjj, A.; Shestopalov, V. M.; Zheleznyak, M.; Kashparov, V. A.; Antropov, A. S.; Kireev, S. I.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Ivanov, Y.; Oskolkov, B.; Marra, J.; Jannik, T.; Farfan, E.; Monken-Fernandes, H.; Hinton, T.; Smith, J.; Onishi, Y.; Konoplev, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although there are many contaminated sites that may be suitable candidates for providing analogue information for the development and testing of environmental modeling and risk assessment approaches, of particular scientific and practical interests is the feasibility study of planned decommissioning and remediation of the highly contaminated Chernobyl Cooling Pond (CP), located within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The presence of the CP has caused an artificially high groundwater table within the ChEZ. After the planned cessation of water pumping from the Pripyat River to the CP, substantial areas of sediments, containing 137Cs, 90Sr, and hot particles with U, Pu, and Am. will be exposed to the atmosphere, and the groundwater level is expected to decline by as much as 7 m. The areal extent of the exposed zone, the dissolution rate, mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides will vary over time, depending on the dynamics of seepage losses from the pond and climatic conditions. The objective of the presentation is to discuss hydrological and geochemical processes, a conceptual model, and the results and perspectives of numerical modeling of coupled surface water-groundwater flow and transport, including the parameter estimation and uncertainty evaluation for various decommissioning and remediation options of the CP. In particular, the results of 1D, 2D, and 3D simulations of radionuclide transport in surface water and groundwater will be discussed, along with the evaluation of Kd parameters from the results of field monitoring and modeling of seasonal variations of 137Cs concentrations in pond water and sediments. It will be shown that the results of field monitoring and modeling of the Chernobyl CP can be used as analogue for several US DOE sites to improve scientific and practical understanding of subsurface hydrological and geochemical processes, as well as to obtain a better understanding of processes affecting natural attenuation of radionuclides in

  2. Physiologic and Functional Responses of MS Patients to Body Cooling Using Commercially Available Cooling Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Lee, Hank C.; Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Personal cooling systems are widely used in industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. Increasingly they are also used by heat sensitive multiple sclerosis (HSMS) patients to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. There are a variety of cooling systems commercially available to the MS community. However, little information is available regarding the comparative physiological changes produced by routine operation of these various systems. The objective of this study was to document and compare the patient response to two passive cooling vests and one active cooling garment. The Life Enhancement Technology, Inc. (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems (MCS) Change of Phase garment, and the Steele Vest were each used to cool 13 male and 13 female MS subjects (31 to 67 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approximately 22 C), were tested with one of the cooling garments. Oral, fight and left ear temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. An-n, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. Each subject was given a series of subjective and objective evaluation tests before and after cooling. The LET and Steele vests test groups had similar, significant (P less than 0.01) cooling effects on oral and ear canal temperature, which decreased approximately 0.4 C, and 0.3 C, respectively. Core temperature increased (N.S.) with all three vests during cooling. The LET vest produced the coldest (P less than 0.01) skin temperature. Overall, the LET vest provided the most improvement on subjective and objective performance measures. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all MS patients. Cooling with the LET active garment configuration resulted in the lowest body temperatures for the MS subjects; cooling with

  3. Simulation of cold leg manifold break and station blackout revised sequences for reduced ECCS (emergency core cooling system) in the N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bolander, M.A.; Chapman, J.C.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1988-02-01

    This report presents analyses of two loss-of-coolant-accident sequences of the N Reactor using the RELAPS/MOD2 computer code. RELAP5/MOD2 is a best estimate, two phase, nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium, thermal-hydraulic, computer code designed for light water pressurized reactor transient. The N Reactor is a graphite- moderated, pressurized water reactor. The primary coolant is channeled through 1003 horizontal pressure tubes which contain two concentric tubular metallic fuel elements. The two accident sequences simulated were a double-ended guillotine break in the cold leg manifold and a station blackout. Both simulations cover the period beginning with the initiating event, either the break or the loss of ac power, to the stabilization of the core fuel element temperatures. (The station blackout calculation was carried out until the core was quenched.) The discussion presented in this report includes brief descriptions of the N Reactor, of the computer code and specific code modifications for horizontal reflood, and the computer code model used for the simulation. This discussion also presents the results and the analyses of the two calculations.

  4. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  5. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  6. Pre-cooling with intermittent ice ingestion lowers the core temperature in a hot environment as compared with the ingestion of a single bolus.

    PubMed

    Naito, Takashi; Ogaki, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    The timing in which ice is ingested may be important for optimizing its success. However, the effects of differences in the timing of ice ingestion has not been studied in resting participants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of differences in the timing of ice ingestion on rectal temperature (Tre) and rating of perceptual sensation in a hot environment. Seven males ingested 1.25gkg(-1) of crushed ice (ICE1.25: 0.5°C) or cold water (CON: 4°C) every 5min for 30min, or were given 7.5gkgBM(-1) of crushed ice (ICE7.5) to consume for 30min in a hot environment (35°C, 30% relative humidity). The participants then remained at rest for 1h. As physiological indices, Tre, body mass and urine specific gravity were measured. Rating of thermal sensation was measured at 5-min intervals throughout the experiment. ICE1.25 continued to decrease Tre until approximately 50min, and resulted in a greater reduction in Tre (-0.56±0.20°C) than ICE7.5 (-0.41±0.14°C). Tre was reduced from 40 to 75min by ICE1.25, which is a significant reduction in comparison to ICE7.5 (p<.05). Mean RTS with ICE1.25 at 50-65min was significantly lower than that with ICE7.5 (p<.05). These results suggest that pre-cooling with intermittent ice ingestion is a more effective strategy both for lowering the Tre and for the rating of thermal sensation. PMID:27264882

  7. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peinado, Charles O.; Koutz, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

  8. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF A2199: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN MERGER-INDUCED GAS MOTIONS AND NUCLEAR OUTBURSTS IN A COOL CORE CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Li, Zhiyuan; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lal, Dharam V.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Johnson, Ryan E.

    2013-10-01

    We present new Chandra observations of A2199 that show evidence of gas sloshing due to a minor merger, as well as impacts of the radio source, 3C 338, hosted by the central galaxy, NGC 6166, on the intracluster gas. The new data are consistent with previous evidence of a Mach ≅ 1.46 shock 100'' from the cluster center, although there is still no convincing evidence for the expected temperature jump. Other interpretations of this feature are possible, but none is fully satisfactory. Large scale asymmetries, including enhanced X-ray emission 200'' southwest of the cluster center and a plume of low entropy, enriched gas reaching 50'' to the north of the center, are signatures of gas sloshing induced by core passage of a merging subcluster about 400 Myr ago. An association between the unusual radio ridge and low entropy gas are consistent with this feature being the remnant of a former radio jet that was swept away from the active galactic nucleus by gas sloshing. A large discrepancy between the energy required to produce the 100'' shock and the enthalpy of the outer radio lobes of 3C 338 suggests that the lobes were formed by a more recent, less powerful radio outburst. The lack of evidence for shocks in the central 10'' indicates that the power of the jet now is some two orders of magnitude smaller than when the 100'' shock was formed.

  9. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  10. Monitoring soil and vegetation fluxes of carbon and water at the global scale: the land carbon core information service of geoland2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, J.-C.; Balsamo, G.; Chevallier, F.; Kullmann, L.; Papale, D.; Seufert, G.; The, H.; Gibelin, A.-L.; Horanyi, A.; Lafont, S.

    2009-04-01

    The vegetation/land component of GMES is called "Land Monitoring Core service" (LMCS). The geoland2 European project (FP7, 2008-2012) is a demonstrator of the evolution of the LMCS, including the consolidation of prototype services and the test of their operational capacity. In particular, the perimeter of the LMCS is extended, with a global component (biogeophysical parameters), and thematic core information services. The main mission of the land carbon core information service (LC-CIS) of geoland2 is to assess the impact of weather and climate variability on terrestrial biospheric carbon fluxes, in the context of international conventions. The LC-CIS aims at monitoring the global terrestrial carbon fluxes (e.g. to support reporting obligations in the course of the Kyoto Protocol) and setting-up pre-operational infrastructures for providing global products, both in near real time and off-line mode. A multi-model carbon accounting system is developed, coupled with EO data assimilation schemes. Emphasis is put on validation (in-situ data), with downscaling on reference European countries (F, NL, HU). The C-TESSEL and SURFEX modelling platforms (of ECMWF and Météo-France, respectively) are used for production. The ORCHIDEE modelling platform (LSCE) is used for benchmarking and validation purposes. The ECWMF reanalysis (ERA-Interim) will be used to build a global 20-y climatology of carbon and water fluxes, LAI and vegetation biomass, in order to rank the near-real time simulations. Gradually, EO data will be integrated in the modelling platforms, in order to improve the atmospheric constraint on the model (e.g. downwelling solar radiation from the EUMETSAT's Land-SAF), analyse soil moisture and vegetation biomass (e.g. assimilate the EUMETSAT's ASCAT soil moisture product and MODIS and/or SPOT/VGT LAI estimates). Finally, EO data will be used for model verification (e.g. land surface temperature).

  11. Microscale technology electronics cooling overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golliher, Eric L.

    2002-01-01

    NASA requirements and subsequent technology solutions for high heat flux electronics are generally different that those for the terrestrial applications. Unlike terrestrial operations. NASA spacecraft have limited opportunities for air cooling, for example, and must rely on less efficient thermal radiation to reject heat to space. The terrestrial commercial electronics industry, as well as other Government agencies, is investing in advanced technologies for electronics cooling at the microscale. This paper gives a brief summary of metrics used in high heat flux electronics cooling, the difference between solutions developed for terrestrial requirements and those for space, and a short description of challenges as well as possible solutions for space-based high heat flux electronics cooling. The argument is made that high heat flux electronics cooling is indeed a core technology required by NASA, since the thermal and other environmental requirements are unique to NASA space missions and are not addressed by current terrestrial electronics cooling technology development projects. .

  12. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  13. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  14. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  15. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  16. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  17. Curriculum-based assessment of oral language and listening comprehension: a tool for intervention and progress monitoring in the Common Core State Standards.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Wendy

    2012-05-01

    The Common Core State Standards and a Response to Intervention framework are movements sweeping the nation. Speech-language pathologists are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in supporting successful implementation of these movements. This article explores the assessment tools speech-language pathologists SLPs will need to identify and progress monitor critical language/literacy skills such as listening comprehension and oral narratives skills. Foundational research demonstrates that communication units, total words spoken, and major story components are measures that will discriminate between students with adequate language skills and language disorders and are curriculum-based, sensitive to change, and useful to determine the effectiveness of language/literacy interventions. Speech-language pathologist can broaden the impact of their knowledge and skills to improve outcomes for all students. PMID:22538711

  18. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  19. Fabrication of Graphene and AuNP Core Polyaniline Shell Nanocomposites as Multifunctional Theranostic Platforms for SERS Real-time Monitoring and Chemo-photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haolin; Liu, Zhiming; Li, Songyang; Su, Chengkang; Qiu, Xuejun; Zhong, Huiqing; Guo, Zhouyi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel theranostic platforms based on graphene oxide and AuNP core polyaniline shell (GO-Au@PANI) nanocomposites are fabricated for simultaneous SERS imaging and chemo-photothermal therapy. PANI, a new NIR photothermal therapy agent with strong NIR absorption, outstanding stability and low cytotoxicity is decorated on AuNPs by one-pot oxidative polymerization, then the Au@PANI core-shell nanoparticles are attached to the graphene oxide (GO) sheet via π-π stacking and electrostatic interaction. The obtained GO-Au@PANI nanohybirds exhibit excellent NIR photothermal transduction efficiency and ultrahigh drug-loading capacity. The nanocomposites can also serve as novel NIR SERS probes utilizing the intense SERS signals of PANI. Rapid SERS imaging of cancer cells is achieved using this ultrasensitive nanoprobe. GO-Au@PANI also reveals good capability of drug delivery with the DOX-loading efficiency of 189.2% and sensitive NIR/pH-responsive DOX release. The intracellular real-time drug release dynamics from the nanocomposites is monitored by SERS-fluorescence dual mode imaging. Finally, chemo-photothermal ablation of cancer cells is carried out in vitro and in vivo using GO-Au@PANI as high-performance chemo-photothermal therapeutic nanoagent. The theranostic applications of GO-Au@PANI endow it with great potential for personalized and precise cancer medicine. PMID:27279904

  20. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  1. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  2. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  3. High temperature cooling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Loewen, Eric P.

