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Sample records for core junctions modelling

  1. Modelling of crack deflection at core junctions in sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Andreasen, J. H.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2009-08-01

    The paper treats the problem of crack propagation in sandwich panels with interior core junctions. When a face-core interface crack approaches a trimaterial wedge, as it may occur at a sandwich core junction, two options exist for further crack advance; one is for the interface crack to penetrate the wedge along the face-core interface, and the second is deflection along the core junction interface. Crack deflection is highly relevant and a requirement for the functionality of a newly developed peel stopper for sandwich structures. The physical model presented in this paper enables the quantitative prediction of the ratio of the toughnesses of the two wedge interfaces required to control the crack propagation, and the derived results can be applied directly in future designs of sandwich structures. The solution strategy is based on finite element analysis (FEA), and a realistic engineering practice example of a tri-material composition corresponding to face and core materials is presented.

  2. Localised Effects in Sandwich Structures with Internal Core Junctions:Modelling and Experimental Characterisation of Load Response, Failure and Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Martin; Thomsen, Ole Thybo

    The objective is to provide an overview of the mechanisms which determine the occurrence and severity of localized bending effects in sandwich structures. It is known from analytical and numerical modelling that local effects lead to an increase of the face bending stresses as well as the core shear and transverse normal stresses. The modelling and experimental characterisation of local effects in sandwich structures will be addressed based on the simple and generic case of sandwich structures with internal core junctions under general shear, bending and in-plane loading conditions. The issue of failure and fatigue phenomena induced by the presence of core junctions will be discussed in detail, with the inclusion of recent theoretical and experimental results.

  3. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-Macarthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-04-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry.

  4. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  5. Nanooptics of Plasmonic Nanomatryoshkas: Shrinking the Size of a Core-Shell Junction to Subnanometer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Zapata, Mario; Xiong, Min; Liu, Zhonghui; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Hong; Borisov, Andrei G; Gu, Hongchen; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier; Ye, Jian

    2015-10-14

    Quantum effects in plasmonic systems play an important role in defining the optical response of structures with subnanometer gaps. Electron tunneling across the gaps can occur, altering both the far-field optical response and the near-field confinement and enhancement. In this study, we experimentally and theoretically investigate plasmon coupling in gold "nanomatryoshka" (NM) nanoparticles with different core-shell separations. Plasmon coupling effects between the core and the shell become significant when their separation decreases to 15 nm. When their separation decreases to below 1 nm, the near- and far-field properties can no longer be described by classical approaches but require the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects such as electron transport through the self-assembled monolayer of molecular junction. In addition, surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements indicate strong electron-transport induced charge transfer across the molecular junction. Our quantum modeling provides an estimate for the AC conductances of molecules in the junction. The insights acquired from this work pave the way for the development of novel quantum plasmonic devices and substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  6. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  7. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  8. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  9. PbOx/Au-Pd core-shell structures for Schottky junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipal B.; Chauhan, Khushbu R.; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2014-03-01

    Since the beginning of the era of third generation solar cells, researchers are motivated to explore various semiconductor-metal configurations for the efficient solar energy conversion. We first time report the use of non-stoichiometric PbOx electrodes in the Schottky junction solar cell. This metal oxide makes an efficient Schottky junction with the high work function alloy of Au-Pd. It was found that thin films of anodized lead metal prepared via potential pulse technique result in the nanowall assemblies. When a few nanometer layer of Au-Pd was sputtered on these assemblies, we obtained a core-shell Schottky junction solar cells of PbOx/Au-Pd. With these newly developed structures, we obtained highest Jsc of 2.04 mA/cm2 with Voc of 707 mV achieving an overall efficiency of 0.384%. The performance of solar cell was assessed by D.C. and A.C. techniques. An equivalent circuit model is also presented for understanding the charge transfer mechanisms in such solar cells.

  10. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  11. A core-shell strategy for constructing a single-molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le-Jia; Zhou, Kai-Ge; Tan, Lin; Wang, Hong; Shi, Zi-Fa; Wu, Guo-Ping; Xu, Zhu-Guo; Cao, Xiao-Ping; He, Hui-Xin; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2011-07-18

    Understanding the effects of intermolecular interactions on the charge-transport properties of metal/molecule/metal junctions is an important step towards using individual molecules as building blocks for electronic devices. This work reports a systematic electron-transport investigation on a series of "core-shell"-structured oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (Gn-OPE) molecular wires. By using dendrimers of different generations as insulating "shells", the intermolecular π-π interactions between the OPE "cores" can be precisely controlled in single-component monolayers. Three techniques are used to evaluate the electron-transport properties of the Au/Gn-OPE/Au molecular junctions, including crossed-wire junction, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) break-junction techniques. The STM break-junction measurement reveals that the electron-transport pathways are strongly affected by the size of the side groups. When the side groups are small, electron transport could occur through three pathways, including through single-molecule junctions, double-molecule junctions, and molecular bridges between adjacent molecules formed by aromatic π-π coupling. The dendrimer shells effectively prohibit the π-π coupling effect, but at the same time, very large dendrimer side groups may hinder the formation of Au-S bonds. A first-generation dendrimer acts as an optimal shell that only allows electron transport through the single-molecule junction pathway, and forbids the other undesired pathways. It is demonstrated that the dendrimer-based core-shell strategy allows the single-molecule conductance to be probed in a homogenous monolayer without the influence of intermolecular π-π interactions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Modeling Bloch oscillations in nanoscale Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Heli; Kautz, R. L.; Nam, S. W.; Aumentado, J.

    2017-08-01

    Bloch oscillations in nanoscale Josephson junctions with a Coulomb charging energy comparable to the Josephson coupling energy are explored within the context of a model previously considered by Geigenmüller and Schön that includes Zener tunneling and treats quasiparticle tunneling as an explicit shot-noise process. The dynamics of the junction quasicharge are investigated numerically using both Monte Carlo and ensemble approaches to calculate voltage-current characteristics in the presence of microwaves. We examine in detail the origin of harmonic and subharmonic Bloch steps at dc biases I =(n /m )2 e f induced by microwaves of frequency f and consider the optimum parameters for the observation of harmonic (m =1 ) steps. We also demonstrate that the GS model allows a detailed semiquantitative fit to experimental voltage-current characteristics previously obtained at the Chalmers University of Technology, confirming and strengthening the interpretation of the observed microwave-induced steps in terms of Bloch oscillations.

  13. String networks with junctions in competition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Menezes, J.; de Oliveira, B. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to t 1 / 2, where t is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  14. Transcription factor AP-2γ is a core regulator of tight junction biogenesis and cavity formation during mouse early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inchul; Carey, Timothy S.; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    The trophectoderm epithelium is the first differentiated cell layer to arise during mammalian development. Blastocyst formation requires the proper expression and localization of tight junction, polarity, ion gradient and H2O channel proteins in the outer cell membranes. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that control their expression are largely unknown. Here, we report that transcription factor AP-2γ (Tcfap2c) is a core regulator of blastocyst formation in mice. Bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional analysis revealed that Tcfap2c binds and regulates a diverse group of genes expressed during blastocyst formation. RNA interference experiments demonstrated that Tcfap2c regulates genes important for tight junctions, cell polarity and fluid accumulation. Functional and ultrastructural studies revealed that Tcfap2c is necessary for tight junction assembly and paracellular sealing in trophectoderm epithelium. Aggregation of control eight-cell embryos with Tcfap2c knockdown embryos rescued blastocyst formation via direct contribution to the trophectoderm epithelium. Finally, we found that Tcfap2c promotes cellular proliferation via direct repression of p21 transcription during the morula-to-blastocyst transition. We propose a model in which Tcfap2c acts in a hierarchy to facilitate blastocyst formation through transcriptional regulation of core genes involved in tight junction assembly, fluid accumulation and cellular proliferation. PMID:23136388

  15. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  16. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  17. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  18. Flexible Photodiodes Based on Nitride Core/Shell p–n Junction Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A flexible nitride p-n photodiode is demonstrated. The device consists of a composite nanowire/polymer membrane transferred onto a flexible substrate. The active element for light sensing is a vertical array of core/shell p–n junction nanowires containing InGaN/GaN quantum wells grown by MOVPE. Electron/hole generation and transport in core/shell nanowires are modeled within nonequilibrium Green function formalism showing a good agreement with experimental results. Fully flexible transparent contacts based on a silver nanowire network are used for device fabrication, which allows bending the detector to a few millimeter curvature radius without damage. The detector shows a photoresponse at wavelengths shorter than 430 nm with a peak responsivity of 0.096 A/W at 370 nm under zero bias. The operation speed for a 0.3 × 0.3 cm2 detector patch was tested between 4 Hz and 2 kHz. The −3 dB cutoff was found to be ∼35 Hz, which is faster than the operation speed for typical photoconductive detectors and which is compatible with UV monitoring applications. PMID:27615556

  19. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  20. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-08

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016.

  1. Silicon-core glass fibres as microwire radial-junction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, F. A.; Smeltzer, B. K.; Nord, M.; Hawkins, T.; Ballato, J.; Gibson, U. J.

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned radial-junction solar cell designs offer potential improvements over planar geometries, as carrier generation occurs close to the junction for all absorption depths, but most production methods still require a single crystal substrate. Here, we report on the fabrication of such solar cells from polycrystalline, low purity (99.98%) p-type silicon starting material, formed into silicon core, silica sheath fibres using bulk glass draw techniques. Short segments were cut from the fibres, and the silica was etched from one side, which exposed the core and formed a conical cavity around it. We then used vapour deposition techniques to create p-i-n junction solar cells. Prototype cells formed from single fibres have shown conversion efficiencies up to 3.6%, despite the low purity of the starting material. This fabrication method has the potential to reduce the energy cost and the silicon volume required for solar cell production. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential of the conical cavity around the silicon core for light collection. Absorption of over 90% of the incident light was predicted, over a wide range of wavelengths, using these structures in combination with a 10% volume fraction of silicon. PMID:25187060

  2. Silicon-core glass fibres as microwire radial-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, F A; Smeltzer, B K; Nord, M; Hawkins, T; Ballato, J; Gibson, U J

    2014-09-04

    Vertically aligned radial-junction solar cell designs offer potential improvements over planar geometries, as carrier generation occurs close to the junction for all absorption depths, but most production methods still require a single crystal substrate. Here, we report on the fabrication of such solar cells from polycrystalline, low purity (99.98%) p-type silicon starting material, formed into silicon core, silica sheath fibres using bulk glass draw techniques. Short segments were cut from the fibres, and the silica was etched from one side, which exposed the core and formed a conical cavity around it. We then used vapour deposition techniques to create p-i-n junction solar cells. Prototype cells formed from single fibres have shown conversion efficiencies up to 3.6%, despite the low purity of the starting material. This fabrication method has the potential to reduce the energy cost and the silicon volume required for solar cell production. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential of the conical cavity around the silicon core for light collection. Absorption of over 90% of the incident light was predicted, over a wide range of wavelengths, using these structures in combination with a 10% volume fraction of silicon.

  3. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  4. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  5. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  6. Role of cleavage at the core-E1 junction of hepatitis C virus polyprotein in viral morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pène, Véronique; Lemasson, Matthieu; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Rosenberg, Arielle R.

    2017-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein sequence, core protein terminates with E1 envelope signal peptide. Cleavage by signal peptidase (SP) separates E1 from the complete form of core protein, anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the signal peptide. Subsequent cleavage of the signal peptide by signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) releases the mature form of core protein, which preferentially relocates to lipid droplets. Both of these cleavages are required for the HCV infectious cycle, supporting the idea that HCV assembly begins at the surface of lipid droplets, yet SPP-catalyzed cleavage is dispensable for initiation of budding in the ER. Here we have addressed at what step(s) of the HCV infectious cycle SP-catalyzed cleavage at the core-E1 junction is required. Taking advantage of the sole system that has allowed visualization of HCV budding events in the ER lumen of mammalian cells, we showed that, unexpectedly, mutations abolishing this cleavage did not prevent but instead tended to promote the initiation of viral budding. Moreover, even though no viral particles were released from Huh-7 cells transfected with a full-length HCV genome bearing these mutations, intracellular viral particles containing core protein protected by a membrane envelope were formed. These were visualized by electron microscopy as capsid-containing particles with a diameter of about 70 nm and 40 nm before and after delipidation, respectively, comparable to intracellular wild-type particle precursors except that they were non-infectious. Thus, our results show that SP-catalyzed cleavage is dispensable for HCV budding per se, but is required for the viral particles to acquire their infectivity and secretion. These data support the idea that HCV assembly occurs in concert with budding at the ER membrane. Furthermore, capsid-containing particles did not accumulate in the absence of SP-catalyzed cleavage, suggesting the quality of newly formed viral particles is controlled before

  7. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  8. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

  9. Lunar magnetism. [primordial core model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown, for a very simple model of the moon, that the existence of a primordial core magnetic field would give rise to a present day nonzero dipole external field. In the investigation a uniformly magnetized core embedded in a permeable mantle is considered. The significance of the obtained results for the conclusions reported by Runcorn (1975) is discussed. Comments provided by Runcorn to the discussion are also presented.

  10. Lunar magnetism. [primordial core model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown, for a very simple model of the moon, that the existence of a primordial core magnetic field would give rise to a present day nonzero dipole external field. In the investigation a uniformly magnetized core embedded in a permeable mantle is considered. The significance of the obtained results for the conclusions reported by Runcorn (1975) is discussed. Comments provided by Runcorn to the discussion are also presented.

  11. Axially connected nanowire core-shell p-n junctions: a composite structure for high-efficiency solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijia; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Junshuai; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    A composite nanostructure for high-efficiency solar cells that axially connects nanowire core-shell p-n junctions is proposed. By axially connecting the p-n junctions in one nanowire, the solar spectrum is separated and absorbed in the top and bottom cells with respect to the wavelength. The unique structure of nanowire p-n junctions enables substantial light absorption along the nanowire and efficient radial carrier separation and collection. A coupled three-dimensional optoelectronic simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the structure. With an excellent current matching, a promising efficiency of 19.9% can be achieved at a low filling ratio of 0.283 (the density of the nanowire array), which is much higher than the tandem axial p-n junctions.

  12. Moon model - An offset core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransford, G.; Sjogren, W.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar model proposed helps to account for the offset of the center of gravity from the center of the optical figure, the moments of inertia of the Moon, the 'mascons,' the localization of the maria basins on the near side of the Moon, the igneous nature of rocks, and the remanent magnetism. In the proposed model the Moon has a core whose center is offset from the center of the outside spheroid towards the earth. Such a core will be formed if the Moon were entirely molten at some time in its past, and on solidification was synchronous with the earth.

  13. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  14. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  15. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  16. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  17. Molecular modeling of inelastic electron transport in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2008-09-01

    A quantum chemical approach for the modeling of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of molecular junctions based on scattering theory is presented. Within a harmonic approximation, the proposed method allows us to calculate the electron-vibration coupling strength analytically, which makes it applicable to many different systems. The calculated inelastic electron transport spectra are often in very good agreement with their experimental counterparts, allowing the revelation of detailed information about molecular conformations inside the junction, molecule-metal contact structures, and intermolecular interaction that is largely inaccessible experimentally.

  18. Extension of the ADC Charge-Collection Model to Include Multiple Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    The ADC model is a charge-collection model derived for simple p-n junction silicon diodes having a single reverse-biased p-n junction at one end and an ideal substrate contact at the other end. The present paper extends the model to include multiple junctions, and the goal is to estimate how collected charge is shared by the different junctions.

  19. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Bryan John

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density

  20. Summary of mathematical models for a conventional and vertical junction photoconverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The geometry and computer programming for mathematical models of a one-dimensional conventional photoconverter, a one-dimensional vertical junction photoconverter, a three-dimensional conventinal photoconverter, and a three-dimensional vertical junction solar cell are discussed.

  1. A Novel Approach to Modeling Tunnel Junction Diodes Using Silvaco Atlas Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    MODELING TUNNEL JUNCTION DIODES USING SILVACO ATLAS SOFTWARE by Robert Gelinas December 2005 Thesis Advisor: Sherif Michael Second...Junction Diodes using Silvaco Atlas Software 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert J Gelinas 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...ability to model a tunnel junction device using the ATLAS device simulator by Silvaco International. The tunnel junction is a critical component of a

  2. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  3. Frame junction vibration transmission with a modified frame deformation model.

    PubMed

    Moore, J A

    1990-12-01

    A previous paper dealt with vibration transmission through junctions of connected frame members where the allowed frame deformations included bending, torsion, and longitudinal motions [J.A. Moore, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2766-2776 (1990)]. In helicopter and aircraft structures the skin panels can constitute a high impedance connection along the length of the frames that effectively prohibits in-plane motion at the elevation of the skin panels. This has the effect of coupling in-plane bending and torsional motions within the frame. This paper discusses the transmission behavior through frame junctions that accounts for the in-plane constraint in idealized form by assuming that the attached skin panels completely prohibit inplane motion in the frames. Also, transverse shear deformation is accounted for in describing the relatively deep web frame constructions common in aircraft structures. Longitudinal motion in the frames is not included in the model. Transmission coefficient predictions again show the importance of out-of-plane bending deformation to the transmission of vibratory energy in an aircraft structure. Comparisons are shown with measured vibration transmission data along the framing in the overhead of a helicopter airframe, with good agreement. The frame junction description has been implemented within a general purpose statistical energy analysis (SEA) computer code in modeling the entire airframe structure including skin panels.

  4. Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

  5. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

  6. Josephson-junction single plaquette as a model for the high-Tc grain-boundary junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinhee; Shin, Hyun Joon; Lee, Hu Jong

    1994-03-01

    We have calculated the widths of the integer and half-integer voltage steps in a square Josephson-junction single plaquette as a function of ac level for various filling factors f. The characteristic features of the step widths, corresponding to n=0, 1/2, and 1, show clear differences between small and large values of f, and are in reasonable agreement with the results observed experimentally in high-Tc single grain-boundary junctions. When the inhomogeneity in the critical current of the junctions parallel and perpendicular to the external current is introduced to the model the equations of motion for a single plaquette become equivalent to those of a dc superconducting quantum interference device in the limit of small loop inductance.

  7. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  8. A Nexus Model of the Temporal-Parietal Junction

    PubMed Central

    Carter, R. McKell; Huettel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) has been proposed to support either specifically social functions or non-specific processes of cognition like memory and attention. To account for diverse prior findings, we propose a Nexus Model for TPJ function: overlap of basic processes produces novel secondary functions at their convergence. We present meta-analytic evidence that is consistent with the anatomical convergence of attention, memory, language, and social processing in the TPJ – leading to a higher-order role in the creation of a social context for behavior. The Nexus Model accounts for recent examples of TPJ contributions specifically to decision making in a social context, and it provides a potential reconciliation for competing claims about TPJ function. PMID:23790322

  9. Modeling of charge transport in ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Anton V; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus; Zozoulenko, Igor V

    2014-06-17

    Spatiotemporal control of the complex chemical microenvironment is of great importance to many fields within life science. One way to facilitate such control is to construct delivery circuits, comprising arrays of dispensing outlets, for ions and charged biomolecules based on ionic transistors. This allows for addressability of ionic signals, which opens up for spatiotemporally controlled delivery in a highly complex manner. One class of ionic transistors, the ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs), is especially attractive for these applications because these transistors are functional at physiological conditions and have been employed to modulate the delivery of neurotransmitters to regulate signaling in neuronal cells. Further, the first integrated complementary ionic circuits were recently developed on the basis of these ionic transistors. However, a detailed understanding of the device physics of these transistors is still lacking and hampers further development of components and circuits. Here, we report on the modeling of IBJTs using Poisson's and Nernst-Planck equations and the finite element method. A two-dimensional model of the device is employed that successfully reproduces the main characteristics of the measurement data. On the basis of the detailed concentration and potential profiles provided by the model, the different modes of operation of the transistor are analyzed as well as the transitions between the different modes. The model correctly predicts the measured threshold voltage, which is explained in terms of membrane potentials. All in all, the results provide the basis for a detailed understanding of IBJT operation. This new knowledge is employed to discuss potential improvements of ion bipolar junction transistors in terms of miniaturization and device parameters.

  10. TDDB modeling depending on interfacial conditions in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chul-Min; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji; Song, Yun-Heub

    2017-10-01

    We investigated time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) modeling for MgO dielectrics with/without Mg insertion of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The number of permanent trap sites at the no-Mg insertion interface was much larger than that at the Mg-inserted interface as determined by interval voltage stress (IVS) tests. The interfacial conditions related to trap sites at MgO dielectrics give rise to the different TDDB modeling. Here, we confirmed that the TDDB curves obtained from the constant voltage stress (CVS) tests for the Mg inserted interface case were well fitted by the power-law voltage V model, while the case of no-Mg inserted interface showed a good correlation to the 1/E model. The difference in the TDDB models related to interfacial conditions was understood based on theoretical and experimental results. Finally, we concluded that it is necessary to select an appropriate reliability model depending upon the presence or absence of the trap sites at dielectric interfaces.

  11. Three-dimensional models of conventional and vertical junction laser-photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Walker, Gilbert H.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of both conventional planar junction and vertical junction photovoltaic energy converters have been constructed. The models are a set of linear partial differential equations and take into account many photoconverter design parameters. The model is applied to Si photoconverters; however, the model may be used with other semiconductors. When used with a Nd laser, the conversion efficiency of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is 47 percent, whereas the efficiency for the conventional planar Si photoconverter is only 17 percent. A parametric study of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is then done in order to describe the optimum converter for use with the 1.06-micron Nd laser. The efficiency of this optimized vertical junction converter is 44 percent at 1 kW/sq cm.

  12. Time resolution of core flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, N.; Pais, A.; Jault, D.

    2008-12-01

    We estimate the robust component of quasi-geostrophic surface core flow models from two secular variation models spanning respectively the periods 1960-2002 (CM4) and 1997-2008 (xCHAOS). We rely on stochastic models to account for the contributions of the hidden small-scale magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) interacting with core surface flows to the observed magnetic field changes. These contributions amount to errors of representativeness in the inversion of the radial induction equation at the CMB, which dominate the error budget. Taking into account the finite correlation time of the small scale magnetic field, we find that these errors of representativeness also have finite correlation time, of the order of 10 years. Our conclusion that the advection of the small scale magnetic field does not strongly contribute to the changes of the magnetic field occuring in less than 10 years -such as the geomagnetic jerks- implies that these changes should be well accounted for by core flow models. Our core flow models show, at all epochs, a grand westward current circling around the cylindrical surface tangent to the inner core, at approximately 30° and 60° latitude under the Indian and Pacific oceans, respectively. They account well for the changes in core angular momentum for the most recent epochs. We show that the interaction between the hidden magnetic field and core motions also cause apparent changes of the magnetic flux at the core-mantle boundary, which may be misunderstood as evidence for magnetic diffusion.

  13. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-21

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  14. Zero-Bias-Field Spin Torque Induced Oscillation of a Vortex Core in a Magnetic Junction Nano-Pillar with High Magnetoresistance Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Hiroshi; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Spin torque induced dynamics of a vortex core in a magnetic junction nano-pillar is studied by paying special attention to the effect of the in-plane current due to the spatial variation of magnetization. We calculated the motion of the vortex core and the current distribution simultaneously. The current has a considerable in-plane component within the magnetic junction nano-pillar with a high magnetoresistance ratio, and the stable rotational motion of the vortex core is caused by a spin transfer torque from the in-plane current without a bias field when the magnetoresistance ratio is over 180%. It is shown that the zero-bias-field oscillation of the vortex core can be maintained if the magnetoresistance ratio and strength of the in-plane current exceed a certain critical value.

  15. Strains at the myotendinous junction predicted by a micromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Bahar; Ames, Elizabeth G; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Blemker, Silvia S

    2011-11-10

    The goal of this work was to create a finite element micromechanical model of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) to examine how the structure and mechanics of the MTJ affect the local micro-scale strains experienced by muscle fibers. We validated the model through comparisons with histological longitudinal sections of muscles fixed in slack and stretched positions. The model predicted deformations of the A-bands within the fiber near the MTJ that were similar to those measured from the histological sections. We then used the model to predict the dependence of local fiber strains on activation and the mechanical properties of the endomysium. The model predicted that peak micro-scale strains increase with activation and as the compliance of the endomysium decreases. Analysis of the models revealed that, in passive stretch, local fiber strains are governed by the difference of the mechanical properties between the fibers and the endomysium. In active stretch, strain distributions are governed by the difference in cross-sectional area along the length of the tapered region of the fiber near the MTJ. The endomysium provides passive resistance that balances the active forces and prevents the tapered region of the fiber from undergoing excessive strain. These model predictions lead to the following hypotheses: (i) the increased likelihood of injury during active lengthening of muscle fibers may be due to the increase in peak strain with activation and (ii) endomysium may play a role in protecting fibers from injury by reducing the strains within the fiber at the MTJ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Retention Models on Core-Shell Columns.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Růžičková, Marie

    2017-07-13

    A thin, active shell layer on core-shell columns provides high efficiency in HPLC at moderately high pressures. We revisited three models of mobile phase effects on retention for core-shell columns in mixed aqueous-organic mobile phases: linear solvent strength and Snyder-Soczewiński two-parameter models and a three-parameter model. For some compounds, two-parameter models show minor deviations from linearity due to neglect of possible minor retention in pure weak solvent, which is compensated for in the three-parameter model, which does not explicitly assume either the adsorption or the partition retention mechanism in normal- or reversed-phase systems. The model retention equation can be formulated as a function of solute retention factors of nonionic compounds in pure organic solvent and in pure water (or aqueous buffer) and of the volume fraction of an either aqueous or organic solvent component in a two-component mobile phase. With core-shell columns, the impervious solid core does not participate in the retention process. Hence, the thermodynamic retention factors, defined as the ratio of the mass of the analyte mass contained in the stationary phase to its mass in the mobile phase in the column, should not include the particle core volume. The values of the thermodynamic factors are lower than the retention factors determined using a convention including the inert core in the stationary phase. However, both conventions produce correct results if consistently used to predict the effects of changing mobile phase composition on retention. We compared three types of core-shell columns with C18-, phenyl-hexyl-, and biphenyl-bonded phases. The core-shell columns with phenyl-hexyl- and biphenyl-bonded ligands provided lower errors in two-parameter model predictions for alkylbenzenes, phenolic acids, and flavonoid compounds in comparison with C18-bonded ligands.

  17. Modeling of the Mechanical Function of the Human Gastroesophageal Junction Using an Anatomically-Realistic Three-Dimensional Model

    PubMed Central

    Yassi, R.; Cheng, L. K.; Rajagopal, V.; Nash, M. P.; Windsor, J. A.; Pullan, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to combine the anatomy and physiology of the human gastroesophageal junction (the junction between the esophagus and the stomach) into a unified computer model. A three-dimensional computer model of the gastroesophageal junction was created using cross-sectional images from a human cadaver. The governing equations of finite deformation elasticity were incorporated into the three-dimensional model. The model was used to predict the intraluminal pressure values (pressure inside the junction) due to the muscle contraction of the gastroesophageal junction and the effects of the surrounding structures. The intraluminal pressure results obtained from the three-dimensional model were consistent with experimental values available in the literature. The model was also used to examine the independent roles of each muscle layer (circular and longitudinal) of the gastroesophageal junction by contracting them separately. Results showed that the intraluminal pressure values predicted by the model were primarily due to the contraction of the circular muscle layer. If the circular muscle layer was quiescent, the contraction of the longitudinal muscle layer resulted in an expansion of the junction. In conclusion, the model provided reliable predictions of the intraluminal pressure values during the contraction of a normal gastroesophageal junction. The model also provided a framework to examine the role of each muscle layer during the contraction of the gastroesophageal junction. PMID:19481212

  18. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus. PMID:23365558

  19. Emergent central pattern generator behavior in gap-junction-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kyle G; Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (I(AHP)) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus.

  20. Dynamic compact model of thermally assisted switching magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Baraji, M.; Javerliac, V.; Guo, W.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.

    2009-12-01

    The general purpose of spin electronics is to take advantage of the electron's spin in addition to its electrical charge to build innovative electronic devices. These devices combine magnetic materials which are used as spin polarizer or analyzer together with semiconductors or insulators, resulting in innovative hybrid CMOS/magnetic (Complementary MOS) architectures. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be used for the design of magnetic random access memories [S. Tehrani, Proc. IEEE 91, 703 (2003)], magnetic field programmable gate arrays [Y. Guillement, International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing, 2008], low-power application specific integrated circuits [S. Matsunaga, Appl. Phys. Express 1, 091301 (2008)], and rf oscillators. The thermally assisted switching (TAS) technology requires heating the MTJ before writing it by means of an external field. It reduces the overall power consumption, solves the data writing selectivity issues, and improves the thermal stability of the written information for high density applications. The design of hybrid architectures requires a MTJ compact model, which can be used in standard electrical simulators of the industry. As a result, complete simulations of CMOS/MTJ hybrid circuits can be performed before experimental realization and testing. This article presents a highly accurate model of the MTJ based on the TAS technology. It is compatible with the Spectre electrical simulator of Cadence design suite.

  1. Dynamics in classical Josephson junction arrays: models and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciria, José C.; Giovannella, C.

    1998-05-01

    These lecture notes are divided in three main sections. In the first one we give a detailed derivation of the equation of motion of an array of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson Junctions (JJA). The derivation starts from a Lagrangian written for the gauge invariant phase, φij, and its conjugate variable, φij, and it is done in the full inductance-matrix approximation. The ohmic dissipation due to the shunting resistances is taken in account through the introduction in the Euler-Lagrangian equation of a convenient Rayleigh's function. The JJA formalism, then, is extended to the much more complex case of a granular superconductor. In order to make clear the relationship between the JJA formalism and those developed in the framework of other discrete models, like the discrete sine-Gordon and the Frenkel-Kontorova ones, a paragraph is devoted to their comparative analysis. The relationship between phase and `particle' dynamics is also briefly discussed. In the second section we provide the `beginners' with some basic ideas on how to perform numerical simulations based on the JJA formalism. Finally, in the third section we give a flavour of the physical problems that one can solve by `running' numerical codes like the ones we have developed. The dynamical properties of single massless and massive vortices and those of a JJA subjected to an external ac driving force are briefly discussed.

  2. Bipolar junction transistor models for circuit simulation of cosmic-ray-induced soft errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines bipolar junction transistor models suitable for calculating the effects of large excursions of some of the variables determining the operation of a transistor. Both the Ebers-Moll and Gummel-Poon models are studied, and the junction and diffusion capacitances are evaluated on the basis of the latter model. The most interesting result of this analysis is that a bipolar junction transistor when struck by a cosmic particle may cause a single event upset in an electronic circuit if the transistor is operated at a low forward base-emitter bias.

  3. Liquid sodium models of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Stone, Douglas R.; Zimmerman, Daniel S.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the dynamics of the Earth's core can be advanced by a combination of observation, experiments, and simulations. A crucial aspect of the core is the interplay between the flow of the conducting liquid and the magnetic field this flow sustains via dynamo action. This non-linear interaction, and the presence of turbulence in the flow, precludes direct numerical simulation of the system with realistic turbulence. Thus, in addition to simulations and observations (both seismological and geomagnetic), experiments can contribute insight into the core dynamics. Liquid sodium laboratory experiments can serve as models of the Earth's core with the key ingredients of conducting fluid, turbulent flow, and overall rotation, and can also approximate the geometry of the core. By accessing regions of parameter space inaccessible to numerical studies, experiments can benchmark simulations and reveal phenomena relevant to the Earth's core and other planetary cores. This review focuses on the particular contribution of liquid sodium spherical Couette devices to this subject matter.

  4. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  5. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  6. Flexure modelling at seamounts with dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The lithospheric response to seamounts and ocean islands has been successfully described by deformation of an elastic plate induced by a given volcanic load. If the shape and mass of a seamount are known, the lithospheric flexure due to the seamount is determined by the thickness of an elastic plate, Te, which depends on the load density and the age of the plate at the time of seamount construction. We can thus infer important thermomechanical properties of the lithosphere from Te estimates at seamounts and their correlation with other geophysical inferences, such as cooling of the plate. Whereas the bathymetry (i.e. shape) of a seamount is directly observable, the total mass often requires an assumption of the internal seamount structure. The conventional approach considers the seamount to have a uniform density (e.g. density of the crust). This choice, however, tends to bias the total mass acting on an elastic plate. In this study, we will explore a simple approximation to the seamount's internal structure that considers a dense core and a less dense outer edifice. Although the existence of a core is supported by various gravity and seismic studies, the role of such volcanic cores in flexure modelling has not been fully addressed. Here, we present new analytic solutions for plate flexure due to axisymmetric dense core loads, and use them to examine the effects of dense cores in flexure calculations for a variety of synthetic cases. Comparing analytic solutions with and without a core indicates that the flexure model with uniform density underestimates Te by at least 25 per cent. This bias increases when the uniform density is taken to be equal to the crustal density. We also propose a practical application of the dense core model by constructing a uniform density load of same mass as the dense core load. This approximation allows us to compute the flexural deflection and gravity anomaly of a seamount in the wavenumber domain and minimize the limitations

  7. Novel model for the mechanisms of glutamate-dependent excitotoxicity: Role of neuronal gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, Andrei B.

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), coupling of neurons by gap junctions (electrical synapses) increases during early postnatal development, then decreases, but increases in the mature CNS following neuronal injury, such as ischemia, traumatic brain injury and epilepsy. Glutamate-dependent neuronal death also occurs in the CNS during development and neuronal injury, i.e., at the time when neuronal gap junction coupling is increased. Here, we review our recent studies on regulation of neuronal gap junction coupling by glutamate during development and injury and on the role of gap junctions in neuronal cell death. A novel model of the mechanisms of glutamate-dependent neuronal death is discussed, which includes neuronal gap junction coupling as a critical part of these mechanisms. PMID:22771704

  8. Towards Consistent Models of Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, Boris; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Shematovich, Valery; Wiebe, Dimitri; Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dimitri; Launhardt, Ralf

    The complete theory of the earliest stages of star formation can be developed only on the basis of self-consistent coupled dynamical and chemical models for the evolution of protostellar clouds. The models including multidimensional geometry ""full"" chemistry and 2D/3D radiation transfer still do not exist. We analyze limitations of the existing approaches and main directions of the model improvements: revision of chemical reaction data bases reduction of chemical reaction network reasonable choice of model geometry radiation transfer. The most important goal of modeling of the real objects is to reveal unambiguous signatures of their evolutionary status. Starless cores are believed to be compact objects at very early stages of star formation. We use our results on 1D self-consistent evolution of starless cores to illustrate problems of modeling and interpretation. Special attention is drawn to the radiation transfer problem. New 2D code URAN(IA) for simulation of radiation transfer in molecular lines was developed. This code was used to analyze spectra of starless cores L1544 and CB17. The deduced parameters of these cores are discussed.

  9. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  10. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  11. Model for large arrays of Josephson junctions with unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khveshchenko, D. V.; Crooks, R.

    2011-10-01

    We study large arrays of mesoscopic junctions made out of gapless unconventional superconductors where the tunneling processes of both particle-hole and Cooper pairs give rise to a strongly retarded effective action which, contrary to the standard case, cannot be readily characterized in terms of a local Josephson energy. This action can be relevant, for example, to grain boundary and c-axis junctions in layered high-Tc superconductors. By using a particular functional representation, we describe emergent collective phenomena in this system, ascertain its phase diagram, and compute electrical conductivity.

  12. Experimental testing and modeling analysis of solute mixing at water distribution pipe junctions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jeffrey Yang, Y; Jiang, Lijie; Yu, Tingchao; Shen, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. The effect can lead to different outcomes of water quality modeling and, hence, drinking water management in a distribution network. Here we have investigated solute mixing behavior in pipe junctions of five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for network modeling are proposed. First, based on experiments, the degree of mixing at a cross is found to be a function of flow momentum ratio that defines a junction flow distribution pattern and the degree of departure from complete mixing. Corresponding analytical solutions are also validated using computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) simulations. Second, the analytical mixing model is further extended to double-Tee junctions. Correspondingly the flow distribution factor is modified to account for hydraulic departure from a cross configuration. For a double-Tee(A) junction, CFD simulations show that the solute mixing depends on flow momentum ratio and connection pipe length, whereas the mixing at double-Tee(B) is well represented by two independent single-Tee junctions with a potential water stagnation zone in between. Notably, double-Tee junctions differ significantly from a cross in solute mixing and transport. However, it is noted that these pipe connections are widely, but incorrectly, simplified as cross junctions of assumed complete solute mixing in network skeletonization and water quality modeling. For the studied pipe junction types, analytical solutions are proposed to characterize the incomplete mixing and hence may allow better water quality simulation in a distribution network.

  13. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Gleichauf, Karla T.; Fong, Derek A.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results. An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.

  14. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    DOE PAGES

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; ...

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results.more » An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.« less

  15. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Gleichauf, Karla T.; Fong, Derek A.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results. An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.

  16. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  17. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  18. Mucin-type core 1 glycans regulate the localization of neuromuscular junctions and establishment of muscle cell architecture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Fuwa, Takashi J; Sato, Chikara; Komatsu, Akira; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    T antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure, is synthesized by Drosophila core 1 β1,3-galactosyltrasferase 1 (dC1GalT1) and is expressed in various tissues. We previously reported that dC1GalT1 synthesizes T antigen expressed in hemocytes, lymph glands, and the central nervous system (CNS) and that dC1GalT1 mutant larvae display decreased numbers of circulating hemocytes and excessive differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in lymph glands. dC1GalT1 mutant larvae have also been shown to have morphological defects in the CNS. However, the functions of T antigen in other tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that glycans contributed to the localization of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) boutons. In dC1GalT1 mutant larvae, NMJs were ectopically formed in the cleft between muscles 6 and 7 and connected with these two muscles. dC1GalT1 synthesized T antigen, which was expressed at NMJs. In addition, we determined the function of mucin-type O-glycans in muscle cells. In dC1GalT1 mutant muscles, myofibers and basement membranes were disorganized. Moreover, ultrastructural defects in NMJs and accumulation of large endosome-like structures within both NMJ boutons and muscle cells were observed in dC1GalT1 mutants. Taken together, these results demonstrated that mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by dC1GalT1 were involved in the localization of NMJ boutons, synaptogenesis of NMJs, establishment of muscle cell architecture, and endocytosis.

  19. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  20. 2D modeling of silicon based thin film dual and triple junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. G.; Uehara, K.; Lestrade, M.; Li, Z. Q.; Li, Z. M. S.

    2009-08-01

    Based on Crosslight APSYS, thin film amorphous Si (a-Si:H)/microcrystalline (μc-Si) dual-junction (DJ) and a- Si:H/amorphous SiGe:H (a-SiGe:H)/μc-Si triple-junction (TJ) solar cells are modeled. Basic physical quantities like band diagrams, optical absorption and generation are obtained. Quantum efficiency and I-V curves for individual junctions are presented for current matching analyses. The whole DJ and TJ cell I-V curves are also presented and the results are discussed with respect to the top surface ZnO:Al TCO layer affinity. The interface texture effect is modeled with FDTD (finite difference time domain) module and results for top junction are presented. The modeling results give possible clues to achieve high efficiency for DJ and TJ thin film solar cells.

  1. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  2. CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING FERRITE-CORE PROBES

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D(c), and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  3. Comparative analysis of system identification techniques for nonlinear modeling of the neuron-microelectrode junction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saad Ahmad; Thakore, Vaibhav; Behal, Aman; Bölöni, Ladislau; Hickman, James J

    2013-03-01

    Applications of non-invasive neuroelectronic interfacing in the fields of whole-cell biosensing, biological computation and neural prosthetic devices depend critically on an efficient decoding and processing of information retrieved from a neuron-electrode junction. This necessitates development of mathematical models of the neuron-electrode interface that realistically represent the extracellular signals recorded at the neuroelectronic junction without being computationally expensive. Extracellular signals recorded using planar microelectrode or field effect transistor arrays have, until now, primarily been represented using linear equivalent circuit models that fail to reproduce the correct amplitude and shape of the signals recorded at the neuron-microelectrode interface. In this paper, to explore viable alternatives for a computationally inexpensive and efficient modeling of the neuron-electrode junction, input-output data from the neuron-electrode junction is modeled using a parametric Wiener model and a Nonlinear Auto-Regressive network with eXogenous input trained using a dynamic Neural Network model (NARX-NN model). Results corresponding to a validation dataset from these models are then employed to compare and contrast the computational complexity and efficiency of the aforementioned modeling techniques with the Lee-Schetzen technique of cross-correlation for estimating a nonlinear dynamic model of the neuroelectronic junction.

  4. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  5. Josephson junction devices: Model quantum mechanical systems and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Josephine

    In this dissertation, three experiments using Josephson junction devices are described. In Part I, the effect of dissipation on tunneling between charge states in a superconducting single-electron transistor (sSET) was studied. The sSET was fabricated on top of a semi-conductor heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) imbedded beneath the surface. The 2DEG acted as a dissipative ground plane. The sheet resistance of the 2DEG could be varied in situ by applying a large voltage to a gate on the back of the substrate. The zero-bias conductance of the sSET was observed to increase with increasing temperature and 2DEG resistance. Some qualitative but not quantitative agreement was found with theoretical calculations of the functional dependence of the conductance on temperature and 2DEG resistance. Part II describes a series of experiments performed on magnesium diboride point-contact junctions. The pressure between the MgB2 tip and base pieces could be adjusted to form junctions with different characteristics. With light pressure applied between the two pieces, quasiparticle tunneling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions was measured. From these data, a superconducting gap of approximately 2 meV and a critical temperature of 29 K were estimated. Increasing the pressure between the MgB2 pieces formed junctions with superconductor-normal metal-superconductor characteristics. We used these junctions to form MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). Noise levels as low as 35 fT/Hz1/2 and 4 muphi 0/Hz1/2 at 1 kHz were measured. In Part III, we used a SQUID-based instrument to acquire magnetocardiograms (MCG), the magnetic field signal measured from the human heart. We measured 51 healthy volunteers and 11 cardiac patients both at rest and after treadmill exercise. We found age and sex related differences in the MCG of the healthy volunteers that suggest that these factors should be considered when evaluating the MCG for

  6. Gibbons-Hawking boundary terms and junction conditions for higher-order brane gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: mpdabfz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2009-01-15

    We derive the most general junction conditions for the fourth-order brane gravity constructed of arbitrary functions of curvature invariants. We reduce these fourth-order theories to second order theories at the expense of introducing new scalar and tensor fields - the scalaron and the tensoron. In order to obtain junction conditions we apply the method of generalized Gibbons-Hawking boundary terms which are appended to the appropriate actions. After assuming the continuity of the scalaron and the tensoron on the brane, we recover junction conditions for such general brane universe models previously obtained by different methods. The derived junction conditions can serve studying the cosmological implications of the higher-order brane gravity models.

  7. Dissipation in a simple model of a topological Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul; Ribeiro, Pedro; García-García, Antonio M

    2014-06-20

    The topological features of low-dimensional superconductors have created a lot of excitement recently because of their broad range of applications in quantum information and their potential to reveal novel phases of quantum matter. A potential problem for practical applications is the presence of phase slips that break phase coherence. Dissipation in nontopological superconductors suppresses phase slips and can restore long-range order. Here, we investigate the role of dissipation in a topological Josephson junction. We show that the combined effects of topology and dissipation keep phase and antiphase slips strongly correlated so that the device is superconducting even under conditions where a nontopological device would be resistive. The resistive transition occurs at a critical value of the dissipation that is 4 times smaller than that expected for a conventional Josephson junction. We propose that this difference could be employed as a robust experimental signature of topological superconductivity.

  8. Assessment of Groin Application of Junctional Tourniquets in a Manikin Model.

    PubMed

    Kragh, John F; Lunati, Matthew P; Kharod, Chetan U; Cunningham, Cord W; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Cap, Andrew P; Chen, Jacob; Aden, James K; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2016-08-01

    Introduction To aid in preparation of military medic trainers for a possible new curriculum in teaching junctional tourniquet use, the investigators studied the time to control hemorrhage and blood volume lost in order to provide evidence for ease of use. Hypothesis Models of junctional tourniquet could perform differentially by blood loss, time to hemostasis, and user preference. In a laboratory experiment, 30 users controlled simulated hemorrhage from a manikin (Combat Ready Clamp [CRoC] Trainer) with three iterations each of three junctional tourniquets. There were 270 tests which included hemorrhage control (yes/no), time to hemostasis, and blood volume lost. Users also subjectively ranked tourniquet performance. Models included CRoC, Junctional Emergency Treatment Tool (JETT), and SAM Junctional Tourniquet (SJT). Time to hemostasis and total blood loss were log-transformed and analyzed using a mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the users represented as random effects and the tourniquet model used as the treatment effect. Preference scores were analyzed with ANOVA, and Tukey's honest significant difference test was used for all post-hoc pairwise comparisons. All tourniquet uses were 100% effective for hemorrhage control. For blood loss, CRoC and SJT performed best with least blood loss and were significantly better than JETT; in pairwise comparison, CRoC-JETT (P .5, all models). The CRoC and SJT performed best in having least blood loss, CRoC performed best in having least time to hemostasis, and users did not differ in preference of model. Models of junctional tourniquet performed differentially by blood loss and time to hemostasis. Kragh JF Jr , Lunati MP , Kharod CU , Cunningham CW , Bailey JA , Stockinger ZT , Cap AP , Chen J , Aden JK 3d , Cancio LC . Assessment of groin application of junctional tourniquets in a manikin model. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(4):358-363.

  9. Osmotic forces and gap junctions in spreading depression: a computational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    In a computational model of spreading depression (SD), ionic movement through a neuronal syncytium of cells connected by gap junctions is described electrodiffusively. Simulations predict that SD will not occur unless cells are allowed to expand in response to osmotic pressure gradients and K+ is allowed to move through gap junctions. SD waves of [K+]out approximately 25 to approximately 60 mM moving at approximately 2 to approximately 18 mm/min are predicted over the range of parametric values reported in gray matter, with extracellular space decreasing up to approximately 50%. Predicted waveform shape is qualitatively similar to laboratory reports. The delayed-rectifier, NMDA, BK, and Na+ currents are predicted to facilitate SD, while SK and A-type K+ currents and glial activity impede SD. These predictions are consonant with recent findings that gap junction poisons block SD and support the theories that cytosolic diffusion via gap junctions and osmotic forces are important mechanisms underlying SD.

  10. Osmotic forces and gap junctions in spreading depression: a computational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    In a computational model of spreading depression (SD), ionic movement through a neuronal syncytium of cells connected by gap junctions is described electrodiffusively. Simulations predict that SD will not occur unless cells are allowed to expand in response to osmotic pressure gradients and K+ is allowed to move through gap junctions. SD waves of [K+]out approximately 25 to approximately 60 mM moving at approximately 2 to approximately 18 mm/min are predicted over the range of parametric values reported in gray matter, with extracellular space decreasing up to approximately 50%. Predicted waveform shape is qualitatively similar to laboratory reports. The delayed-rectifier, NMDA, BK, and Na+ currents are predicted to facilitate SD, while SK and A-type K+ currents and glial activity impede SD. These predictions are consonant with recent findings that gap junction poisons block SD and support the theories that cytosolic diffusion via gap junctions and osmotic forces are important mechanisms underlying SD.

  11. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-07

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. We analyzed a set of exemplary model junction structures using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond tomore » the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N–Au and S–Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This, then, allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by

  12. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-01

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. A set of exemplary model junction structures has been analyzed using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond to the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N-Au and S-Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by the donor

  13. Hepatic immunohistochemical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in rat models of cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. M.; Glade, J. L.; Stevenson, B. R.; Boyer, J. L.; Mooseker, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Structural alterations in hepatocyte tight junctions accompanying cholestasis were investigated using immunolocalization of ZO-1, the first known protein component of the tight junction. Disruption in the paracellular barrier function of the tight junction has been proposed to allow reflux of bile into the blood. Cholestasis was induced in 210 to 235 g male Sprague-Dawley rats either by five consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.5 mg/kg/d in propylene glycol) or ligation of the common bile duct for 72 hours. The structural organization of the tight junction was assessed in each model by indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining for ZO-1 on frozen sections of liver and compared with controls. In control, sham-operated, and estradiol-injected animals, ZO-1 localizes in a uniform continuous manner along the margins of the canaliculi. In contrast, bile duct ligation results in the appearance of numerous discontinuities in ZO-1 staining accompanied by dilation or collapse of the lumenal space. Tissue content of the ZO-1 protein, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting, was unaffected in either cholestatic model compared with controls. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of the tight junction can be assessed from immunostaining patterns of ZO-1 in frozen sections of cholestatic livers. Under these experimental conditions, the organization of the tight junction at the level of the ZO-1 protein is altered by bile duct obstruction but not by ethinyl estradiol. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719075

  14. Junction-less phototransistor with nanowire channels, a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Anita Fadavi; Saini, Simarjeet S; O, Nixon; Anantram, M P

    2014-05-19

    We propose a new nanowire based, junction-less phototransistor, that consists of a channel with both wide and narrow regions to ensure efficient light absorption and low dark current, respectively. While the light is absorbed in the wide region, the narrow region allows for ease of band engineering. We also find that a nanowire in the source can further boost the optical gain. The proposed device, which can potentially detect very low light intensities, does not rely on complicated doping profiles, but instead uses suitably designed gates. Our calculations show the detection of a photon flux as low as 35 per second.

  15. Modeling and theoretical efficiency of a silicon nanowire based thermoelectric junction with area enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, M; Sadhu, JS; Ma, J; Ghossoub, MG; Sinha, S

    2012-06-15

    Recent experimental work suggests that individual silicon nanowires with rough surfaces possess a thermoelectric figure of merit as high as 0.6 near room temperature. This paper addresses the possibility of using an array of such nanowires in a thermoelectric junction for generation. Employing a model of frequency dependent phonon boundary scattering, we estimate the effective thermal conductivity of the array and investigate heat flow through the junction. We show that charge transport is largely unaffected by the roughness scales considered. Enhancing the area for heat exchange at an individual 200 mu m x 200 mu m p-n junction yields significant temperature differences across the junction leading to power >0.6 mW and efficiency >1.5% for a junction with effective thermal conductivity <5 W/mK, when the source and sink are at 450 K and 300 K, respectively. We show that relatively short nanowires of similar to 50 mu m length are sufficient for obtaining peak power and reasonable efficiency. This substantially reduces the challenge of engineering low resistivity electrical contacts that critically affect power and efficiency. This paper provides insight into how fundamental transport in relation to bulk heat transfer and charge transport, affects the performance of thermoelectric junctions based on nanostructured materials. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4728189

  16. Predictive model for motorcycle accidents at three-legged priority junctions.

    PubMed

    Harnen, S; Umar, R S Radin; Wong, S V; Wan Hashim, W I

    2003-12-01

    In conjunction with a nationwide motorcycle safety program, the provision of exclusive motorcycle lanes has been implemented to overcome link-motorcycle accidents along trunk roads in Malaysia. However, not much work has been done to address accidents at junctions involving motorcycles. This article presents the development of predictive model for motorcycle accidents at three-legged major-minor priority junctions of urban roads in Malaysia. The generalized linear modeling technique was used to develop the model. The final model reveals that motorcycle accidents are proportional to the power of traffic flow. An increase in nonmotorcycle and motorcycle flows entering the junctions is associated with an increase in motorcycle accidents. Nonmotorcycle flow on major roads had the highest effect on the probability of motorcycle accidents. Approach speed, lane width, number of lanes, shoulder width, and land use were found to be significant in explaining motorcycle accidents at the three-legged major-minor priority junctions. These findings should enable traffic engineers to specifically design appropriate junction treatment criteria for nonexclusive motorcycle lane facilities.

  17. An AlGaN Core-Shell Tunnel Junction Nanowire Light-Emitting Diode Operating in the Ultraviolet-C Band.

    PubMed

    Sadaf, S M; Zhao, S; Wu, Y; Ra, Y-H; Liu, X; Vanka, S; Mi, Z

    2017-02-08

    To date, semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs) operating in the deep ultraviolet (UV) spectral range exhibit very low efficiency due to the presence of large densities of defects and extremely inefficient p-type conduction of conventional AlGaN quantum well heterostructures. We have demonstrated that such critical issues can be potentially addressed by using nearly defect-free AlGaN tunnel junction core-shell nanowire heterostructures. The core-shell nanowire arrays exhibit high photoluminescence efficiency (∼80%) in the UV-C band at room temperature. With the incorporation of an epitaxial Al tunnel junction, the p-(Al)GaN contact-free nanowire deep UV LEDs showed nearly one order of magnitude reduction in the device resistance, compared to the conventional nanowire p-i-n device. The unpackaged Al tunnel junction deep UV LEDs exhibit an output power >8 mW and a peak external quantum efficiency ∼0.4%, which are nearly one to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported AlGaN nanowire devices. Detailed studies further suggest that the maximum achievable efficiency is limited by electron overflow and poor light extraction efficiency due to the TM polarized emission.

  18. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  19. Three-dimensional models: an emerging investigational revolution for craniovertebral junction surgery.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Jankharia, Bhavin; Shah, Abhidha; Sathe, Prashant

    2016-12-01

    Complex craniovertebral junctional anomalies can be daunting to treat surgically, and preoperative information regarding the osseous abnormalities, course of the vertebral arteries, size of the pedicles, and location of the transverse foramina is invaluable to surgeons operating on these challenging cases. The authors present their experience with the emerging technology of 3D model acquisition for surgery in 11 cases of complex craniovertebral junction region anomalies. For each case, a 3D printed model was made from thin CT scans using a 64-slice CT scanner. The inclination of the joints, the presence of false articulations, the size of the pedicles, and the course of the vertebral arteries were studied preoperatively on the 3D models. The sizes of the plates and screws to be used and the angle of insertion of the screws were calculated based on the data from the models. The model was scaled to actual size and was kept beside the operating surgeon in its anatomical position during surgery. The potential uses of the models and their advantages over conventional radiological investigations are discussed. The authors conclude that 3D models can be an invaluable aid during surgery for complex craniovertebral junction anomalies. The information available from a real life-size model supersedes the information available from 3D CT reconstructions and can also be superior to virtual simulation. The models are both cost effective and easy to build and the authors suggest that they may form the basis of investigations in the near future for craniovertebral junction surgery.

  20. Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize Functional Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Injury to Human Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0688 TITLE: Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize Functional Mechanisms of Sulfur...30 Apr 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa DAMD17-01-1-0688 to Characterize...further explore the role of BM in decreased SM susceptibility, primary keratinocytes harvested from Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa (JEB) patients (#552

  1. Strongly-coupled Josephson junction array for simulation of frustrated one-dimensional spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Du, Lianghui; Zhou, Xingxiang; Han, Yongjian; Guo, Guangcan

    2013-03-01

    We study the capacitance-coupled Josephson-junction array beyond the small-coupling limit. We find that, when the scale of the system is large, its Hamiltonian can be obtained without the small-coupling approximation and the system can be used to simulate strongly frustrated one-dimensional Ising spin problems. To engineer the system Hamiltonian for an ideal theoretical model, we apply a dynamical-decoupling technique to eliminate undesirable couplings in the system. Using a six-site junction array as an example, we numerically evaluate the system to show that it exhibits important characteristics of the frustrated spin model.

  2. Mathematical modeling of intrinsic Josephson junctions with capacitive and inductive couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Sarhadov, I.; Andreeva, O.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the current voltage characteristics (CVC) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) with two types of couplings between junctions: capacitive and inductive. The IJJ model is described by a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations which is solved numerically by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The method of numerical simulation and numerical results are presented. The magnetic field distribution is calculated as the function of coordinate and time at different values of the bias current. The influence of model parameters on the CVC is studied. The behavior of the IJJ in dependence on coupling parameters is discussed.

  3. Computational model of erratic arrhythmias in a cardiac cell network: the role of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Casaleggio, Aldo; Hines, Michael L; Migliore, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac morbidity and mortality increases with the population age. To investigate the underlying pathological mechanisms, and suggest new ways to reduce clinical risks, computational approaches complementing experimental and clinical investigations are becoming more and more important. Here we explore the possible processes leading to the occasional onset and termination of the (usually) non-fatal arrhythmias widely observed in the heart. Using a computational model of a two-dimensional network of cardiac cells, we tested the hypothesis that an ischemia alters the properties of the gap junctions inside the ischemic area. In particular, in agreement with experimental findings, we assumed that an ischemic episode can alter the gap junctions of the affected cells by reducing their average conductance. We extended these changes to include random fluctuations with time, and modifications in the gap junction rectifying conductive properties of cells along the edges of the ischemic area. The results demonstrate how these alterations can qualitatively give an account of all the main types of non-fatal arrhythmia observed experimentally, and suggest how premature beats can be eliminated in three different ways: a) with a relatively small surgical procedure, b) with a pharmacological reduction of the rectifying conductive properties of the gap-junctions, and c) by pharmacologically decreasing the gap junction conductance. In conclusion, our model strongly supports the hypothesis that non-fatal arrhythmias can develop from post-ischemic alteration of the electrical connectivity in a relatively small area of the cardiac cell network, and suggests experimentally testable predictions on their possible treatments.

  4. Modeling the power flow in normal conductor-insulator-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Jochum, J.; Mears, C.; Golwala, S.; Sadoulet, B.; Castle, J.P.; Cunningham, M.F.; Drury, O.B.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E.; Lipschultz, F.P.; Netel, H.; Neuhauser, B.

    1998-03-01

    Normal conductor-insulator-superconductor (NIS) junctions promise to be interesting for x-ray and phonon sensing applications, in particular due to the expected self-cooling of the N electrode by the tunneling current. Such cooling would enable the operation of the active element of the sensor below the cryostat temperature and at a correspondingly higher sensitivity. It would also allow the use of NIS junctions as microcoolers. At present, this cooling has not been realized in large area junctions (suitable for a number of detector applications). In this article, we discuss a detailed modeling of the heat flow in such junctions; we show how the heat flow into the normal electrode by quasiparticle back-tunneling and phonon absorption from quasiparticle pair recombination can overcompensate the cooling power. This provides a microscopic explanation of the self-heating effects we observe in our large area NIS junctions. The model suggests a number of possible solutions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Predictive model for the size of bubbles and droplets created in microfluidic T-junctions.

    PubMed

    van Steijn, Volkert; Kleijn, Chris R; Kreutzer, Michiel T

    2010-10-07

    We present a closed-form expression that allows the reader to predict the size of bubbles and droplets created in T-junctions without fitting. Despite the wide use of microfluidic devices to create bubbles and droplets, a physically sound expression for the size of bubbles and droplets, key in many applications, did not yet exist. The theoretical foundation of our expression comprises three main ingredients: continuity, geometrics and recently gained understanding of the mechanism which leads to pinch-off. Our simple theoretical model explains why the size of bubbles and droplets strongly depends on the shape of a T-junction, and teaches how the shape can be tuned to obtain the desired size. We successfully validated our model experimentally by analyzing the formation of gas bubbles, as well as liquid droplets, in T-junctions with a wide variety of shapes under conditions typical to multiphase microfluidics.

  6. Modified pressure loss model for T-junctions of engine exhaust manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhui; Lu, Xiaolu; Cui, Yi; Deng, Kangyao

    2014-11-01

    The T-junction model of engine exhaust manifolds significantly influences the simulation precision of the pressure wave and mass flow rate in the intake and exhaust manifolds of diesel engines. Current studies have focused on constant pressure models, constant static pressure models and pressure loss models. However, low model precision is a common disadvantage when simulating engine exhaust manifolds, particularly for turbocharged systems. To study the performance of junction flow, a cold wind tunnel experiment with high velocities at the junction of a diesel exhaust manifold is performed, and the variation in the pressure loss in the T-junction under different flow conditions is obtained. Despite the trend of the calculated total pressure loss coefficient, which is obtained by using the original pressure loss model and is the same as that obtained from the experimental results, large differences exist between the calculated and experimental values. Furthermore, the deviation becomes larger as the flow velocity increases. By improving the Vazsonyi formula considering the flow velocity and introducing the distribution function, a modified pressure loss model is established, which is suitable for a higher velocity range. Then, the new model is adopted to solve one-dimensional, unsteady flow in a D6114 turbocharged diesel engine. The calculated values are compared with the measured data, and the result shows that the simulation accuracy of the pressure wave before the turbine is improved by 4.3% with the modified pressure loss model because gas compressibility is considered when the flow velocities are high. The research results provide valuable information for further junction flow research, particularly the correction of the boundary condition in one-dimensional simulation models.

  7. Synchronization of coupled rotators: Josephson junction ladders and the Kuramoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, B. C.; Trees, B. R.

    2002-10-01

    We show that the resistively shunted junction (RSJ) equations describing a ladder array of overdamped, critical-current disordered Josephson junctions that are current-biased along the rungs of the ladder can be mapped onto a Kuramoto model with nearest-neighbor, sinusoidal couplings. This result is obtained by an averaging method, in which the fast dynamics of the RSJ equations are integrated out, leaving the dynamics which describe the time scale over which neighboring junctions along the rungs of the ladder phase and frequency synchronize. We quantify the degree of frequency synchronization of the rung junctions by calculating the standard deviation of their time-averaged voltages, σ_ω, and the phase synchronization is quantified by calculating the time average of the modulus of the Kuramoto order parameter, < |r|>. We test the results of our averaging process by comparing the values of σ_ω and < |r|> for the original RSJ equations and our averaged equations. We find excellent agreement for DC bias currents of I_B/< I_c>agt 3, where < I_c> is the average critical current of the rung junctions, and critical current disorders of up to 10%. We also study the effects of thermal noise on the synchronization properties of the overdamped ladder. Finally, we find that including the effects of junction capacitance can lead to a discontinuous synchronization transition as the strength of the coupling between neighboring junctions is smoothly varied. This project was supported by the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Research Program which was funded in part by the McGregor Fund.

  8. Modeling of 4H—SiC multi-floating-junction Schottky barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hong-Bin; Cao, Lin; Chen, Zhi-Ming; Ren, Jie; Nan, Ya-Gong

    2010-10-01

    This paper develops a new and easy to implement analytical model for the specific on-resistance and electric field distribution along the critical path for 4H—SiC multi-floating junction Schottky barrier diode. Considering the charge compensation effects by the multilayer of buried opposite doped regions, it improves the breakdown voltage a lot in comparison with conventional one with the same on-resistance. The forward resistance of the floating junction Schottky barrier diode consists of several components and the electric field can be understood with superposition concept, both are consistent with MEDICI simulation results. Moreover, device parameters are optimized and the analyses show that in comparison with one layer floating junction, multilayer of floating junction layer is an effective way to increase the device performance when specific resistance and the breakdown voltage are traded off. The results show that the specific resistance increases 3.2 mΩ·cm2 and breakdown voltage increases 422 V with an additional floating junction for the given structure.

  9. Theoretical values of various parameters in the Gummel-Poon model of a bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, R.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters in the Gummel-Poon model of a bipolar junction transistor are expressed in terms of the basic structure of a transistor. A consistent theoretical approach is used which facilitates an understanding of the foundations and limitations of the derived formulas. The results enable one to predict how changes in the geometry and composition of a transistor would affect performance.

  10. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models.

  11. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  12. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Ormand, W. Erich; Caurier, Etienne; Bertulani, Carlos

    2005-10-14

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+6Li and 6He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7Be(p,{gamma})8B S-factor.

  13. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-04-29

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+{sup 6}Li and {sup 6}He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B S-factor.

  14. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  15. Feynman's and Ohta's Models of a Josephson Junction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Josephson equations are derived by means of the weakly coupled two-level quantum system model given by Feynman. Adopting a simplified version of Ohta's model, starting from Feynman's model, the strict voltage-frequency Josephson relation is derived. The contribution of Ohta's approach to the comprehension of the additional term given by the…

  16. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  17. Multiple inner core wobbles in a simple Earth model with inviscid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, Yves

    2010-01-01

    The inner core wobble (ICW) is the chandler wobble of the inner core. Its predicted period for the PREM model is about 7.5 years, based upon the resolution of the Liouville equations of conservation of angular momentum. Here, solving the local equation of conservation of linear momentum with a truncated chain that couples the toroidal and spheroidal displacement fields, the ICW is computed for a model made up of three homogeneous layers: an incompressible liquid outer core and rigid mantle and inner core. Contrary to the angular momentum approach, as implemented up to now, that provides a single ICW, the linear momentum approach shows that the dynamics of the neutrally stratified outer core may generate a family of ICWs with periods ranging from a few dozens to thousands of days. The mode with the largest wobble amplitude in the inner core has a period close to that obtained with the angular momentum approach.

  18. Analytical models of on-resistance and breakdown voltage for 4H-SiC floating junction Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hao; Tang, Xiaoyan; Song, Qingwen; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming; Yang, Fei; Niu, Yingxi

    2015-01-01

    The analytical models of on-resistance and reverse breakdown voltage for 4H-SiC floating junction SBD are presented with the analysis of the transport path of the carriers and electric field distribution in the drift region. The calculation results from the analytical models well agree with the simulation results. The effects of the key structure parameters on specific on-resistance and breakdown voltage are described respectively by analytical models. Moreover, the relationship between BFOM and parameters of floating junction are investigated. It is proved that the analytical models are more convenient for the design of the floating junction SBDs.

  19. Tight-binding model for amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions formed with carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Hyeon; Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-05-01

    We measured the conductance of a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junction formed with carbon electrodes by using a scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. The tight-binding model that includes the molecular backbone states accurately captured the experimentally measured the molecular conductance and the exponential decay trend of the conductance with the molecular backbone length. Furthermore, we found that this model tracked successfully the shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital toward the Fermi energy as increasing the molecular length. Finally, we found that the tight-binding model explaining more week coupling strength with the graphite electrode than that with the Au electrode is in quantitative agreement with the density functional theory calculations.