    2006-12-12

    A method for cooling a heat source, a method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition therein, and a cooling system. The method for cooling employs a containment vessel with an oxidizable interior wall. The interior wall is oxidized to form an oxide barrier layer thereon, the cooling composition is monitored for excess oxidizing agent, and a reducing agent is provided to eliminate excess oxidation. The method for preventing chemical interaction between a vessel and a cooling composition involves introducing a sufficient quantity of a reactant which is reactive with the vessel in order to produce a barrier layer therein that is non-reactive with the cooling composition. The cooling system includes a containment vessel with oxidizing agent and reducing agent delivery conveyances and a monitor of oxidation and reduction states so that proper maintenance of a vessel wall oxidation layer occurs.

  4. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  5. Cooling systems for satellite remote sensing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Oren, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a cryogenic cooling system for the Pollution Monitoring Satellite (PMS) are discussed. Studies were conducted to make the following determinations: (1) the characteristics and use of proven and state-of-the-art cryogenic cooling systems for six specified ranges of performance, (2) the system most applicable for each of the six cooling categories, and (3) conceptual designs for candidate system for each of the six representative cooling categories. The six cooling categories of electrical loads are defined. The desired mission life for the cooling system is two years with both continuous and intermittent operating conditions.

  6. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  7. Gas-cooled flameholder assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Abreau, M.E.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises an air compressor; an outer casing extending downstream from the compressor; a core engine including a turbine joined to the compressor, the core engine being disposed in the casing and defining therewith a bypass duct for channeling a first portion of air from the compressor around the core engine and for receiving a second portion of air from the compressor for mixing with fuel and generating combustion gases for driving the turbine and the compressor, the gases being dischargeable from an aft end of the core engine; an afterburner disposed downstream of the core engine and including: a combustor liner, a flameholder assembly disposed upstream of the liner and downstream of the core engine, the assembly including a flameholder, and means for cooling the flameholder by channeling only noncombustible gas to the flameholder, the noncombustible gas being a first portion of the combustion gases.

  8. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  9. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  10. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H.; Bos, W.

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  11. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  12. Security monitoring subsystem design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1986-06-01

    Security Monitoring acquires and processes sensor data for use by security personnel in the performance of their function. Security Monitoring is designed and implemented as a part of an overall security plan which is classified as Safeguards Information under 10CFR73.21.

  13. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  14. Magnetic suspension using high temperature superconducting cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The development of YBCO high temperature superconductors, in wire and tape forms, is rapidly approaching the point where the bulk transport current density j vs magnetic field H characteristics with liquid nitrogen cooling will enable its use in model cores. On the other hand, BSCCO high temperature superconductor in wire form has poor j-H characteristics at 77 K today, although with liquid helium or hydrogen cooling, it appears to be superior to NbTi superconductor. Since liquid nitrogen cooling is approx. 100 times cheaper than liquid helium cooling, the use of YBCO is very attractive for use in magnetic suspension. The design is discussed of a model core to accommodate lift and drag loads up to 6000 and 3000 N respectively. A comparison is made between the design performance of a liquid helium cooled NbTi (or BSCCO) superconducting core and a liquid nitrogen cooled YBCO superconducting core.

  15. Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy for monitoring soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.-C.; Wen, C.-R.

    2006-05-15

    Continuous-time core-level photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) spectroscopy was proposed for monitoring the soft x-ray-induced reactions of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used as a soft x-ray light source in the photon-induced reactions of CF{sub 3}Cl adsorbed on a Si(111)-7x7 surface at 30 K and also as a probe for studying the produced fluorination states of the bonding surface Si atom in the positive-ion PSD spectroscopy. The F{sup +} PSD spectrum was obtained by monitoring the F{sup +} signal as a function of incident photon energy near the Si(2p) edge (98-110 eV). Sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra were measured as a function of photon exposure at four adsorbate coverages (the first dose=0.3x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the second dose=0.8x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, the third dose=2.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}, and the fourth dose=3.2x10{sup 15} molecules/cm{sup 2}). For the first and second CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces, the sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and indicate the formation of surface SiF species. The sequential F{sup +} PSD spectra for the third and fourth CF{sub 3}Cl-dosed surfaces also show the variation of their shapes with photon exposure and depict the production of surface SiF and SiF{sub 3} species.

  16. Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Kaminker, A. D.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2008-02-27

    We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

  17. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  18. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  19. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  20. Design, Manufacture, and Operation of a Core Barrel for the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, A. C.; Bowers, P.; Þórhallsson, S.; Ómar Friðleifsson, G.; Guðmundsson, H.

    2010-09-01

    The science program of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) requires as much core as possible in the transition zone to supercritical and inside the supercritical zone (>374°C), in the depth interval 2400-4500 m. The spot coring system selected has a 7 1/4" (184.15 mm) OD at 10 m length and collects a 4" (101.6 mm) diameter core using an 8 1/2" (215.9 mm) OD core bit. It incorporates design characteristics, materials, clearances and bearings compatible with operation of the core barrel at temperatures as high as 600°C. Special attention was given to the volume of flushing which could be applied to the core barrel and through the bit while running in and out of the borehole and while coring. In November 2008 a successful spot coring test using the new core barrel was performed at 2800 m depth in the production well RN-17 B at Reykjanes, Iceland, where the formation temperature is 322°C. A 9.3-m hydrothermally altered hyaloclastite breccia was cored with 100% core recovery, in spite of it being highly fractured. A core tube data logger was also designed and placed inside the inner barrel to monitor the effectiveness of cooling. The temperature could be maintained at 100°C while coring, but it reached 170°C for a very short period while tripping in. The effective cooling is attributed to the high flush design and a top drive being employed, which allows circulation while tripping in or out, except for the very short time when a new drill pipe connection is being made. doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.10.05.2010

  1. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    DOEpatents

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  2. Cool-Water Coal Gasification Program: Environmental Monitoring Plan Commissioning Phase, final report. Volume 1. Technical report. Volume 2. Appendix A - HRSG (heat recovery steam generator) stack-testing results. Volume 3. Appendix B - analytical results. Appendix C - sampling analytical methods. Appendix D - ambient air monitoring data. Volume 4. Appendix E - quality assurance/quality control. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-11

    The Cool Water Coal Gasification Program (CWCGP) began electrical production under the terms of the Price Guarantee Commitment with the U.S. Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) on June 24, 1984. An Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) approved by the SFC was initiated at that time. The Commissioning Phase, the first of four phases of the EMP, was conducted from June 24 through December 31, 1984. Sampling and analysis of compliance and supplemental parameters produced over 1100 samples and 8500 data points from 17 aqueous, ten gaseous, and four solid sampling streams. The technical report includes a description of the CWCGP process as it was operated during the Commissioning Phase, a summary of process changes that occurred during the period, their effect on the environmental monitoring effort, and details of pollution-control testing (Appendix A), data calculations (Appendix B), analytical methods and results (Appendix C), ambient-air-monitoring data (Appendix D), and quality-assurance/quality-control program results (Appendix E).

  3. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  4. Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates

    2010-10-01

    A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

  5. Physiologic Responses Produced by Active and Passive Personal Cooling Vests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to document and compare the subjects' response to three cooling vests in their recommended configurations. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems Change of Phase garment (MCS), and the Steele Vest were each used to cool the chest regions of 12 male and 8 female Healthy subjects (21 to 69 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 22 C), were tested for 60 min. with one of the cooling garments. The LET active garment had an initial coolant fluid inlet temperature of 60 F, and was ramped down to 50 F. Oral, right and left ear canal temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. For men, all three vests had similar, significant cooling effects. Decreases in the average rectal temperature, oral temperature, and ear canal temperatures were approximately 0.2 C, 0.2 C and 0.1 C, respectively. In contrast to the men, the female subjects wearing the MCS and Steel vests had similar cooling responses in which the core temperature remained elevated and oral and ear canal temperatures did not drop. The LET active garment cooled most of the female subjects in this study; rectal, oral and ear temperature decreased about 0.2 C, 0.3 C and 0.3 C, respectively. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all subjects. A gender difference is evident. The LET active garment configuration was most effective in decreasing temperatures of the female subjects; the MCS

  6. 40 CFR 89.327 - Charge cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charge cooling. 89.327 Section 89.327....327 Charge cooling. For engines with an air-to-air intercooler (or any other low temperature charge... and the temperature of the charge air shall be monitored and recorded....

  7. 40 CFR 89.327 - Charge cooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Charge cooling. 89.327 Section 89.327....327 Charge cooling. For engines with an air-to-air intercooler (or any other low temperature charge... and the temperature of the charge air shall be monitored and recorded....

  8. Physiological and Thermal Responses of MS Patients to Head and Vest Cooling: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal cooling systems are used to alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and to prevent increased core temperature during daily activities. The objective of this study was to determine the operating characteristics and the physiologic changes produced by short term application of the stationary thermal control system used by most clinical institutions. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) Mark VII portable cooling system and a lightweight Head-vest active cooling garment were used to cool the head and chest regions of 4 male and 3 female MS patients (30 to 66 yrs. old) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 24 C), were tested for 60 min. with the liquid cooling garment (LCG) operated at 50 F. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures, heart rate, respiration, and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc., Biolog ambulatory monitor. All temperature responses showed extreme variation among subjects. The cold-sensitive subject's rectal temperature increased initially in response to cooling; the heat sensitive subject's rectal temperature decreased. After 40 min. of cooling and during recovery, all subjects'rectal temperatures decreased. Oral temperatures began to decrease after 30 min. of cooling. After 60 min. of cooling, temperature drops ranged from approx. 0.3 - 0.8 C. Oral temperatures continued to decrease during recovery (approx. 0.2 C). The car temperature of the heat sensitive subject was increased after cooling, other subjects exhibited an ear temperature decrease (0.0 - 0.5 C). These data indicate that head and vest cooling may be used to reduce the oral temperatures of MS patients by the approximate amount needed for symptomatic relief as shown by other researchers. The combination of a small subject population and a large subject variance does not permit us to draw statistical

  9. A buoyancy profile for the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Gubbins, D.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the thermal and chemical buoyancy forces that drive convection in the Earth's liquid outer core and derive a radial buoyancy profile that can be used in geodynamo models. We assume the core is well mixed, adiabatic and cools as a result of mantle convection. The buoyancy profile is developed for a Boussinesq fluid and incorporates secular cooling, latent heat release at the inner core boundary, radiogenic heating, the effect of the adiabat, and compositional buoyancy due to inner core freezing. Surprisingly, these complex effects can be modelled accurately by a simple combination of bottom heating and near-uniform heat sinks, which is implemented using a cotemperature formulation that converts compositional effects into effective thermal effects. The relative importance of internal and bottom heating is then defined by just two parameters, the cooling rate at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the uniform rate of internal radiogenic heat production, both of which can be obtained from core evolution calculations. We vary these parameters in geodynamo models and compare basic features of the generated fields with the geomagnetic field; in this manner we link core evolution models, geodynamo simulations and geomagnetic observations. We consider three end-member scenarios for core evolution: (1) rapid cooling and a young inner core; (2) moderate cooling and neutral stability at the CMB; (3) slow cooling and enough radiogenic heating to allow the inner core to be 3.5 Gyr old. We find that compositional buoyancy dominates thermal buoyancy everywhere except near the CMB, even with large amounts of radiogenic heating, and buoyancy forces are far larger at depth than higher up. Reducing the cooling rate and increasing radiogenic heating reduces the drop in the superadiabatic gradient between the inner and outer boundaries: for rapid cooling the drop is by a factor 50; for slow cooling it is a factor of 5. We demonstrate the effects of these different buoyancy