  20. Physical model of the contact resistivity of metal-graphene junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, Ferney A. Jiménez, David; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

    2014-04-28

    While graphene-based technology shows great promise for a variety of electronic applications, including radio-frequency devices, the resistance of the metal-graphene contact is a technological bottleneck for the realization of viable graphene electronics. One of the most important factors in determining the resistance of a metal-graphene junction is the contact resistivity. Despite the large number of experimental works that exist in the literature measuring the contact resistivity, a simple model of it is still lacking. In this paper, we present a comprehensive physical model for the contact resistivity of these junctions, based on the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian method. This model unveils the role played by different electrical and physical parameters in determining the specific contact resistivity, such as the chemical potential of interaction, the work metal-graphene function difference, and the insulator thickness between the metal and graphene. In addition, our model reveals that the contact resistivity is strongly dependent on the bias voltage across the metal-graphene junction. This model is applicable to a wide variety of graphene-based electronic devices and thus is useful for understanding how to optimize the contact resistance in these systems.

  1. Secular variation and core-flow modelling with stable strafication at the top of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Richard; Buffett, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Observed geomagnetic secular variation has been used for many years to provide an observational constraint on the dynamics of the core through the modelling of its surface flow. Recent results in both seismology and mineral physics provide strong evidence of a stably stratified layer at the top of the core, which has substantial implications for the calculation of such flows. It has been assumed for many years that the dynamic state at the core surface is close to tangentially geostrophic, and pure stable stratification also requires a flow to be toroidal. Combining these two conditions requires variations in flow that are completely zonal toroidal, which are known not to provide an adequate explanation of the observed secular variation. However, a stably stratified layer can support flow instabilities of a more general character. Buffett (2014) has recently provided a model in which zonal toroidal motions are associated with the excitation of a zonal poloidal instability. This model is able to explain the broad variation of the axial dipole over the past 100 years, and also to explain feature of geomagnetic jerks that cannot be explained by purely torsional motions. This model has inspired a new generation of core-flow models, with a substantial time-varying zonal poloidal component, something that is absent from most models of core surface flow. Here, we present these new models, and consider to what extent this flow structure can explain the details of secular variation. We also consider the implications for the connection between core-surface flow and length-of-day variation - a stably stratified layer has implications for the interpretation of core flow and the Earth's angular momentum budget. Finally, we consider the ability of core-surface flow models to probe the structure of the stably- stratified layer. Buffett (2014). Geomagnetic fluctuations reveal stable stratification at the top of the Earth's core, Nature 507, 484-487, doi:10.1038/nature13122

  2. A technique for modelling p- n junction depletion capacitance of multiple doping regions in integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkham, Raymond; Anderson, Daniel F.

    1986-08-01

    The continuing advancements in integrated circuit technology have placed new burdons on the circuit design engineer, who must rely extensively upon computer simulation to correctly predict circuit behavior. One challenge is to develop better modelling techniques to more accurately deal with complex p- n junction structures often used in modern VLSI designs. This paper presents an easily implemented method for deriving parameters which accurately model the behavior of MOS VLSI structures containing complex p- n junction capacitance components. The methodology is applicable to both planar and laterally diffused junctions, whether formed by direct ion implantation or by diffusion from a finite or infinite source. The theories behind the equations used and results of the application of this new technique are discussed. A flow chart for a fitter program based on the new method is presented and described. The corresponding program written for the TI-59 scientific programmable calculator is available. Final model parameters are given and are shown to produce a numerical capacitance model which is accurate to within 2%.

  3. Theoretical Modeling of Josephson Junctions for Digital Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-29

    the Mott insulator-superfluid transition in the Bose Hubbard model", National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersberg (November, 2002...Phys. Rev. B 69, 165105--1-5 (2004). [20] D. 0. Demchencko, A. V. Joura, and J. K. Freericks, Effect of particle-hole asymmetry on the Mott- Hubbard

  4. A three-dimensional junction-pore-matrix model for capillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Weinbaum, S; Tsay, R; Curry, F E

    1992-07-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented for the hydraulic conductivity and diffusive permeability of capillary endothelial clefts with a junctional strand with discrete pores and a fiber matrix in its wide parts. The model attempts to provide new insight into long-standing issues concerning the relative importance of open junction discontinuities, restricted slit regions, and matrix components in determining the permeability and selectivity of the capillary wall. The predictions drawn from the model are used to formulate new experiments to test two hypotheses concerning the molecular organization of the junction strand and the location of matrix structures in the wide part of the cleft. Using the three-dimensional theoretical approach recently developed by Tsay, Weinbaum, and Pfeffer (Chem. Eng. Comm. 82, 67-102, 1989), the model first explores the behavior of three different molecular models for the junctional strand discontinuities: (i) a more frequent circular pore of 5.5-nm radius formed by isolated missing junction proteins; (ii) a restricted rectangular slit of four to eight missing proteins and 8-nm gap height; and (iii) larger more infrequent breaks of four to eight missing proteins with a gap height of 22 nm, equal to the width of the wide part of the cleft. For the circular and 8-nm gap height pores the primary molecular sieve can be located at the level of the junction strand, whereas for the 22-nm gap height pores, matrix components must be present in at least some portion of the cleft to provide the molecular filter. The water flow through the cross-bridging fibers in the wide part of the cleft is described either by a new exact three-dimensional theory (Tsay and Weinbaum, J. Fluid Mech. 226, 125-148, 1991) for an ordered periodic array or by a new approximate theory for a random array of perpendicular fibers. Both this theory and the new approximate theory for diffusion presented herein take into account for the first time the interaction between the

  5. Spontaneous calcium signals induced by gap junctions in a network model of astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a network model of astrocytes coupled by gap junctions is investigated. Calcium dynamics of the single cell is described by the biophysical model comprising the set of three nonlinear differential equations. Intercellular dynamics is provided by the diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) through gap junctions between neighboring astrocytes. It is found that the diffusion induces the appearance of spontaneous activity patterns in the network. Stability of the network steady state is analyzed. It is proved that the increase of the diffusion coefficient above a certain critical value yields the generation of low-amplitude subthreshold oscillatory signals in a certain frequency range. It is shown that such spontaneous oscillations can facilitate calcium pulse generation and provide a certain time scale in astrocyte signaling.

  6. The Bose-Hubbard model: from Josephson junction arrays to optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, C.; Fazio, R.; Schön, G.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]The Bose-Hubbard model is a paradigm for the study of strongly correlated bosonic systems. We review some of its properties with emphasis on the implications on quantum phase transitions of Josephson junction arrays and quantum dynamics of topological excitations as well as the properties of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices.

  7. Bacterial Fouling in a Model Core System

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. C.; Bramhill, B.; Wardlaw, N. C.; Costerton, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a sintered glass bead core to simulate the spaces and surfaces of reservoir rock in studies of the bacterial plugging phenomenon that affects waterflood oil recovery operations. The passage of pure or mixed natural populations of bacteria through this solid matrix was initially seen to promote the formation of adherent bacterial microcolonies on available surfaces. Bacteria within these microcolonies produced huge amounts of exopolysaccharides and coalesced to form a confluent plugging biofilm that eventually caused a >99% decrease in core permeability. Aerobic bacteria developed a plugging biofilm on the inlet face of the core, facultative anaerobes plugged throughout the core, and dead bacteria did not effectively plug the narrow (33-μm) spaces of this solid matrix because they neither adhered extensively to surfaces nor produced the extensive exopolysaccharides characteristic of living cells. The presence of particles in the water used in these experiments rapidly decreased the core permeability because they became trapped in the developing biofilm and accelerated the plugging of pore spaces. Once established, cells within the bacterial biofilm could be killed by treatment with a biocide (isothiazalone), but their essentially inert carbohydrate biofilm matrix persisted and continued to plug the pore spaces, whereas treatment with 5% sodium hypochlorite killed the bacteria, dissolved the exopolysaccharide biofilm matrix, and restored permeability to these plugged glass bead cores. Images PMID:16346760

  8. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  9. Ab initio no core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Navrátil, Petr; Vary, James P.

    2012-11-17

    and NNN interactions, characterized by the order of the expansion retained (e.g. 'next-to-next-to leading order' is NNLO), provide a high-quality fit to the NN data and the A = 3 ground-state (g.s.) properties. The derivations of NN, NNN, etc. interactions within meson-exchange and {chi}EFT are well-established but are not subjects of this review. Our focus is solution of the non-relativistic quantum many-body Hamiltonian that includes these interactions using our no core shell model (NCSM) formalism. In the next section we will briefly outline the NCSM formalism and then present applications, results and extensions in later sections.

  10. Gaussian tunneling model of c-axis twist Josephson junctions.

    SciTech Connect

    Bille, A.; Klemm, R. A.; Scharnberg, K.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Hamburg

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the critical current density J{sub c}{sup J}({var_phi}{sub 0}) for Josephson tunneling between identical high-temperature superconductors twisted an angle {var_phi}{sub 0} about the c axis. Regardless of the shape of the two-dimensional Fermi surface and for very general tunneling matrix elements, an order parameter (OP) with general d-wave symmetry leads to J{sub c}{sup J}({pi}/4)=0. This general result is inconsistent with the data of Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4160 (1999)] on Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi2212), which showed J{sub c}{sup J} to be independent of {var_phi}{sub 0}. If the momentum parallel to the barrier is conserved in the tunneling process, J{sub c}{sup J} should vary substantially with the twist angle {var_phi}{sub 0} when the tight-binding Fermi surface appropriate for Bi2212 is taken into account, even if the OP is completely isotropic. We quantify the degree of momentum nonconservation necessary to render J{sub c}{sup J}({var_phi}{sub 0}) constant within experimental error for a variety of pair states by interpolating between the coherent and incoherent limits using five specific models to describe the momentum dependence of the tunneling matrix element squared. From the data of Li et al., we conclude that the c-axis tunneling in Bi2212 must be very nearly incoherent, and that the OP must have a nonvanishing Fermi-surface average for T<{approx}T{sub c}. We further show that the apparent conventional sum-rule violation observed by Basov et al. [Science 283, 49 (1999)] can be consistent with such strongly incoherent c-axis tunneling.

  11. Controlling the conductance of molecular junctions using proton transfer reactions: A theoretical model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Chriszandro; Coto, Pedro B.; Thoss, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an intramolecular proton transfer reaction on the conductance of a molecular junction is investigated employing a generic model, which includes the effects of the electric field of the gate and leads electrodes and the coupling to a dissipative environment. Using a quantum master equation approach it is shown that, depending on the localization of the proton, the junction exhibits a high or low current state, which can be controlled by external electric fields. Considering different regimes, which range from weak to strong hydrogen bonds in the proton transfer complex and comprise situations with high and low barriers, necessary preconditions to achieve control are analyzed. The results show that systems with a weak hydrogen bond and a significant energy barrier for the proton transfer can be used as molecular transistors or diodes.

  12. Tucker core consistency for validation of restricted Tucker3 models.

    PubMed

    Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Akhlaghi, Yousef; Bro, Rasmus

    2012-04-20

    In Tucker3 analysis of three-way data array obtained from a chemical or biological system, it is sometimes possible to use a priori knowledge about the system to specify what is called a restricted Tucker3 model. Often, the restricted Tucker3 model is characterized by having some elements of the core forced to zero. As a simple example, an F-component PARAFAC model can be seen as a restricted (F, F, F) Tucker3 model in which only superdiagonal elements of the core are allowed to be nonzero. The core consistency diagnostic was previously introduced by Bro and Kiers for determining the proper number of components in PARAFAC analysis. In the current study, this diagnostic is extended to other restricted Tucker3 models to validate the appropriateness of the applied constraints. The new diagnostic is named Tucker core consistency (TuckCorCon). When the dimensionality and the pattern of the restricted core is valid, the simple core of restricted Tucker3 model and a corresponding unrestricted core will be similar and in this case the TuckCorCon will be close to maximum (100%). A simulated chemical equilibrium data set and two experimental data sets were used to evaluate the applicability of the TuckCorCon to decide about the appropriateness of dimensionality and pattern of the core nonzero elements in the restricted Tucker3 models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize Functional Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Injury to Human Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0688 TITLE: Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize Functional Mechanisms of Sulfur...2005 Final 1 May 2001 -28 Feb 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a, CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Tissue Models of Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa to Characterize... Epidermolysis Bullosa (JEB) patients (#552), that lack a functional y2 chain of laminin 5 and do not adhere to BM, were transduced with retroviral vectors (TASK

  14. Functional asymmetry and plasticity of electrical synapses interconnecting neurons through a 36-state model of gap junction channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Kraujalis, Tadas; Maciunas, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    We combined the Hodgkin–Huxley equations and a 36-state model of gap junction channel gating to simulate electrical signal transfer through electrical synapses. Differently from most previous studies, our model can account for dynamic modulation of junctional conductance during the spread of electrical signal between coupled neurons. The model of electrical synapse is based on electrical properties of the gap junction channel encompassing two fast and two slow gates triggered by the transjunctional voltage. We quantified the influence of a difference in input resistances of electrically coupled neurons and instantaneous conductance–voltage rectification of gap junctions on an asymmetry of cell-to-cell signaling. We demonstrated that such asymmetry strongly depends on junctional conductance and can lead to the unidirectional transfer of action potentials. The simulation results also revealed that voltage spikes, which develop between neighboring cells during the spread of action potentials, can induce a rapid decay of junctional conductance, thus demonstrating spiking activity-dependent short-term plasticity of electrical synapses. This conclusion was supported by experimental data obtained in HeLa cells transfected with connexin45, which is among connexin isoforms expressed in neurons. Moreover, the model allowed us to replicate the kinetics of junctional conductance under different levels of intracellular concentration of free magnesium ([Mg2+]i), which was experimentally recorded in cells expressing connexin36, a major neuronal connexin. We demonstrated that such [Mg2+]i-dependent long-term plasticity of the electrical synapse can be adequately reproduced through the changes of slow gate parameters of the 36-state model. This suggests that some types of chemical modulation of gap junctions can be executed through the underlying mechanisms of voltage gating. Overall, the developed model accounts for direction-dependent asymmetry, as well as for short- and long

  15. Sustained rhythmic activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks of model neurons depends on the diameter of coupled dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Gansert, Juliane; Golowasch, Jorge; Nadim, Farzan

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions are known to be important for many network functions such as synchronization of activity and the generation of waves and oscillations. Gap junctions have also been proposed to be essential for the generation of early embryonic activity. We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. Additionally, in networks of gap-junctionally coupled neurons, rhythmic activity can emerge when closed loops (re-entrant paths) occur but again only for a finite range of dendrite diameters. The frequency of such rhythmic activity depends on the length of the path and the dendrite diameter. For large networks of randomly coupled neurons, we find that the re-entrant paths that underlie rhythmic activity also depend on dendrite diameter. These results underline the potential importance of dendrite diameter as a determinant of network activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks, such as network rhythms that are observed during early nervous system development. PMID:17913989

  16. Important issues facing model-based approaches to tunneling transport in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2015-08-21

    Extensive studies on thin films indicated a generic cubic current-voltage I-V dependence as a salient feature of charge transport by tunneling. A quick glance at I-V data for molecular junctions suggests a qualitatively similar behavior. This would render model-based studies almost irrelevant, since, whatever the model, its parameters can always be adjusted to fit symmetric (asymmetric) I-V curves characterized by two (three) expansion coefficients. Here, we systematically examine popular models based on tunneling barriers or tight-binding pictures and demonstrate that, for a quantitative description at biases of interest (V slightly higher than the transition voltage Vt), cubic expansions do not suffice. A detailed collection of analytical formulae as well as their conditions of applicability is presented to facilitate experimentalist colleagues to process and interpret their experimental data obtained by measuring currents in molecular junctions. We discuss in detail the limits of applicability of the various models and emphasize that uncritically adjusting the model parameters to experiment may be unjustified because the values deduced in this way may fall in ranges rendering a specific model invalid or incompatible to ab initio estimates. We exemplify with the benchmark case of oligophenylene-based junctions, for which the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations are also reported. As a specific issue, we address the impact of the spatial potential profile and show that it is not notable up to biases V ≳ Vt, unlike at higher biases, where it may be responsible for negative differential resistance effects.

  17. Nanomanipulation and Lithography: The Building (and Modeling) of Carbon Nanotube Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Richard Nam

    2002-12-01

    Aircraft fuselages suffer alternating stress during takeoffs and landings, and fatigue cracks begin to grow, usually at rivet holes. The detection of these fatigue cracks under installed fasteners in aging aircraft is a major goal of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. The use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors in electromagnetic (EM) NDE has been increasing rapidly. For example, here at Langley Research Center, a Rotating Probe System (RPS) containing a GMR element has been incorporated into a product to detect deeply buried flaws in aerospace structures. In order to advance this eddy current probe application and many similar ones, research to create smaller, more sensitive and energy-efficient EM sensors has been aggressively pursued. Recent theoretical and experimental work on spin coherent transport supports the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based magnetic tunnel junctions. In this study, a spatial filtering scheme is presented that improves the signal to noise ratio of the RPS and does not significantly impact the number of false alarms. Signals due to buried flaws occur at higher frequencies than do signals due to rivet tilt or probe misalignment, and the strategy purposefully targets this fact. Furthermore, the spatial filtering scheme exploits decreases in the probe output that are observed immediately preceding and following the peak in output due to a fatigue crack. Using the new filters, an enhanced probability of flaw detection is expected. In the future, even tinier, more sensitive, low-power sensors are envisioned for the rotating probe and other nondestructive inspection systems. These may be comprised of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that connect two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Theoretical work has been done at Langley to model the electrical and magnetoconductance behavior of such junctions, for systems containing short "armchair" nanotubes. The present work facilitates the modeling of more realistic system

  18. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials.

  19. Characterization and modeling of radiation damages via internal radiative efficiency in multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kim, Changsu; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Chen, Shaoqiang; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    In order to understand the radiation effects in space-used multi-junction solar cells, we characterized degradations of internal radiative efficiency (ηint i ) in respective subcells in InGaP/GaAs double-junction solar cells after 1-MeV electron irradiations with different electrons fluences (Φ) via absolute electroluminescence (EL) measurements, because ηint i purely represents material-quality change due to radiation damage, independently from cell structures. We analyzed the degradation of ηint i under different Φ and found that the data of ηint i versus Φ in moderate and high Φ regions are very similar and almost independent of subcell materials, while the difference in beginning-of-life qualities of InGaP and GaAs materials causes dominant difference in sub-cell sensitivity to the low radiation damages. Finally, a simple model was proposed to explain the mechanism in degradation of ηint i, and also well explained the degradation behavior in open-circuit voltage for these multi-junction solar cells.

  20. Neuromuscular junctions are pathological but not denervated in two mouse models of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Poort, Jessica E; Rheuben, Mary B; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-09-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive, late onset neuromuscular disease causing motor dysfunction in men. While the morphology of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is typically affected by neuromuscular disease, whether NMJs in SBMA are similarly affected by disease is not known. Such information will shed light on whether defective NMJs might contribute to the loss of motor function and represent a potential therapeutic target for treating symptoms of SBMA. To address this gap in information, the morphology of NMJs was examined in two mouse models of SBMA, a myogenic model that overexpresses wildtype androgen receptor (AR) exclusively in muscle fibres and a knockin (KI) model expressing a humanized mutant AR gene. The tripartite motor synapse consisting of motor nerve terminal, terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) and postsynaptic specialization were visualized and analysed using confocal microscopy. Counter to expectation, we found no evidence of denervation in either model, but junctions in both models show pathological fragmentation and an abnormal synaptophysin distribution consistent with functionally weak synapses. Neurofilament accumulations were observed only in the myogenic model, even though axonal transport dysfunction is characteristic of both models. The ultrastructure of NMJs revealed additional pathology, including deficits in docked vesicles presynaptically, wider synaptic clefts, and simpler secondary folds postsynaptically. The observed pathology of NMJs in diseased SBMA mice is likely the morphological correlates of defects in synaptic function which may underlie motor impairments associated with SBMA.

  1. Modeling of Schottky Barrier Modulation due to Oxidation at Metallic Electrode and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model is proposed for the previously reported lower Schottky barrier for holes PHI (sub bH) in air than in vacuum at a metallic electrode - semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) junction. We assume that there is a transition region between the electrode and the CNT, and an appreciable potential can drop there. The role of the oxidation is to increase this potential drop with negatively charged oxygen molecules on the CNT, leading to lower PHI(sub Bh) after oxidation. The mechanism prevails in both p- and n-CNTs, and the model consistently explains the key experimental findings.

  2. Stochastic Model of Gap Junctions Exhibiting Rectification and Multiple Closed States of Slow Gates.

    PubMed

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Kraujalis, Tadas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Maciunas, Kestutis; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2016-03-29

    Gap-junction (GJ) channels formed from connexin (Cx) proteins provide direct pathways for electrical and metabolic cell-cell communication. Earlier, we developed a stochastic 16-state model (S16SM) of voltage gating of the GJ channel containing two pairs of fast and slow gates, each operating between open (o) and closed (c) states. However, experimental data suggest that gates may in fact contain two or more closed states. We developed a model in which the slow gate operates according to a linear reaction scheme, o↔c1↔c2, where c1 and c2 are initial-closed and deep-closed states that both close the channel fully, whereas the fast gate operates between the open state and the closed state and exhibits a residual conductance. Thus, we developed a stochastic 36-state model (S36SM) of GJ channel gating that is sensitive to transjunctional voltage (Vj). To accelerate simulation and eliminate noise in simulated junctional conductance (gj) records, we transformed an S36SM into a Markov chain 36-state model (MC36SM) of GJ channel gating. This model provides an explanation for well-established experimental data, such as delayed gj recovery after Vj gating, hysteresis of gj-Vj dependence, and the low ratio of functional channels to the total number of GJ channels clustered in junctional plaques, and it has the potential to describe chemically mediated gating, which cannot be reflected using an S16SM. The MC36SM, when combined with global optimization algorithms, can be used for automated estimation of gating parameters including probabilities of c1↔c2 transitions from experimental gj-time and gj-Vj dependencies. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A junction-orifice-fiber entrance layer model for capillary permeability: application to frog mesenteric capillaries.

    PubMed

    Fu, B M; Weinbaum, S; Tsay, R Y; Curry, F E

    1994-11-01

    The recent serial section electron microscopic studies by Adamson and Michel (1993) on microves gels of frog mesentery have revealed that the large pores in the junction strand of the interendothelial cleft are widely separated 150 nm wide orifice-like breaks whose gap height 20 nm is the same as the wide part of the cleft. In this paper a modified version of the model in Weinbaum et al. (1992) is first developed in which this orifice structure is explored in combination with a random or ordered fiber matrix layer that is at the luminal surface and/or occupies a fraction of the wide part of the cleft. This basic orifice model predicts that for the measured Lp to be achieved the fiber layer must be confined to a relatively narrow region at the entrance to the cleft where it serves as the primary molecular filter. The model provides a much better fit of the permeability P for intermediate size solutes between 1 and 2 nm radius than the previous model in Weinbaum et al., where the junction strand breaks were treated as finite depth circular or rectangular pores, but like the previous model significantly underestimates P for small ions. However, it is shown that if a small frequent pore of 1.5 nm radius with characteristic spacing comparable to the diameter of the junction proteins or a continuous narrow slit of approximately 1.5 to 2.3 nm gap height is also present in the continuous part of the junction strand, small ion permeability can also be satisfied. The 1.5 nm radius pore does not significantly change Lp, whereas the continuous narrow slit provides a contribution to Lp that is comparable to, or in the case of the 2.3 nm slit greater than, the widely spaced 150 nm orifices. Thus, for the narrow slit the contribution to Lp from the orifices can be as low as 1.0 x 10(-7) cm/s/cm H2O and it is also possible to satisfy the 2.5 fold increase in permeability that occurs when the matrix is enzymatically removed from the luminal side of the cleft, Adamson (1990). The

  4. Developing the HTA core model for the online environment.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Kristian; Pasternack, Iris; Saarekas, Oskari; Raustia, Leena; Cleemput, Irina; Corio, Mirella; Endel, Gottfried; Frønsdal, Katrine; Imaz, Iñaki; Kleijnen, Sarah; Kristensen, Finn; Rüther, Alric; Werkö, Sophie; Cerbo, Marina

    2014-11-01

    A framework for collaborative production and sharing of HTA information, the HTA Core Model, was originally developed within EUnetHTA in 2006-08. In this paper, we describe the further development of the Model to allow implementation and utilization of the Model online. The aim was to capture a generic HTA process that would allow effective use of the HTA Core Model and resulting HTA information while at the same time not interfering with HTA agencies' internal processes. The work was coordinated by a development team in Finland, supported by an international expert group. Two pilot testing rounds were organized among EUnetHTA agencies and two extensive core HTA projects tested the tool in a real setting. The final work was also formally validated by a group of HTA agencies. The HTA Core Model Online--available at http://www.corehta.info--is a web site hosting a) a tool to allow electronic utilization of the HTA Core Model and b) a database of produced HTA information. While access to the HTA information is free to all, the production features are currently available to EUnetHTA member agencies only. A policy was crafted to steer the use of the Model and produced information. We have successfully enabled electronic use of the HTA Core Model and agreed on a policy for its utilization. The system is already being used in subsequent HTA projects within EUnetHTA Joint Action 2. Identified shortcomings and further needs will be addressed in subsequent development.

  5. Constraint on the 1D earth model near core-mantle boundary by free core nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengli; Zhang, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Free core nutation (FCN) is a normal mode of the rotating earth with fluid outer core (FOC). Its period depends on the physics of the mantle and FOC, especially the parameters near core-mantle boundary (CMB), like the density and elastic (Lame) parameters. FCN period can be determined very accurately by VLBI and superconductive tidal gravimetry, but the theoretical calculation results of FCN period from traditional approaches and 1D earth model (like PREM) deviate significantly from the accurate observation. Meanwhile, the influence of the uncertainty of a given earth model on nutation has never been studied before. In this work, a numerical experiment is presented to check this problem, and we want to see whether FCN can provide a constraint on the construction of a 1D earth model, especially on the gradient of material density near CMB.

  6. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth’s core

    PubMed Central

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S.; Brodholt, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain “light elements,” such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe–Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle. PMID:24821817

  7. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle.

  8. Accessing gap-junction channel structure-function relationships through molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Villanelo, F; Escalona, Y; Pareja-Barrueto, C; Garate, J A; Skerrett, I M; Perez-Acle, T

    2017-01-17

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) are massive protein channels connecting the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. These channels allow intercellular transfer of molecules up to ~1 kDa, including water, ions and other metabolites. Unveiling structure-function relationships coded into the molecular architecture of these channels is necessary to gain insight on their vast biological function including electrical synapse, inflammation, development and tissular homeostasis. From early works, computational methods have been critical to analyze and interpret experimental observations. Upon the availability of crystallographic structures, molecular modeling and simulations have become a valuable tool to assess structure-function relationships in GJCs. Modeling different connexin isoforms, simulating the transport process, and exploring molecular variants, have provided new hypotheses and out-of-the-box approaches to the study of these important channels. Here, we review foundational structural studies and recent developments on GJCs using molecular modeling and simulation techniques, highlighting the methods and the cross-talk with experimental evidence. By comparing results obtained by molecular modeling and simulations techniques with structural and functional information obtained from both recent literature and structural databases, we provide a critical assesment of structure-function relationships that can be obtained from the junction between theoretical and experimental evidence.

  9. Model-Form Uncertainty Quantification in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinlong; Wang, Jianxun; Xiao, Heng

    2015-11-01

    Junction flow, known as one of the remaining challenges for computational aerodynamics, occurs when a boundary layer encounters an obstacle mounted on the surface. Previous studies have shown that the RANS models are not capable to provide satisfactory prediction. In this work, a novel open-box, physics-informed Bayesian framework is used to quantify the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulation of junction flow. The first objective is to correct the bias in RANS prediction, by utilizing several observation data. The second one is to quantify the model-form uncertainties, which can enable risk-informed decision-making. To begin with a standard RANS simulation, which is performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder, uncertainties with empirical prior knowledge and physical constraints are directly injected into the Reynolds stresses term, and the unbiased knowledge from observation data is incorporated by an iterative ensemble Kalman method. Current results show that the bias in the quantities of interest (QoIs) of the RANS prediction, e.g., mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, etc, can be significantly corrected by this novel Bayesian framework. The probability density distributions of QoIs show that the model-form uncertainty can be quantified as well.

  10. 20-junction photonic power converter performance under non-uniform illumination calculated by 3D distributed circuit model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Sanmeet; Wilkins, Mathew M.; Masson, Denis P.; Fafard, Simon; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Distributed circuit models (DCM) divide photovoltaic devices into discrete elementary units. Each unit is assigned an equivalent circuit based on geometry and location, with circuit parameters being fit to or extrapolated from experimental results. Interconnection of these elementary units with ohmic resistors representing lateral and vertical resistances within the layers of the device forms the complete circuit model. DCMs allow grid design optimization, simulation of chromatic aberration, luminescent coupling and analysis of power losses due to regionally specific resistances, which are not possible with simple lumped models. Previous DCMs have been limited to 1-3 junction devices, using a 2D surface model, or use of a one-diode circuit model for the cell junctions. Furthermore, a DCM can be used to simulate complex multi-junction devices with non-uniform illumination, whereas in comprehensive physics-based simulators like Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus this would require vastly greater computational resources. In this work, a parameterized 3D distributed circuit model was developed to calculate the performance of III-V solar cells and photonic power converters (PPC) with a variable number of epitaxially stacked pn junctions. We validated these calculations against published results using a similar 3D model for a 1-junction solar cell. Furthermore, experimental results from Azastra Opto's 20-junction PPC illuminated by an 845 nm diode laser are compared. These devices are designed with many pn junctions to achieve higher voltages and to operate under non-uniform illumination profiles from a laser or LED. The effect on device performance of varying both these parameters will be discussed.

  11. Model of stacked long Josephson junctions: Parallel algorithm and numerical results in case of weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Volokhova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a model of system of long Josephson junctions (LJJ) with inductive and capacitive coupling. Corresponding system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by means of the standard three-point finite-difference approximation in the spatial coordinate and utilizing the Runge-Kutta method for solution of the resulting Cauchy problem. A parallel algorithm is developed and implemented on a basis of the MPI (Message Passing Interface) technology. Effect of the coupling between the JJs on the properties of LJJ system is demonstrated. Numerical results are discussed from the viewpoint of effectiveness of parallel implementation.

  12. Theoretical results on the tandem junction solar cell based on its Ebers-Moll transistor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Vaughn, J.; Baraona, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional theoretical model of the tandem junction solar cell (TJC) with base resistivity greater than about 1 ohm-cm and under low level injection has been derived. This model extends a previously published conceptual model which treats the TJC as an npn transistor. The model gives theoretical expressions for each of the Ebers-Moll type currents of the illuminated TJC and allows for the calculation of the spectral response, I(sc), V(oc), FF and eta under variation of one or more of the geometrical and material parameters and 1MeV electron fluence. Results of computer calculations based on this model are presented and discussed. These results indicate that for space applications, both a high beginning of life efficiency, greater than 15% AM0, and a high radiation tolerance can be achieved only with thin (less than 50 microns) TJC's with high base resistivity (greater than 10 ohm-cm).

  13. Fluid dynamic modeling of junctions in internal combustion engine inlet and exhaust systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalet, David; Chesse, Pascal

    2010-10-01

    The modeling of inlet and exhaust systems of internal combustion engine is very important in order to evaluate the engine performance. This paper presents new pressure losses models which can be included in a one dimensional engine simulation code. In a first part, a CFD analysis is made in order to show the importance of the density in the modeling approach. Then, the CFD code is used, as a numerical test bench, for the pressure losses models development. These coefficients depend on the geometrical characteristics of the junction and an experimental validation is made with the use of a shock tube test bench. All the models are then included in the engine simulation code of the laboratory. The numerical calculation of unsteady compressible flow, in each pipe of the inlet and exhaust systems, is made and the calculated engine torque is compared with experimental measurements.

  14. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  15. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  16. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  17. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  18. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  19. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  20. Mobilities of polyatomic ions in gases - Core model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, E. A.; O'Hara, H.; Smith, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    A core model, consisting of a (12-4) central potential displaced from the origin, is suggested as a representation of the interaction of polyatomic ions with neutral molecules. The diffusion collision integral, which describes ion mobility, is computed and tabulated as a function of temperature and core size. The addition of the core reduces the maximum in the mobility against temperature curve, and eventually reduces the mobility below its polarization limit at all temperatures. These results are in accord with limited available experimental data. Comparison is made with other models of ion-neutral interactions.

  1. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Anam; Obaid, Ayesha; Awan, Faryal M.; Ikram, Aqsa; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells. PMID:28932213

  2. Petri Net-Based Model of Helicobacter pylori Mediated Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins in Stomach Lining during Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naz, Anam; Obaid, Ayesha; Awan, Faryal M; Ikram, Aqsa; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad

    2017-01-01

    Tight junctions help prevent the passage of digestive enzymes and microorganisms through the space between adjacent epithelial cells lining. However, Helicobacter pylori encoded virulence factors negatively regulate these tight junctions and contribute to dysfunction of gastric mucosa. Here, we have predicted the regulation of important tight junction proteins, such as Zonula occludens-1, Claudin-2 and Connexin32 in the presence of pathogenic proteins. Molecular events such as post translational modifications and crosstalk between phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, palmitoylation and methylation are explored which may compromise the integrity of these tight junction proteins. Furthermore, the signaling pathways disrupted by dysregulated kinases, proteins and post-translational modifications are reviewed to design an abstracted computational model showing the situation-dependent dynamic behaviors of these biological processes and entities. A qualitative hybrid Petri Net model is therefore constructed showing the altered host pathways in the presence of virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A, leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. The model is qualitative logic-based, which does not depend on any kinetic parameter and quantitative data and depends on knowledge derived from experiments. The designed model provides insights into the tight junction disruption and disease progression. Model is then verified by the available experimental data, nevertheless formal in vitro experimentation is a promising way to ensure its validation. The major findings propose that H. pylori activated kinases are responsible to trigger specific post translational modifications within tight junction proteins, at specific sites. These modifications may favor alterations in gastric barrier and provide a route to bacterial invasion into host cells.

  3. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  4. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    PubMed

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core.

  5. Forward modeling of δ18O in Andean ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Vuille, M.; Hardy, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Tropical ice core archives are among the best dated and highest resolution from the tropics, but a thorough understanding of processes that shape their isotope signature as well as the simulation of observed variability remain incomplete. To address this, we develop a tropical Andean ice core isotope forward model from in situ hydrologic observations and satellite water vapor isotope measurements. A control simulation of snow δ18O captures the mean and seasonal trend but underestimates the observed intraseasonal variability. The simulation of observed variability is improved by including amount effects associated with South American cold air incursions, linking synoptic-scale disturbances and monsoon dynamics to tropical ice core δ18O. The forward model was calibrated with and run under present-day conditions but can also be driven with past climate forcings to reconstruct paleomonsoon variability. The model is transferable and may be used to render a (paleo)climatic context at other ice core locations.

  6. On the influence of a translating inner core in models of outer core convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Silva, L.; Mound, J.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the hemispheric seismic structure of the inner core can be explained by a self-sustained rigid-body translation of the inner core material, resulting in melting of the solid at the leading face and a compensating crystallisation at the trailing face. This process induces a hemispherical variation in the release of light elements and latent heat at the inner-core boundary, the two main sources of thermochemical buoyancy thought to drive convection in the outer core. However, the effect of a translating inner core on outer core convection is presently unknown. In this paper we model convection in the outer core with a nonmagnetic Boussinesq fluid in a rotating spherical shell driven by purely thermal buoyancy, incorporating the effect of a translating inner core by a time-independent spherical harmonic degree and order 1 (Y11) pattern of heat-flux imposed at the inner boundary. The analysis considers Rayleigh numbers up to 10 times the critical value for onset of nonmagnetic convection, a parameter regime where the effects of the inhomogeneous boundary condition are expected to be most pronounced, and focuses on varying q∗, the amplitude of the imposed boundary anomalies. The presence of inner boundary anomalies significantly affects the behaviour of the model system. Increasing q∗ leads to flow patterns dominated by azimuthal jets that span large regions of the shell where radial motion is significantly inhibited. Vigorous convection becomes increasingly confined to isolated regions as q∗ increases; these regions do not drift and always occur in the hemisphere subjected to a higher than average boundary heat-flux. Effects of the inner boundary anomalies are visible at the outer boundary in all inhomogeneous models considered. At low q∗ the expression of inner boundary effects at the core surface is a difference in the flow speed between the two hemispheres. As q∗ increases the spiralling azimuthal jets driven from the

  7. Detailed physics based modeling of triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseyev, Alexandre; Bald, Timothy; Raman, Ashok; Hubbard, Seth; Forbes, David; Freundlich, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Space exploration missions and space electronic equipment require improvements in solar cell efficiency and radiation hardness. Triple-junction photovoltaic (TJ PV) cell is one of the most widely used PV for space missions due to it high efficiency. A proper models and simulation techniques are needed to speed-up the development on novel solar cell devices and reduce the related expenses. In this paper we have developed a detailed 3D TCAD model of a TJ PV cell, and calibrated the various (not accurately known) physical parameters to match experimental data, such as dark and light JV, external quantum efficiency (EQE) . A detailed model of triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar cell has been developed and implemented in CFDRC's 3D NanoTCAD simulator. The model schematic, materials, layer thicknesses, doping levels and meshing are discussed. This triple-junction model is based on the experimental measurements of a Spectrolab triple-junction cell by [1] with material layer thicknesses provided by Rochester Institute of Technology [2]. This model of the triple-junction solar cell is primarily intended to simulate the external quantum efficiency, JV and other characteristics of a physical cell. Simulation results of light JV characteristics and EQE are presented. The calculated performance parameters compare well against measured experimental data [1]. Photovoltaic performance parameters (Jsc, Voc, Jm, Vm, FF, and Efficiency) can also be simulated using the presented model. This TCAD model is to be used to design an enhanced TJ PV with increased efficiency and radiation tolerance. Keywords: photovoltaic cell, triple-junction, numerical modeling, TCAD, dark and light JV.

  8. Computational modelling of combining compressible flow through 30--150{degree} tee junction

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, N.I.A.

    1994-12-31

    The present computational investigation is concerned with quantifying the influence of fluid compressibility on the additional total pressure losses in three-leg branched ducts. A fully-elliptic, control volume computational model is presented for the simulation of subsonic steady flow under combining conditions in 30--150{degree} sharp-cornered tee-junctions, in 300 increments, similar to those used in the secondary air cooling systems of gas turbine engines. For the main part of the flow the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model is adopted, while wall functions are employed in the near wall region. A comparison is presented between computational and experimental results for the additional total pressure losses occurring in these tee-junctions using dry air as the working fluid. The Mach number of the average flow in the leg carrying the whole flow range between 0.2 and 0.6 in 0.1 increments. The successive refinement of the grid is found to bring the computed additional total pressure loss coefficients (i.e. pressure fields) into close accord with measurements. The comparison demonstrates that the adopted procedure is capable of predicting magnitude of pressure losses and extent of separation regions of low subsonic flows in branched ducts.

  9. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-07

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.

  10. Design optimization of thin-film/wafer-based tandem junction solar cells using analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Lauren; Toor, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Several research groups are developing solar cells of varying designs and materials that are high efficiency as well as cost competitive with the single junction silicon (Si) solar cells commercially produced today. One of these solar cell designs is a tandem junction solar cell comprised of perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) and silicon (Si). Loper et al.1 was able to create a 13.4% efficient tandem cell using a perovskite top cell and a Si bottom cell, and researchers are confident that the perovskite/Si tandem cell can be optimized in order to reach higher efficiencies without introducing expensive manufacturing processes. However, there are currently no commercially available software capable of modeling a tandem cell that is based on a thin-film based bottom cell and a wafer-based top cell. While PC1D2 and SCAPS3 are able to model tandem cells comprised solely of thin-film absorbers or solely of wafer-based absorbers, they result in convergence errors if a thin-film/wafer-based tandem cell, such as the perovskite/ Si cell, is modeled. The Matlab-based analytical model presented in this work is capable of modeling a thin-film/wafer-based tandem solar cell. The model allows a user to adjust the top and bottom cell parameters, such as reflectivity, material bandgaps, donor and acceptor densities, and material thicknesses, in order to optimize the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and quantum efficiency of the tandem solar cell. Using the Matlab-based analytical model, we were able optimize a perovskite/Si tandem cell with an efficiency greater than 30%.

  11. Update to Core reporting practices in structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, James B

    2016-07-21

    This paper is a technical update to "Core Reporting Practices in Structural Equation Modeling."(1) As such, the content covered in this paper includes, sample size, missing data, specification and identification of models, estimation method choices, fit and residual concerns, nested, alternative, and equivalent models, and unique issues within the SEM family of techniques.

  12. Rapid Remodeling of Tight Junctions During Paracellular Diapedesis in a Human Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Ryan C.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Muller, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM; diapedesis) is a critical event in immune surveillance and inflammation. Most TEM occurs at endothelial cell borders (paracellular). However, there is indirect evidence to suggest that at the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leukocytes migrate directly through the endothelial cell body (transcellular). Why leukocytes migrate through the endothelial cell body rather than the cell borders is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the tightness of endothelial cell junctions influences the pathway of diapedesis, we developed an in vitro model of the BBB that possessed ten-fold higher electrical resistance than standard culture conditions and strongly expressed the BBB tight junction proteins claudin-5 and claudin-3. We found that paracellular TEM was still the predominant pathway (≥98%) and TEM was dependent on PECAM-1 and CD99. We show that endothelial tight junctions expressing claudin-5 are dynamic and undergo rapid remodeling during TEM. Membrane from the endothelial lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC) is mobilized to the exact site of tight junction remodeling. This preserves the endothelial barrier by sealing the intercellular gaps with membrane and engaging the migrating leukocyte with unligated adhesion molecules (PECAM-1 and CD99) as it crosses the cell border. These findings provide new insights into leukocyte-endothelial interactions at the BBB and suggest that tight junctions are more dynamic than previously appreciated. PMID:25063869

  13. Rapid remodeling of tight junctions during paracellular diapedesis in a human model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Winger, Ryan C; Koblinski, Jennifer E; Kanda, Takashi; Ransohoff, Richard M; Muller, William A

    2014-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM; diapedesis) is a critical event in immune surveillance and inflammation. Most TEM occurs at endothelial cell borders (paracellular). However, there is indirect evidence to suggest that, at the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leukocytes migrate directly through the endothelial cell body (transcellular). Why leukocytes migrate through the endothelial cell body rather than the cell borders is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the tightness of endothelial cell junctions influences the pathway of diapedesis, we developed an in vitro model of the BBB that possessed 10-fold higher electrical resistance than standard culture conditions and strongly expressed the BBB tight junction proteins claudin-5 and claudin-3. We found that paracellular TEM was still the predominant pathway (≥98%) and TEM was dependent on PECAM-1 and CD99. We show that endothelial tight junctions expressing claudin-5 are dynamic and undergo rapid remodeling during TEM. Membrane from the endothelial lateral border recycling compartment is mobilized to the exact site of tight junction remodeling. This preserves the endothelial barrier by sealing the intercellular gaps with membrane and engaging the migrating leukocyte with unligated adhesion molecules (PECAM-1 and CD99) as it crosses the cell border. These findings provide new insights into leukocyte-endothelial interactions at the BBB and suggest that tight junctions are more dynamic than previously appreciated. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Multiple tunnel junctions based nanowire photodetector model for single charge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatbouri, Samir; Touati, A.; Troudi, M.; Sghaier, N.; Kalboussi, A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we propose a new silicon nanowire photodetector model based on a single-electron transistor for single charge detection (photo-NWSET). In the first part of this work we present the two blocks of the device structure (reading and detection blocks). The presented model is consisting of two blocks capacitively coupled. The first SET (SET1) is supposed to read the charge whereas the detection block is represented by the nanowire (NW) system associated to an optical source. We modeled the NW by a series of seven islands separated by eight tunnel junctions (8TJs). In the second part of this work, we investigate the effects of photoexcitation on Id-Vg curves and we present results obtained on the output (photo-NWSET) characteristics after variation of power illumination and response time.

  15. Implementation of total dose effects in the bipolar junction transistor Gummel-Poon model

    SciTech Connect

    Montagner, X.; Fouillat, P.; Briand, R.; Touboul, A.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.; Calvet, M.C.; Calvel, P.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of total dose on the SPICE model of bipolar junction transistors are investigated. The limitations of the standard Gummel-Poon model for simulating the radiation-induced excess base current are analyzed, and a new model based on an empirical approach is proposed. Four new SPICE rad-parameters are presented, and investigated for different dose rates. The relevant parameters are extracted using a new algorithmic procedure, combining a genetic approach and the standard optimization technique which minimizes the RMS error between measured and simulated excess base current. It is shown that the excess base current is accurately described by the same formula whatever the device type is. An empirical fitting of the rad-parameters as a function of total dose is proposed to use in hardening electronic circuits for space-like environments.

  16. Neuroprotective Role of Gap Junctions in a Neuron Astrocyte Network Model.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Gemma; Joglekar, Anoushka; Messi, Leopold Matamba; Buckalew, Richard; Wong, Sarah; Terman, David

    2016-07-26

    A detailed biophysical model for a neuron/astrocyte network is developed to explore mechanisms responsible for the initiation and propagation of cortical spreading depolarizations and the role of astrocytes in maintaining ion homeostasis, thereby preventing these pathological waves. Simulations of the model illustrate how properties of spreading depolarizations, such as wave speed and duration of depolarization, depend on several factors, including the neuron and astrocyte Na(+)-K(+) ATPase pump strengths. In particular, we consider the neuroprotective role of astrocyte gap junction coupling. The model demonstrates that a syncytium of electrically coupled astrocytes can maintain a physiological membrane potential in the presence of an elevated extracellular K(+) concentration and efficiently distribute the excess K(+) across the syncytium. This provides an effective neuroprotective mechanism for delaying or preventing the initiation of spreading depolarizations.

  17. Seismic tomography and deformation modeling of the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorbath, C.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.; King, G.

    1996-01-01

    Local earthquake P traveltime data is inverted to obtain a three-dimensional tomographic image of the region centered on the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults. The resulting velocity model is then used to relocate more than 17,000 earthquakes and to produce a model of fault structure in the region. These faults serve as the basis for modeling the topography using elastic dislocation methods. The region is of interest because active faults join, it marks the transition zone from creeping to locked fault behavior on the San Andreas fault, it exhibits young topography, and it has a good spatial distribution of seismicity. The tomographic data set is extensive, consisting of 1445 events, 96 stations, and nearly 95,000 travel time readings. Tomographic images are resolvable to depths of 12 km and show significant velocity contrasts across the San Andreas and Calaveras faults, a low-velocity zone associated with the creeping section of the San Andreas fault, and shallow low-velocity sediments in the southern Santa Clara valley and northern Salinas valley. Relocated earthquakes only occur where vp>5 km/s and indicate that portions of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are non vertical, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that all or part of this results from ray tracing problems. The new dips are more consistent with geological observations that dipping faults intersect the surface where surface traces have been mapped. The topographic modeling predicts extensive subsidence in regions characterized by shallow low-velocity material, presumably the result of recent sedimentation. Some details of the topography at the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are not consistent with the modeling results, suggesting that the current position of this "triple junction" has changed with time. The model also predicts those parts of the fault subject to contraction or extension perpendicular to the fault strike and hence the sense of any

  18. Core Accretion - Gas Capture Model for Gas Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    The core accretion - gas capture model is generally accepted as the standard formation model for gas giant planets. This model proposes that a solid core grows via the accretion of planetesimals and then captures a massive envelope from the solar nebula gas. Simulations based on this model (Pollack et al. 1996, Bodenheimer et al. 2000) have been successful in explaining many features of giant planets. We have computed simulations (Hubickyj et al. 2005) of the growth of Jupiter using various values for the opacity produced by grains in the protoplanet's atmosphere and for the initial planetesimal surface density in the protoplanetary disk. We also explore the implications of halting the solid accretion at selected core mass values during the protoplanet's growth. Halting planetesimal accretion at low core mass simulates the presence of a competing embryo, and decreasing the atmospheric opacity due to grains emulates the settling and coagulation of grains within the protoplanet's atmosphere. We examine the effects of adjusting these parameters to determine whether or not gas runaway can occur for small mass cores on a reasonable timescale. Our results demonstrate that reducing grain opacities results in formation times less than half of those for models computed with full interstellar grain opacity values. The reduction of opacity due to grains in the upper portion of the envelope with T ≤ 500 K has the largest effect on the lowering of the formation time. If the accretion of planetesimals is not cut off prior to the accretion of gas, then decreasing the surface density of planetesimals lowers the final core mass of the protoplanet, but increases the formation timescale considerably. Finally, a core mass cutoff results in a reduction of the time needed for a protoplanet to evolve to the stage of runaway gas accretion, provided the cutoff mass is sufficiently large. The overall results indicate that, with reasonable parameters, it is possible that Jupiter formed at

  19. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  20. Silicon-gold core-shell nanowire array for an optically and electrically characterized refractive index sensor based on plasmonic resonance and Schottky junction.

    PubMed

    Qin, Linling; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Runfeng; Li, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    This work reports the plasmonically enhanced refractive index sensor consisting of silicon nanowire array (Si-NWA) coated by a conformal gold (Au) nanoshell. Compared to the pure Si or Au NWA system, the Si-Au core-shell setup leads to substantially enhanced optical in-coupling to excite strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for highly sensitive sensors. Results indicate that the SPR wavelength can be subtly tuned by manipulating the nanowire radius, and it shows a strong shift with very small variation of the refractive index of the analyte. Furthermore, we configure the system into the Schottky junction, which can separate the photogenerated hot electrons so that the electrical outputs under various incident wavelengths can be measured. The capabilities of optical and electrical measurements ensure a high flexibility of the sensing system. Through our optoelectronic evaluation, the optimally designed system shows a sensitivity up to 1008 nm per refractive index unit and a full width at half-maximum of 9.89 nm; moreover, the high sensing performance can be sustained in a relatively large range of the incident angle.

  1. Control of Junctional Hemorrhage in a Consensus Swine Model With Hemostatic Gauze Products Following Minimal Training.

    PubMed

    Conley, Sean P; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Henao, Jose; DeVito, Sara S; Zarow, Gregory J

    2015-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage from junctional wounds that cannot be controlled by traditional tourniquets accounts for one in five preventable battlefield exsanguination deaths. Products for treating these wounds are costly and require special training. However, chemically treated gauze products are inexpensive, potentially effective, and require only minimal training. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of three hemostatic gauze products following brief training, using a consensus swine groin injury model. After viewing a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation, without demonstration or practice, 24 U.S. Navy Corpsmen, most with little to no live tissue or hemostatic agent experience, applied one of three hemostatic agents: QuikClot Combat Gauze, Celox Trauma Gauze, or Hemcon ChitoGauze. Animals were resuscitated and monitored for 150 minutes to assess initial hemostasis, blood loss, rebleeding, and survival. Participants completed a survey before training and following testing. Products were similar in initial hemostasis, blood loss, and rebleeding. Twenty-three swine survived (96%). Ease of use and perceived efficacy of training ratings were high. Comfort level with application improved following training. Hemostatic gauze can potentially be effective for treating junctional wounds following minimal training, which has important implications for corpsmen, self-aid/buddy-aid, civilian providers, and Tactical Combat Casualty Care guidelines. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Modeling of LC-shunted intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-T c superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Kulikov, K. V.; Botha, A. E.; Plecenik, A.; Seidel, P.; Nawrocki, W.

    2017-02-01

    Resonance phenomena in a model of intrinsic Josephson junctions shunted by LC-elements (L-inductance, C-capacitance) are studied. The phase dynamics and IV-characteristics are investigated in detail when the Josephson frequency approaches the frequency of the resonance circuit. A realization of parametric resonance through the excitation of a longitudinal plasma wave, within the bias current interval corresponding to the resonance circuit branch, is demonstrated. It is found that the temporal dependence of the total voltage of the stack, and the voltage measured across the shunt capacitor, reflect the charging of superconducting layers, a phenomenon which might be useful as a means of detecting such charging experimentally. Thus, based on the voltage dynamics, a novel method for the determination of charging in the superconducting layers of coupled Josephson junctions is proposed. A demonstration and discussion of the influence of external electromagnetic radiation on the IV-characteristics and charge-time dependence is given. Over certain parameter ranges the radiation causes an interesting new type of temporal splitting in the charge-time oscillations within the superconducting layers.

  3. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    We present a model introducing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  4. Macro model for stochastic behavior of resistance distribution of magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Gyuhyun; Choi, Juntae; Song, Yunheub

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we fabricated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) samples to observe behavior of resistance variation, and investigated a stochastic behavior model for MTJ resistance from measured real data. We found the relationship between parallel resistance (RP), anti-parallel resistance (RAP), and TMR from the measurements. The variation of barrier thickness affects not only resistance but also TMR. This means that broad RAP distribution is caused by RP distribution. In addition, RAP distribution can be reduced by increasing temperature and bias voltage. We developed a macro model that can evaluate resistance distribution based on the stochastic behavior of MTJ resistance variation from only tox varied. The amount of resistance variation, which is considered with regard to the circuit performance, can be obtained from Δtox designed by designer. In addition, the impact for operating circumstance such as bias and temperature can be considered by using fit equations.

  5. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Plant safety as well as plant availability can be significantly improved if functions such as data validation, plant state verification, and fault identification are automated. A methodology for automation of these functions was presented in an earlier paper. To implement this methodology, plant models that run significantly faster than real transient time are needed. Such models for the intermediate heat exchanger and a once-through liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) steam generator have been presented. This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that, with a proper choice of shape functions, a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times. From the point of view of operational safety, it is desirable to terminate a transient before sodium boiling is initiated in the core. Thus, only the modeling of the preboiling phase of core transients is discussed.

  6. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  7. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  8. Expression of the core exon-junction complex factor eukaryotic initiation factor 4A3 is increased during spatial exploration and striatally-mediated learning.

    PubMed

    Barker-Haliski, M L; Pastuzyn, E D; Keefe, K A

    2012-12-13

    Regulation of dendritically localized mRNAs offers an important means by which neurons can sculpt precise signals at synapses. Arc is one such dendritically localized mRNA, and it has been shown to contain two exon-junction complexes (EJCs) within its 3'UTR. The EJC has been postulated to regulate cytoplasmic Arc mRNA availability through translation-dependent decay and thus contribute to synaptic plasticity. Core proteins of the EJC include eIF4A3, an RNA helicase, and Magoh, which stabilizes the interaction of eIF4A3 with target mRNAs. Arc mRNA expression is activity-regulated in numerous brain regions, including the dorsal striatum and hippocampus. Therefore in this study, the in vivo expression of these core EJC components was investigated in adult Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether there are also behaviorally regulated changes in their expression. In the present work, there was no change in the expression of Magoh mRNA following spatial exploration, a paradigm previously reported to robustly and reliably upregulate Arc mRNA expression. Interestingly, however, there were increases in eIF4A3 mRNA levels in the dorsal striatum and hippocampus following spatial exploration, similar to previous reports for Arc mRNA. Furthermore, there were activity-dependent changes in eIF4A3 protein distribution and expression within the striatum following spatial exploration. Importantly, eIF4A3 protein colocalized with Arc mRNA in vivo. Like Arc mRNA expression, eIF4A3 mRNA expression in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral striatum or hippocampus, significantly correlated with behavioral performance on a striatally-mediated, response-reversal learning task. This study provides direct evidence that a core EJC component, eIF4A3, shows activity-dependent changes in both mRNA and protein expression in the adult mammalian brain. These findings thus further implicate eIF4A3 as a key mediator of Arc mRNA availability underlying learning and memory processes in vivo.

  9. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, R. E.; Guillory, J. U.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ("core") plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  10. A multiscale model of Earth's inner-core anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Sébastien; Lincot, Ainhoa; Deguen, Renaud; Cardin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's solid inner-core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe-alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Cubic-structured Fe-alloy fail at producing significant global scale anisotropy. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal-close-packed structure for the inner-core Fe-alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal ⟨c + a⟩ slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c-axis.

  11. Bayesian Glaciological Modelling to quantify uncertainties in ice core chronologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Blackwell, Paul G.; Buck, Caitlin E.; Mulvaney, Robert; Röthlisberger, Regine; Wolff, Eric W.

    2011-10-01

    Valuable information about the environment and climate of the past is preserved in ice cores which are drilled through ice sheets in polar and alpine regions. A pivotal part of interpreting the information held within the cores is to build ice core chronologies i.e. to relate time to depth. Existing dating methods can be categorised as follows: (1) layer counting using the seasonality in signals, (2) glaciological modelling describing processes such as snow accumulation and plastic deformation of ice, (3) comparison with other dated records, or (4) any combination of these. Conventionally, implementation of these approaches does not use statistical methods. In order to quantify dating uncertainties, in this paper we develop the approach of category (2) further. First, the sources of uncertainty involved in glaciological models are formalised. Feeding these into a statistical framework, that we call Bayesian Glaciological Modelling (BGM), allows us to demonstrate the effect that uncertainty in the glaciological model has on the chronology. BGM may also include additional information to constrain the resulting chronology, for example from layer counting or other dated records such as traces from volcanic eruptions. Our case study involves applying BGM to date an Antarctic ice core (a Dyer plateau core). Working through this example allows us to emphasise the importance of properly assessing uncertain elements in order to arrive at accurate chronologies, including valid dating uncertainties. Valid dating uncertainties, in turn, facilitate the interpretation of environmental and climatic conditions at the location of the ice core as well as the comparison and development of ice core chronologies from different locations.

  12. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  13. Modeling Magnetic Core Loss for Sinusoidal Waveforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Manganese Zinc (MnZn) Power Ferrites between 100 kHz to 500 kHz CPL data is empirically fit to the PLE given in Equation 3, the values of the curve...calculation. The frequency range used in this experiment was 100 to 700 kHz and the material used was 3F3. 3F3 is a Manganese Zinc power ferrite ...reported that compares these models to actual Power Ferrite data. In addition, three components used in several of CPL empirical equations have been

  14. Flow past a wing-body junction - Experimental evaluation of turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devenport, William J.; Simpson, Roger L.

    1992-04-01

    Detailed three-component laser Doppler velocimeter measurements have been made in the flow of a turbulent boundary layer past an idealized wing-body junction. These measurements are used to evaluate the closure assumptions of a number of turbulence models. Many of these models require or imply a relationship between the angles of the turbulence shear-stress and mean-velocity vectors. In the present flow, these angles are not only different but do not follow any simple relationship. To predict the shear-stress angle, accurate modeling of the full shear-stress transport equations is clearly needed. In particular, new models based on measurements are needed for the pressure-strain term. The closure assumptions of six turbulence models are tested by using them to predict the magnitude of the shear-stress vector from the mean-velocity and/or turbulence kinetic energy. Among the best are those of the Cebeci-Smith and algebraic-stress models. The k-epsilon model does not appear suited to this vortical flow.

  15. Large magnetocapacitance effect in magnetic tunnel junctions based on Debye-Fröhlich model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiju, Hideo Takei, Masashi; Misawa, Takahiro; Nishii, Junji; Nagahama, Taro; Xiao, Gang

    2015-09-28

    The frequency dependence of tunneling magnetocapacitance (TMC) in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. According to the calculation based on Debye-Fröhlich model combined with Julliere formula, the TMC ratio strongly depends on the frequency and it has the maximum peak at a specific frequency. The calculated frequency dependence of TMC is in good agreement with the experimental results obtained in MgO-based MTJs with a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 108%, which exhibit a large TMC ratio of 155% at room temperature. This calculation also predicts that the TMC ratio can be as large as about 1000% for a spin polarization of 87%, while the TMR ratio is 623% for the same spin polarization. These theoretical and experimental findings provide a deeper understanding on AC spin-dependent transport in the MTJs and will open up wider opportunities for device applications, such as highly sensitive magnetic sensors and impedance-tunable devices.

  16. Field theoretical model of multilayered Josephson junction and dynamics of Josephson vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Iida, Hideaki; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-09-01

    Multilayered Josephson junctions are modeled in the context of a field theory, and dynamics of Josephson vortices trapped inside insulators are studied. Starting from a theory consisting of complex and real scalar fields coupled to a U(1) gauge field which admit parallel N -1 domain-wall solutions, Josephson couplings are introduced weakly between the complex scalar fields. The N -1 domain walls behave as insulators separating N superconductors, where one of the complex scalar fields has a gap. We construct the effective Lagrangian on the domain walls, which reduces to a coupled sine-Gordon model for well-separated walls and contains more interactions for walls at short distance. We then construct sine-Gordon solitons emerging in an effective theory in which we identify Josephson vortices carrying singly quantized magnetic fluxes. When two neighboring superconductors tend to have the same phase, the ground state does not change with the positions of domain walls (the width of superconductors). On the other hand, when two neighboring superconductors tend to have π -phase differences, the ground state has a phase transition depending on the positions of domain walls; when the two walls are close to each other (one superconductor is thin), frustration occurs because of the coupling between the two superconductors besides the thin superconductor. Focusing on the case of three superconductors separated by two insulators, we find for the former case that the interaction between two Josephson vortices on different insulators changes its nature, i.e., attractive or repulsive, depending on the positions of the domain walls. In the latter case, there emerges fractional Josephson vortices when two degenerate ground states appear due to spontaneous charge-symmetry breaking, and the number of the Josephson vortices varies with the position of the domain walls. Our predictions should be verified in multilayered Josephson junctions.

  17. An MPI-based MoSST core dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiyuan; Kuang, Weijia

    2008-09-01

    Distributed systems are among the main cost-effective and expandable platforms for high-end scientific computing. Therefore scalable numerical models are important for effective use of such systems. In this paper, we present an MPI-based numerical core dynamics model for simulation of geodynamo and planetary dynamos, and for simulation of core-mantle interactions. The model is developed based on MPI libraries. Two algorithms are used for node-node communication: a "master-slave" architecture and a "divide-and-conquer" architecture. The former is easy to implement but not scalable in communication. The latter is scalable in both computation and communication. The model scalability is tested on Linux PC clusters with up to 128 nodes. This model is also benchmarked with a published numerical dynamo model solution.

  18. Modeling Laser Effects on Multi-Junction Solar Cells Using Silvaco ATLAS Software for Spacecraft Power Beaming Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    devised was meant to achieve the highest efficiency of the solar cell while maintaining the same power output. In a perfect world the system would...CHAMPION CELL - 36.28% Efficiency !! #This model is an explicit InGaP/ GaAs /Ge Triple Junction solar cell with Tunnel Junction KATO OPTM 0.82InGaP...the same output of the cell as experienced under solar illumination, thereby replacing the sun. The original cell boasted 36.29% efficiency under

  19. The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction as a model for scaffold complexes at glutamatergic synapses: benefits and limitations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ulrich; Kobler, Oliver; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2010-09-01

    Based on unbeatable genetic accessibility and relative simplicity, the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction has become a widely used model system for studying functional and structural aspects of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like proteins (MAGUKs) are first-order scaffolding molecules enriched at many cellular junctions, including synapses, where they coordinate multiple binding partners, including cell adhesion molecules and ion channels. The enrichment of the prototypic MAGUK Discs-Large at larval NMJs apparently parallels the high abundance of its homologs at excitatory synapses in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, the authors review selected aspects of the long-standing work on Dlg at fly neuromuscular junctions, thereby scrutinizing its subcellular localization, function, and regulation with regard to corresponding aspects of MAGUKs in vertebrate neurons.

  20. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  1. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  2. Novel modeling and dynamic simulation of magnetic tunnel junctions for spintronic sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yu; Liu, Jie; Yang, Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Spintronic magnetic sensors with the integration of magnetic materials and microstructures have been enabling people to make use of the electron spin and charge properties in many applications. The high demand for such sensors has in turn spurred the technology developments in both novel materials and their atomic-level controls. Few works, however, have been carried out and reported thus far in modeling and simulation of these spintronic magnetic sensing units based on magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) technology. Accordingly, this paper proposes a novel modeling approach as well as an iterative simulation methodology for MTJs. A more comprehensive electrical tunneling model is established for better interpreting the conductance and current generated by the electron tunneling, and this model can also facilitate the iterative simulation of the micromagnetic dynamics. Given the improved tunneling model as well as the updated dynamic simulation, the electric characteristics of an MTJ with an external magnetic field can be conveniently computed, which provides a reliable benchmark for the future development of novel spintronic magnetic sensors.

  3. Effective model for a short Josephson junction with a phase discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, E.; Mironov, S.; Buzdin, A.; Mints, R. G.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a short Josephson junction with a phase discontinuity κ created, e.g., by a pair of tiny current injectors, at some point x0 along the width of the junction. We derive the effective current-phase relation (CPR) for the system as a whole, i.e., reduce it to an effective pointlike junction. From the effective CPR we obtain the ground state of the system and predict the dependence of its critical current on κ . We show that in a large range of κ values the effective junction behaves as a φ0 Josephson junction, i.e., has a unique ground state phase φ0 within each 2 π interval. For κ ≈π and x0 near the middle of the junction one obtains a φ0±φ junction, i.e., a Josephson junction with degenerate ground state phase φ0±φ within each 2 π interval. Further, in view of possible escape experiments especially in the quantum domain, we investigate the scaling of the energy barrier and eigenfrequency close to the critical currents and predict the behavior of the escape histogram width σ (κ ) in the regime of the macroscopic quantum tunneling.