  10. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  11. Geminga: A cooling superfluid neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1994-01-01

    We compare the recent temperature estimate for Geminga with neutron star cooling models. Because of its age (approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) yr), Geminga is in the photon cooling era. We show that its surface temperature (approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K) can be understood by both types of neutrino cooling scenarios, i.e., slow neutrino cooling by the modified Urca process or fast neutrino cooling by the direct Urca process or by some exotic matter, and thus does not allow us to discriminate between these two competing schemes. However, for both types of scenarios, agreement with the observed temperature can only be obtained if baryon pairing is present in most, if not all, of the core of the star. Within the slow neutrino cooling scenario, early neutrino cooling is not sufficient to explain the observed low temperature, and extensive pairing in the core is necessary to reduce the specific heat and increase the cooling rate in the present photon cooling era. Within all the fast neutrino cooling scenarios, pairing is necessary throughout the whole core to control the enormous early neutrino emission which, without pairing suppression, would result in a surface temperature at the present time much lower than observed. We also comment on the recent temperature estimates for PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, which pertain to the same photon cooling era. If one assumes that all neutron stars undergo fast neutrino cooling, then these two objects also provide evidence for extensive baryon pairing in their core; but observational uncertainties also permit a more conservative interpretation, with slow neutrino emission and no pairing at all. We argue though that observational evidence for the slow neutrino cooling model (the 'standard' model) is in fact very dim and that the interpretation of the surface temperature of all neutron stars could be done with a reasonable theoretical a priori within the fast neutrino cooling scenarios only. In this case, Geminga, PSR 0656+14, and PSR

  12. Cooled spool piston compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  13. Internally Cooled Monolithic Silicon Nitride Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Jonathan E.; Cawley, James D.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.; Lang, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A set of rapid prototyping (RP) processes have been combined with gelcasting to make ceramic aerospace components that contain internal cooling geometry. A mold and core combination is made using a MM6Pro (Sanders Prototyping, Inc.) and SLA-250/40 (3Dsystems, Inc.). The MM6Pro produces cores from ProtoBuild (trademarked) wax that are dissolved in room temperature ethanol following gelcasting. The SLA-250/40 yields epoxy/acrylate reusable molds. Parts produced by this method include two types of specimens containing a high density of thin long cooling channels, thin-walled cylinders and plates, as well as a model hollow airfoil shape that can be used for burner rig evaluation of coatings. Both uncoated and mullite-coated hollow airfoils has been tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig with cooling air demonstrating internal cooling and confirming the effectiveness of mullite coatings.

  14. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  15. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  16. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is reported. Manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems is included. Heating and cooling equipment for single family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling) is described.

  17. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  18. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  19. Autonomous stress imaging cores: from concept to reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velden, Stephen; Rajic, Nik; Brooks, Chris; Galea, Steve

    2016-04-01

    The historical reliance of thermoelastic stress analysis on cooled infrared detection has created significant cost and practical impediments to the widespread use of this powerful full-field stress measurement technique. The emergence of low-cost microbolometers as a practical alternative has allowed for an expansion of the traditional role of thermoelastic stress analysis, and raises the possibility that it may in future become a viable structural health monitoring modality. Experimental results are shown to confirm that high resolution stress imagery can be obtained from an uncooled thermal camera core significantly smaller than any infrared imaging device previously applied to TSA. The paper provides a summary of progress toward the development of an autonomous stress-imaging capability based on this core.

  20. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FACILITY CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Assessment Facility Core will continue to collect environmental measures including personal and indoor air monitoring and repeat collection of dust samples from the home and biologic measures including urine and blood samples collected from the mother during pregn...

  1. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  2. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOEpatents

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  3. Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, A; Ueda, N; Wade, D; Greenspan, E; Brown, N

    2005-11-02

    The Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study documents results from activities conducted under Small Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Coordination Program (SLMFR-CP) Agreement, January 2004, between the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)[1]. Evaluations were completed on topics that are important to the safety of small sodium cooled and lead alloy cooled reactors. CRIEPI investigated approaches for evaluating postulated severe accidents using the CANIS computer code. The methods being developed are improvements on codes such as SAS 4A used in the US to analyze sodium cooled reactors and they depend on calibration using safety testing of metal fuel that has been completed in the TREAT facility. The 4S and the small lead cooled reactors in the US are being designed to preclude core disruption from all mechanistic scenarios, including selected unprotected transients. However, postulated core disruption is being evaluated to support the risk analysis. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley also supported LLNL with evaluation of cores with small positive void worth and core designs that would limit void worth. Assessments were also completed for lead cooled reactors in the following areas: (1) continuing operations with cladding failure, (2) large bubbles passing through the core and (3) recommendations concerning reflector control. The design approach used in the US emphasizes reducing the reactivity in the control mechanisms with core designs that have essentially no, or a very small, reactivity change over the core life. This leads to some positive void worth in the core that is not considered to be safety problem because of the inability to identify scenarios that would lead to voiding of lead. It is also believed that the void worth will not dominate the severe accident analysis. The approach used by 4S requires negative void worth throughout

  4. Determining the controls on δ13C of sedimentary organic matter in Lake Tiefer See (NE Germany) - an integration of sediment cores and monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dräger, Nadine; Kienel, Ulrike; Groß-Schmölders, Miriam; Plessen, Birgit; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary organic matter (δ13Corg) is widely used in paleoenvironmental studies and commonly considered as proxy for lake productivity. In order to better understand the δ13Corg record of the partly annually laminated (varved) sediment profile of Lake Tiefer See, we complemented measurements from a long sediment core with analyses of short cores from different water depths and sediment trap data. The δ13Corg signature was determined (i) at 2 cm resolution from a 7.7 m-long continuous sediment record covering the last ˜6100 years retrieved from the deepest part of the lake (62 m), (ii) at 1 cm resolution from four short cores (0.5 to 0.9 m long) located at different water depths (20 -- 62 m) and covering at least the last 200 years and (iii) at bi-weekly to monthly resolution from sediment trap material collected at three water depths (5, 12 and 45 m) since march 2012. We observed that δ13Corg fluctuations are paralleled by changes in varve preservation, as well-varved sections show more negative δ13Corg values compared to non-varved intervals (1 -- 4‰ difference; analytical precision ±0.2‰). In short cores the negative shift of δ13Corg always appears at the most recent transition from non-varved to well-varved sediments. Depending on the water depth the onset of varve preservation occurred at different times (e.g. AD 1924 in 62 m water depth; AD 1981 in 20 m water depth). Since sediment trap data exhibit similar δ13Corg values of -30‰ to -31‰ in the entire water column and in the uppermost varved parts of the sediment cores, it is unlikely that the shift in δ13Corg was caused by processes in the water column because this should be seen in all cores at the same time. Therefore, we suggest that the δ13Corg record of the long sediment core of Lake Tiefer See does not reflect processes in the water column (i.e. productivity), but different early diagenetic processes in varved and non-varved sediment. In this study

  5. Endovascular Cooling Method for Hypothermia in Injured Swine.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Françoise; Haque, Ashraful; Solomon, Daniel; Kim, Robert B; Pappas, Georgina; Scultetus, Anke H; Auker, Charles; McCarron, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated an endovascular cooling method to modulate core temperature in trauma swine models with and without fluid support. Anesthetized swine (N = 80) were uninjured (SHAM) or injured through a bone fracture plus soft tissue injury or an uncontrolled hemorrhage and then subdivided to target body temperatures of 38°C (normothermia) or 33°C (hypothermia) by using a Thermogard endovascular cooling device (Zoll Medical). Temperature regulation began simultaneously at onset of injury (T0). Body temperatures were recorded from a rectal probe (Rec Temp) and from a central pulmonary artery catheter (PA Temp). At T15, swine received 500 mL IV Hextend over 30 minutes or no treatment (NONE) with continued monitoring until 3 hours from injury. Hypothermia was attained in 105 ± 39 minutes, at a cooling rate of -0.061°C ± 0.007°C/min for NONE injury groups. Postinjury Hextend administration resulted in faster cooling (-0.080°C ± 0.006°C/min); target temperature was reached in 83 ± 11 minutes (p < 0.05). During active cooling, body temperature measured by the PA Temp was significantly cooler than the Rec Temp due to the probe's closer proximity to the blood-cooling catheter balloons (p < 0.05). This difference was smaller in SHAM and fluid-supported injury groups (1.1°C ± 0.4°C) versus injured NONE groups (2.1°C ± 0.3°C). Target temperatures were correctly maintained thereafter in all groups. In normothermia groups, there was a small initial transient overshoot to maintain 38°C. Despite the noticeable difference between PA Temp and Rec Temp until target temperature was attained, this endovascular method can safely induce moderate hypothermia in anesthetized swine. However, likely due to their compromised hemodynamic state, cooling in hypovolemic and/or injured patients will be different from those without injury or those that also received fluids. PMID:26918281

  6. Real-Time Spectroscopic Monitoring of the Synthesis of Core and Core/Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals and Finite-Difference Time Domain Modeling of the Interaction Between Light and Spherical Microwell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, John

    Nanocrystalline beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ has significant potential for applications in a wide variety of fields including solar technologies, security printing, and biological imaging and sensing. In order to increase the potential of these nanocrystals for these applications, we have developed a method for the real-time, in situ, spectroscopic monitoring of nanocrystal growth and shell-addition. In situ real-time monitoring of upconversion emission is applied to study the reaction mechanism for the synthesis of beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3++ nanoparticles in oleic acid and octadecene via the heat-up method. Transmission electron microscopy is used to correlate the spectroscopic signature of the reaction mixture with its composition. The power of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to precisely time the duration of the various stages of the reaction, and to accurately identify the transitions between those stages, including the completion of the reaction, is demonstrated. Real-time spectroscopic monitoring is used to study the effect of increasing the oleic acid concentration on the duration of these stages as well as the size and shape of resulting nanocrystals. The use of real-time spectroscopic monitoring to study shell-addition, specifically, the addition of an un-doped NaYF4 shell, is also discussed. Patterned gold surfaces are known to enhance the upconversion efficiency of lanthanide based upconversion materials, such as nanocrystalline beta-NaYF 4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er3+. Here, spherical microwell arrays are shown to provide up to a 40x enhancement of upconversion emission from beta-NaYF4:17% Yb3+, 3% Er 3+ nanocrystals. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) is a method to solve, numerically, the Maxwell equations across a 3D simulation grid and has been used to simulate the interaction of light with a variety of materials, including metal surfaces and particles. FDTD simulations is used to investigate the nature of the enhancement from the patterned gold

  7. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  8. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  9. Physiologic and thermal responses of male and female patients with multiple sclerosis to head and neck cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Y. T.; Montgomery, L. D.; Wenzel, K. C.; Webbon, B. W.; Burks, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Personal cooling systems are used to alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis and to prevent increased core temperature during daily activities. The objective of this study was to determine the thermal and physiologic responses of patients with multiple sclerosis to short-term maximal head and neck cooling. A Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used to cool the head and neck regions of 24 female and 26 male patients with multiple sclerosis in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approximately 22 degrees C), were cooled for 30 min by the liquid cooling garment, which was operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Oral, right, and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Forearm, calf, chest, and rectal temperatures, heart rate, and respiration rate were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. This protocol was performed during the winter and summer to investigate the seasonal differences in the way patients with multiple sclerosis respond to head and neck cooling. No significant differences were found between the male and female subject group's mean rectal or oral temperature responses during any phase of the experiment. The mean oral temperature decreased significantly (P < 0.05) for both groups approximately 0.3 degrees C after 30 min of cooling and continued to decrease further (approximately 0.1-0.2 degrees C) for a period of approximately 15 min after removal of the cooling helmet. The mean rectal temperatures decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in both male and female subjects in the winter studies (approximately 0.2-0.3 degrees C) and for the male subjects during the summer test (approximately 0.2 degrees C). However, the rectal temperature of the female subjects did not change significantly during any phase of the summer test. These data indicate that head and neck cooling may, in

  10. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  11. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  12. Mars: a new core-crystallization regime.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Andrew J; Schmidt, Max W; van Westrenen, Wim; Liebske, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The evolution of the martian core is widely assumed to mirror the characteristics observed for Earth's core. Data from experiments performed on iron-sulfur and iron-nickel-sulfur systems at pressures corresponding to the center of Mars indicate that its core is presently completely liquid and that it will not form an outwardly crystallizing iron-rich inner core, as does Earth. Instead, planetary cooling will lead to core crystallization following either a "snowing-core" model, whereby iron-rich solids nucleate in the outer portions of the core and sink toward the center, or a "sulfide inner-core" model, where an iron-sulfide phase crystallizes to form a solid inner core. PMID:17540900

  13. Multicompartment Liquid-Cooling/Warming Protective Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koscheyev, Victor S.; Leon, Gloria R.; Dancisak, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Shortened, multicompartment liquid-cooling / warming garments (LCWGs) for protecting astronauts, firefighters, and others at risk of exposure to extremes of temperature are undergoing development. Unlike prior liquid-circulation thermal-protection suits that provide either cooling or warming but not both, an LCWG as envisioned would provide cooling at some body locations and/or heating at other locations, as needed: For example, sometimes there is a need to cool the body core and to heat the extremities simultaneously. An LCWG garment of the type to be developed is said to be shortened because the liquid-cooling and - heating zones would not cover the whole body and, instead, would cover reduced areas selected for maximum heating and cooling effectiveness. Physiological research is under way to provide a rational basis for selection of the liquid-cooling and -heating areas. In addition to enabling better (relative to prior liquid-circulation garments) balancing of heat among different body regions, the use of selective heating and cooling in zones would contribute to a reduction in the amount of energy needed to operate a thermal-protection suit.

  14. A comparison of cooling techniques in firefighters after a live burn evolution

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Deanna; Suyama, Joe; Reis, Steven E; Morley, Julia L; Goss, Fredric L; Chen, Yi-Fan; Moore, Charity G; Hostler, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective We compared two active cooling devices to passive cooling in a moderate (≈22°C) temperature environment on heart rate (HR) and core temperature (Tc) recovery when applied to firefighters following 20 min. of fire suppression. Methods Firefighters (23 male, 2 female) performed 20 minutes of fire suppression at a live fire evolution. Immediately following the evolution, the subjects removed their thermal protective clothing and were randomized to receive forearm immersion (FI), ice water perfused cooling vest (CV) or passive (P) cooling in an air-conditioned medical trailer for 30 minutes. Heart rate and deep gastric temperature were monitored every five minutes during recovery. Results A single 20-minute bout of fire suppression resulted in near maximal HR (175±13 - P, 172±20 - FI, 177±12 beats•min−1 - CV) when compared to baseline (p < 0.001), a rapid and substantial rise in Tc (38.2±0.7 - P, 38.3±0.4 - FI, 38.3±0.3° - CV) compared to baseline (p < 0.001), and mass lost from sweating of nearly one kilogram. Cooling rates (°C/min) differed (p = 0.036) by device with FI (0.05±0.04) providing higher rates than P (0.03±0.02) or CV (0.03±0.04) although differences over 30 minutes were small and recovery of body temperature was incomplete in all groups. Conclusions During 30 min. of recovery following a 20-minute bout of fire suppression in a training academy setting, there is a slightly higher cooling rate for FI and no apparent benefit to CV when compared to P cooling in a moderate temperature environment. PMID:21294631

  15. Empirical evaluation of the radiative cooling coefficient for krypton gas in the FTU plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K.B.; Pacella, D.; Gregory, B.C.; May, M.J.; Mazzitelli, G.; Gabellieri, L.; Leigheb, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Soukanovskii, V.; Goldstein, W.H.

    1997-11-18

    For future fusion reactors, a careful balance must be achieved between the cooling of the outer plasma via impurity radiation and the deleterious effects of inevitable core penetration by impurity ions. We have injected krypton gas into the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) plasma. The measured visible bremsstrahlung and bolometric signals from krypton have been inverted and the resulting radial impurity density profile and power loss profile for krypton gas are extracted. Using the measured electron density and temperature profiles, the radiative cooling coefficient for krypton is derived. The level of intrinsic impurities (Mo, Cr, Mn and Fe) in the plasma during the krypton puffing is monitored with a VUV SPRED spectrometer. Models for krypton emissivity from the literature are compared to our measured results. 7 figs.

  16. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  17. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  18. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P. [Trafford, PA; Tilbrook, Roger W. [Monroeville, PA; Heylmun, Neal F. [Pittsburgh, PA

    1977-07-19

    Apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed.

  19. Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor. Quarterly progress report, February 1-April 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Information is presented concerning the reactor vessel; reactivity control mechanisms and instrumentation; reactor internals; primary coolant circuits;core auxiliary cooling system; reactor core; systems engineering; and reactor safety and reliability;

  20. Metallographic Cooling Rate of IVA Irons Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2005-01-01

    There is long standing problem reconciling the chemical evidence that the IVA iron meteorites formed in a core with the diverse cooling rates reported by several researchers. This large inferred range of cooling rates suggests that the IVA irons were distributed at different depths in a parent body with a complex structure when the Widmanstatten pattern formed. On the other hand, some researchers argued that the diverse cooling rates in group IVA result from inaccurate model parameters such as phase diagram, interdiffusion coefficients, and kamacite nucleation and growth mechanisms. In addition, the measured cooling rates may not apply for the same cooling temperature ranges, and the variation in the crystallographic orientations of the Widmanstatten plates on the analysis surface may result in inaccurate measurements of widths needed for the computer simulation models. We have revaluated the major parameters in computer model developed by Hopfe and Goldstein and measured cooling rates for the IVA irons. Such data are useful in evaluating whether these meteorites were part of a single core of a parent body during the formation of the Widmanstatten pattern.

  1. Adiabatic cooling of antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3×10(6) p are cooled to 3.5 K-10(3) times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e(-) (with many fewer e(-) than p in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process-a significant advantage for rare particles. PMID:21405511

  2. Adiabatic Cooling of Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Oelert, W.; Grzonka, D.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3x10{sup 6} p are cooled to 3.5 K--10{sup 3} times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e{sup -} (with many fewer e{sup -} than p) in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process--a significant advantage for rare particles.

  3. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  4. Detection of analyte refractive index and concentration using liquid-core photonic Bragg fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate detection of liquid analyte refractive index by using a hollow-core photonic Bragg fiber. We apply this fiber sensor to monitor concentrations of commercial cooling oil. The sensor operates on a spectral modality. Variation in the analyte refractive index modifies the bandgap guidance of a fiber, leading to spectral shifts in the fiber transmission spectrum. The sensitivity of the sensor to changes in the analyte refractive index filling in the fiber core is found to be 1460nm/Refractive index unit (RIU). By using the spectral modality and effective medium theory, we determine the concentrations of commercial fluid from the measured refractive indices with an accuracy of ~0.42%. The presented fiber sensor can be used for on-line monitoring of concentration of many industrial fluids and dilutions with sub-1%v accuracy.

  5. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  6. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aid core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile, akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core; (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle is calculated to be at most 1.5 deg./yr.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  8. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  9. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  10. Debuncher cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  11. Debuncher Cooling Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P. F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven

    2006-03-20

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  12. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  13. Solar UV flux measurements from the SBUV2 monitor on the NOAA9 satellite. Part 1: MG II H and K line core-to-wing ratios for 1986-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Puga, L. C.; Barrett, J.; Bouwer, S. D.; Pap, J.; Stevens, D. E.; Tobiska, W. K.

    1994-12-01

    Analyses of the discrete-wavelength mode of observations of the solar full-disk MG 2 h and k line spectral irradiance measured by the Solar Backscatter UV Monitor (SBUV2) on the NOAA9 satellite are presented. Relative photometry techniques were used to derive a core-to-wing. This ratio has been modified, relative to that used by Heath and Schlesinger's (1986) classical MG 2 ratio derived for solar UV measurements made by their SBUV experiment aboard the Nimbus-7 satellite, to avoid inter-range instrumentation drifts encountered in the NOAA9 SBUV2 monitor. Prior research of the solar MG 2 h and k lines is reviewed. The raw measurements and observational parameters, such as the angle of the Sun as seen at the SBUV2 monitor are discussed. Temporal interpolations among the sets of discrete-mode measurements are used to account for most of the Sun-angle dependence and to reduce the sensitivity of the results to any errors in the Sun angles. Wavelength 'jitter' and long-term drift are studied, and intensity linearity and inter-range drift are analyzed. The NOAA9 results are compared with same-day Nimbus-7 data, the Kitt Peak Ca K1 angstrom index, the Canadian 10.7 cm solar radio flux, and observations of the solar H Lyman alpha line.

  14. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  15. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  16. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  17. Controlled Rate Cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled-rate cooling is one of several techniques available for the long-term storage of plants in liquid nitrogen. In this technique samples are slowly cooled to an intermediate temperature and then plunged in liquid nitrogen. Controlled rate cooling is based on osmotic regulation of cell conte...

  18. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  20. Cooling apparatus for water-cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, T.; Tamba, S.

    1986-05-20

    A cooling apparatus is described for a water-cooled internal combustion engine including a shaft that rotates when the engine is running, the apparatus comprising a centrifugal fan adapted to be connected to and rotated by the shaft, the fan having an intake air port and a discharge air opening, a rotary screen adapted to be operatively connected to and rotated by the shaft, the screen being disposed in the intake air port, a cooling radiator, a spiral-shaped duct connecting the radiator with the discharge air opening, and separating means on the duct, the separating means comprising an opening formed in the outer wall of the duct.

  1. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  3. Heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Imig, L.A.; Gardner, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  4. A possible link between North Atlantic cooling and dry events in the core SW monsoon region identified from Lonar Lake in central India: Indication of a connection between solar output and monsoon variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Prasad, S.; Plessen, B.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Basavaiah, N.

    2013-12-01

    Former comparison of climate sensitive proxies from natural archives of the northern monsoon domain with proxy data from mid and high latitude archives have proven a correlation between the proxies of both regions. But still some ambiguities concerning the mechanisms that drive this correlation exist. During our investigation of a sediment core from Lonar Lake in central India, which covers the complete Holocene sedimentation history of the lake, we could identify several phases of centennial scale climate alteration on the basis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, mineralogy, and amino acid derived degradation proxies. These phases correlate with climate sensitive proxies from the North Atlantic region as well as with 14C nuclide production rate, which indicates changes in solar output. The results from this first continuous, high resolution record of Holocene climate history from central India indicate sensitivity of monsoon climate to solar forcing. Additionally, a connection between North Atlantic climate and the climate of a region that is not affected by the Westerlies or shifts of the summer ITCZ to a position south of the investigation site could be identified.

  5. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  6. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  7. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  8. Neutron star cooling and pion condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    1994-01-01

    The nonstandard cooling of a neutron star with the central pion core is explored. By adopting the latest results from the pion condensation theory, neutrino emissivity is calulated for both pure charged pions and a mixture of charged and neutral pions, and the equations of state are constructed for the pion condensate. The effect of superfluidity on cooling is investigated, adopting methods more realistic than in previous studies. Our theoretical models are compared with the currently updated observational data, and possible implications are explored.