  4. Probiotics modify tight-junction proteins in an animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, David; Heritage, Mandy; Jaskowski, Lesley-Anne; Peake, Jonathan; Gobe, Glenda; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Crawford, Darrell; Campbell, Catherine; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have investigated the effects of a multispecies probiotic preparation containing a combination of probiotic bacterial genera that included Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and a Streptococcus in a mouse model of high-fat diet or obesity-induced liver steatosis. Methods: Three groups of C57B1/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 20 weeks, while a third group was fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and then concomitantly administered probiotics for a further 10 weeks. Serum, liver and large bowel samples were collected for analysis. Results: The expression of the tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 was reduced (p < 0.05) in high-fat diet-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Probiotic supplementation helped to maintain tight ZO-1 and ZO-2 expression compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05), but did not restore ZO-1 or ZO-2 expression compared with chow-fed mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics had significant steatosis development compared with chow-fed mice (p < 0.05); steatosis was less severe in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration was higher in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics compared with the chow group (p < 0.05), and was lower in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05). Compared with chow-fed mice, serum glucose, cholesterol concentration and the activity of alanine transaminase were higher (p < 0.05), whereas serum triglyceride concentration was lower (p < 0.05) in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics. Conclusions: Supplementation with a multispecies probiotic formulation helped to maintain tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, and reduced hepatic triglyceride concentration compared with a high-fat diet alone. PMID:27366215

  5. Mathematical Modeling, Sense Making, and the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    On October 14, 2013 the Mathematics Education Department at Teachers College hosted a full-day conference focused on the Common Core Standards Mathematical Modeling requirements to be implemented in September 2014 and in honor of Professor Henry Pollak's 25 years of service to the school. This article is adapted from my talk at this conference…

  6. Mathematical Modeling, Sense Making, and the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    On October 14, 2013 the Mathematics Education Department at Teachers College hosted a full-day conference focused on the Common Core Standards Mathematical Modeling requirements to be implemented in September 2014 and in honor of Professor Henry Pollak's 25 years of service to the school. This article is adapted from my talk at this conference…

  7. Contemporary Programming Concepts: A Common Core Model for Career Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Harry; Valentine, Ivan E.

    1974-01-01

    A model shows how learning strands from the core subjects in grades K-9 can be woven into a strong career plan based on effective career guidance and counseling, enabling students to eventually establish an occupational objective and distinguish among educational alternatives leading to that objective. (AG)

  8. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that with a proper choice of shape functions a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times.

  9. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies.

  10. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies.

  11. Development of a core-stability model: a delphi approach.

    PubMed

    Majewski-Schrage, Tricia; Evans, Todd A; Ragan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Despite widespread acceptance, there is currently no consensus on the definition, components, and the specific techniques most appropriate to measure and quantify core stability. To develop a comprehensive core-stability model addressing its definition, components, and assessment techniques. Delphi technique. University laboratory. 15 content experts from United States and Canada, representing a variety of disciplines. The authors distributed an open-ended questionnaire pertaining to a core-stability definition, components, and assessment techniques specific to each expert. They collected data over 2 rounds of telephone interviews. They concluded data collection once a consensus was achieved that equated with 51% agreement among respondents. The authors developed a working definition of core stability as the ability to achieve and sustain control of the trunk region at rest and during precise movement. Eighty-three percent of the experts considered the definition satisfactory. Therefore, the definition was accepted. Furthermore, the experts agreed that muscles (14/15 = 93.3%) and neuromuscular control (8/12 = 66.7%) were components of core stability. Assessment techniques were identified and inconsistencies were highlighted; however, no consensus was established. A consensus core-stability definition was created and 2 components were identified. However, of the initial definitions provided by the experts, no 2 were identical, which revealed the inconsistencies among experts and the importance of this study. Nonetheless, the goal of obtaining a consensus definition was obtained. Although a consensus for the assessment techniques of core stability could not be reached, it was a beneficial starting point to identify the inconsistencies that were discovered among the content experts.

  12. Model-based parameterisation of a hydrocyclone air-core

    PubMed

    Podd; Schlaberg; Hoyle

    2000-03-01

    An important metric for the accurate control of a hydrocyclone is the diameter of its air-core. Ultrasonic data from a 16-transducer, 1.5 MHz pulse-echo tomographic system are analysed to determine the variation of the air-core diameter with various operating conditions. The back-projection image reconstruction method is not accurate enough for this task. Sub-millimetre accuracy is obtained, however, by applying a combination of signal processing and model-based reconstruction, using the fact that there is a small variation in the air-core boundary position. The findings correspond well to the results obtained from X-ray and electrical resistance modalities.

  13. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  14. Experimental Model of Proximal Junctional Fracture after Multilevel Posterior Spinal Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan; Petit, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk of proximal junctional fractures (PJF) with multilevel spinal instrumentation, especially in the osteoporotic spine. This problem is associated with significant morbidity and possibly the need for reoperation. Various techniques have been proposed in an attempt to decrease the risk of PJF but there is no experimental model described for in vitro production of PJF after multilevel instrumentation. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental model of PJF after multilevel posterior instrumentation. Initially, four porcine specimens including 4 vertebrae and instrumented at the 3 caudal vertebrae using a pedicle screw construct were subjected to different loading conditions. Loading conditions on porcine specimens involving cyclic loading along the axis of the center vertebral body line, with constrained flexion between 0° and 15° proximally, and fully constraining the specimen distally resulted in a fracture pattern most representative of a PJF seen clinically in humans, so to undergo human cadaveric testing with similar loading conditions was decided. Clinically relevant PJF were produced in all 3 human specimens. The experimental model described in this study will allow the evaluation of different parameters influencing the incidence and prevention of PJF after multilevel posterior spinal instrumentation. PMID:27610381

  15. Toxicants target cell junctions in the testis: Insights from the indazole-carboxylic acid model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous types of junctions in the seminiferous epithelium which are integrated with, and critically dependent on the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. These include the basal tight junctions between Sertoli cells that form the main component of the blood–testis barrier, the basal ectoplasmic specializations (basal ES) and basal tubulobulbar complexes (basal TBC) between Sertoli cells; as well as apical ES and apical TBC between Sertoli cells and the developing spermatids that orchestrate spermiogenesis and spermiation. These junctions, namely TJ, ES, and TBC interact with actin microfilament-based cytoskeleton, which together with the desmosomal junctions that interact with the intermediate filament-based cytoskeleton plus the highly polarized microtubule-based cytoskeleton are working in concert to move spermatocytes and spermatids between the basal and luminal aspect of the seminiferous epithelium. In short, these various junctions are structurally complexed with the actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton or intermediate filaments of the Sertoli cell. Studies have shown toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A (BPA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), phthalates, and glycerol), and some male contraceptives under development (e.g., adjudin, gamendazole), exert their effects, at least in part, by targeting cell junctions in the testis. The disruption of Sertoli–Sertoli cell and Sertoli–germ cell junctions, results in the loss of germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. Adjudin, a potential male contraceptive under investigation in our laboratory, produces loss of spermatids from the seminiferous tubules through disruption of the Sertoli cell spermatid junctions and disruption of the Sertoli cell cytoskeleton. The molecular and structural changes associated with adjudin administration are described, to provide an example of the profile of changes caused by disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell and also Sertoli cell-cell junctions. PMID:26413399

  16. Kinematic History of a Salient-recess Junction Explored through a Combined Approach of Field Data and Analog Sandbox Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ismat, Zeshan; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2016-08-05

    Within fold-thrust belts, the junctions between salients and recesses may hold critical clues to the overall kinematic history. The deformation history within these junctions is best preserved in areas where thrust sheets extend from a salient through an adjacent recess. We examine one such junction within the Sevier fold-thrust belt (western United States) along the Leamington transverse zone, northern Utah. Deformation within this junction took place by faulting and cataclastic flow. Here, we describe a protocol that examines these fault patterns to better understand the kinematic history of the field area. Fault data is supplemented by analog sandbox experiments. This study suggests that, in detail, deformation within the overlying thrust sheet may not directly reflect the underlying basement structure. We demonstrate that this combined field-experimental approach is easy, accessible, and may provide more details to the deformation preserved in the crust than other more expensive methods, such as computer modeling. In addition, the sandbox model may help to explain why and how these details formed. This method can be applied throughout fold-thrust belts, where upper-crustal rocks are well preserved. In addition, it can be modified to study any part of the upper crust that has been deformed via elastico-frictional mechanisms. Finally, this combined approach may provide more details as to how fold-thrust belts maintain critical-taper and serve as potential targets for natural resource exploration.

  17. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  18. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  19. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  20. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  1. Extended Triple-Junction Solar Cell 3D Distributed Model: Application to Chromatic Aberration-Related Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, I.; Espinet-González, P.; Rey-Stolle, I.; Barrigón, E.; Algora, C.

    2011-12-01

    An extended 3D distributed model based on distributed circuit units for the simulation of triple-junction solar cells under realistic conditions for the light distribution has been developed. A special emphasis has been put in the capability of the model to accurately account for current mismatch and chromatic aberration effects. This model has been validated, as shown by the good agreement between experimental and simulation results, for different light spot characteristics including spectral mismatch and irradiance non-uniformities. This model is then used for the prediction of the performance of a triple-junction solar cell for a light spot corresponding to a real optical architecture in order to illustrate its suitability in assisting concentrator system analysis and design process.

  2. Primary esophageal and gastro-esophageal junction cancer xenograft models: clinicopathological features and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Sun, Bin; Panchal, Devang; Patel, Devalben; Tse, Alvina; Chen, Zhuo; Faluyi, Olusola O; Renouf, Daniel J; Girgis, Hala; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Darling, Gail E; Ailles, Laurie E; El-Zimaity, Hala; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    There are very few xenograft models available for the study of esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Using a NOD/SCID model, we implanted 90 primary E and GEJ tumors resected from patients and six endoscopic biopsy specimens. Of 69 resected tumors with histologically confirmed viable adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, 22 (32%) was engrafted. One of 11 tumors, considered to have had a complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, also engrafted. Of the 23 patients whose tumors were engrafted, 65% were male; 30% were early stage while 70% were late stage; 22% received neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation; 61% were GEJ cancers. Engraftment occurred in 18/54 (33%) adenocarcinomas and 5/16 (31%) squamous cell carcinomas. Small endoscopic biopsy tissue had a 50% (3/6) engraftment rate. Of the factors analyzed, pretreatment with chemo-radiation and well/moderate differentiation showed significantly lower correlation with engraftment (P<0.05). In the subset of patients who did not receive neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, 18/41 (44%) engrafted compared with those with pretreatment where 5/29 (17%, P=0.02) engrafted. Primary xenograft lines may be continued through 4-12 passages. Xenografts maintained similar histology and morphological characteristics with only minor variations even after multiple passaging in most instances.

  3. A Mouse Model of Generalized non-Herlitz Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Bubier, Jason A.; Sproule, Thomas J.; Petell, Lydia; Webb, Cameron; Fine, Jo-David; Roopenian, Derry C.; Sundberg, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a class of intractable, rare, genetic disorders characterized by fragile skin and blister formation as a result of dermal-epidermal mechanical instability. EB presents with considerable clinical and molecular heterogeneity. Viable animal models of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), that both mimic the human disease and survive beyond the neonatal period, are needed. We identified a spontaneous, autosomal recessive mutation (Lamc2 jeb) due to a Murine Leukemia Virus long terminal repeat insertion in Lamc2 that results in a hypomorphic allele with reduced levels of LAMC2 protein. These mutant mice develop a progressive blistering disease validated at the gross and microscopic levels to closely resemble generalized non-Herlitz JEB. The Lamc2 jeb mice display additional extracutaneous features such as loss of bone mineralization and abnormal teeth, as well as a respiratory phenotype that is recognized but not as well characterized in humans. This model faithfully recapitulates human JEB and provides an important preclinical tool to test novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:20336083

  4. Treating network junctions in finite volume solution of transient gas flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Alfredo; López, Xián; Vázquez-Cendón, M. Elena

    2017-09-01

    A finite volume scheme for the numerical solution of a non-isothermal non-adiabatic compressible flow model for gas transportation networks on non-flat topography is introduced. Unlike standard Euler equations, the model takes into account wall friction, variable height and heat transfer between the pipe and the environment which are source terms. The case of one single pipe was considered in a previous reference by the authors, [8], where a finite volume method with upwind discretization of the flux and source terms has been proposed in order to get a well-balanced scheme. The main goal of the present paper is to go a step further by considering a network of pipes. The main issue is the treatment of junctions for which container-like 2D finite volumes are introduced. The couplings between pipes (1D) and containers (2D) are carefully described and the conservation properties are analyzed. Numerical tests including real gas networks are solved showing the performance of the proposed methodology.

  5. Myotubular myopathy and the neuromuscular junction: a novel therapeutic approach from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, James J.; Joubert, Romain; Low, Sean E.; Durban, Ashley N.; Messaddeq, Nadia; Li, Xingli; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Pierson, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe congenital muscle disease characterized by profound weakness, early respiratory failure and premature lethality. MTM is defined by muscle biopsy findings that include centralized nuclei and disorganization of perinuclear organelles. No treatments currently exist for MTM. We hypothesized that aberrant neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission is an important and potentially treatable aspect of the disease pathogenesis. We tested this hypothesis in two murine models of MTM. In both models we uncovered evidence of a disorder of NMJ transmission: fatigable weakness, improved strength with neostigmine, and electrodecrement with repetitive nerve stimulation. Histopathological analysis revealed abnormalities in the organization, appearance and size of individual NMJs, abnormalities that correlated with changes in acetylcholine receptor gene expression and subcellular localization. We additionally determined the ability of pyridostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, to ameliorate aspects of the behavioral phenotype related to NMJ dysfunction. Pyridostigmine treatment resulted in significant improvement in fatigable weakness and treadmill endurance. In all, these results describe a newly identified pathological abnormality in MTM, and uncover a potential disease-modifying therapy for this devastating disorder. PMID:22645112

  6. Novel compact model for multi-level spin torque magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Sanjay; Verma, Shivam; Kulkarni, Anant Aravind; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Spin-transfer torque (STT) and spin-orbit torque (SOT) based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices are emerging as strong contenders for the next generation memories. Conventional STT magneto-resistive random access memory (MRAM) offers lower power, non-volatility and CMOS process compatibility. However, higher current requirement during the write operation leads to tunnel barrier reliability issues and larger access devices. SOT-MRAM eliminates the reliability issues with strong spin polarized current (100%) and separate read/write current paths; however, the additional two access transistors in SOT-MRAM results into increased cell area. Multilevel cell (MLC) structure paves a way to circumvent the problems related to the conventional STT/SOT based MTJ devices and provides enhanced integration density at reduced cost per bit. Conventional STT/SOT-MRAM requires a unit cell area of 10-60 F2 and reported simulations have been based on available single-level MTJ compact models. However, till date no compact model exists that can capture the device physics of MLC-MTJ accurately. Hence, a novel compact model is proposed in this paper to capture the accurate device physics and behaviour of the MLC-MTJs. It is designed for MLCs with different MTJ configurations demonstrated so far, such as series and parallel free layer based MLC-MTJs. The proposed model is coded in Verilog-A, which is compatible with SPICE for circuit level simulations. The model is in close agreement with the experimental results exhibiting an average error of less than 15%.

  7. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  8. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection.

  9. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  10. Modelling exchange bias in core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Oscar; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amílcar

    2007-10-10

    We present an atomistic model of a single nanoparticle with core/shell structure that takes into account its lattice structure and spherical geometry, and in which the values of microscopic parameters such as anisotropy and exchange constants can be tuned in the core, shell and interfacial regions. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of the hysteresis loops based on this model, we have determined the range of microscopic parameters for which loop shifts after field cooling can be observed. The study of the magnetic order of the interfacial spins for different particle sizes and values of the interfacial exchange coupling have allowed us to correlate the appearance of loop asymmetries and vertical displacements to the existence of a fraction of uncompensated spins at the shell interface that remain pinned during field cycling, offering new insight on the microscopic origin of the experimental phenomenology.

  11. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  12. Fusobacterium nucleatum biofilm induces epithelial migration in an organotypic model of dento-gingival junction.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Marja T; Gursoy, Ulvi K; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka

    2012-10-01

    Effects of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) biofilm on epithelial cell proliferation, apoptotic cell death, and basement membrane constituent collagen IV production were examined in an organotypic dento-epithelial (OD-E) model. The OD-E model was constructed by seeding keratinocytes on fibroblast-containing collagen gels and by placing tooth pieces on top. A 3-day-old biofilm either a laboratory strain (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 25586) or a clinical strain (Anaerobe Helsinki Negative [AHN] 9508) of F. nucleatum was placed on the top of the model. The coculture was incubated ≤24 hours. The expression and localization of Ki-67, caspase-3, and collagen IV were examined by immunohistochemistry. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed epithelial migration and lateral sprouting into the connective tissue matrix in F. nucleatum OD-E cocultures. The proliferation pattern of the in vitro dento-epithelial junction was changed. In controls without bacterial challenge, the Ki-67 expression was abundant in the cells attached to the tooth, whereas in F. nucleatum biofilm-treated cultures, the Ki-67-expressing cells were more often in the connective tissue-facing side of the epithelium. An apoptotic marker caspase-3 was expressed in controls and in F. nucleatum laboratory strain ATCC cocultures throughout the epithelium, in contrast to cultures treated with F. nucleatum clinical strain AHN, in which caspase-3 was absent. Collagen IV stainings were negative in both controls and F. nucleatum cocultures. F. nucleatum biofilm coculture with OD-E model causes lateral sprouting of the epithelium with an altered epithelial proliferation pattern, resembling the histologic changes seen in vivo in the early pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  13. 98. View of IBM digital computer model 7090 magnet core ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. View of IBM digital computer model 7090 magnet core installation. ITT Artic Services, Inc., Official photograph BMEWS Site II, Clear, AK, by unknown photographer, 17 September 1965. BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6606. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. Models and observations of deuterated molecules in protostellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H.

    2008-10-01

    Measuring the deuterium fractionation in different molecules can allow one to determine the physical conditions in the gas and to differentiate between gas-phase and grain surface chemical processing. Observations of molecular D/H ratios in different species towards the dense gas surrounding low-mass protostars are presented and are compared with model simulations. These consider gas-phase chemistry, accretion and desorption, and reactions on grain surfaces during the initial stages of core collapse.

  15. Thermal conductivity modeling of core-shell and tubular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronggui; Chen, Gang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of crystalline core-shell nanostructures of a variety of materials has become possible in recent years, allowing the realization of various novel nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. The increased surface or interface area will decrease the thermal conductivity of such nanostructures and impose challenges for the thermal management of such devices. In the meantime, the decreased thermal conductivity might benefit the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, we present modeling results on the lattice thermal conductivity of core-shell and tubular nanowires along the wire axis direction using the phonon Boltzmann equation. We report the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the surface conditions and the core-shell geometry for silicon core-germanium shell and tubular silicon nanowires at room temperature. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity changes not only with the composition of the constituents but also with the radius of the nanowires and nanopores due to the nature of the ballistic phonon transport. The results in this work have implications for the design and operation of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronic devices, and thermoelectric materials and devices.

  16. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  17. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  18. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  19. Quasi-exactly solvable relativistic soft-core Coulomb models

    SciTech Connect

    Agboola, Davids Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    2012-09-15

    By considering a unified treatment, we present quasi exact polynomial solutions to both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with the family of soft-core Coulomb potentials V{sub q}(r)=-Z/(r{sup q}+{beta}{sup q}){sup 1/q}, Z>0, {beta}>0, q{>=}1. We consider cases q=1 and q=2 and show that both cases are reducible to the same basic ordinary differential equation. A systematic and closed form solution to the basic equation is obtained using the Bethe ansatz method. For each case, the expressions for the energies and the allowed parameters are obtained analytically and the wavefunctions are derived in terms of the roots of a set of Bethe ansatz equations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relativistic bound-state solutions of the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quasi-exact treatments of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations for the soft-core Coulomb models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solutions obtained in terms of the roots to the Bethe ansatz equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hidden Lie algebraic structure discussed for the models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results useful in describing mesonic atoms and interaction of intense laser fields with atom.

  20. Exchange bias phenomenology and models of core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Some of the main experimental observations related to the occurrence of exchange bias in magnetic systems are reviewed, focusing the attention on the peculiar phenomenology associated to nanoparticles with core/shell structure as compared to thin film bilayers. The main open questions posed by the experimental observations are presented and contrasted to existing theories and models for exchange bias formulated up to date. We also present results of simulations based on a simple model of a core/shell nanoparticle in which the values of microscopic parameters such as anisotropy and exchange constants can be tuned in the core, shell and at the interfacial regions, offering new insight on the microscopic origin of the experimental phenomenology. A detailed study of the magnetic order of the interfacial spins shows compelling evidence that most of the experimentally observed effects can be qualitatively accounted within the context of this model and allows also to quantify the magnitude of the loop shifts in striking agreement with the macroscopic observed values.

  1. Creep effect modeling for a core free tubular actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Oubaek, Jakob; Jones, Richard W.

    2009-03-01

    Of the range of dielectric EAP-based actuators that currently exist those having a cylindrical configuration are perhaps the most important. Up until now the most popular tubular actuator designs have exploited the exceptional pre-strain performance of the acrylics VHB 2910 and VHB 2905. Unfortunately pre-stained acrylic film rolled tubular actuators with a spring core experience problems concerning reliability and life expectancy. Partly because of these problems research is beginning to be directed towards the design, fabrication and characterisation of core free tubular actuators. This work reviews the Voltage-Strain modeling of core free rolled actuators that are constructed using a dielectric electro active polymer film that employs smart electrode technology. Position response tests, whereby a step input of 1500 V was applied to each actuator, confirmed that time dependent strain influences the Voltage-Strain behaviour of the actuators. To represent the time dependent strain behaviour a creep effect model was combined with Pelrine's electromechanical model to provide a more accurate representation of the Voltage-Strain characteristics of the actuators.

  2. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  3. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  4. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  5. Lattice charge models and core level shifts in disordered alloys.

    PubMed

    Underwood, T L; Cole, R J

    2013-10-30

    Differences in core level binding energies between atoms belonging to the same chemical species can be related to differences in their intra- and extra-atomic charge distributions, and differences in how their core holes are screened. With this in mind, we consider the charge-excess functional model (CEFM) for net atomic charges in alloys (Bruno et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 166401). We begin by deriving the CEFM energy function in order to elucidate the approximations which underpin this model. We thereafter consider the particular case of the CEFM in which the strengths of the 'local interactions' within all atoms are the same. We show that for binary alloys the ground state charges of this model can be expressed in terms of charge transfer between all pairs of unlike atoms analogously to the linear charge model (Magri et al 1990 Phys. Rev. B 42 11388). Hence, the model considered is a generalization of the linear charge model for alloys containing more than two chemical species. We then determine the model's unknown 'geometric factors' over a wide range of parameter space. These quantities are linked to the nature of charge screening in the model, and we illustrate that the screening becomes increasingly universal as the strength of the local interactions is increased. We then use the model to derive analytical expressions for various physical quantities, including the Madelung energy and the disorder broadening in the core level binding energies. These expressions are applied to ternary random alloys, for which it is shown that the Madelung energy and magnitude of disorder broadening are maximized at the composition at which the two species with the largest 'electronegativity difference' are equal, while the remaining species have a vanishing concentration. This result is somewhat counterintuitive with regards to the disorder broadening since it does not correspond to the composition with the highest entropy. Finally, the model is applied to CuPd and Cu

  6. The Open Provenance Model core specification (v1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Luc; Clifford, Ben; Freire, Juliana; Futrelle, Joe; Gil, Yolanda; Groth, Paul; Kwasnikowska, Natalia; Miles, Simon; Missier, Paolo; Myers, Jim; Plale, Beth; Simmhan, Yogesh; Stephan, Eric; den Bussche, Jan Van

    2011-06-01

    The Open Provenance Model is a model of provenance that is designed to meet the following requirements: (1) To allow provenance information to be ex- changed between systems, by means of a compatibility layer based on a shared provenance model. (2) To allow developers to build and share tools that operate on such a provenance model. (3) To deFIne provenance in a precise, technology- agnostic manner. (4) To support a digital representation of provenance for any “thing, whether produced by computer systems or not. (5) To allow multiple levels of description to coexist. (6) To deFIne a core set of rules that identify the valid inferences that can be made on provenance representation. This docu- ment contains the speciFIcation of the Open Provenance Model (v1.1) resulting from a commChallenge.

  7. Understanding Core-Mantle Coupling Through Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, B.

    2007-12-01

    Core-mantle interaction in the Earth is studied using convection-driven dynamo models. We begin by considering an idealized regime that supports locking of the fluid motion and magnetic field to external inhomogeneities. In perfect locking, the azimuthal velocity in the fluid core has the profile of a thermal wind imposed by the boundary. In strongly convective dynamos, the competition between buoyancy-driven and boundary-driven thermal winds determines the extent of fluid-boundary coupling. We go on to show that dynamos with weakly convecting outer layers support locking, whereas strongly convecting outer regions swamp any influence of the lateral variations at the boundary. Finally, we investigate the tomographic boundary condition to see how its individual harmonic components may affect the morphology of the geomagnetic field.

  8. Dynamical Models to Infer the Core Mass Fraction of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The uncompressed density of Venus is just a few percent lower than Earth's, however the nature of the interior core structure of Venus remains unclear. Employing state-of-the-art dynamical formation models that allow both accretion and collisional fragmentation, we perform hundreds of simulations of terrestrial planet growth around the Sun in the presence of the giant planets. For both Earth and Venus analogs, we quantify the iron-silicate ratios, water/volatile abundances and specific impact energies of all collisions that lead to their formation. Preliminary results suggest that the distributions of core mass fraction and water content are comparable among the Earth and Venus analogs, suggesting that Earth and Venus may indeed have formed with similar structures and compositions.

  9. Loss of neurofilaments in the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of proximal axonopathy.

    PubMed

    Soler-Martín, C; Vilardosa, U; Saldaña-Ruíz, S; Garcia, N; Llorens, J

    2012-02-01

    Rodents exposed to 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) develop an axonopathy similar to that observed in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis motor neurones, in which neurofilaments accumulate in swollen proximal axon segments. This study addressed the hypotheses that this proximal axonopathy is associated with loss of neurofilament proteins in the neuromuscular junctions and a progressive loss of neurofilaments advancing in a distal-proximal direction from the distal motor nerve. Adult male Long-Evans rats were exposed to 0 or 15 mM of IDPN in drinking water for 1, 3 or 5 weeks, and their distal axons and neuromuscular junction organization studied by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative data were obtained by confocal microscopy on whole mounts of the Levator auris longus. Muscles showed no change in the distribution of acetylcholine receptor labelling in the neuromuscular junctions after IDPN. In contrast, the amount of neurofilament labelling in the junctions was significantly reduced by IDPN, assessed with two different anti-neurofilament antibodies. In preterminal axons and in more proximal axon levels, no statistically significant reductions in neurofilament content were observed. The proximal neurofilamentous axonopathy induced by IDPN is associated with an abnormally low content of neurofilaments in the motor terminals, with a potential impact in the function or stability of the neuromuscular junction. In contrast, neurofilaments are significantly maintained in the distal axon. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  10. Model for the architecture of claudin-based paracellular ion channels through tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tamura, Atsushi; Tsukita, Sachiko; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-30

    Claudins are main cell-cell adhesion molecules of tight junctions (TJs) between cells in epithelial sheets that form tight barriers that separate the apical from the basolateral space but also contain paracellular channels that regulate the flow of ions and solutes in between these intercellular spaces. Recently, the first crystal structure of a claudin was determined, that of claudin-15, which indicated the parts of the large extracellular domains that likely form the pore-lining surfaces of the paracellular channels. However, the crystal structure did not show how claudin molecules are arranged in the cell membrane to form the backbone of TJ strands and to mediate interactions between adjacent cells, information that is essential to understand how the paracellular channels in TJs function. Here, we propose that TJ strands consist of claudin protomers that assemble into antiparallel double rows. This model is based on cysteine crosslinking experiments that show claudin-15 to dimerize face to face through interactions between the edges of the extracellular β-sheets. Strands observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy of TJs also show that their width is consistent with the dimensions of a claudin dimer. Furthermore, we propose that extracellular variable regions are responsible for head-to-head interactions of TJ strands in adjoining cells, thus resulting in the formation of paracellular channels. Our model of the TJ architecture provides a basis to discuss structural mechanisms underlying the selective ion permeability and barrier properties of TJs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  12. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  13. Multicycle PWR in-core fuel management through one-and-a-half-dimensional core modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, B.G.; Levine, S.H. )

    1992-01-01

    The one-and-a-half-dimensional (1 and 1/2-D) model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core employs one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion calculation followed by a fast, few-step procedure to unfold the 1-D results into the two-dimensional (2-D) results. A computer code was developed based on that model. The initial benchmarking has shown the code to be almost as fast as a plain 1-D code and significantly faster than the analogous 2-D code (10 to 100 times for a typical problem). Yet, it provides results in 2-D form and better accuracy than the 1-D code. The model itself and the initial benchmarking were described in more detail elsewhere. The code has since been enhanced, and a multicycle analysis option has been implemented. This paper presents results of benchmarking the model using the actual data for three successive cycles of the Krsko nuclear power plant and complex low-leakage loading patterns.

  14. Testing a new Free Core Nutation empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Santiago; Ferrándiz, José M.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a free mode of the Earth's rotation caused by the different material characteristics of the Earth's core and mantle. This causes the rotational axes of those layers to slightly diverge from each other, resulting in a wobble of the Earth's rotation axis comparable to nutations. In this paper we focus on estimating empirical FCN models using the observed nutations derived from the VLBI sessions between 1993 and 2013. Assuming a fixed value for the oscillation period, the time-variable amplitudes and phases are estimated by means of multiple sliding window analyses. The effects of using different a priori Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) in the derivation of models are also addressed. The optimal choice of the fundamental parameters of the model, namely the window width and step-size of its shift, is searched by performing a thorough experimental analysis using real data. The former analyses lead to the derivation of a model with a temporal resolution higher than the one used in the models currently available, with a sliding window reduced to 400 days and a day-by-day shift. It is shown that this new model increases the accuracy of the modeling of the observed Earth's rotation. Besides, empirical models determined from USNO Finals as a priori ERP present a slightly lower Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) of residuals than IERS 08 C04 along the whole period of VLBI observations, according to our computations. The model is also validated through comparisons with other recognized models. The level of agreement among them is satisfactory. Let us remark that our estimates give rise to the lowest residuals and seem to reproduce the FCN signal in more detail.

  15. Chemical modeling of interstellar molecules in dense cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Donghui

    There are billions of stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way Galaxy. In between the stars is where the so-called "interstellar medium" locates. The majority of the mass of interstellar medium is clumped into interstellar clouds, in which cold and hot dense cores exist. Despite of the extremely low densities and low temperatures of the dense cores, over one hundred molecules have been found in these sources. This makes the field of astrochemistry vivid. Chemical modeling plays very important roles to understand the mechanism of formation and destruction of interstellar molecules. In this thesis, chemical kinetics models of different types were applied: in Chapter 4, pure gas phase models were used for seven newly detected or confirmed molecules by the Green Bank Telescope; in Chapter 5, the potential reason of non-detection of O 2 was explored; in Chapter 6, the mysterious behavior of CHNO and CHNS isomers were studied by gas-grain models. In addition, effects of varying rate coefficients to the models are also discussed in Chapter 3 and 7.

  16. Two-fluid models of superfluid neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.

    2008-08-01

    Both relativistic and non-relativistic two-fluid models of neutron star cores are constructed, using the constrained variational formalism developed by Brandon Carter and co-workers. We consider a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons at zero temperature, taking into account mutual entrainment effects. Leptons, which affect the interior composition of the neutron star and contribute to the pressure, are also included. We provide the analytic expression of the Lagrangian density of the system, the so-called master function, from which the dynamical equations can be obtained. All the microscopic parameters of the models are calculated consistently using the non-relativistic nuclear energy density functional theory. For comparison, we have also considered relativistic mean field models. The correspondence between relativistic and non-relativistic hydrodynamical models is discussed in the framework of the recently developed 4D covariant formalism of Newtonian multifluid hydrodynamics. We have shown that entrainment effects can be interpreted in terms of dynamical effective masses that are larger in the relativistic case than in the Newtonian case. With the nuclear models considered in this work, we have found that the neutron relativistic effective mass is even greater than the bare neutron mass in the liquid core of neutron stars.

  17. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  18. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a global, continuous in value and gradient, representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere for five ion species. These and other works enable a new more robust empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  19. The Candy Wrapper Velocity Model for the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattesini, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent global expansion of seismic data motivated a number of seismological studies of the Earth's inner core that proposed the existence of increasingly complex structure and anisotropy. In the meantime, new hypotheses of dynamic mechanisms have been put forward to interpret seismological results. Here, the nature of hemispherical dichotomy and anisotropy is re-investigated by bridging the observations of PKP(bc-df) differential travel-times with the iron bcc/hcp elastic properties computed from first-principles methods.The Candy Wrapper velocity model introduced here accounts for a dynamic picture of the inner core (i.e., the eastward drift of material), where different iron crystal shapes can be stabilized at the two hemispheres. We show that seismological data are best explained by a rather complicated, mosaic-like, structure of the inner core, where well-separated patches of different iron crystals compose the anisotropic western hemispherical region, and a conglomerate of almost indistinguishable iron phases builds-up the weakly anisotropic eastern side.