  9. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  10. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide

  11. Mars: A New Core-Crystallization Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Max W.; van Westrenen, Wim; Liebske, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The evolution of the martian core is widely assumed to mirror the characteristics observed for Earth’s core. Data from experiments performed on iron-sulfur and iron-nickel-sulfur systems at pressures corresponding to the center of Mars indicate that its core is presently completely liquid and that it will not form an outwardly crystallizing iron-rich inner core, as does Earth. Instead, planetary cooling will lead to core crystallization following either a “snowing-core” model, whereby iron-rich solids nucleate in the outer portions of the core and sink toward the center, or a “sulfide inner-core” model, where an iron-sulfide phase crystallizes to form a solid inner core.

  12. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  13. NASA Microclimate Cooling Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this outline form presentation is to present NASA's challenges in microclimate cooling as related to the spacesuit. An overview of spacesuit flight-rated personal cooling systems is presented, which includes a brief history of cooling systems from Gemini through Space Station missions. The roles of the liquid cooling garment, thermal environment extremes, the sublimator, multi-layer insulation, and helmet visor UV and solar coatings are reviewed. A second section is presented on advanced personal cooling systems studies, which include heat acquisition studies on cooling garments, heat rejection studies on water boiler & radiators, thermal storage studies, and insulation studies. Past and present research and development and challenges are summarized for the advanced studies.

  14. Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    To emphasize energy conservation and low cost energy, the systems of solar heating and cooling are analyzed and compared with fossil fuel systems. The application of solar heating and cooling systems for industrial and domestic use are discussed. Topics of discussion include: solar collectors; space heating; pools and spas; domestic hot water; industrial heat less than 200 F; space cooling; industrial steam; and initial systems cost. A question and answer period is generated which closes out the discussion.

  15. The Industrial Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays; Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of enrichment and moderator zoning methods for optimizing the r-z power distribution within sodium cooled fast reactors. These methods allow overall greater fuel utilization in the core resulting in more fuel being irradiated near the maximum allowed thermal power. The peak-to-average power density was held to 1.18. This core design, in conjunction with a multiple-reheat Brayton power conversion system, has merit for producing an industrial level of electrical output (2400MWth, 1000MWe) from a relatively compact core size. The total core radius, including reflectors and shields, was held to 1.78m. Preliminary safety analysis suggests that positive reactivity insertion resulting from a leak between the sodium primary loop and helium power conversion system can be mitigated using simple gas-liquid centripetal separation strategies in the plant’s primary loop.

  16. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-04-15

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  17. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  18. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  19. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  20. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program is to develop intelligent control and distribution methods for turbine cooling, while achieving a reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. The program also will develop embedded sensor technologies and cooling system models for real-time engine diagnostics and health management. Both active and passive control strategies will be investigated that include the capability of intelligent modulation of flow quantities, pressures, and temperatures both within the supply system and at the turbine component level. Thermal management system concepts were studied, with a goal of reducing HPT blade cooling air supply temperature. An assessment will be made of the use of this air by the active clearance control system as well. Turbine component cooling designs incorporating advanced, high-effectiveness cooling features, will be evaluated. Turbine cooling flow control concepts will be studied at the cooling system level and the component level. Specific cooling features or sub-elements of an advanced HPT blade cooling design will be downselected for core fabrication and casting demonstrations.

  1. A ventilation cooling shirt worn during office work in a hot climate: cool or not?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Kuklane, Kalev; Lundgren, Karin; Gao, Chuansi; Wang, Faming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify whether a ventilation cooling shirt was effective in reducing heat strain in a hot climate. Eight female volunteers were exposed to heat (38 °C, 45% relative humidity) for 2 h with simulated office work. In the first hour they were in normal summer clothes (total thermal insulation 0.8 clo); in the second hour a ventilation cooling shirt was worn on top. After the shirt was introduced for 1 h, the skin temperatures at the scapula and the chest were significantly reduced (p < 0.05). The mean skin and core temperatures were not reduced. The subjects felt cooler and more comfortable by wearing the shirt, but the cooling effect was most conspicuous only during the initial 10 min. The cooling efficiency of the ventilation shirt was not very effective under the low physical activity in this hot climate. PMID:26693998

  2. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  3. Biomedical Application of Aerospace Personal Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which are used by astronauts to alleviate thermal stress during extravehicular activity have been applied to the therapeutic management of multiple sclerosis. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 10 male and female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.22C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' oral and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (P<0.05) lower than during the control period, approx. 0.2 - 0.5C, for both men and women wearing any of the four different garments. The corresponding ear temperatures were significantly (P<0.05) decreased approx.0.2 - 0.4C by the end of the recovery period. Compared to the control period, no significant differences were found in rectal temperatures during cooling and

  4. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  5. The fluffy core of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James H.

    2015-09-01

    Enceladus is well known for its young south polar terrain, observed by Cassini to emit several GW of heat as well as plumes of vapor and ice. The source of this energy is believed to be tidal dissipation. However, the observed south polar heat flux cannot be sustained over the age of the Solar System. Furthermore, thermal evolution models suggest that any global subsurface ocean should freeze on a timescale of tens to hundreds of My, sharply reducing future tidal heating, unless large amounts of antifreeze are present in the ocean. Here I propose an alternative internal structure for Enceladus, in which the silicate core is fragmented, and that the tidal deformation of the core may be partially controlled by interstitial ice. I find that fragmentation of the core increases tidal dissipation by a factor of 20, consistent with the long-term dynamically sustainable level, even when the interior is completely frozen, but only if the interior starts out warm and tidal heating is strong from the beginning. If this is not the case, radioactive heating will be insufficient to prevent the interior from cooling. Although an ocean need not be present in order for the interior to experience significant tidal heating, all models that dissipate enough heat to prevent runaway cooling are also warm enough to have an ocean. Tidal dissipation in the weak core provides an additional source of heat that may prevent a global subsurface ocean from freezing.

  6. Thermomagnetic Mechanism for Self-Cooling Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Medici, Luca

    2016-02-01

    A solid-state mechanism for cooling high-current cables is proposed based on the Ettingshausen effect, i.e., the transverse-thermoelectric cooling generated in magnetic fields. The intense current running in the cable generates a strong magnetic field around it that can be exploited by a small current running in a coating layer made out of a strong "thermomagnetic" material to induce a temperature difference between the cable core and the environment. Both analytical calculations and realistic numerical simulations for the steady state of bismuth coatings in typical magnetic fields are presented. The latter yield temperature drops ≃60 K and >100 K for a single- and double-layer coating, respectively. These encouraging results should stimulate the search for better thermomagnetic materials in view of applications such as self-cooled superconducting cables working at room temperature.

  7. Low gravity exothermic heating/cooling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A low gravity exothermic heating/cooling apparatus is disclosed for processing materials in space which includes an insulated casing and a sample support carried within the casing which support a sample container. An exothermic heat source includes a plurality of segments of exothermic material stacked one upon another to produce a desired temperature profile when ignited. The sample container is arranged within the core of the stacked exothermic heating material. Igniters are spaced vertically along the axis of the heating material to ignite the exothermic material at spaced points to provide total rapid burn and release of heat. To rapidly cool and quench the heat, a source of liquid carbon dixoide is provided which is conveyed through a conduit and a metering orifice into a distribution manifold where the carbon dioxide is gasified and dispersed around the exothermic heating material and the sample container via tubes for rapidly cooling the material sample.

  8. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we

  9. Influence of cooling rate on zirconia/veneer interfacial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Göstemeyer, Gerd; Jendras, Michael; Dittmer, Marc P; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike; Kohorst, Philipp

    2010-12-01

    Slow cooling firing schedules have recently been introduced by some manufacturers to reduce chipping complications in zirconia-based core/veneer composites. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that these firing schedules may influence the bond strength between the zirconia core and veneering ceramic. Four different veneering ceramics recommended for zirconia (Lava Ceram, Triceram, VM9 and Zirox) were fired onto rectangular shaped Y-TZP specimens (Lava Frame) and cooled using a rapid or a slow cooling rate. The resulting bilayer specimens were notched, loaded in a four-point bending test and load-displacement curves were recorded. The critical load to induce stable crack extension at the core/veneer interface was determined, in order to calculate the strain energy release rate (G, Jm⁻²). Additionally, dilatometric measurements of the veneering ceramics were performed to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (α, ppm.K⁻¹) between 50 and 450°C (α₁) and in the temperature region above the glass transition temperature (α₂). Discrepancies between α₂ and α₁ (Δα) were calculated. For all core/veneer compositions G values were lower for the slowly cooled specimens than for the rapidly cooled specimens. Significant differences with respect to the firing schedule were found in the Triceram and VM9 groups (P<0.05). The reductions in G values correlated with Δα. The bond strength between the zirconia core and the veneer decreased with the slow cooling rate. These results indicate that slow cooling of zirconia restorations may increase the risk of adhesive delamination failures between the core and veneer. PMID:20601242

  10. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  11. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  12. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  13. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  14. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  15. Coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  16. District cooling in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B.

    1996-11-01

    This paper will present the status of the development of district cooling systems in Scandinavia over the last 5 years. It will describe the technologies used in the systems that have been constructed as well as the options considered in different locations. It will identify the drivers for the development of the cooling business to-date, and what future drivers for a continuing development of district cooling in Sweden. To-date, approximately 25 different cities of varying sizes have completed feasibility studies to determine if district cooling is an attractive option. In a survey, that was conducted by the Swedish District Heating Association, some 25 cities expected to have district cooling systems in place by the year 2000. In Sweden, district heating systems with hot water is very common. In many cases, it is simply an addition to the current service for the district heating company to also supply district cooling to the building owners. A parallel from this can be drawn to North America where district cooling systems now are developing rapidly. I am convinced that in these cities a district heating service will be added as a natural expansion of the district cooling company`s service.

  17. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  18. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  19. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  20. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  1. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  2. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Berman, Mark J.

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  3. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  4. Turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  6. New sintering process adjusts magnetic value of ferrite cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinal, A. W.

    1964-01-01

    A two-phase sintering technique based on time and temperature permits reversible control of the coercive threshold of sintered ferrite cores. Threshold coercivity may be controlled over a substantial range of values by selective control of the cooling rate.

  7. Emergency cooling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

    1994-01-04

    An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

  8. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  9. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  10. Optimization of evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Bradley, C. C.; Hulet, R. G.

    1997-05-01

    Recent experiments have used forced evaporative cooling to produce Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases. The evaporative cooling process can be optimized to provide the maximum phase-space density with a specified number of atoms remaining. We show that this global optimization is approximately achieved by locally optimizing the cooling efficiency at each instant. We discuss how this method can be implemented, and present the results for our 7Li trap. The predicted behavior of the gas is found to agree well with experiment.

  11. Personal Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Cool Head, a personal cooling system for use in heat stress occupations, is a spinoff of a channeled cooling garment for space wear. It is portable and includes a heat exchanger, control display unit, liquid reservoir and temperature control unit. The user can eliminate 40 to 60 percent of his body's heat storage and lower heart rate by 50 to 80 beats a minute. The system is used by the Army, Navy, crop dusting pilots, heavy equipment operators and auto racing drivers and is marketed by Life Enhancement Technologies, LLC. Further applications are under consideration.

  12. Feedback cooling of currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Sean

    1989-02-01

    Just as feedback can be used to correct errors in the output voltages of amplifiers, it can also be used to remove noise from the current through a resistor. Such a feedback amplifier behaves as a refrigerator cooling the electrons in a resistor connnected to it. This principle has been recognized since the 1940s but has been largely ignored because the cooling power available from such refrigerators is miniscule. It is pointed out here that the method might be practical for cooling the currents in the microscopic circuits that are typical of modern electrical engineering and recent studies in transport physics.