  20. A Global Model for Circumgalactic and Cluster-core Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, G. Mark; Meece, Greg; Li, Yuan; O'Shea, Brian W.; Bryan, Greg L.; Donahue, Megan

    2017-08-01

    We provide an analytic framework for interpreting observations of multiphase circumgalactic gas that is heavily informed by recent numerical simulations of thermal instability and precipitation in cool-core galaxy clusters. We start by considering the local conditions required for the formation of multiphase gas via two different modes: (1) uplift of ambient gas by galactic outflows, and (2) condensation in a stratified stationary medium in which thermal balance is explicitly maintained. Analytic exploration of these two modes provides insights into the relationships between the local ratio of the cooling and freefall timescales (i.e., {t}{cool}/{t}{ff}), the large-scale gradient of specific entropy, and the development of precipitation and multiphase media in circumgalactic gas. We then use these analytic findings to interpret recent simulations of circumgalactic gas in which global thermal balance is maintained. We show that long-lasting configurations of gas with 5≲ \\min ({t}{cool}/{t}{ff})≲ 20 and radial entropy profiles similar to observations of cool cores in galaxy clusters are a natural outcome of precipitation-regulated feedback. We conclude with some observational predictions that follow from these models. This work focuses primarily on precipitation and AGN feedback in galaxy-cluster cores, because that is where the observations of multiphase gas around galaxies are most complete. However, many of the physical principles that govern condensation in those environments apply to circumgalactic gas around galaxies of all masses.

  1. Tight junctions as regulators of tissue remodelling.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Formation of tissue barriers by epithelial and endothelial cells requires neighbouring cells to interact via intercellular junctions, which includes tight junctions. Tight junctions form a semipermeable paracellular diffusion barrier and act as signalling hubs that guide cell behaviour and differentiation. Components of tight junctions are also expressed in cell types not forming tight junctions, such as cardiomyocytes, where they associate with facia adherens and/or gap junctions. This review will focus on tight junction proteins and their importance in tissue homeostasis and remodelling with a particular emphasis on what we have learned from animal models and human diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Electromagnetic model for near-field microwave microscope with atomic resolution: Determination of tunnel junction impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, Alexander N.

    2014-08-25

    An electrodynamic model is proposed for the tunneling microwave microscope with subnanometer space resolution as developed by Lee et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 183111 (2010)]. Tip-sample impedance Z{sub a} was introduced and studied in the tunneling and non-tunneling regimes. At tunneling breakdown, the microwave current between probe and sample flows along two parallel channels characterized by impedances Z{sub p} and Z{sub t} that add up to form overall impedance Z{sub a}. Quantity Z{sub p} is the capacitive impedance determined by the near field of the probe and Z{sub t} is the impedance of the tunnel junction. By taking into account the distance dependences of effective tip radius r{sub 0}(z) and tunnel resistance R{sub t}(z) = Re[Z{sub t}(z)], we were able to explain the experimentally observed dependences of resonance frequency f{sub r}(z) and quality factor Q{sub L}(z) of the microscope. The obtained microwave resistance R{sub t}(z) and direct current tunnel resistance R{sub t}{sup dc}(z) exhibit qualitatively similar behavior, although being largely different in both magnitude and the characteristic scale of height dependence. Interpretation of the microwave images of the atomic structure of test samples proved possible by taking into account the inductive component of tunnel impedance ImZ{sub t} = ωL{sub t}. Relation ωL{sub t}/R{sub t} ≈ 0.235 was obtained.

  3. Elaboration of a finite element model of pancreatic islet dielectric response to gap junction expression and insulin release.

    PubMed

    Heileman, Khalil Leon; Daoud, Jamal; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy could potentially be a powerful tool to monitor isolated human pancreatic islets for applications in diabetes therapy and research. Isolated intact human islets provide the most relevant means to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with diabetes. The advantages of dielectric spectroscopy for continuous islet monitoring are that it is a non-invasive, inexpensive and real-time technique. We have previously assessed the dielectric response of human islet samples during stimulation and differentiation. Because of the complex geometry of islets, analytical solutions are not sufficiently representative to provide a pertinent model of islet dielectric response. Here, we present a finite element dielectric model of a single intact islet that takes into account the tight packing of islet cells and intercellular junctions. The simulation yielded dielectric spectra characteristic of cell aggregates, similar to those produced with islets. In addition, the simulation showed that both exocytosis, such as what occurs during insulin secretion, and differential gap junction expression have significant effects on islet dielectric response. Since the progression of diabetes has some connections with dysfunctional islet gap junctions and insulin secretion, the ability to monitor these islet features with dielectric spectroscopy would benefit diabetes research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radical precursors and related species from traffic as observed and modeled at an urban highway junction.

    PubMed

    Rappenglück, Bernhard; Lubertino, Graciela; Alvarez, Sergio; Golovko, Julia; Czader, Beata; Ackermann, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) are important precursors for radicals and are believed to favor ozone formation significantly. Traffic emission data for both compounds are scarce and mostly outdated. A better knowledge of today's HCHO and HONO emissions related to traffic is needed to refine air quality models. Here the authors report results from continuous ambient air measurements taken at a highway junction in Houston, Texas, from July 15 to October 15, 2009. The observational data were compared with emission estimates from currently available mobile emission models (MOBILE6; MOVES [MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator]). Observations indicated a molar carbon monoxide (CO) versus nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) ratio of 6.01 +/- 0.15 (r2 = 0.91), which is in agreement with other field studies. Both MOBILE6 and MOVES overestimate this emission ratio by 92% and 24%, respectively. For HCHO/CO, an overall slope of 3.14 +/- 0.14 g HCHO/kg CO was observed. Whereas MOBILE6 largely underestimates this ratio by 77%, MOVES calculates somewhat higher HCHO/CO ratios (1.87) than MOBILE6, but is still significantly lower than the observed ratio. MOVES shows high HCHO/CO ratios during the early morning hours due to heavy-duty diesel off-network emissions. The differences of the modeled CO/NO(x) and HCHO/CO ratios are largely due to higher NO(x) and HCHO emissions in MOVES (30% and 57%, respectively, increased from MOBILE6 for 2009), as CO emissions were about the same in both models. The observed HONO/NO(x) emission ratio is around 0.017 +/- 0.0009 kg HONO/kg NO(x) which is twice as high as in MOVES. The observed NO2/NO(x) emission ratio is around 0.16 +/- 0.01 kg NO2/kg NO(x), which is a bit more than 50% higher than in MOVES. MOVES overestimates the CO/CO2 emission ratio by a factor of 3 compared with the observations, which is 0.0033 +/- 0.0002 kg CO/kg CO2. This as well as CO/NO(x) overestimation is coming from light-duty gasoline vehicles.

  5. Core-Envelope Interior Models of the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Anderson, J. D.; Helled, R.

    2009-12-01

    The constraints on giant planet interior models with density discontinuities, for example, a core-envelope boundary, are more difficult to treat than a continuous density distribution that decreases monotonically and continuously from the center to the surface of the planet. We revise our previous interior calculations (Anderson, J. D., and G. Schubert, Saturn’s gravitational field, internal rotation, and interior structure, 2007, Science, 317, 1384-1387, doi: 101126/science.1144835, 2007), which solved a system of integro-differential equations to third order in the smallness parameter ω2a3/GM (ω is the angular velocity of the planet, a is the planet’s equatorial radius, G is the gravitational constant, and M is the planet’s mass), and introduce Clairaut’s differential equation for the flattening f, with appropriate boundary conditions at the planet’s surface and at its center. The calculations can be carried to second order in the smallness parameter by solving Darwin’s differential equation for k, a parameter that describes a second-order deviation from sphericity. In principle, the calculations can be extended to differential equations of arbitrary order in smallness. As with our earlier method, we apply this revised method to the outer planets with interiors comprising a compressible core, obeying a linear density distribution, and an envelope in which density vs. radius is described by a sixth degree polynomial. This method of gravity sounding, with cores and envelope polynomial density distributions, can yield insights into a class of possible cores that fit the boundary conditions, consisting of the measured even zonal gravitational harmonics, plus the measured size and total mass of the planet. We apply the method to the four outer planets.

  6. A compact model for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switched by thermally assisted Spin transfer torque (TAS + STT).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weisheng; Duval, Julien; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2011-04-28

    Thermally assisted spin transfer torque [TAS + STT] is a new switching approach for magnetic tunnel junction [MTJ] nanopillars that represents the best trade-off between data reliability, power efficiency and density. In this paper, we present a compact model for MTJ switched by this approach, which integrates a number of physical models such as temperature evaluation and STT dynamic switching models. Many experimental parameters are included directly to improve the simulation accuracy. It is programmed in the Verilog-A language and compatible with the standard IC CAD tools, providing an easy parameter configuration interface and allowing high-speed co-simulation of hybrid MTJ/CMOS circuits.

  7. A compact model for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switched by thermally assisted Spin transfer torque (TAS + STT)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thermally assisted spin transfer torque [TAS + STT] is a new switching approach for magnetic tunnel junction [MTJ] nanopillars that represents the best trade-off between data reliability, power efficiency and density. In this paper, we present a compact model for MTJ switched by this approach, which integrates a number of physical models such as temperature evaluation and STT dynamic switching models. Many experimental parameters are included directly to improve the simulation accuracy. It is programmed in the Verilog-A language and compatible with the standard IC CAD tools, providing an easy parameter configuration interface and allowing high-speed co-simulation of hybrid MTJ/CMOS circuits. PMID:21711868

  8. Ab Initio and Ab Exitu No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J P; Navratil, P; Gueorguiev, V G; Ormand, W E; Nogga, A; Maris, P; Shirokov, A

    2007-10-02

    We outline two complementary approaches based on the no core shell model (NCSM) and present recent results. In the ab initio approach, nuclear properties are evaluated with two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon interactions (TNI) derived within effective field theory (EFT) based on chiral perturbation theory (ChPT). Fitting two available parameters of the TNI generates good descriptions of light nuclei. In a second effort, an ab exitu approach, results are obtained with a realistic NN interaction derived by inverse scattering theory with off-shell properties tuned to fit light nuclei. Both approaches produce good results for observables sensitive to spin-orbit properties.

  9. Ab-Initio Shell Model with a Core

    SciTech Connect

    Lisetskiy, A F; Barrett, B R; Kruse, M; Navratil, P; Stetcu, I; Vary, J P

    2008-06-04

    We construct effective 2- and 3-body Hamiltonians for the p-shell by performing 12{h_bar}{Omega} ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) calculations for A=6 and 7 nuclei and explicitly projecting the many-body Hamiltonians onto the 0{h_bar}{Omega} space. We then separate these effective Hamiltonians into 0-, 1- and 2-body contributions (also 3-body for A=7) and analyze the systematic behavior of these different parts as a function of the mass number A and size of the NCSM basis space. The role of effective 3- and higher-body interactions for A > 6 is investigated and discussed.

  10. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  12. Symmetry Based No Core Shell Model in a Deformed Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekejian, David; Draayer, Jerry; Launey, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    To address current limitations of shell-model descriptions of large spatial deformation and cluster structures, we adopt a no-core shell model with a deformed harmonic oscillator basis and implement an angular momentum projection in a symmetry-adapted scheme. This approach allows us to reach larger model spaces as a result of computational memory savings for calculations of highly deformed states, such as the Hoyle state in C-12. The method is first tested with schematic interactions, but the ultimate goal is to carry forward calculations with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in future work. Supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI-1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and benefitted from computing resources provided by Blue Waters and LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  13. Core competency model for the family planning public health nurse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Caroline M; Roye, Carol; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    A core competency model for family planning public health nurses has been developed, using a three stage Delphi Method with an expert panel of 40 family planning senior administrators, community/public health nursing faculty and seasoned family planning public health nurses. The initial survey was developed from the 2011 Title X Family Planning program priorities. The 32-item survey was distributed electronically via SurveyMonkey(®). Panelist attrition was low, and participation robust resulting in the final 28-item model, suggesting that the Delphi Method was a successful technique through which to achieve consensus. Competencies with at least 75% consensus were included in the model and those competencies were primarily related to education/counseling and administration of medications and contraceptives. The competencies identified have implications for education/training, certification and workplace performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  15. Characterization and Modeling of Superconducting Josephson Junction Arrays at Low Voltage and Liquid Helium Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    technical report demonstrates the capabilities to measure Niobium-based Josephson junction arrays at liquid helium temperatures at less than 50 mV. We find...2 3. Measurements of the array in the resistive state with temperature greater than the... Measurements of the array in the cryogenic conditions near the critical temperature (i.e., 7 to 8

  16. Model Career Exploratory Program. Junction City Jr. High School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Anthony

    The report describes a career education demonstration project conducted in Junction City, Oregon, a city of 2,535 people with a high concentration of low-income families. Major limitations encountered were resistance to change and lack of funds. Procedures included four inservice sessions for instructional and guidance staff and four visitations…

  17. MicroRNA Intercellular Transfer and Bioelectrical Regulation of Model Multicellular Ensembles by the Gap Junction Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Meseguer, Salvador; Mafe, Salvador

    2017-08-17

    We have studied theoretically the microRNA (miRNA) intercellular transfer through voltage-gated gap junctions in terms of a biophysically grounded system of coupled differential equations. Instead of modeling a specific system, we use a general approach describing the interplay between the genetic mechanisms and the single-cell electric potentials. The dynamics of the multicellular ensemble are simulated under different conditions including spatially inhomogeneous transcription rates and local intercellular transfer of miRNAs. These processes result in spatiotemporal changes of miRNA, mRNA, and ion channel protein concentrations that eventually modify the bioelectrical states of small multicellular domains because of the ensemble average nature of the electrical potential. The simulations allow a qualitative understanding of the context-dependent nature of the effects observed when specific signaling molecules are transferred through gap junctions. The results suggest that an efficient miRNA intercellular transfer could permit the spatiotemporal control of small cellular domains by the conversion of single-cell genetic and bioelectric states into multicellular states regulated by the gap junction interconnectivity.

  18. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  19. Dynamic phenomena arising from an extended Core Group model.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David; Griffiths, Martin

    2009-10-01

    In order to obtain a reasonably accurate model for the spread of a particular infectious disease through a population, it may be necessary for this model to possess some degree of structural complexity. Many such models have, in recent years, been found to exhibit a phenomenon known as backward bifurcation, which generally implies the existence of two subcritical endemic equilibria. It is often possible to refine these models yet further, and we investigate here the influence such a refinement may have on the dynamic behaviour of a system in the region of the parameter space near R(0)=1. We consider a natural extension to a so-called Core Group model for the spread of a sexually transmitted disease, arguing that this may in fact give rise to a more realistic model. From the deterministic viewpoint we study the possible shapes of the resulting bifurcation diagrams and the associated stability patterns. Stochastic versions of both the original and the extended models are also developed so that the probability of extinction and time to extinction may be examined, allowing us to gain further insights into the complex system dynamics near R(0)=1. A number of interesting phenomena are observed, for which heuristic explanations are provided.

  20. MCNP/MCNPX model of the annular core research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Cooper, Philip J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Many experimenters at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) have a need to predict the neutron/gamma environment prior to testing. In some cases, the neutron/gamma environment is needed to understand the test results after the completion of an experiment. In an effort to satisfy the needs of experimenters, a model of the ACRR was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport codes MCNP [Br03] and MCNPX [Wa02]. The model contains adjustable safety, transient, and control rods, several of the available spectrum-modifying cavity inserts, and placeholders for experiment packages. The ACRR model was constructed such that experiment package models can be easily placed in the reactor after being developed as stand-alone units. An addition to the 'standard' model allows the FREC-II cavity to be included in the calculations. This report presents the MCNP/MCNPX model of the ACRR. Comparisons are made between the model and the reactor for various configurations. Reactivity worth curves for the various reactor configurations are presented. Examples of reactivity worth calculations for a few experiment packages are presented along with the measured reactivity worth from the reactor test of the experiment packages. Finally, calculated neutron/gamma spectra are presented.

  1. A numerical strategy for modelling rotating stall in core compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdati, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper will focus on one specific core-compressor instability, rotating stall, because of the pressing industrial need to improve current design methods. The determination of the blade response during rotating stall is a difficult problem for which there is no reliable procedure. During rotating stall, the blades encounter the stall cells and the excitation depends on the number, size, exact shape and rotational speed of these cells. The long-term aim is to minimize the forced response due to rotating stall excitation by avoiding potential matches between the vibration modes and the rotating stall pattern characteristics. Accurate numerical simulations of core-compressor rotating stall phenomena require the modelling of a large number of bladerows using grids containing several tens of millions of points. The time-accurate unsteady-flow computations may need to be run for several engine revolutions for rotating stall to get initiated and many more before it is fully developed. The difficulty in rotating stall initiation arises from a lack of representation of the triggering disturbances which are inherently present in aeroengines. Since the numerical model represents a symmetric assembly, the only random mechanism for rotating stall initiation is provided by numerical round-off errors. In this work, rotating stall is initiated by introducing a small amount of geometric mistuning to the rotor blades. Another major obstacle in modelling flows near stall is the specification of appropriate upstream and downstream boundary conditions. Obtaining reliable boundary conditions for such flows can be very difficult. In the present study, the low-pressure compression (LPC) domain is placed upstream of the core compressor. With such an approach, only far field atmospheric boundary conditions are specified which are obtained from aircraft speed and altitude. A chocked variable-area nozzle, placed after the last compressor bladerow in the model, is used to impose boundary

  2. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  3. Development of CFD model for augmented core tripropellant rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle era has made major advances in technology and vehicle design to the point that the concept of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle appears more feasible. NASA presently is conducting studies into the feasibility of certain advanced concept rocket engines that could be utilized in a SSTO vehicle. One such concept is a tripropellant system which burns kerosene and hydrogen initially and at altitude switches to hydrogen. This system will attain a larger mass fraction because LOX-kerosene engines have a greater average propellant density and greater thrust-to-weight ratio. This report describes the investigation to model the tripropellant augmented core engine. The physical aspects of the engine, the CFD code employed, and results of the numerical model for a single modular thruster are discussed.

  4. Mean-field fluid behavior of the gaussian core model

    PubMed

    Louis; Bolhuis; Hansen

    2000-12-01

    We show that the Gaussian core model of particles interacting via a penetrable repulsive Gaussian potential, first considered by Stillinger [J. Chem. Phys. 65, 3968 (1976)], behaves as a weakly correlated "mean-field fluid" over a surprisingly wide density and temperature range. In the bulk, the structure of the fluid phase is accurately described by the random phase approximation for the direct correlation function, and by the more sophisticated hypernetted chain integral equation. The resulting pressure deviates very little from a simple mean-field-like quadratic form in the density, while the low density virial expansion turns out to have an extremely small radius of convergence. Density profiles near a hard wall are also very accurately described by the corresponding mean-field free-energy functional. The binary version of the model exhibits a spinodal instability against demixing at high densities. Possible implications for semidilute polymer solutions are discussed.

  5. Systems Modeling for Crew Core Body Temperature Prediction Postlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Cynthia; Ochoa, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, NASA s latest crewed spacecraft project, presents many challenges to its designers including ensuring crew survivability during nominal and off nominal landing conditions. With a nominal water landing planned off the coast of San Clemente, California, off nominal water landings could range from the far North Atlantic Ocean to the middle of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. For all of these conditions, the vehicle must provide sufficient life support resources to ensure that the crew member s core body temperatures are maintained at a safe level prior to crew rescue. This paper will examine the natural environments, environments created inside the cabin and constraints associated with post landing operations that affect the temperature of the crew member. Models of the capsule and the crew members are examined and analysis results are compared to the requirement for safe human exposure. Further, recommendations for updated modeling techniques and operational limits are included.

  6. Mean-field fluid behavior of the Gaussian core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, A. A.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Hansen, J. P.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the Gaussian core model of particles interacting via a penetrable repulsive Gaussian potential, first considered by Stillinger [J. Chem. Phys. 65, 3968 (1976)], behaves as a weakly correlated ``mean-field fluid'' over a surprisingly wide density and temperature range. In the bulk, the structure of the fluid phase is accurately described by the random phase approximation for the direct correlation function, and by the more sophisticated hypernetted chain integral equation. The resulting pressure deviates very little from a simple mean-field-like quadratic form in the density, while the low density virial expansion turns out to have an extremely small radius of convergence. Density profiles near a hard wall are also very accurately described by the corresponding mean-field free-energy functional. The binary version of the model exhibits a spinodal instability against demixing at high densities. Possible implications for semidilute polymer solutions are discussed.

  7. A vectorized heat transfer model for solid reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The new generation of nuclear reactors includes designs that are significantly different from light water reactors. Among these new reactor designs is the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). In addition, nuclear thermal rockets share a number of similarities with terrestrial HTGRs and would be amenable to similar types of analyses. In these reactors, the heat transfer in the solid core mass is of primary interest in design and safety assessment. One significant safety feature of these reactors is the capability to withstand a loss of pressure and forced cooling in the primary system and still maintain peak fuel temperatures below the safe threshold for retaining the fission products. To accurately assess the performance of gas-cooled reactors during these types of transients, a Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions. Also, HERA has been used to analyze a depressurized loss of forced cooling transient in a HTGR with a very detailed three-dimensional input model. The results compare favorably with other means of analysis and provide further validation of the models and methods. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  8. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CORE CONVECTION IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-20

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M{sub Sun} star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  9. Low Mach Number Modeling of Core Convection in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-01

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M ⊙ star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  10. Josephson junctions with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Blackburn, James A.; Huberman, Bernardo A.; Smith, H. J. T.

    1992-12-01

    We study a simple model of an overdamped Josephson junction coupled to a transmission line, which is regarded as a delayed feedback to the junction. It is demonstrated analytically how the nonlocal time dependence can give rise to hysteresis and steps in the current-voltage characteristics of the junction and the fundamental difference between positive and negative feedback is discussed. Excellent agreement between the analytical results and the results of numerical simulations is found.

  11. Epithelial Junction Opener Improves Oncolytic Adenovirus Therapy in Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Yumul, Roma; Richter, Maximilian; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    A central resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. Human adenoviruses (Ads) have evolved mechanisms to breach epithelial barriers. For example, during Ad serotype 3 (Ad3) infection of epithelial tumor cells, massive amounts of subviral penton-dodecahedral particles (PtDd) are produced and released from infected cells to trigger the transient opening of epithelial junctions, thus facilitating lateral virus spread. We show here that an Ad3 mutant that is disabled for PtDd production is significantly less effective in killing of epithelial human xenograft tumors than the wild-type Ad3 virus. Intratumoral spread and therapeutic effect of the Ad3 mutant was enhanced by co-administration of a small recombinant protein (JO; produced in Escherichia coli) that incorporated the minimal junction opening domains of PtDd. We then demonstrated that co-administration of JO with replication-competent Ads that do not produce PtDd (Ad5, Ad35) resulted in greater attenuation of tumor growth than virus injection alone. Furthermore, we genetically modified a conditionally replicating Ad5-based oncolytic Ad (Ad5Δ24) to express a secreted form of JO upon replication in tumor cells. The JO-expressing virus had a significantly greater antitumor effect than the unmodified AdΔ24 version. Our findings indicate that epithelial junctions limit the efficacy of oncolytic Ads and that this problem can be address by co-injection or expression of JO. JO has also the potential for improving cancer therapy with other types of oncolytic viruses. PMID:26993072

  12. Modeling Radiation Effects on a Triple Junction Solar Cell using Silvaco ATLAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    structure. Intrinsic semiconductors are impossible to create because at some point during the growth process impurities inadvertently contaminate the...crystal, called the seed, is placed into a liquid comprised of the same material as the seed and is slowly twisted and pulled upwards. If a doped...boundary which joins these two regions is known as the metallurgical junction. As soon as the two regions are joined, majority carrier electrons from

  13. Model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage because disasters frequently cross jurisdictional lines and involve responders from multiple agencies who may be using different triage tools. These criteria (Tables 1-4) reflect the available science, but it is acknowledged that there are significant research gaps. When no science was available, decisions were formed by expert consensus derived from the available triage systems. The intent is to ensure that providers at a mass-casualty incident use triage methodologies that incorporate these core principles in an effort to promote interoperability and standardization. At a minimum, each triage system must incorporate the criteria that are listed below. Mass casualty triage systems in use can be modified using these criteria to ensure interoperability. The criteria include general considerations, global sorting, lifesaving interventions, and assignment of triage categories. The criteria apply only to providers who are organizing multiple victims in a discrete geographic location or locations, regardless of the size of the incident. They are classified by whether they were derived through available direct scientific evidence, indirect scientific evidence, expert consensus, and/or are used in multiple existing triage systems. These criteria address only primary triage and do not consider secondary triage. For the purposes of this document the term triage refers to mass-casualty triage and provider refers to any person who assigns primary triage categories to victims of a mass-casualty incident.

  14. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  15. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS will be designed and implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP) . The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and on the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: digitised geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  16. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo; Morel, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS is being designed and will be implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP/IODP). The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and of the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  17. Hydrodynamic models of AGN feedback in cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.

    X-ray observations show that the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) in many galaxy clusters is cooling at a rapid rate, often to the point that it should have radiated away all of its energy in less than the age of the cluster. There is however a very clear lack of enough cool end products of this gas in the centers of the clusters. Energetic arguments indicate that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should be capable of heating the inner regions of clusters enough to offset the radiative cooling; truncating massive galaxy formation and solving the cooling flow problem. We present three sets of high resolution, ideal hydrodynamic simulations with the ZEUS code to test this AGN heating paradigm. For the first set of simulations, we study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves. We present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere. We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures. These simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which the energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases, a large fraction of the energy injected by the jet ends up as gravitational potential energy due to the expansion of the atmosphere. For the second set, we present three-dimensional simulations of jetted AGN that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. Finally, we

  18. Mouse models of Casc3 reveal developmental functions distinct from other components of the exon junction complex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hanqian; Brown, Hannah E; Silver, Debra L

    2017-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is a multiprotein complex integral to mRNA metabolism. Biochemistry and genetic studies have concluded that the EJC is composed of four core proteins, MAGOH, EIF4A3, RBM8A, and CASC3. Yet recent studies in Drosophila indicate divergent physiological functions for Barentsz, the mammalian Casc3 ortholog, raising the question as to whether CASC3 is a constitutive component of the EJC. This issue remains poorly understood, particularly in an in vivo mammalian context. We previously found that haploinsufficiency for Magoh, Eif4a3, or Rbm8a disrupts neuronal viability and neural progenitor proliferation, resulting in severe microcephaly. Here, we use two new Casc3 mouse alleles to demonstrate developmental phenotypes that sharply contrast those of other core EJC components. Homozygosity for either null or hypomorphic Casc3 alleles led to embryonic and perinatal lethality, respectively. Compound embryos lacking Casc3 expression were smaller with proportionately reduced brain size. Mutant brains contained fewer neurons and progenitors, but no apoptosis, all phenotypes explained by developmental delay. This finding, which contrasts with severe neural phenotypes evident in other EJC mutants, indicates Casc3 is largely dispensable for brain development. In the developing brain, CASC3 protein expression is substoichiometric relative to MAGOH, EIF4A3, and RBM8A. Taken together, this argues that CASC3 is not an essential EJC component in brain development and suggests it could function in a tissue-specific manner.

  19. Benchmarking spin-state chemistry in starless core models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, O.; Caselli, P.; Harju, J.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to present simulated chemical abundance profiles for a variety of important species, giving special attention to spin-state chemistry, in order to provide reference results to which present and future models can be compared. Methods: We employ gas-phase and gas-grain models to investigate chemical abundances in physical conditions that correspond to starless cores. To this end, we have developed new chemical reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry, including the deuterated forms of species with up to six atoms and the spin-state chemistry of light ions and of the species involved in the ammonia and water formation networks. The physical model is kept simple to facilitate straightforward benchmarking of other models against the results of this paper. Results: We find that the ortho/para ratios of ammonia and water are similar in both gas-phase and gas-grain models, particularly at late times, implying that the ratios are determined by gas-phase processes. Furthermore, the ratios do not exhibit any strong dependence on core density. We derive late-time ortho/para ratios of ~0.5 for ammonia and ~1.6 for water. We find that including or excluding deuterium in the calculations has little effect on the abundances of non-deuterated species and on the ortho/para ratios of ammonia and water, especially in gas-phase models where deuteration is naturally hindered by the presence of abundant heavy elements. Although we study a rather narrow temperature range (10-20 K), we find strong temperature dependence in, e.g., deuteration and nitrogen chemistry. For example, the depletion timescale of ammonia is significantly reduced when the temperature is increased from 10 to 20 K; this is because the increase in temperature translates into increased accretion rates, while the very high binding energy of ammonia prevents it from being desorbed at 20 K. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Morse potential-based model for contacting composite rough surfaces: Application to self-assembled monolayer junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Suarez, Jonatan A.; Majumdar, Shubhaditya; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Malen, Jonathan A.; Higgs, C. Fred

    2016-04-01

    This work formulates a rough surface contact model that accounts for adhesion through a Morse potential and plasticity through the Kogut-Etsion finite element-based approximation. Compared to the commonly used Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, the Morse potential provides a more accurate and generalized description for modeling covalent materials and surface interactions. An extension of this contact model to describe composite layered surfaces is presented and implemented to study a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) grown on a gold substrate placed in contact with a second gold substrate. Based on a comparison with prior experimental measurements of the thermal conductance of this SAM junction [Majumdar et al., Nano Lett. 15, 2985-2991 (2015)], the more general Morse potential-based contact model provides a better prediction of the percentage contact area than an equivalent LJ potential-based model.

  1. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, make possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented. Specifically shown here are the inner-plasmasphere RIMS measurements, radial fits to densities and temperatures for H(+), He(+), He(++), O(+), and O(+) and the error associated with these initial simple fits. Also shown are more subtle dependencies on the f10.7 P-value (see Richards et al. [1994]).

  2. Core polarization and modern realistic shell-model Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Gargano, A.; Itaco, N.

    The understanding of the convergence properties of the shell-model effective Hamiltonian, within the framework of the many-body perturbation theory, is a long-standing problem. The infinite summation of a certain class of diagrams, the so-called "bubble diagrams," may be provided calculating the Kirson-Babu-Brown induced interaction, and provides a valid instrument to study whether or not the finite summation of the perturbative series is well-grounded. Here, we perform an application of the calculation of the Kirson-Babu-Brown induced interaction to derive the shell-model effective Hamiltonian for p-shell nuclei starting from a modern nucleon-nucleon potential, obtained by way of the chiral perturbation theory. The outcome of our calculation is compared with a standard calculation of the shell-model Hamiltonian, where the core-polarization effects are calculated only up to third-order in perturbation theory. The results of the two calculations are very close to each other, evidencing that the perturbative approach to the derivation of the shell-model Hamiltonian is still a valid tool for nuclear structure studies.

  3. Core polarization and modern realistic shell-model Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Gargano, A.; Itaco, N.

    The understanding of the convergence properties of the shell-model effective Hamiltonian, within the framework of the many-body perturbation theory, is a long-standing problem. The infinite summation of a certain class of diagrams, the so-called “bubble diagrams,” may be provided calculating the Kirson-Babu-Brown induced interaction, and provides a valid instrument to study whether or not the finite summation of the perturbative series is well-grounded. Here, we perform an application of the calculation of the Kirson-Babu-Brown induced interaction to derive the shell-model effective Hamiltonian for p-shell nuclei starting from a modern nucleon-nucleon potential, obtained by way of the chiral perturbation theory. The outcome of our calculation is compared with a standard calculation of the shell-model Hamiltonian, where the core-polarization effects are calculated only up to third-order in perturbation theory. The results of the two calculations are very close to each other, evidencing that the perturbative approach to the derivation of the shell-model Hamiltonian is still a valid tool for nuclear structure studies.

  4. New developments within the no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B. R.; Navrátil, P.; Nogga, A.; Ormand, W. E.; Quaglioni, S.; Stetcu, I.; Varyd, J. P.

    2006-10-01

    We review recent developments in the ab initio no-core shell model, such as the influence of 3NFs on the binding energies and excitation spectra of light nuclei. Our calculations permit us to compare the effect of different choices for the theoretical 3NF on the properties of light nuclei. This is of particular interest in determining the best choice of the values for the contact terms in 3NFs derived from Chiral Perturbation Theory. Other recent developments in the NCSM include an investigation of the renormalization properties of physical operators, besides the nuclear Hamiltonian, as well as the Lorentz integral transform approach to the description of select reaction observables in light nuclei.

  5. No-core shell model in an EFT framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, Ionel; Torkkola, Juhani L.; Barrett, Bruce R.; van Kolck, Ubirajara

    2006-10-01

    Based on an effective field theory (EFT) that integrates out the pions as degrees of freedom (pionless theory), we present a new approach to the derivation of effective interactions suitable for many-body calculations by means of the no-core shell model. The main investigation is directed toward the description of two-body scattering observables in a restricted harmonic oscillator (HO) basis, and the inherent Gibbs oscillation problem which arises from the truncation of the Hilbert space using HO wave functions. Application of the effective interactions to the description of ^4He will be discussed. I.S. J.L.T, and B.R.B. acknowledge partial support by NSF grant numbers PHY0070858 and PHY0244389. U.v.K. acknowledges partial support from DOE grant number DE-FG02-04ER41338 and from the Sloan Foundation.