  13. Solar Induced Climate Changes and Cooling of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.

    2011-06-01

    Evidences are given for the cooling effect induced by solar weak cycles. It is forecasted that the coming solar cycle number 24, which has started on January 2008, would be very weak. This cycle would be followed by several weak cycles. Its very start on January 2008 have induced a climate change that forced global cooling, Indeed all global temperature monitors have shown temperature drops. The GISS monitor showed a 0.75°C drop between January 2007 and January 2008. This sharp temperature drop characterizes cooling induced by weak cycles as was evident by historical temperature records. It also happened in the right exact timing of the start of cycle 24. This cooling is real and could last for some time. The cooling well width is location dependant. Last January cooling left many countries in deep freeze. Cooling is very serious and can destroy crops and cause famines. This cooling is instrumentally recorded. This is an appeal to scientists to consider the present cooling seriously, after all the truth ought to be followed. Alert is also given to the reaponsible authorities to work promptly to choose the proper crops that can tolerate the cold otherwise it would be a disaster worldwide.

  14. Hole Cooling Is Much Faster than Electron Cooling in PbSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Spoor, Frank C M; Kunneman, Lucas T; Evers, Wiel H; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2016-01-26

    In semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), charge carrier cooling is in direct competition with processes such as carrier multiplication or hot charge extraction that may improve the light conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Understanding charge carrier cooling is therefore of great interest. We investigate high-energy optical transitions in PbSe QDs using hyperspectral transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe bleaching of optical transitions involving higher valence and conduction bands upon band edge excitation. The kinetics of rise of the bleach of these transitions after a pump laser pulse allow us to monitor, for the first time, cooling of hot electrons and hot holes separately. Our results show that holes cool significantly faster than electrons in PbSe QDs. This is in contrast to the common assumption that electrons and holes behave similarly in Pb chalcogenide QDs and has important implications for the utilization of hot charge carriers in photovoltaic devices. PMID:26654878

  15. Recent climate tendencies on an East Antarctic ice shelf inferred from a shallow firn core network

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, E; Anschütz, H; Divine, D; Martma, T; Sinisalo, A; Altnau, S; Isaksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Nearly three decades of stable isotope ratios and surface mass balance (SMB) data from eight shallow firn cores retrieved at Fimbul Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, in the Austral summers 2009–2011 have been investigated. An additional longer core drilled in 2000/2001 extends the series back to the early eighteenth century. Isotope ratios and SMB from the stacked record of all cores were also related to instrumental temperature data from Neumayer Station on Ekström Ice Shelf. Since the second half of the twentieth century, the SMB shows a statistically significant negative trend, whereas the δ18O of the cores shows a significant positive trend. No trend is found in air temperature at the nearest suitable weather station, Neumayer (available since 1981). This does not correspond to the statistically significant positive trend in Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index, which is usually associated with a cooling of East Antarctica. SAM index and SMB are negatively correlated, which might be explained by a decrease in meridional exchange of energy and moisture leading to lower precipitation amounts. Future monitoring of climate change on the sensitive Antarctic ice shelves is necessary to assess its consequences for sea level change. Key Points Mass balance and stable oxygen isotope ratios from shallow firn cores Decreasing trend in surface mass balance, no trend in stable isotopes Negative correlation between SAM and SMB PMID:25821663

  16. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  17. Sisyphus cooling of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Kim, Geena; Joshi, Trinity; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Tiarks, Daniel; Müller, Holger

    2014-02-01

    Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a wide range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 μK, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single-photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency-locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali-metal species.

  18. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  19. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  20. Too cool to work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, Xavier; Defay, Emmanuel; Heine, Volker; Mathur, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetocaloric and electrocaloric effects are driven by doing work, but this work has barely been explored, even though these caloric effects are being exploited in a growing number of prototype cooling devices.

  1. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  2. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  3. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  4. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  5. Liquid cooled helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, William (Inventor); Williams, Bill A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Liquid cooled helmet comprising a cap of flexible material adapted to fit the head of a person, cooling panels mounted inside the cap forming passageways for carrying a liquid coolant, the panels being positioned to engage the cranium and neck of a person wearing the helmet, inlet and outlet lines communicating with the passageways, and releasable straps for securing the helmet about the neck of the wearer.

  6. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  7. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  8. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  9. Shape optimization of a sodium cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Damien; Allaire, Grégoire; Pantz, Olivier; Pozin, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Traditional designs of sodium cooled fast reactors have a positive sodium expansion feedback. During a loss of flow transient without scram, sodium heating and boiling thus insert a positive reactivity and prevents the power from decreasing. Recent studies led at CEA, AREVA and EDF show that cores with complex geometries can feature a very low or even a negative sodium void worth.(1, 2) Usual optimization methods for core conception are based on a parametric description of a given core design(3).(4) New core concepts and shapes can then only be found by hand. Shape optimization methods have proven very efficient in the conception of optimal structures under thermal or mechanical constraints.(5, 6) First studies show that these methods could be applied to sodium cooled core conception.(7) In this paper, a shape optimization method is applied to the conception of a sodium cooled fast reactor core with low sodium void worth. An objective function to be minimized is defined. It includes the reactivity change induced by a 1% sodium density decrease. The optimization variable is a displacement field changing the core geometry from one shape to another. Additionally, a parametric optimization of the plutonium content distribution of the core is made, so as to ensure that the core is kept critical, and that the power shape is flat enough. The final shape obtained must then be adjusted to a get realistic core layout. Its caracteristics can be checked with reference neutronic codes such as ERANOS. Thanks to this method, new shapes of reactor cores could be inferred, and lead to new design ideas.

  10. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  11. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  12. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  13. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOEpatents

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  14. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  15. A cooling water system copper corrosion study

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkrabek, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    The plant has four units that have been operating normally for 12--33 years. Two of the units are 70 MW sister units that have copper alloy once-through condensers. The other two units are 350 MW and 500 MW units with copper alloy condensers and cooling towers. No cooling water related tube leaks had been experienced. Until 1993, the only chemicals used were sulfuric acid for pH control of the cooling tower systems and chlorine for biological control. The units were chlorinated for one hour per day per condenser. In early July 1992, their copper grab sample at the plant discharge to the river exceeded the weekly environmental limit. In fact, it was so high that there was a slim chance of coming in under their monthly average copper limit unless something was done quickly. The result of this incident was an extensive study of their plant wastewater and cooling systems. The study revealed that the elevated copper problem had existed sporadically for several years. Initially, copper control was achieved by altering the wastewater treatment processes and cooling tower blowdown flow path. Two extended trials, one with tolyltriazole (TTA) and one with a chemically modified benzotriazole (BZT) were performed. Optimal control of copper corrosion was eventually achieved by the application of a TTA treatment program in which the feed rates are adjusted based on on-line corrosion monitoring measurements. This report documents experiences and results over the past six years.

  16. Supplemental Cooling for Nitrate Salt Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Mitchell S.

    2015-08-19

    In July 2015, Los Alamos National Laboratory completed installation of a supplemental cooling system in the structure where remediated nitrate salt waste drums are stored. Although the waste currently is in a safe configuration and is monitored daily,controlling the temperature inside the structure adds another layer of protection for workers, the public,and the environment.This effort is among several layers of precautions designed to secure the waste.

  17. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, Attilio; Dumberry, Mathieu; Van Hoolst, Tim; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is less steep than the core melting temperature, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steepper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first cross the melting temperature near the core mantle boundary and produce iron-rich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, top down crystallization is expected to generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection. In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials.

  18. Extending the life of water-cooled copper cooling fingers for furnace refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Gabriel; Utigard, Torstein A.; Plascencia, Gabriel; Jaramillo, David

    2005-10-01

    To extend the service life of refractory linings in high-temperature furnaces, it is becoming common to embed copper cooling devices in the lining. These devices extract enough heat from the hearth of the furnace to freeze a protective thin layer of slag onto the surface of the lining. However, the cooling devices may lose their efficiency over time. It is believed that high-temperature oxidation of copper is responsible for the loss in heat-extraction capacity. To test coolers under severe conditions, immersion tests were carried out in molten matte and slag of laboratory-scale cooling elements protected by various means. A composite cooler was developed that consists of a copper core shielded by a Cu-4 wt.% Al alloy sheet. Although the rate of heat extraction is not as high as that of the un-alloyed copper, this cooler still extracts heat at a very high rate.

  19. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  20. Limb cooling with targeted arterial infusion of cold fluid alleviates scald injury: an experimental rabbit study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hao; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhou, Qin; He, Fei; Yu, Min; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Ximing; Xu, Zhigang; Hou, Hongyi; Hu, Dahai

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the cooling and healing effect of different modalities: Hydrogel dressing® was compared with targeted artery injection of low temperature liquid as a coolant following application to a fresh deep partial thickness hot water scald in a rabbit hind limb model. Materials and methods: Fifty five rabbits were randomly divided into 5 groups. Treatment group received femoral artery injection of low temperature liquid and hydrogel dressing post burn 30 min or 1 hour. Control group were just scalded. Subcutaneous (Tu) and deep mussel temperatures (Tm) were continually monitored in all wounds. After scald the rectal temperature were detected within 6 hours. The wounds were biopsied for histological assessment at 72 h and 3 weeks. Results: Effective cooling of the burn wound and an increased rate of wound healing was achieved by both treatment methods. The final temperature at 1h decreased to the preburn temperature. Compared with hydrogel dressing group (Tm decreased by 1.3 ± 0.4°C), Tm decreased by 2.8 ± 0.3°C in femoral artery injection group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Artery injection of low temperature liquid and hydrogel dressing almost exert no influence on rabbit core temperature. Clinical and histological assessment at 21 days indicated more rapid healing in both the 30 min hydrogel dressing and artery injection burns compared with the controls and the 60 minutes intervention groups. Conclusion: This result indicates artery injection of low temperature liquid earlier to cooling limb is an effective means to reduce residual heat damage tissue without affect core temperature and increase wound healing. PMID:25356176

  1. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  2. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  3. Sewage Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Every U.S. municipality must determine how much waste water it is processing and more importantly, how much is going unprocessed into lakes and streams either because of leaks in the sewer system or because the city's sewage facilities were getting more sewer flow than they were designed to handle. ADS Environmental Services, Inc.'s development of the Quadrascan Flow Monitoring System met the need for an accurate method of data collection. The system consists of a series of monitoring sensors and microcomputers that continually measure water depth at particular sewer locations and report their findings to a central computer. This provides precise information to city managers on overall flow, flow in any section of the city, location and severity of leaks and warnings of potential overload. The core technology has been expanded upon in terms of both technical improvements, and functionality for new applications, including event alarming and control for critical collection system management problems.

  4. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  5. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  6. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  7. Exciton and carrier dynamics in ZnTe-Zn1 -xMgxTe core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymura, M.; Kłopotowski, Ł.; Mitioglu, A. A.; Wojnar, P.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Maude, D. K.; Plochocka, P.; Kossut, J.

    2016-04-01

    We employ time-resolved photoluminescence combined with scanning electron microscopy and modeling to evaluate the lifetimes of excitons and free carriers in core-shell ZnTe -Zn1 -xMgxTe nanowires. We find that electron tunneling through the shell to the surface controls the decay dynamics. The photoluminescence of single nanowires reveals contributions from an electron-hole plasma. The analysis of its temporal behavior allows one to extract the carrier and exciton lifetimes and monitor the cooling dynamics. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the electrons tunnel out before they cool down or bind into excitons. A semiclassical model allows us to extract the contributions of tunneling and recombination to the photoluminescence decay. We find that the recombination time shortens with increasing temperature as a result of an activation of a phonon-assisted nonradiative process.

  8. Effects of regolith/megaregolith insulation on the cooling histories of differentiated asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Henning; Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Warren, Paul H.

    1990-01-01

    The cooling histories of differentiated asteroids are calculated employing a variety of thermal-conductivity structures to simulate the potential insulating effects of regolith and megaregolith layers on the cooling rate. It was found that a combination of relatively thick megaregolith and regolith can potentially reduce the core cooling rate by more than a factor of 10 below the rate predicted by models with conventional thermal conductivity structure. Thus, differences in cratering (regolith production) histories may have resulted in radically different cooling rates for asteroids of similar radius, or in similar cooling rates from asteroids of different radius.