  6. Integration of geometric consistency contributory factors in three-leg junctions collision prediction models of Portuguese two-lane national highways.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jocilene Otilia; Jacques, Maria Alice Prudêncio; Soares, Francisco Emanuel Cunha; Freitas, Elisabete Fraga

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at developing a collision prediction model for three-leg junctions located in national roads (NR) in Northern Portugal. The focus is to identify factors that contribute for collision type crashes in those locations, mainly factors related to road geometric consistency, since literature is scarce on those, and to research the impact of three modeling methods: generalized estimating equations, random-effects negative binomial models and random-parameters negative binomial models, on the factors of those models. The database used included data published between 2008 and 2010 of 177 three-leg junctions. It was split in three groups of contributing factors which were tested sequentially for each of the adopted models: at first only traffic, then, traffic and the geometric characteristics of the junctions within their area of influence; and, lastly, factors which show the difference between the geometric characteristics of the segments boarding the junctions' area of influence and the segment included in that area were added. The choice of the best modeling technique was supported by the result of a cross validation made to ascertain the best model for the three sets of researched contributing factors. The models fitted with random-parameters negative binomial models had the best performance in the process. In the best models obtained for every modeling technique, the characteristics of the road environment, including proxy measures for the geometric consistency, along with traffic volume, contribute significantly to the number of collisions. Both the variables concerning junctions and the various national highway segments in their area of influence, as well as variations from those characteristics concerning roadway segments which border the already mentioned area of influence have proven their relevance and, therefore, there is a rightful need to incorporate the effect of geometric consistency in the three-leg junctions safety studies. Copyright © 2015

  7. A Single-Level Tunnel Model to Account for Electrical Transport through Single Molecule- and Self-Assembled Monolayer-based Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Thompon, Damien; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis aimed at understanding electrical conduction in molecular tunnel junctions. We focus on discussing the validity of coherent versus incoherent theoretical formulations for single-level tunneling to explain experimental results obtained under a wide range of experimental conditions, including measurements in individual molecules connecting the leads of electromigrated single-electron transistors and junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of molecules sandwiched between two macroscopic contacts. We show that the restriction of transport through a single level in solid state junctions (no solvent) makes coherent and incoherent tunneling formalisms indistinguishable when only one level participates in transport. Similar to Marcus relaxation processes in wet electrochemistry, the thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution describing the electronic occupation energies in the electrodes accounts for the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on temperature. We demonstrate that a single-level tunnel model satisfactorily explains experimental results obtained in three different molecular junctions (both single-molecule and SAM-based) formed by ferrocene-based molecules. Among other things, we use the model to map the electrostatic potential profile in EGaIn-based SAM junctions in which the ferrocene unit is placed at different positions within the molecule, and we find that electrical screening gives rise to a strongly non-linear profile across the junction. PMID:27216489

  8. Analytical model and new structure of the enhancement-mode polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Xiong, Jiayun; Wei, Jie; Wu, Junfeng; Peng, Fu; Deng, Siyu; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Xiaorong

    2016-04-01

    A novel enhancement-mode (E-mode) polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel (PVC-HEMT) is proposed, and its analytical model for threshold voltage (Vth) is presented. It has two features: one is GaN/AlGaN/GaN double hetero-structure, the other is that source and drain locate at the same side of trench-type MOS gate (T-gate), and the source contacts with the T-gate, which forms vertical conduction channel (VC). The 2-D hole gas (2-DHG) and 2-D electron gas (2-DEG) are formed at the GaN-top/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN-buffer interface, respectively, forming the polarization-junction. First, the E-mode operation is realized because 2-DHG under the source prevents the electrons injecting from source to 2-DEG, breaking through the conventional E-mode method by depleting 2-DEG under the gate. Second, a uniform electric field (E-field) distribution is achieved due to the assisted depletion effect by polarization-junction. Third, the source reduces the E-field peak at the T-gate side and modulates the E-field distribution. The breakdown voltage (BV) of PVC-HEMT is 705 V and specific ON-resistance (RON,sp) is 1.18 mΩ cm2. Compared with conventional HEMT (C-HEMT), PVC-HEMT has a smaller size due to the special location of the source and T-gate. An analytic threshold voltage model is presented and the analytical results agree well with the simulated results.

  9. Numerical modelling of triple-junction tectonics at Karlıova, Eastern Turkey, with implications for regional magma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Browning, John; Bazargan, Mohsen; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-10-01

    Few places on Earth are as tectonically active as the Karlıova region of eastern Turkey. In this region, complex interactions between the Arabian, Eurasian and Anatolian plates occur at the Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ). The relationship between tectonics and magma propagation in triple-junction tectonic settings is poorly understood. Here we present new field and numerical results on the mechanism of magma propagation at the KTJ. We explore the effects of crustal heterogeneity and anisotropy, in particular the geometry and mechanical properties of many faults and layers, on magma propagation paths under a variety of tectonic loadings. We propose that two major volcanic centres in the area, the Turnadağ volcano and the Varto caldera, are both fed by comparatively shallow magma chambers at depths of about 8 km, which, in turn, are fed by a single, much larger and deeper reservoir at about 15-18 km depth. By contrast, the nearby Özenç volcanic area is fed directly by the deeper reservoir. We present a series of two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical models showing that the present tectonic stresses encourage magma-chamber rupture and dyke injection. The results show that inversion tectonics encourages the formation of magma paths as potential feeder dykes. Our three-dimensional models allow us to explore the local stresses induced by complex loading conditions at the Karlıova triple junction, using an approach that can in future be applied to other similar tectonic regions. The numerical results indicate a great complexity in the potential magma (dyke) paths, resulting from local stresses generated by interaction between mechanical layers, major faults, and magma chambers. In particular, the results suggest three main controls on magma path formation and eventual eruptions at KTJ: (1) the geometry and attitude of the associated faults; (2) the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the crust; and (3) mechanical (stress) interactions between deep and shallow

  10. The performances of silicon solar cell with core-shell p-n junctions of micro-nano pillars fabricated by cesium chloride self-assembly and dry etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xinshuai; Dong, Gangqiang; Liao, Yuanxun; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Tianchong; Yi, Futing

    2014-03-01

    Silicon micro-nano pillars are cost-efficiently integrated using twice cesium chloride (CsCl) islands lithography technique and dry etching for solar cell applications. The micro PMMA islands are fabricated by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching with micro CsCl islands as masks, and the nano CsCl islands with nano sizes then are made on the surface of micro PMMA islands and silicon. By ICP dry etching with the mask of micro PMMA islands and nano CsCl islands, the micro-nano silicon pillars are made and certain height micro pillars are randomly positioned between dense arrays of nano pillars with different morphologies by controlling etching conditions. With 300 nm depth p-n junction detected by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the micro pillars of the diameter about 1 μm form the core-shell p-n junction to maximize utility of p-n junction interface and enable efficient free carrier collection, and the nano tapered pillars of 150 nm diameter are used to decrease reflection by a graded-refractive-index. Compared to single micro or nano pillar arrayed cells, the co-integrated solar cell with micro and nano pillars demonstrates improved photovoltaic characteristic that is a photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.35 % with a short circuit current density ( J sc) of 38.40 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage ( V oc) of 555.7 mV, which benefits from the advantages of micro-nano pillar structures and can be further improved upon process optimization.

  11. Phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2005-05-01

    We trace with high numerical accuracy the phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model, a classical system of point particles interacting via a Gaussian-shaped, purely repulsive potential. This model, which provides a reliable qualitative description of the thermal behavior of interpenetrable globular polymers, is known to exhibit a polymorphic fcc-bcc transition at low densities and reentrant melting at high densities. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations, carried out in conjunction with accurate calculations of the solid free energies, lead to a thermodynamic scenario that is partially modified with respect to previous knowledge. In particular, we find that: (i) the fluid-bcc-fcc triple-point temperature is about one third of the maximum freezing temperature; (ii) upon isothermal compression, the model exhibits a fluid-bcc-fcc-bcc-fluid sequence of phases in a narrow range of temperatures just above the triple point. We discuss these results in relation to the behavior of star-polymer solutions and of other softly repulsive systems.

  12. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times. PMID:25705700

  13. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    For a long time as a most convenient had been the model of mega impact in which the early forming of the Earth's core and mantle had been the consequence of formed protoplanet collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,3] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius, the growing area of the future core can save also the silicate envelope fragments. All existing dynamical accumulation models are constructed by using a spherical-symmetrical model. Hence for understanding the further planet evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on the planet accumulation stage. In that paper we are modeling distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3D- spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach. The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in

  14. The composition of Earth's core from equations of state, metal-silicate partitioning, and core formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rebecca; Campbell, Andrew; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The Earth accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, the metallic core segregated from the silicate mantle, acquiring its modern composition through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and metal-silicate partitioning experiments, constrained by density measurements of Fe-rich alloys. Previously, the equations of state of FeO, Fe-9Si, Fe-16Si, and FeSi were measured to megabar pressures and several thousand K using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. With these equations of state, we determined that the core's density can be reproduced through the addition of 11.3 +/- 0.6 wt% silicon or 8.1 +/- 1.1 wt% oxygen to an Fe-Ni alloy (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O have been performed in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5700 K, allowing the effects of P, T, and composition on the partitioning behaviors of these elements to be parameterized (Fischer et al., 2015; Siebert et al., 2012). Here we apply those experimental results to model Earth's core formation, using N-body simulations to describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). For partial equilibration of the mantle at 55% of the evolving core-mantle boundary pressure and the liquidus temperature, we find that the core contains 5.4 wt% Si and 1.9 wt% O. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to our equations of state, and indicate that the core cannot contain more than ~2 wt% S or C. Earth analogues experience 1.2 +/- 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion, due to both the effects of high P

  15. Evolution of resistive switching and its ionic models in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Ma, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Xi, He; Lv, Ling; Zhang, Peng; Xie, Yong; Gao, Haixia; Cao, Yanrong; Li, Shuwei; Hao, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Charge-trapping or ionic mechanisms of the resistive switching (RS) at metal/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (NSTO) interfaces are still unclear. Here, the electrical properties and RS evolution at Pt/NSTO interfaces are investigated. A volatile RS in the fresh junctions complies with Schottky theory involving an interfacial layer and electrically dependent permittivity. The RS is interpreted by a redox-reaction modulated barrier model. A nonvolatile RS emerges and evolves with increasing the forward voltage. I-V and C-V characteristics imply different conductive filament (CF) configurations in high and low resistance states. An in-barrier ionic CF model is established for the nonvolatile RS. The coherent ionic models are beneficial for understanding the interfacial role in RS and for regulating RS characteristics or realizing high quality metal/oxide diodes.

  16. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modeling in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Cohen, R H; LoDestro, L L; Mattor, N; Porter, G D; Rensink, M E; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Scott, H A; Wan, A

    1998-10-14

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. Two-dimensional simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and B-drift effects. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, and interesting effects, some traveling back up the magnetic field-lines to the SOL plasma, are predicted. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts at the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative rnodelling. Long-lived oscillatory UEDGE solutions in both ITER and DIII-D are reported. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are shown to be well modelled with UEDGE, and the roles of impurity and neutral transport in the edge and SOL are discussed.

  17. Modeling of residual stresses in core shroud structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Dong, P.; Brust, F.W.; Mayfield, M.; McNeil, M.; Shack, W.J.

    1997-10-01

    A BWR core shroud is a cylindrical shell that surrounds the reactor core. Feedwater for the reactor is introduced into the annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the shroud. The shroud separates the feedwater from the cooling water flowing up through the reactor core. The shroud also supports the top guide which provides lateral support to the fuel assemblies and maintains core geometry during operational transients and postulated accidents to permit control rod insertion and provides the refloodable volume needed to ensure safe shutdown and cooling of the core during postulated accident conditions. Core shrouds were fabricated from welded Type 304 or 304L stainless steel plates and are supported at the top and bottom by forged ring support structures. In 1990, cracking was reported in the core shroud of a non-U.S. BWR. The cracks were located in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a circumferential core shroud weld. Subsequent inspections in U.S. BWRs have revealed the presence of numerous flaw indications in some BWR core shrouds, primarily in weld HAZs. In several instances, this cracking was quite extensive, with the cracks extending 75% or more around the circumference of some welds. However, because the applied stresses on the shroud are low during operation and postulated accidents and because of the high fracture toughness of stainless steel, adequate structural margins can be preserved even in the presence of extensive cracking. Although assessments by the USNRC staff of the potential significance of this cracking have shown that core shroud cracking does not pose a high degree of risk in the short term, the staff concluded that the cracking was a safety concern for the long term because of the uncertainties associated with the behavior of core shrouds with complete 360{degrees} through-wall cracks under accident conditions and because it could eliminate a layer of defense-in-depth.

  18. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  19. Preschool Literacy and the Common Core: A Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Donna G.; Benson, Tammy Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Many states have adopted the Common Core Standards for literacy and math and have begun enacting these standards in school curriculum. In states where these standards have been adopted, professional educators working in K-12 contexts have been working to create transition plans from existing state-based standards to the Common Core standards. A…

  20. Adjustable 3-D structure with enhanced interfaces and junctions towards microwave response using FeCo/C core-shell nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoran; Liang, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei; Ma, Jianna; Zhang, Yanan; Ji, Guangbin; Meng, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the 3-D honeycomb-like FeCo/C nanocomposites were synthesized through the carbon thermal reduction under an inert atmosphere. The enhanced microwave absorption properties of the composites were mainly attributed to the unique three dimensional structure of the FeCo/C nanocomposites, abundant interfaces and junctions, and the appropriate impedance matching. The Cole-Cole semicircles proved the sufficient dielectric relaxation process. The sample calcinated at 600°C for 4h showed the best microwave absorption properties. A maximum reflection loss of -54.6dB was achieved at 10.8GHz with a thickness of 2.3mm and the frequency bandwidth was as large as 5.3GHz. The results showed that the as-prepared FeCo/C nanocomposite could be a potential candidate for microwave absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The HTA core model: a novel method for producing and reporting health technology assessments.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Kristian; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Garrido, Marcial Velasco; Anttila, Heidi; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Hicks, Nicholas J; Hofmann, Björn; Koivisto, Juha; Kunz, Regina; Kärki, Pia; Malmivaara, Antti; Meiesaar, Kersti; Reiman-Möttönen, Päivi; Norderhaug, Inger; Pasternack, Iris; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Räsänen, Pirjo; Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Saarni, Samuli I; Walin, Laura; Kristensen, Finn Børlum

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test a generic framework to enable international collaboration for producing and sharing results of health technology assessments (HTAs). Ten international teams constructed the HTA Core Model, dividing information contained in a comprehensive HTA into standardized pieces, the assessment elements. Each element contains a generic issue that is translated into practical research questions while performing an assessment. Elements were described in detail in element cards. Two pilot assessments, designated as Core HTAs were also produced. The Model and Core HTAs were both validated. Guidance on the use of the HTA Core Model was compiled into a Handbook. The HTA Core Model considers health technologies through nine domains. Two applications of the Model were developed, one for medical and surgical interventions and another for diagnostic technologies. Two Core HTAs were produced in parallel with developing the model, providing the first real-life testing of the Model and input for further development. The results of formal validation and public feedback were primarily positive. Development needs were also identified and considered. An online Handbook is available. The HTA Core Model is a novel approach to HTA. It enables effective international production and sharing of HTA results in a structured format. The face validity of the Model was confirmed during the project, but further testing and refining are needed to ensure optimal usefulness and user-friendliness. Core HTAs are intended to serve as a basis for local HTA reports. Core HTAs do not contain recommendations on technology use.

  2. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  3. Measuring Neuromuscular Junction Functionality in the SOD1(G93A) Animal Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Emanuele; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to motor neuron degeneration, alteration in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle atrophy, and paralysis. To investigate the NMJ functionality in ALS we tested, in vitro, two innervated muscle types excised from SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice at the end-stage of the disease: the Soleus, a postural muscle almost completely paralyzed at that stage, and the diaphragm, which, on the contrary, is functional until death. To this aim we employed an experimental protocol that combined two types of electrical stimulation: the direct stimulation and the stimulation through the nerve. The technique we applied allowed us to determine the relevance of NMJ functionality separately from muscle contractile properties in SOD1(G93A) animal model. Functional measurements revealed that the muscle contractility of transgenic diaphragms is almost unaltered in comparison to control muscles, while transgenic Soleus muscles were severely compromised. In contrast, when stimulated via the nerve, both transgenic muscle types showed a strong decrease of the contraction force, a slowing down of the kinetic parameters, as well as alterations in the neurotransmission failure parameter. All together, these results confirm a severely impaired functionality in the SOD1(G93A) neuromuscular junctions.

  4. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression.

  5. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  6. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuromuscular disease. DOK7 gene therapy benefits mouse models of diseases characterized by defects in the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Sumimasa; Okada, Takashi; Tezuka, Tohru; Chiyo, Tomoko; Kasahara, Yuko; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Motomura, Masakatsu; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Beeson, David; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2014-09-19

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. Defects in NMJ transmission cause muscle weakness, termed myasthenia. The muscle protein Dok-7 is essential for activation of the receptor kinase MuSK, which governs NMJ formation, and DOK7 mutations underlie familial limb-girdle myasthenia (DOK7 myasthenia), a neuromuscular disease characterized by small NMJs. Here, we show in a mouse model of DOK7 myasthenia that therapeutic administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding the human DOK7 gene resulted in an enlargement of NMJs and substantial increases in muscle strength and life span. When applied to model mice of another neuromuscular disorder, autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, DOK7 gene therapy likewise resulted in enlargement of NMJs as well as positive effects on motor activity and life span. These results suggest that therapies aimed at enlarging the NMJ may be useful for a range of neuromuscular disorders.

  8. Applying the Network Simulation Method for testing chaos in a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellver, Fernando Gimeno; Garratón, Manuel Caravaca; Soto Meca, Antonio; López, Juan Antonio Vera; Guirao, Juan L. G.; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel

    In this paper, we explore the chaotic behavior of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junctions via the so-called Network Simulation Method. Such a numerical approach establishes a formal equivalence among physical transport processes and electrical networks, and hence, it can be applied to efficiently deal with a wide range of differential systems. The generality underlying that electrical equivalence allows to apply the circuit theory to several scientific and technological problems. In this work, the Fast Fourier Transform has been applied for chaos detection purposes and the calculations have been carried out in PSpice, an electrical circuit software. Overall, it holds that such a numerical approach leads to quickly computationally solve Josephson differential models. An empirical application regarding the study of the Josephson model completes the paper.

  9. Computer modeling of a two-junction, monolithic cascade solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.; Abbott, D.

    1979-01-01

    The theory and design criteria for monolithic, two-junction cascade solar cells are described. The departure from the conventional solar cell analytical method and the reasons for using the integral form of the continuity equations are briefly discussed. The results of design optimization are presented. The energy conversion efficiency that is predicted for the optimized structure is greater than 30% at 300 K, AMO and one sun. The analytical method predicts device performance characteristics as a function of temperature. The range is restricted to 300 to 600 K. While the analysis is capable of determining most of the physical processes occurring in each of the individual layers, only the more significant device performance characteristics are presented.

  10. On-voltage analysis of a forward-biased pn-junction: an interconnect model for CMOS device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Ken

    2002-06-01

    A model of ohmic connection through an n-type drain, metal, and a p-type drain in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverters has been developed. This model is based on drift-diffusion (DD) transport, and in the model, the metal that connects nMOS and pMOS is replaced with an n + (or p +) low-resistance semiconductor. The diode formed between the n-type and p-type drains was designed to operate with an extremely low on-voltage ( Von), above which current flows through forward-biased pn-junctions. To reduce Von, we studied the relationship between Von and the material parameters of the diode (e.g., carrier lifetime and band parameters). We found that Von decreases with a decrease in carrier lifetime in a homogeneous material system but the minimum Von is a half of the band gap (˜ Eg/2). By sandwiching narrow-gap semiconductors between the n- and p-type silicon regions, Von can be reduced to smaller than a half of the band gap of the original material. When the band gap gradually narrows with multi-steps and a pn-junction is formed at the narrowest gap region with recombination centers, Von drastically decreases ( Von≪ Eg) and the diode behaves like an ohmic resistor. When the n- and p-type drains are connected with a resistor-like diode, ohmic connection with low resistance can be achieved between nMOS and pMOS. The present modeling is validated by analyzing CMOS inverter operation.

  11. Integrating evolutionary game theory into an agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ: Role of gap junctions in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Malekian, Negin; Habibi, Jafar; Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Aghakhani, Hojjat

    2016-11-01

    There are many cells with various phenotypic behaviors in cancer interacting with each other. For example, an apoptotic cell may induce apoptosis in adjacent cells. A living cell can also protect cells from undergoing apoptosis and necrosis. These survival and death signals are propagated through interaction pathways between adjacent cells called gap junctions. The function of these signals depends on the cellular context of the cell receiving them. For instance, a receiver cell experiencing a low level of oxygen may interpret a received survival signal as an apoptosis signal. In this study, we examine the effect of these signals on tumor growth. We make an evolutionary game theory component in order to model the signal propagation through gap junctions. The game payoffs are defined as a function of cellular context. Then, the game theory component is integrated into an agent-based model of tumor growth. After that, the integrated model is applied to ductal carcinoma in situ, a type of early stage breast cancer. Different scenarios are explored to observe the impact of the gap junction communication and parameters of the game theory component on cancer progression. We compare these scenarios by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test succeeds in proving a significant difference between the tumor growth of the model before and after considering the gap junction communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test also proves that the tumor growth significantly depends on the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis. In this study, the gap junction communication is modeled by using evolutionary game theory to illustrate its role at early stage cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ. This work indicates that the gap junction communication and the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis can notably affect cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. New Insights from Modeling of Core-collapse Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of modern survey telescopes, research into supernovae (SNe) is making huge advances. The surveys are discovering thousands of SNe, identifying new classes of SNe, refining the statistics of SNe occurrence as a function of class and host galaxy properties, and allowing the direct identification of SNe progenitors. With these new observations comes the need for theoretical advances in modeling SNe spectra. In this presentation we discuss recent advances in modeling and interpreting the spectra of core-collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic, and II) and pair-instability SNe. Recent investigations have revealed the importance of mixing nickel into the helium-rich layer for the excitation of He I lines in Type Ib and Ic supernovae. In particular, we were able to generate Ib and Ic like spectra from the same progenitor model - the only distinction in the SN ejecta is the amount of mixing. There is also now a general realization that most Ib and Ic SNe arise from intermediate mass stars (M < 20 Mo) which have undergone complex mass-transfer and mass-loss processes in a binary system. While some super-luminous SNe have been associated with the pair-production instability, detailed spectroscopic modeling has revealed that the observed post-maximum spectra are too blue, and this raises serious doubts as to their origin. With the advent of the mesa star, a publicly available stellar evolution code, we can now create our own SN progenitors with physically consistent structures. Importantly, we can alter the inputs to mesa star to check the influence of different evolutionary parameters on the structure of the pre-SN star, and its subsequent influence on the SN light curve and spectra. We have used mesa star to generate RSG progenitors for a star with an initial mass of 15 Mo, and have examined the influence of the assumed mixing length, metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss rate. All show measurable effects on the pre-SN progenitor, and on the resulting SN light curves and

  13. Integrating a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Weng, Wenguo; Wang, Faming; Song, Guowen

    2017-05-01

    This paper aims to integrate a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures. The human thermoregulatory model, consisting of an active system and a passive system, was used to determine the thermoregulation and heat exchanges within the body. The clothing model simulated heat and moisture transfer from the human skin to the environment through the microenvironment and fabric. In this clothing model, the air gap between skin and clothing, as well as clothing properties such as thickness, thermal conductivity, density, porosity, and tortuosity were taken into consideration. The simulated core and mean skin temperatures were compared to the published experimental results of subject tests at three levels of ambient temperatures of 20 °C, 30 °C, and 40 °C. Although lower signal-to-noise-ratio was observed, the developed model demonstrated positive performance at predicting core temperatures with a maximum difference between the simulations and measurements of no more than 0.43 °C. Generally, the current model predicted the mean skin temperatures with reasonable accuracy. It could be applied to predict human physiological responses and assess thermal comfort and heat stress.

  14. Chemically synthesized nanowire TiO2/ZnO core-shell p-n junction array for high sensitivity ultraviolet photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, T. D.; Dang, C. T. T.; Han, G.; Hoang, C. V.; Yi, W.; Narayanamurti, V.; Nagao, T.

    2013-11-01

    A sol-gel-based ultrathin TiO2 lamination coating was adapted to a hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowire array to realize an all-oxide ultra-sensitive p-n photodiode. The core-shell heterojunction—the key component of the device—is composed of a 5-10 nm thick p-type Cr-doped TiO2 nanoshell and n-type single-crystalline ZnO nanowires (50 nm radius). Owing to the enhanced light scattering and carrier separation in the core-shell architecture, this device exhibits the highest performance among the ZnO nanowire-based photodetectors. At a moderate reverse bias of -5 V and under ultraviolet light illumination at 104 μW, it shows a switch current ratio of 140 and a responsivity as large as 250 A/W, while it shows nearly no response to the infrared and visible light.

  15. Simulating and modeling the breakdown voltage in a semi-insulating GaAs P+N junction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resfa, A.; Menezla, Brahimi. R.; Benchhima, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work aims to determine the characteristic I (breakdown voltage) of the inverse current in a GaAs PN junction diode, subject to a reverse polarization, while specifying the parameters that influence the breakdown voltage of the diode. In this work, we simulated the behavior of the ionization phenomenon by impact breakdown by avalanche of the PN junctions, subject to an inverse polarization. We will take into account both the trapping model in a stationary regime in the P+N structure using like material of basis the III-V compounds and mainly the GaAs semi-insulating in which the deep centers have in important densities. We are talking about the model of trapping in the space charge region (SCR) and that is the trap density donor and acceptor states. The carrier crossing the space charge region (SCR) of W thickness creates N electron—hole pairs: for every created pair, the electron and the hole are swept quickly by the electric field, each in an opposite direction, which comes back, according to an already accepted reasoning, to the crossing of the space charge region (SCR) by an electron or a hole. So the even N pair created by the initial particle provoke N2 ionizations and so forth. The study of the physical and electrical behaviour of semiconductors is based on the influence of the presence of deep centers on the characteristic I(V) current-tension, which requires the calculation of the electrostatic potential, the electric field, the integral of ionization, the density of the states traps, the diffusion current of minority in the regions (1) and (3), the current thermal generation in the region (2), the leakage current in the surface, and the breakdown voltage.

  16. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores - I. The constant-mass case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasi-static evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving towards virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion on to cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parametrizing the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the `virial plane'. We find that not all virially bound and pressure-confined cores will evolve to become gravitationally bound, with many instead contracting to virial equilibrium with their surroundings, and find an absence of gravitationally dominated and virially unbound cores. We hypothesize a `starless core desert' in this quadrant of the virial plane, which may result from cores initially forming as pressure-confined objects. We conclude that a virially bound and pressure-confined core will not necessarily evolve to become gravitationally bound, and thus cannot be considered pre-stellar. A core can only be definitively considered pre-stellar (collapsing to form an individual stellar system) if it is gravitationally unstable.

  17. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  18. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; ...

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  19. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  20. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  1. Validation of a model for faster than real time LMFBR core transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    This report briefly describes experimental validation of a computer model used to analyze LMFBR type core transients. This model is used to predict coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions during transient overpower accidents. (JDH)

  2. Eddy viscosity of core flow inferred from comparison between time evolutions of the length-of-day and a core surface flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusive processes of large scales in the Earth's core are dominated not by the molecular diffusion but by the eddy diffusion. To carry out numerical simulations of realistic geodynamo models, it is important to adopt appropriate parameters. However, the eddy viscous diffusion, or the eddy viscosity, is not a property of the core fluid but of the core flow. Hence it is significant to estimate the eddy viscosity from core flow models. In fact, fluid motion near the Earth's core surface provides useful information on core dynamics, features of the core-mantle boundary (CMB), and core-mantle coupling, for example. Such core fluid motion can be estimated from spatial and temporal distributions of the geomagnetic field. Most of core surface flow models rely on the frozen-flux approximation (Roberts and Scott, 1965), in which the magnetic diffusion is neglected. It should be noted, however, that there exists a viscous boundary layer at the CMB, where the magnetic diffusion may play an important role in secular variations of geomagnetic field. Therefore, a new approach to estimation of core surface flow has been devised by Matsushima (2015). That is, the magnetic diffusion is explicitly incorporated within the viscous boundary layer, while it is neglected below the boundary layer at the CMB which is assumed to be a spherical surface. A core surface flow model between 1840 and 2015 has been derived from a geomagnetic field model, COV-OBS.x1 (Gillet et al., 2015). Temporal variations of core flows contain information on phenomena in relation with core-mantle coupling, such as the LOD (length-of-day), and spin-up/spin-down of core flows. In particular, core surface flows inside the viscous boundary layer at the CMB may reveal an interesting feature in relation with Earth's rotation. We have examined time series of the LOD and vorticity derived from the core surface flow model. We have found a possible correlation between the LOD and the axial component of global vorticity

  3. Gap junctions, pannexins and pain.

    PubMed

    Spray, David C; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-06-22

    Enhanced expression and function of gap junctions and pannexin (Panx) channels have been associated with both peripheral and central mechanisms of pain sensitization. At the level of the sensory ganglia, evidence includes augmented gap junction and pannexin1 expression in glial cells and neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models and increased synchrony and enhanced cross-excitation among sensory neurons by gap junction-mediated coupling. In spinal cord and in suprapinal areas, evidence is largely limited to increased expression of relevant proteins, although in several rodent pain models, hypersensitivity is reduced by treatment with gap junction/Panx1 channel blocking compounds. Moreover, targeted modulation of Cx43 expression was shown to modulate pain thresholds, albeit in somewhat contradictory ways, and mice lacking Panx1 expression globally or in specific cell types show depressed hyperalgesia. We here review the evidence for involvement of gap junctions and Panx channels in a variety of animal pain studies and then discuss ways in which gap junctions and Panx channels may mediate their action in pain processing. This discussion focusses on spread of signals among satellite glial cells, in particular intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which are propagated through both gap junction and Panx1-dependent routes and have been associated with the phenomenon of spreading depression and the malady of migraine headache with aura. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  5. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  6. Inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields in osteoblast-like models is dependent on cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Dean T; Huang, Jason; Ma, Defang; Wang, Paul K C

    2002-02-01

    Electromagnetic fields have been used to augment the healing of fractures because of its ability to increase new bone formation. The mechanism of how electromagnetic fields can promote new bone formation is unknown, although the interaction of electromagnetic fields with components of the plasma membrane of cells has been hypothesized to occur in bone cells. Gap junctions occur among bone forming cells, the osteoblasts, and have been hypothesized to play a role in new bone formation. Thus it was investigated whether extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields alter gap junction intercellular communication in the pre-osteoblastic model, MC3T3-E1, and the well-differentiated osteoblastic model, ROS 17/2.8. ELF magnetic field exposure systems were designed to be used for an inverted microscope stage and for a tissue culture incubator. Using these systems, it was found that magnetic fields over a frequency range from 30 to 120 Hz and field intensities up to 12.5 G dose dependently decreased gap junction intercellular communication in MC3T3-E1 cells during their proliferative phase of development. The total amount of connexin 43 protein and the distribution of connexin 43 gap junction protein between cytoplasmic and plasma membrane pools were unaltered by treatment with ELF magnetic fields. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) which can inhibit gap junction communication, was not altered by magnetic field exposure. Identical exposure conditions did not affect gap junction communication in the ROS 17/2.8 cell line and when MC3T3-E1 cells were more differentiated. Thus ELF magnetic fields may affect only less differentiated or pre-osteoblasts and not fully differentiated osteoblasts. Consequently, electromagnetic fields may aid in the repair of bone by effects exerted only on osteoprogenitor or pre-osteoblasts.

  7. Gap Junction Dysfunction in the Prefrontal Cortex Induces Depressive-Like Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Dong; Liu, Yan; Yuan, Yu-He; Li, Jing; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has implicated glial anomalies in the pathophysiology of major depression disorder (MDD). Gap junctional communication is a main determinant of astrocytic function. However, it is unclear whether gap junction dysfunction is involved in MDD development. This study investigates changes in the function of astrocyte gap junction occurring in the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) after chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a rodent model of depression. Animals exposed to CUS and showing behavioral deficits in sucrose preference test (SPT) and novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT) exhibited significant decreases in diffusion of gap junction channel-permeable dye and expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a major component of astrocyte gap junction, and abnormal gap junctional ultrastructure in the PFC. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of typical antidepressants fluoxetine and duloxetine and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone on CUS-induced gap junctional dysfunction and depressive-like behaviors. The cellular and behavioral alterations induced by CUS were reversed and/or blocked by treatment with typical antidepressants or mifepristone, indicating that the mechanism of their antidepressant action may involve the amelioration of gap junction dysfunction and the cellular changes may be related to GR activation. We then investigated the effects of pharmacological gap junction blockade in the PFC on depressive-like behaviors. The results demonstrate that carbenoxolone (CBX) infusions induced anhedonia in SPT, and anxiety in NSFT, and Cx43 mimetic peptides Gap27 and Gap26 also induced anhedonia, a core symptom of depression. Together, this study supports the hypothesis that gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:22189291

  8. The Unified Core: A "Major" Learning Community Model in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Johnson, Corey W.; James, J. Joy; Dunlap, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    The Unified Core is an innovative approach to higher education that blends content through linked courses within a major to create a community of learners. This article offers the theoretical background for the approach, describes the implementation, and offers suggestions to educators who would like to design their own version of this innovative…

  9. Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid: Models & Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    This brochure describes Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE), a trademarked process NREL employs to produce conceptual microgrid designs. This systems-based process enables designs to be optimized for economic value, energy surety, and sustainability. Capabilities NREL offers in support of microgrid design are explained.