  9. Effects of regolith/megaregolith insulation on the cooling histories of differentiated asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, H.; Rasmussen, K. L.; Warren, P. H.

    1990-04-01

    The cooling histories of differentiated asteroids are calculated employing a variety of thermal-conductivity structures to simulate the potential insulating effects of regolith and megaregolith layers on the cooling rate. It was found that a combination of relatively thick megaregolith and regolith can potentially reduce the core cooling rate by more than a factor of 10 below the rate predicted by models with conventional thermal conductivity structure. Thus, differences in cratering (regolith production) histories may have resulted in radically different cooling rates for asteroids of similar radius, or in similar cooling rates from asteroids of different radius.

  10. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  11. Cyclic cooling algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Florian; Mahler, Guenter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-09-15

    We introduce a scheme to perform the cooling algorithm, first presented by Boykin et al. in 2002, for an arbitrary number of times on the same set of qbits. We achieve this goal by adding an additional SWAP gate and a bath contact to the algorithm. This way one qbit may repeatedly be cooled without adding additional qbits to the system. By using a product Liouville space to model the bath contact we calculate the density matrix of the system after a given number of applications of the algorithm.

  12. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  14. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  15. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  17. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  18. Preliminary requirements for a Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, M.; Forsberg, C.; Forget, B.; Hu, L. W.

    2012-07-01

    A Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) design is being developed at MIT to provide the first demonstration and test of a salt-cooled reactor using high-temperature fuel. The first step is to define the requirements. The top level requirements are (1) provide the confidence that a larger demonstration reactor is warranted and (2) develop the necessary data for a larger-scale reactor. Because requirements will drive the design of the FHTR, a significant effort is being undertaken to define requirements and understand the tradeoffs that will be required for a practical design. The preliminary requirements include specifications for design parameters and necessary tests of major reactor systems. Testing requirements include demonstration of components, systems, and procedures for refueling, instrumentation, salt temperature control to avoid coolant freezing, salt chemistry and volume control, tritium monitoring and control, and in-service inspection. Safety tests include thermal hydraulics, neutronics - including intrinsic core shutdown mechanisms such as Doppler feedback - and decay heat removal systems. Materials and coolant testing includes fuels (including mechanical wear and fatigue) and system corrosion behavior. Preliminary analysis indicates a thermal power output below 30 MW, an initial core using pebble-bed or prismatic-block fuel, peak outlet temperatures of at least 700 deg. C, and use of FLi{sup 7}Be ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}) coolant. The option to change-out the reactor core, fuel type, and major components is being investigated. While the FHTR will be used for materials testing, its primary mission is as a reactor system performance test to enable the design and licensing of a FHR demonstration power reactor. (authors)

  19. Means and method for facilitating measurements while coring

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, F.L.; Barnum, D.C.; Corea, W.C.

    1986-07-22

    This patent describes an apparatus for monitoring detrimental conditions associated with extraction of a core from an earth formation penetrated by a well bore using a core barrel having a rotatable outer cylindrical barrel attached to and operationally rotated by, a drill string, and drilling fluid circulating within the well bore as the core is extracted, wherein rotation of a usually stationary inner core barrel coaxial of the outer core barrel during the extraction of the core and its placement thereof within the cylindrical inner barrel, is used to indicate the associated detrimental coring conditions.

  20. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  1. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  2. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  3. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  4. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  5. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  6. Deep mine cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Conan, J.

    1984-11-06

    A deep mine cooling system comprising a compressor supplied with air and rotatively driven by a motor and an expansion turbine supplied with compressed air from said compressor and driving an actuating unit, wherein the compressed air, after leaving the compressor but prior to reaching the expansion turbine, passes through a steam generator whose output provides the energy required to operate an absorption refrigeration machine used to cool utility water for mining, said compressed air on leaving the steam generator going to a first heat exchanger in which it yields calories to a water circuit comprising a second heat exchanger, said second heat exchanger giving off the calories absorbed by the water in the first heat exchanger to the air fed by the second heat exchanger to a drying cell that is regenerated by said air from the second heat exchanger, said drying cell being part of a set of two cells working in alternation, the other cell in the set receiving the compressed air from the first heat exchanger, such that the compressed air is fed to said expansion turbine after leaving said drying unit, and wherein the air exhausted from said expansion turbine is sent to a third heat exchanger after which it is distributed according to the needs of the mine, said third exchanger being traversed by the water collected in the mine, cooled in said exchanger and circulated upon leaving said exchanger to meet the cool water requirements of the mine.

  7. Elementary stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  8. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  9. COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

  10. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  11. Laser cooling of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2010-08-01

    Laser cooling of solids, sometimes also known as optical refrigeration, is a fast developing area of optical science, investigating the interaction of light with condensed matter. Apart from being of fundamental scientific interest, this topic addresses a very important practical issue: design and construction of laser pumped solid-state cryocoolers, which are compact, free from mechanical vibrations, moving parts, fluids and can cause only low electromagnetic interference in the cooled area. The optical cryocooler has a broad area of applications such as in the development of magnetometers for geophysical sensors, in biomedical sensing and can be beneficial for satellite instrumentations and small sensors, where compactness and the lack of vibrations are very important. Simply, a laser cooler works on the conversion of low energy pump photons into high-energy anti-Stokes fluorescence photons by extracting some of the phonons (heat energy) in a material. That is, the process of laser cooling of solids is based on anti-Stokes fluorescence also known as luminescence upconversion, when light quanta in the red tail of the absorption spectrum are absorbed from a pump laser, and blue-shifted photons are spontaneously emitted. The extra energy extracted from the solid-state lattice in the form of the phonons is the quanta of vibrational energy which generates heat. The idea to cool solids with anti-Stokes fluorescence was proposed in 1929 by Peter Pringsheim and first demonstrated experimentally by Epstein's research team in 1995. In 1999, Steven Bowman proposed to use the optical refrigeration by anti-Stokes fluorescence within the laser medium to balance the heat generated by the Stokes shifted stimulated emission in a high-power solid-state bulk laser. Such a laser without internal heating named radiation-balanced or athermal laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in 2002. At the present time laser cooling of solids can be largely divided into three

  12. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization régime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.; Rivoldini, A.

    2014-04-01

    Geodetic observations provide insights about the interior structure of Mercury. In particular, they constrain the radius of the core-mantle boundary and on the bulk densities of the core and mantle [5, 3]. Here, we show that they also yield information about the radius of the inner core and on the crystallization regime in the liquid core. Recently, the MESSENGER spacecraft has measured Mercury's internally generated magnetic field and shown that the magnetic field is about two orders of magnitude smaller than Earth's [4]. Dynamo models that agree with those observations require a magnetic field that is driven by chemical convection and generated in a thin spherical shell located deep inside the fluid core that is overlain by a stable thermallystratified layer [1]. We have build models of Mercury that include a sub-adiabatic temperature profile in the upper part of the liquid core. In those models, the dominant light element inside the core is sulfur. Unlike the Earth, upon cooling the core adiabat may first cross the liquidus near the core-mantle boundary resulting in the precipitation of solid iron snow from the liquid Fe - FeS liquid alloy. Cooling extends the precipitation zone to greater depth and produces a stable compositional gradient [2]. Depending on the thermal state of the core the snow zone could extent to the inner core boundary. In that case the inner core would grow through the sedimentation of solid iron snow. If, somewhere below the snow layer, the temperature crosses the liquidus, then inner core growth will proceed in an Earth-like manner. Our study shows that models that best agree with recently measured geodesy observations (88 - day libration and polar moment of inertia) require an inner core that is not larger than 1325 ± 250km. If the inner core radius is smaller than about 650km they have an iron snow layer in the upper part of the fluid core, consistent with a deep seated dynamo. However, if the inner core radius is larger than about 650

  13. A portable personal cooling system for mine rescue operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B.; Williams, B.; Kirk, P.; Elkins, W.; Stein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Design of a portable personal cooling system to reduce physiological stress in high-temperature, high-humidity conditions is discussed. The system, based on technology used in the thermal controls of space suits, employs a combination of head and thoracic insulation and cooling through a heat sink unit. Average metabolic rates, heart rates, rectal temperature increase and sweat loss were monitored for test subjects wearing various configurations of the cooling system, as well as for a control group. The various arrangements of the cooling garment were found to provide significant physiological benefits; however, increases in heat transfer rate of the cooling unit and more effective insulation are suggested to improve the system's function.

  14. Pallasite paleomagnetism: Quiescence of a core dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Claire I. O.; Bryson, James F. J.; Herrero-Albillos, Julia; Kronast, Florian; Nimmo, Francis; Harrison, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    Recent paleomagnetic studies of two Main Group pallasites, the Imilac and Esquel, have found evidence for a strong, late-stage magnetic field on the parent body. It has been hypothesized that this magnetic field was generated by a core dynamo, driven by compositional convection during core solidification. Cooling models suggest that the onset of core solidification occurred ∼200 Ma after planetary accretion. Prior to core solidification, a core dynamo may have been generated by thermal convection; however a thermal dynamo is predicted to be short-lived, with a duration of ∼10 Ma to ∼40 Ma after planetary accretion. These models predict, therefore, a period of quiescence between the thermally driven dynamo and the compositionally driven dynamo, when no core dynamo should be active. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the magnetic remanence recorded by the Marjalahti and Brenham pallasites, which based on cooling-rate data locked in any magnetic field signals present ∼95 Ma to ∼135 Ma after planetary accretion, before core solidification began. The cloudy zone, a region of nanoscale tetrataenite islands within a Fe-rich matrix was imaged using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. The recovered distribution of magnetisation within the cloudy zone suggests that the Marjalahti and Brenham experienced a very weak magnetic field, which may have been induced by a crustal remanence, consistent with the predicted lack of an active core dynamo at this time. We show that the transition from a quiescent period to an active, compositionally driven dynamo has a distinctive paleomagnetic signature, which may be a crucial tool for constraining the time of core solidification on differentiated bodies, including Earth.

  15. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters. PMID:27464191

  16. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  17. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  18. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  19. Development and analysis for core power gamma thermometer adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren-Tai Chiang; Leong, T.

    1996-12-31

    The gamma thermometer (GT) has gained increasing interest to replace the local power range monitor (LPRM) and the traversing in-core probe (TIP) as the core monitoring device in new boiling water reactor (BWR) designs. The number of GTs is designed between the number of LPRMs, 4, and the number of TIPs, 24, per string, but its optimal number is yet to be determined. The authors have modified the BWR core Simulator PANACEA for analyzing the core power GT adaptation and have compared the axial core-averaged relative power distributions and two thermal limits of the GT 8- and 12-point adaptations against those of the TIP 24-point adaptation.

  20. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  1. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  2. EXPOSED LONG-LIFETIME FIRST CORE: A NEW MODEL OF FIRST CORES BASED ON RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.j E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.j

    2010-12-20

    A first adiabatic core is a transient object formed in the early phase of star formation. The observation of a first core is believed to be difficult because of its short lifetime and low luminosity. On the basis of radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we propose a novel theoretical model of first cores, the Exposed Long-lifetime First core (ELF). In the very low-mass molecular core, the first core evolves slowly and lives longer than 10,000 years because the accretion rate is considerably low. The evolution of ELFs is different from that of ordinary first cores because radiation cooling has a significant effect there. We also carry out a radiation-transfer calculation of dust-continuum emission from ELFs to predict their observational properties. ELFs have slightly fainter but similar spectral energy distributions to ordinary first cores in radio wavelengths, therefore they can be observed. Although the probabilities that such low-mass cores become gravitationally unstable and start to collapse are low, we still can expect that a considerable number of ELFs can be formed because there are many low-mass molecular cloud cores in star-forming regions that could be progenitors of ELFs.

  3. MODULAR CORE UNITS FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Gage, J.F. Jr.; Sherer, D.B.

    1964-04-01

    A modular core unit for use in a nuclear reactor is described. Many identical core modules can be placed next to each other to make up a complete core. Such a module includes a cylinder of moderator material surrounding a fuel- containing re-entrant coolant channel. The re-entrant channel provides for the circulation of coolant such as liquid sodium from one end of the core unit, through the fuel region, and back out through the same end as it entered. Thermal insulation surrounds the moderator exterior wall inducing heat to travel inwardly to the coolant channel. Spaces between units may be used to accommodate control rods and support structure, which may be cooled by a secondary gas coolant, independently of the main coolant. (AEC)

  4. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  5. Electron Cooling of Bunched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, T.; Noda, K.; Syresin, E.; Meshkov, I.; Shibuya, S.

    2006-03-20

    Experiments of electron cooling have been done with the HIMAC synchrotron in NIRS. Limitation on cooled beam-sizes in longitudianl and transverse spaces were measured. The effect of space-charge field and intra-beam scattering are investigated.

  6. Maintaining gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.D.

    1997-05-01

    An often overlooked key to satisfactory operation and longevity of any mechanical device is proper operation and maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer`s written instructions. Absorption chillers, although they use a different technology than the more familiar vapor compression cycle to produce chilled water, operate successfully in a variety of applications if operated and maintained properly. Maintenance procedures may be more frequent than those required for vapor compression chillers, but they are also typically less complex. The goal of this article is to describe the basic operation of an absorption chiller to provide an understanding of the relatively simple tasks required to keep the machine operating at maximum efficiency for its design life and beyond. A good starting point is definitions. Gas cooling equipment is generally defined as alternative energy, non-electric cooling products. This includes absorption chillers, engine-drive chillers and packaged desiccant units, among others. Natural gas combustion drives the equipment.

  7. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  8. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  9. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  10. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  11. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  12. Computing Cooling Flows in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm developed for calculating both quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool turbine and resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into gas stream. Program intended for use with axial-flow, air-breathing, jet-propulsion engines with variety of airfoil-cooling configurations. Algorithm results compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk-metal temperatures and cooling configurations. Program written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  13. Cooled thin metal liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, George P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A first metal sheet (34) has openings (46) in registration with depressions (40) in a second contacting metal sheet (36). Each depression has a downstream wall (42) at an angle of 24.degree. from the plane of the sheets. A metering hole (56) in the depression amidst cooling air in a direction to first impinge against an overlaying portion (48) of the first plate, before it diffuses along the downstream wall.

  14. Cooling your home naturally

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

  15. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  16. Project S'COOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.

    1998-01-01

    The Students Clouds Observations On-Line or S'COOL project was piloted in 1997. It was created with the idea of using students to serve as one component of the validation for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument which was launched with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997. As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise CERES is interested in the role clouds play in regulating our climate. Over thirty schools became involved in the initial thrust of the project. The CERES instrument detects the location of clouds and identifies their physical properties. S'COOL students coordinate their ground truth observations with the exact overpass of the satellite at their location. Their findings regarding cloud type, height, fraction and opacity as well as surface conditions are then reported to the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data is then accessible to both the CERES team for validation and to schools for educational application via the Internet. By March of 1998 ninety-three schools, in nine countries had enrolled in the S'COOL project. Joining the United States participants were from schools in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The project is gradually becoming the global project envisioned by the project s creators. As students obtain the requested data useful for the scientists, it was hoped that students with guidance from their instructors would have opportunity and motivation to learn more about clouds and atmospheric science as well.

  17. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  18. Water-Cooled Optical Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menna, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    Water-cooled optical probe measures temperature of nearby radiating object. Intended primarily for use in silicon-growing furnace for measuring and controlling temperatures of silicon ribbon, meniscus, cartridge surfaces, heaters, or other parts. Cooling water and flushing gas cool fiber-optic probe and keep it clean. Fiber passes thermal radiation from observed surface to measuring instrument.

  19. Monitoring of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, James A.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1981-01-01

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  20. Ultrasonic and acoustic emission results from the Stripa heater experiments. Part I. Cross-hole investigation of a rock mass subjected to heating. Part II. Acoustic emission monitoring during cool-down of the Stripa heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.; Rachiele, R.

    1980-12-01

    A cross-hole high-frequency acoustic investigation of a granitic rock mass subjected to sustained heating is reported. Compressional and shear-wave velocity measurements along four different paths between four vertical boreholes were made prior to turning on the heater, during 398 days of heating, and after the heater was turned off. These measurements correlated well with the presence of fracture zones, in which the fractures were closed by thermal expansion of the rock upon heating. When the rock mass cooled, the velocity measurements indicated a greater intensity of fracturing than had existed before heating. Laboratory compressional and shear-wave velocity measurements were also made on intact rock specimens obtained from the site and subjected to axial stress. When used to interpret the increases in velocities measured in the field upon heating the rock mass, these measurements implied increases in horizontal normal stresses to between 30 and 40 MPa. Increases in these magnitudes agree with stress measurements made by the other techniques. The ratio of measured compressional to shear-wave velocity appears to provide a sensitive measure of the fraction of crack porosity containing water or gas.

  1. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  2. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  3. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  4. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, M O; Rau, G C; Andersen, M S; Roshan, H; Rutlidge, H; Marjo, C E; Markowska, M; Jex, C N; Graham, P W; Mariethoz, G; Acworth, R I; Baker, A

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ(18)O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  5. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  6. Infrared thermography of dropwise evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Michael; di Marzo, Marino; Sirkis, James

    1992-01-01

    An infrared thermographic technique is developed to obtain the transient solid surface temperature distribution in the neighborhood of an evaporating droplet. This technique is nonintrusive and is not affected by the time response of the measuring device (i.e., thermocouple). The entire surface is monitored at any instant of time, and information on the area influenced by the evaporative cooling process is easily derived. A detailed description of the image processing based data reduction is provided. A water droplet in the range of 10-50 microliter is deposited on an opaque glasslike material that has an initial surface temperature between 100 and 165 deg C. The evaporative cooling process is fully documented, and these new findings are contrasted with the published literature to gain a better understanding of the phenomena involved.

  7. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  8. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  9. Measurement of the Radiative Cooling Coefficient of Krypton Gas in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Goldstein, W. H.; Pacella, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Gabellieri, L.; Leigheb, M.; de Angelis, R.; May, M. J.; Regan, S. P.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    1997-11-01

    For future fusion reactors, a careful balance must be achieved between the cooling of the outer plasma via impurity radiation and the deleterious effects of inevitable core penetration by impurity ions. We extract the krypton impurity radial profile and the radiative cooling rate for krypton gas in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU). The measured bolometric, soft x-ray and visible bremmstrhalung signals are Abel inverted and then incorporated in an analytic model. Using the known (calculated) ionization state distribution, the radial power loss profile for krypton is derived. Anamolous transport is assumed to have a negligible affect on the total krypton radiation profile; this assumption is confirmed using the derived krypton radiation rate in a plasma transport modeling code. The level of intrinsic impurities (Mo, Cr, Mn and Fe) in the plasma during the krypton puffing is monitored with a VUV SPRED spectrometer. Models for krypton emissivity from the literature are compared to our measured results. These initial results are part of a multiwavelength impurity spectroscopy campaign that will measure transport profiles and basic atomic data in the FTU. Work carried out under the auspices of the U.S. DoE, Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  10. A core dynamo in Vesta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, M.; Federico, C.; De Angelis, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Magni, G.

    2016-05-01

    A recent study of Fu et al. analysed the remaining magnetization in the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001, which mostly likely has been produced during the cooling phase of the life of the asteroid Vesta, arguing that an ancient dynamo in the advective liquid metallic core could be set in. Using petrographic and paleomagnetic arguments, Fu et al. estimated a surface magnetic field of at least 2 μT. In this work, we verify the possibility that an early core dynamo took place in Vesta by analysing four different possible fully differentiated configurations of Vesta, characterized by different chondritic compositions, with the constraints on core size and density provided by Ermakov et al. We only incorporate the thermal convection, by neglecting the effects of the compositional convection, so our results in terms of magnetic Reynolds number and duration of the dynamo can be interpreted as a lower bound. The presence of a magnetic field would make Vesta a peculiar object of the Solar system, a `small-Earth', since it has also a differentiated structure like Earth and the magnetic field has preserved Vesta from the space weathering.

  11. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  12. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, D.

    2012-07-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  13. Particles generation and cooling of pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryvdyk, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    The generation of secondary particles (neutrinos, neutrons, electrons, protons, mesons) and gamma-ray photons because of nuclear interactions in magnetospheres of pulsars and magnetars are considered. By means of the nuclear interactions, the primarily accelerated electrons and protons in the pulsar magnetosphere will be generated secondary particles and photons, which will also generate particles and gamma-ray photons by cascading interactions. Namely from these particles and photons, which arise because of multiple interactions, and will consist of the pulsar magnetosphere. It is important that in pulsar magnetosphere will generate the powerful flux of neutral particles (neutrons) and a neutrino that do not interact with the magnetic field and are free to go out with her, bringing out energy and cooling magnetosphere. So, we obtain a powerful new channel cooling pulsar magnetosphere. This is a new result, which shows that cooling of pulsar and magnetars is not only a result of the processes generating neutrinos in the inner core, but also due to the generation of neutrino and neutrons in the pulsar magnetosphere and subsequently their exit in the interstellar environment.

  14. Emergency cooling analysis for the loss of coolant malfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    This report examines the dynamic response of a conceptual space power fast-spectrum lithium cooled reactor to the loss of coolant malfunction and several emergency cooling concepts. The results show that, following the loss of primary coolant, the peak temperatures of the center most 73 fuel elements can range from 2556 K to the region of the fuel melting point of 3122 K within 3600 seconds after the start of the accident. Two types of emergency aftercooling concepts were examined: (1) full core open loop cooling and (2) partial core closed loop cooling. The full core open loop concept is a one pass method of supplying lithium to the 247 fuel pins. This method can maintain fuel temperature below the 1611 K transient damage limit but requires a sizable 22,680-kilogram auxiliary lithium supply. The second concept utilizes a redundant internal closed loop to supply lithium to only the central area of each hexagonal fuel array. By using this method and supplying lithium to only the triflute region, fuel temperatures can be held well below the transient damage limit.

  15. Legionella in cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Witherell, L E; Novick, L F; Stone, K M; Duncan, R W; Orciari, L A; Kappel, S J; Jillson, D A

    1986-01-01

    Legionellosis (Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever) outbreaks have been associated with aerosols ejected from contaminated cooling towers--wet-type heat rejection units (WTHRUs) used to dissipate unwanted heat into the atmosphere. The Vermont Department of Health undertook a program to inventory, inspect, and sample all WTHRUs in Vermont from April 1981 to April 1982. All WTHRUs were sampled for Legionella pneumophila and data were obtained for location, design, construction, and operating characteristics. Of the 184 WTHRUs operating, statistical analyses were performed on those 130 which were sampled for L. pneumophila only once during the study period. Of these, 11 (8.5%) were positive for L. pneumophila. Sources of makeup water and period of operation had significant association with the recovery of L. pneumophila. Five out of 92 towers (5.4%) utilizing surface water sources for cooling were positive for L. pneumophila, in contrast to 6 positive towers of the 38 units (15.8%) which obtained makeup water from ground water sources (p = .054 by chi-square test). Nearly 15% of the 54 units which operated throughout the year were positive, compared to less than 4% of the 76 towers operating seasonally (p = .03 by chi-square test). The mean pH of the cooling water in units where L. pneumophila was recovered (8.3) was significantly higher than the mean pH of 7.9 in units testing negative (p less than .05 by t-test). In addition, the mean log-transformed turbidity of positive towers, 0.03 nephelometric units (ntu), was significantly lower than the mean of log turbidity of negative towers, 0.69 ntu (p less than .02 by t-test). PMID:10281778

  16. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  17. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  18. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  19. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  20. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.