  10. The Unified Core: A "Major" Learning Community Model in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Johnson, Corey W.; James, J. Joy; Dunlap, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    The Unified Core is an innovative approach to higher education that blends content through linked courses within a major to create a community of learners. This article offers the theoretical background for the approach, describes the implementation, and offers suggestions to educators who would like to design their own version of this innovative…

  11. A Core Journal Decision Model Based on Weighted Page Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hei-Chia; Chou, Ya-lin; Guo, Jiunn-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's aim is to propose a core journal decision method, called the local impact factor (LIF), which can evaluate the requirements of the local user community by combining both the access rate and the weighted impact factor, and by tracking citation information on the local users' articles. Design/methodology/approach: Many…

  12. A Core Journal Decision Model Based on Weighted Page Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hei-Chia; Chou, Ya-lin; Guo, Jiunn-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's aim is to propose a core journal decision method, called the local impact factor (LIF), which can evaluate the requirements of the local user community by combining both the access rate and the weighted impact factor, and by tracking citation information on the local users' articles. Design/methodology/approach: Many…

  13. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp-alloy plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, P.; Deguen, R.; Lincot, A.; Merkel, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  14. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp alloy plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincot, A.; Cardin, Ph.; Deguen, R.; Merkel, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  15. High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Analysis-Challenges and Recent Enhancements in Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Germina

    2016-01-01

    A concerted effort over the past few years has focused on enhancing the core depletion models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as part of a comprehensive study for designing a HFIR core that would use low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A HFIR core depletion model that is based on current state-of-the-art methods and nuclear data was needed for use as a reference for the design of an LEU fuel for HFIR and to improve the basis for analyses that support HFIR s current operation with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. This paper summarizes the recent improvements in modeling and simulation for HFIR core analyses, with a focus on core depletion models.

  16. Sini-san improves duodenal tight junction integrity in a rat model of functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiongfei; Zhao, Luqing; Wang, Jiajia; Lu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Shengsheng

    2017-08-30

    Recent reports have demonstrated that impaired barrier function and local microinflammation in the duodenal mucosa contribute to the pathogeneses of functional dyspepsia (FD). Thus, restoring normal barrier integrity becomes a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of FD. Sini-San (SNS) is a traditional Chinese prescription that exhibits therapeutic effects in FD, but the underlying mechanisms remain not well understood. FD rats were established by tail clamping method and the therapeutic effect of SNS was evaluated by measuring the visceral sensitivity and gastric compliance. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) that reveals epithelial barrier integrity was measured by Ussing chamber. The expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, occludin and claudin-1, in the duodenum was determined by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The amount of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (INF-γ) in duodenal mucosa was detected by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). The mRNA level of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) was measured by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). SNS could improve gastric compliance and attenuate visceral hypersensitivity (VH) in FD rats. TEER was decreased in FD rats, but treatment with SNS restored normal level of TEER and the expression of occludin and claudin-1 in FD rats. In addition, SNS administration ameliorated FD-associated increase in the production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and the expression of TRPV1. The therapeutic effect of SNS on FD is at least partially through improvement of TJ integrity and attenuation of FD-associated low-grade inflammation in the duodenum. Our findings highlight the molecular basis of SNS-based treatment of FD in human patients.

  17. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  18. Dynamics of plume-triple junction interaction: Results from a series of three-dimensional numerical models and implications for the formation of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordevic, Mladen; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Mantle plumes rising in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges often generate anomalies in melt production and seafloor depth. This study investigates the dynamical interactions between a mantle plume and a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, using a parameter space approach and a suite of steady state, three-dimensional finite element numerical models. The top domain boundary is composed of three diverging plates, with each assigned half-spreading rates with respect to a fixed triple junction point. The bottom boundary is kept at a constant temperature of 1350°C except where a two-dimensional, Gaussian-shaped thermal anomaly simulating a plume is imposed. Models vary plume diameter, plume location, the viscosity contrast between plume and ambient mantle material, and the use of dehydration rheology in calculating viscosity. Importantly, the model results quantify how plume-related anomalies in mantle temperature pattern, seafloor depth, and crustal thickness depend on the specific set of parameters. To provide an example, one way of assessing the effect of conduit position is to calculate normalized area, defined to be the spatial dispersion of a given plume at specific depth (here selected to be 50 km) divided by the area occupied by the same plume when it is located under the triple junction. For one particular case modeled where the plume is centered in an intraplate position 100 km from the triple junction, normalized area is just 55%. Overall, these models provide a framework for better understanding plateau formation at triple junctions in the natural setting and a tool for constraining subsurface geodynamical processes and plume properties.

  19. Determination of layer-resolved composition, magnetization, and electronic structure of an Fe/MgO tunnel junction by standing-wave core and valence photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, See-Hun; Balke, Benjamin; Papp, Christian; Döring, Sven; Berges, Ulf; Plucinski, L.; Westphal, Carsten; Schneider, Claus M.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2011-11-01

    Spin-dependent tunneling across a highly textured MgO insulating barrier has received much attention due to its potential applications in various spintronic devices. However, the interfacial magnetic and electronic structure of a prototypical realization of this in Fe/MgO/Fe and the effective band gap of the MgO layer are still under debate. In order to resolve these issues, we have employed standing-wave excited core and valence photoemission, as well as core-level magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) in photoemission, to study the Fe/MgO interface with subnanometer depth resolution. For our synthetic procedure, we show that the Fe/MgO interface is linearly intermixed in composition over a length of ˜8 Å (˜4 monolayers) and that there is a magnetic dead layer ˜2-3 Å thick. The unambiguous extraction of depth-resolved density of states (DOS) reveals that the interfacial layer composition is mostly metallic and nonmagnetic FeOx, with x ≅ 1, which accounts for a smaller magnetoresistance compared to theoretical predictions. The formation of the magnetic dead layer (FeO) at the interface should also reduce the tunneling spin polarization. The analysis of our data also shows a clear valence band edge of ultrathin MgO layer at ˜3.5 eV below the Fermi level (EF) that is very close to that of single crystal bulk MgO. An analysis that does not consider the interdiffused region separately exhibits the valence band edge for MgO layer ˜1.3 eV below EF, which is significantly closer to the MgO barrier height estimated from magnetotransport measurements and further suggests that the Fe/MgO interdiffusion effectively reduces the MgO band gap.

  20. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  1. [Establishment and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element model of human cervicotnoracic junction (C6-T1)].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xun; Guo, Jian-peng; Liang, Kai-heng; Song, Wen-hui

    2010-01-01

    To establish the cervicothoracic spine finite element model with three-dimensional finite element method, verify the effectiveness of this model and explore the stress distribution. DICOM image data of one normal healthy young male volunteer were obtained by spiral CT scan and processed with Mimics software. Datas were imported to ANSYS software to become a 3D entity. Disc structure and the main ligament were added. Disc structure was added using the shell-nuclear unit, representing the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus. Ligament structure was established with 2-node cable element, the beginning and ending points of the ligament and the cross-sectional area were determined in accordance with references. C(6,7) and C7T1 facet joints were definded as the nonliner contact joints with friction coefficient. The lower surface of TI in all the directions was completely fixed in this model. In the model 2.0 Nm pure torque were imposed on C6, and the extension, flexion, axial rotation and lateral bending experiment were conducted. The experimental results were compared with the in vitro biomechanical tests. The cervicothoracic spine finite element model included 169,317 nodes and 106,242 units, and consistent with the in vitro biomechanical tests. The three-dimensional finite element model was in good running under external force. It is a convenient and precise method for physicians to establish the finite element model of the cervicothoracic junction. This method facilitates the computer study on the biomechanical behavior of the local structures of the model under various pressure conditions.

  2. Research on the equivalence between digital core and rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xingyao; Zheng, Ying; Zong, Zhaoyun

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the elastic modulus of 3D digital cores using the finite element method, systematically study the equivalence between the digital core model and various rock physics models, and carefully analyze the conditions of the equivalence relationships. The influences of the pore aspect ratio and consolidation coefficient on the equivalence relationships are also further refined. Theoretical analysis indicates that the finite element simulation based on the digital core is equivalent to the boundary theory and Gassmann model. For pure sandstones, effective medium theory models (SCA and DEM) and the digital core models are equivalent in cases when the pore aspect ratio is within a certain range, and dry frame models (Nur and Pride model) and the digital core model are equivalent in cases when the consolidation coefficient is a specific value. According to the equivalence relationships, the comparison of the elastic modulus results of the effective medium theory and digital rock physics is an effective approach for predicting the pore aspect ratio. Furthermore, the traditional digital core models with two components (pores and matrix) are extended to multiple minerals to more precisely characterize the features and mineral compositions of rocks in underground reservoirs. This paper studies the effects of shale content on the elastic modulus in shaly sandstones. When structural shale is present in the sandstone, the elastic modulus of the digital cores are in a reasonable agreement with the DEM model. However, when dispersed shale is present in the sandstone, the Hill model cannot describe the changes in the stiffness of the pore space precisely. Digital rock physics describes the rock features such as pore aspect ratio, consolidation coefficient and rock stiffness. Therefore, digital core technology can, to some extent, replace the theoretical rock physics models because the results are more accurate than those of the theoretical models.

  3. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  4. Towards Core Modelling Practices in Integrated Water Resource Management: An Interdisciplinary View of the Modelling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeman, A. J.; Elsawah, S.; Pierce, S. A.; Ames, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Core Modelling Practices Pursuit is developing resources to describe core practices for developing and using models to support integrated water resource management. These practices implement specific steps in the modelling process with an interdisciplinary perspective; however, the particular practice that is most appropriate depends on contextual aspects specific to the project. The first task of the pursuit is to identify the various steps for which implementation practices are to be described. This paper reports on those results. The paper draws on knowledge from the modelling process literature for environmental modelling (Jakeman et al., 2006), engaging stakeholders (Voinov and Bousquet, 2010) and general modelling (Banks, 1999), as well as the experience of the consortium members. We organise the steps around the four modelling phases. The planning phase identifies what is to be achieved, how and with what resources. The model is built and tested during the construction phase, and then used in the application phase. Finally, models that become part of the ongoing policy process require a maintenance phase. For each step, the paper focusses on what is to be considered or achieved, rather than how it is performed. This reflects the separation of the steps from the practices that implement them in different contexts. We support description of steps with a wide range of examples. Examples are designed to be generic and do not reflect any one project or context, but instead are drawn from common situations or from extremely different ones so as to highlight some of the issues that may arise at each step. References Banks, J. (1999). Introduction to simulation. In Proceedings of the 1999 Winter Simulation Conference. Jakeman, A. J., R. A. Letcher, and J. P. Norton (2006). Ten iterative steps in development and evaluation of environmental models. Environmental Modelling and Software 21, 602-614. Voinov, A

  5. Stability of core-shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core-shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  6. Compact-device model development for the energy-delay analysis of magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, N.; Bird, J. P.; Dowben, P. A.; Marshall, A.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the application of a novel class of device, the magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction (ME-MTJ) to realize a variety of computational functions, including majority logic and the XNOR/XOR gate. We also develop a compact model to describe the operation of these devices, which function by utilizing the phenomenon of ‘voltage-controlled magnetism’ to switch the operational state of MTJs. The model breaks down the switching process into three key stages of operation: electrical-to-magnetic conversion, magnetization transfer, and final-state readout. Estimates for the switching energy and delay of these devices, obtained from this compact model, reveal significant improvements in both of these parameters when compared to conventional MTJs switched by spin-transfer-torque. In fact, the capacity to use the ME-MTJ to implement complex logical operations within a single device allows its energy costs to even approach those of low-power CMOS. The added benefits of non-volatility and compact circuit footprint, combined with their potential for heterogeneous integration with CMOS, make the ME devices of considerable interest for post-CMOS technology.

  7. Impaired Tight Junctions in Atopic Dermatitis Skin and in a Skin-Equivalent Model Treated with Interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Takuo; Tobiishi, Megumi; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Ota, Yukiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in the stratum granulosum leads to aberrant barrier function of the stratum corneum (SC) in the epidermis. However, it is unclear whether TJs are perturbed in atopic dermatitis (AD), a representative aberrant SC-related skin disease, and whether some factors related to AD pathogenesis induce TJ dysfunction. To address these issues, we investigated the alterations of TJs in AD skin and the effects of Th2 and Th17 cytokines on TJs in a skin-equivalent model. The levels of TJ proteins were determined in the epidermis of nonlesional and lesional skin sites of AD. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the levels of zonula occludens 1 were decreased in the nonlesional sites of AD, and the levels of zonula occludens 1 and claudin-1 were decreased in the lesional sites relative to the levels in skin from healthy subjects. Next, we examined the effects of interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17, and IL-22 on the TJ barrier in a skin-equivalent model. Only IL-17 impaired the TJ barrier. Furthermore, we observed a defect in filaggrin monomer degradation in the IL-17-treated skin model. Thus, TJs are dysfunctional in AD, at least partly, due to the effect of IL-17, which may result in an aberrant SC barrier.

  8. Impaired Tight Junctions in Atopic Dermatitis Skin and in a Skin-Equivalent Model Treated with Interleukin-17

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Takuo; Tobiishi, Megumi; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Ota, Yukiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in the stratum granulosum leads to aberrant barrier function of the stratum corneum (SC) in the epidermis. However, it is unclear whether TJs are perturbed in atopic dermatitis (AD), a representative aberrant SC-related skin disease, and whether some factors related to AD pathogenesis induce TJ dysfunction. To address these issues, we investigated the alterations of TJs in AD skin and the effects of Th2 and Th17 cytokines on TJs in a skin-equivalent model. The levels of TJ proteins were determined in the epidermis of nonlesional and lesional skin sites of AD. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the levels of zonula occludens 1 were decreased in the nonlesional sites of AD, and the levels of zonula occludens 1 and claudin-1 were decreased in the lesional sites relative to the levels in skin from healthy subjects. Next, we examined the effects of interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17, and IL-22 on the TJ barrier in a skin-equivalent model. Only IL-17 impaired the TJ barrier. Furthermore, we observed a defect in filaggrin monomer degradation in the IL-17–treated skin model. Thus, TJs are dysfunctional in AD, at least partly, due to the effect of IL-17, which may result in an aberrant SC barrier. PMID:27588419

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of the ribosomal L1 stalk three-way junction

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Kamila; Šponer, Jiří; Lankaš, Filip

    2012-01-01

    The L1 stalk is a key mobile element of the large ribosomal subunit which interacts with tRNA during translocation. Here, we investigate the structure and mechanical properties of the rRNA H76/H75/H79 three-way junction at the base of the L1 stalk from four different prokaryotic organisms. We propose a coarse-grained elastic model and parameterize it using large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Global properties of the junction are well described by a model in which the H76 helix is represented by a straight, isotropically flexible elastic rod, while the junction core is represented by an isotropically flexible spherical hinge. Both the core and the helix contribute substantially to the overall H76 bending fluctuations. The presence of wobble pairs in H76 does not induce any increased flexibility or anisotropy to the helix. The half-closed conformation of the L1 stalk seems to be accessible by thermal fluctuations of the junction itself, without any long-range allosteric effects. Bending fluctuations of H76 with a bulge introduced in it suggest a rationale for the precise position of the bulge in eukaryotes. Our elastic model can be generalized to other RNA junctions found in biological systems or in nanotechnology. PMID:22451682

  10. Mesoscale modeling of functional properties in core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeri, John; Heinonen, Olle; Karpeev, Dmitry; Nakhmanson, Serge

    2015-03-01

    Core-shell nanoparticle systems of Zn-ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 are studied computationally using the highly scalable MOOSE finite-element framework, developed at Idaho National Lab. The elastic anisotropic mismatch of the core and shell create an imprinting effect within the shell that produces a wide variation of strains. Due to this diversity of strains, the sharp band gap edges of the bulk semiconductor are observed to be ``thinned-out'' much like amorphous silicon. We show that a variety of factors, such as particle size, core-to-shell volume ratio, applied hydrostatic pressure, shell microstructure, as well as the effect of surface elasticity, can influence the distribution of optical band-gap values within the particle, which may prove useful within the field of photovoltaics. Part of the work by O.H. was supported by Award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Material Design.

  11. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated.

  12. Effective medium theory based analytical models for the potential and field distributions in arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2017-07-01

    Recently, we developed an Effective Medium Theory (EMT) for the Space-Charge Region electrostatics of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires, and nanotubes in a dielectric ambient and gave formulas for their junction depletion width and screening length characterizing the space-charge tail. In the present work, we develop this EMT further and derive simple formulas for the potential and field distributions in the semiconductor and dielectric media of the array. The formulas derived are validated with numerical simulations. It is shown that the potential and field distributions perpendicular to the junction plane in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. We also analyze a single NF junction, treating it as a limiting case of an array, and obtain the following key results. For negligible film thickness, the depletion width depends linearly on applied voltage and inverse of doping; the peak electric field depends linearly on doping and inverse of ambient permittivity and varies very gradually with applied voltage. These features of a thin film junction are remarkably different from the bulk junction, wherein the depletion width and peak field have a square-root dependence on applied voltage.

  13. Modeling convective core overshoot and diffusion in Procyon constrained by asteroseismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, D. B.; Gruberbauer, M.; Demarque, P.

    2014-06-01

    We compare evolved stellar models, which match Procyon's mass and position in the HR diagram, to current ground-based asteroseismic observations. Diffusion of helium and metals along with two conventional core overshoot descriptions and the Kuhfuss nonlocal theory of convection are considered. We establish that one of the two published asteroseismic data reductions for Procyon, which mainly differ in their identification of even versus odd l values, is a significantly more probable and self-consistent match to our models than the other. The most probable models according to our Bayesian analysis have evolved to just short of turnoff, still retaining a hydrogen convective core. Our most probable models include Y and Z diffusion and have conventional core overshoot between 0.9 and 1.5 pressure scale heights, which increases the outer radius of the convective core by between 36% and 43%, respectively. We discuss the significance of this comparatively higher than expected core overshoot amount in terms of internal mixing during evolution. The parameters of our most probable models are similar regardless of whether adiabatic or nonadiabatic model p-mode frequencies are compared to the observations, although, the Bayesian probabilities are greater when the nonadiabatic model frequencies are used. All the most probable models (with or without core overshoot, adiabatic or nonadiabatic model frequencies, diffusion or no diffusion, including priors for the observed HRD location and mass or not) have masses that are within 1σ of the observed mass 1.497 ± 0.037 M {sub ☉}.

  14. Modeling of the interleaved hysteresis loop in the measurements of rotational core losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Pillay, Pragasen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of core losses in machine laminations reveals a fundamental difference between rotational and pulsating types. Rotational core losses under rotating fields decrease at high flux density, while pulsating losses keep increasing steadily. Experimental analyses of loss components Px and Py in x and y directions with rotating fields show that the loss decreases in one loss component and sometimes attains negative values. Tracking the evolution of hysteresis loops along this loss component discloses a peculiar behavior of magnetic hysteresis, where the loop changes its path from counterclockwise to clockwise within a cycle of magnetization process, the so called interleaved hysteresis loop. This paper highlights a successful procedure for modeling the interleaved hysteresis loop in the measurement of rotational core losses in electrical machine laminations using the generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model. The efficiency of the proposed model is compared to Preisach model. Results and conclusion of this work are of importance toward building an accurate model of rotational core losses.

  15. Two-dimensional analytical model for hetero-junction double-gate tunnel field-effect transistor with a stacked gate-oxide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui Fang; Gui Guan, Bang

    2017-05-01

    A two-dimensional analytical model for hetero-junction double-gate tunnel FETs (DG TFETs) with a stacked gate-oxide structure is proposed in this paper. The effects of both the channel mobile charges and source/drain depletion regions on the channel potential profile are considered for the higher accuracy of the proposed model. Poisson’s equation is solved using the superposition principle and Fourier series solution to model the channel potential. The band-to-band tunneling generation rate is expressed as a function of the channel electric field derived from the channel potential and then integrated analytically to derive the drain current of the hetero-junction DG TFETs with a stacked gate-oxide structure using the shortest tunneling path. The effects of device parameters on the channel potential, drain current, and transconductance are investigated. Very good agreements are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results.

  16. Sustained phenotypic reversion of junctional epidermolysis bullosa dog keratinocytes: Establishment of an immunocompetent animal model for cutaneous gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Spirito, Flavia; Capt, Annabelle; Rio, Marcela Del; Larcher, Fernando; Guaguere, Eric; Danos, Olivier; Meneguzzi, Guerrino . E-mail: meneguzz@unice.fr

    2006-01-20

    Gene transfer represents the unique therapeutic issue for a number of inherited skin disorders including junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), an untreatable genodermatose caused by mutations in the adhesion ligand laminin 5 ({alpha}3{beta}3{gamma}2) that is secreted in the extracellular matrix by the epidermal basal keratinocytes. Because gene therapy protocols require validation in animal models, we have phenotypically reverted by oncoretroviral transfer of the curative gene the keratinocytes isolated from dogs with a spontaneous form of JEB associated with a genetic mutation in the {alpha}3 chain of laminin 5. We show that the transduced dog JEB keratinocytes: (1) display a sustained secretion of laminin 5 in the extracellular matrix; (2) recover the adhesion, proliferation, and clonogenic capacity of wild-type keratinocytes; (3) generate fully differentiated stratified epithelia that after grafting on immunocompromised mice produce phenotypically normal skin and sustain permanent expression of the transgene. We validate an animal model that appears particularly suitable to demonstrate feasibility, efficacy, and safety of genetic therapeutic strategies for cutaneous disorders before undertaking human clinical trials.

  17. Electrical signal transmission and gap junction regulation in a bone cell network: a cable model for an osteon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, D.; Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.

    1997-01-01

    A cable model is formulated to estimate the spatial distribution of intracellular electric potential and current, from the cement line to the lumen of an osteon, as the frequency of the loading and the conductance of the gap junction are altered. The model predicts that the characteristic diffusion time for the spread of current along the membrane of the osteocytic processes, 0.03 sec, is nearly the same as the predicted pore pressure relaxation time in Zeng et al. (Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 1994) for the draining of the bone fluid into the osteonal canal. This approximate equality of characteristic times causes the cable to behave as a high-pass, low-pass filter cascade with a maximum in the spectral response for the intracellular potential at approximately 30 Hz. This behavior could be related to the experiments of Rubin and McLeod (Osteoporosis, Academic Press, 1996) which show that live bone appears to be selectively responsive to mechanical loading in a specific frequency range (15-30 Hz) for several species.

  18. Electrical signal transmission and gap junction regulation in a bone cell network: a cable model for an osteon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, D.; Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.

    1997-01-01

    A cable model is formulated to estimate the spatial distribution of intracellular electric potential and current, from the cement line to the lumen of an osteon, as the frequency of the loading and the conductance of the gap junction are altered. The model predicts that the characteristic diffusion time for the spread of current along the membrane of the osteocytic processes, 0.03 sec, is nearly the same as the predicted pore pressure relaxation time in Zeng et al. (Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 1994) for the draining of the bone fluid into the osteonal canal. This approximate equality of characteristic times causes the cable to behave as a high-pass, low-pass filter cascade with a maximum in the spectral response for the intracellular potential at approximately 30 Hz. This behavior could be related to the experiments of Rubin and McLeod (Osteoporosis, Academic Press, 1996) which show that live bone appears to be selectively responsive to mechanical loading in a specific frequency range (15-30 Hz) for several species.

  19. Characterization, modeling and design parameters identification of silicon carbide junction field effect transistor for temperature sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Tarek; Khachroumi, Sofiane; Morel, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Sensor technology is moving towards wide-band-gap semiconductors providing high temperature capable devices. Indeed, the higher thermal conductivity of silicon carbide, (three times more than silicon), permits better heat dissipation and allows better cooling and temperature management. Though many temperature sensors have already been published, little endeavours have been invested in the study of silicon carbide junction field effect devices (SiC-JFET) as a temperature sensor. SiC-JFETs devices are now mature enough and it is close to be commercialized. The use of its specific properties versus temperatures is the major focus of this paper. The SiC-JFETs output current-voltage characteristics are characterized at different temperatures. The saturation current and its on-resistance versus temperature are successfully extracted. It is demonstrated that these parameters are proportional to the absolute temperature. A physics-based model is also presented. Relationships between on-resistance and saturation current versus temperature are introduced. A comparative study between experimental data and simulation results is conducted. Important to note, the proposed model and the experimental results reflect a successful agreement as far as a temperature sensor is concerned.

  20. Characterization, Modeling and Design Parameters Identification of Silicon Carbide Junction Field Effect Transistor for Temperature Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Tarek Ben; Khachroumi, Sofiane; Morel, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Sensor technology is moving towards wide-band-gap semiconductors providing high temperature capable devices. Indeed, the higher thermal conductivity of silicon carbide, (three times more than silicon), permits better heat dissipation and allows better cooling and temperature management. Though many temperature sensors have already been published, little endeavours have been invested in the study of silicon carbide junction field effect devices (SiC-JFET) as a temperature sensor. SiC-JFETs devices are now mature enough and it is close to be commercialized. The use of its specific properties versus temperatures is the major focus of this paper. The SiC-JFETs output current-voltage characteristics are characterized at different temperatures. The saturation current and its on-resistance versus temperature are successfully extracted. It is demonstrated that these parameters are proportional to the absolute temperature. A physics-based model is also presented. Relationships between on-resistance and saturation current versus temperature are introduced. A comparative study between experimental data and simulation results is conducted. Important to note, the proposed model and the experimental results reflect a successful agreement as far as a temperature sensor is concerned. PMID:22315547

  1. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  2. A computationally efficient spectral method for modeling core dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, P.; Calkins, M. A.; Julien, K.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient, spectral numerical method is presented for solving problems in a spherical shell geometry that employs spherical harmonics in the angular dimensions and Chebyshev polynomials in the radial direction. We exploit the three-term recurrence relation for Chebyshev polynomials that renders all matrices sparse in spectral space. This approach is significantly more efficient than the collocation approach and is generalizable to both the Galerkin and tau methodologies for enforcing boundary conditions. The sparsity of the matrices reduces the computational complexity of the linear solution of implicit-explicit time stepping schemes to O(N) operations, compared to O>(N2>) operations for a collocation method. The method is illustrated by considering several example problems of important dynamical processes in the Earth's liquid outer core. Results are presented from both fully nonlinear, time-dependent numerical simulations and eigenvalue problems arising from the investigation of the onset of convection and the inertial wave spectrum. We compare the explicit and implicit temporal discretization of the Coriolis force; the latter becomes computationally feasible given the sparsity of the differential operators. We find that implicit treatment of the Coriolis force allows for significantly larger time step sizes compared to explicit algorithms; for hydrodynamic and dynamo problems at an Ekman number of E=10-5, time step sizes can be increased by a factor of 3 to 16 times that of the explicit algorithm, depending on the order of the time stepping scheme. The implementation with explicit Coriolis force scales well to at least 2048 cores, while the implicit implementation scales to 512 cores.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of a Dual-Junction CIGS Solar Cell Using Silvaco ATLAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    for a single CIGS cell. This was accomplished through modeling and simulation using Silvaco ATLASTM, an advanced virtual wafer - fabrication tool. A...modeling and simulation using Silvaco ATLASTM, an advanced virtual wafer -fabrication tool. A Silvaco ATLASTM model of a single CIGS cell was created by...or bumping into the crystal lattice, converting part of their energy to heat. In any case, they are not involved in converting solar energy into

  4. Diffused junction p(+)-n solar cells in bulk GaAs. II - Device characterization and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeney, R.; Sundaram, L. M. G.; Rode, H.; Bhat, I.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of p(+)-n junction solar cells fabricated on bulk GaAs by an open tube diffusion technique are presented in detail. Quantum efficiency measurements were analyzed and compared to computer simulations of the cell structure in order to determine material parameters such as diffusion length, surface recombination velocity and junction depth. From the results obtained it is projected that proper optimization of the cell parameters can increase the efficiency of the cells to close to 20 percent.

  5. Diffused junction p(+)-n solar cells in bulk GaAs. II - Device characterization and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeney, R.; Sundaram, L. M. G.; Rode, H.; Bhat, I.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of p(+)-n junction solar cells fabricated on bulk GaAs by an open tube diffusion technique are presented in detail. Quantum efficiency measurements were analyzed and compared to computer simulations of the cell structure in order to determine material parameters such as diffusion length, surface recombination velocity and junction depth. From the results obtained it is projected that proper optimization of the cell parameters can increase the efficiency of the cells to close to 20 percent.

  6. Ab Initio Study of 40Ca with an Importance Truncated No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R; Navratil, P

    2007-05-22

    We propose an importance truncation scheme for the no-core shell model, which enables converged calculations for nuclei well beyond the p-shell. It is based on an a priori measure for the importance of individual basis states constructed by means of many-body perturbation theory. Only the physically relevant states of the no-core model space are considered, which leads to a dramatic reduction of the basis dimension. We analyze the validity and efficiency of this truncation scheme using different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and compare to conventional no-core shell model calculations for {sup 4}He and {sup 16}O. Then, we present the first converged calculations for the ground state of {sup 40}Ca within no-core model spaces including up to 16{h_bar}{Omega}-excitations using realistic low-momentum interactions. The scheme is universal and can be easily applied to other quantum many-body problems.

  7. The use of CORE model by metacognitive skill approach in developing characters junior high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dahlia; Yaniawati, Poppy; Kusumah, Yaya Sukjaya

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to analyze the character of students who obtain CORE learning model using metacognitive approach. The method in this study is qualitative research and quantitative research design (Mixed Method Design) with concurrent embedded strategy. The research was conducted on two groups: an experimental group and the control group. An experimental group consists of students who had CORE model learning using metacognitive approach while the control group consists of students taught by conventional learning. The study was conducted the object this research is the seventh grader students in one the public junior high schools in Bandung. Based on this research, it is known that the characters of the students in the CORE model learning through metacognitive approach is: honest, hard work, curious, conscientious, creative and communicative. Overall it can be concluded that CORE model learning is good for developing characters of a junior high school student.

  8. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams withintense space-charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, SurgreevR.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2006-08-28

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  9. Inhibiting post-translational core fucosylation prevents vascular calcification in the model of uremia.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Anqi; Yu, Changqing; Wang, Lingyu; Zhou, Mengying; Wang, Nan; Fang, Ming; Wang, Weidong; Lin, Hongli

    2016-10-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in uremia. Post-translational core fucosylation is implicated in a number of pathological processes. First, we investigated the role of core fucosylation and key TGF-β1 pathway receptors in calcified arteries in vivo. To determine whether blocking core fucosylation effectively inhibited VC and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway, we established an in vitro model of phosphate-induced calcification in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to assess the role of core fucosylation in VC. Core fucose could be detected at markedly higher levels in calcified VSMCs than control cells. Fut8 (α-1,6 fucosyltransferase), the only enzyme responsible for core fucosylation in humans, was significantly upregulated by high phosphate. Exposed to high phosphate media and blocking core fucosylation in VSMCs by knocking down Fut8 using a siRNA markedly reduced calcium and phosphorus deposition and Cbfα1 expression (osteoblast-specific transcription factor), and increased α-Sma expression (smooth muscle cell marker). Fut8 siRNA significantly inhibited TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling activation in VSMCs cultured in high phosphate media. In conclusion, this study provides evidence to suggest core fucosylation plays a major role in the process of VC and appropriate blockade of core fucosylation may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for treating VC in end-stage renal disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Interpreting ancient ice in a shallow ice core from the South Yamato (Antarctica) blue ice area using flow modeling and compositional matching to deep ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John C.; Nishio, Fumihiko; Fujita, Shuji; Narita, Hideki; Pasteur, Elizabeth; Grinsted, Aslak; Sinisalo, Anna; Maeno, Norikazu

    2006-08-01

    We explore methods of dating a 101 m ice core from a bare ice ablation area in the Yamato Mountains, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. There are two unknowns, the age of the ice at the surface and the age spanned by the core. The ice crystal growth rate was used to estimate the age span of the core at about 5 kyr. CO2, CH4 and N2O data on the core were compared with well-dated records from deep cores, leading to two plausible matches, both within isotope stage C. Detailed comparison of high-resolution DEP records from this core and the Dome Fuji core support the 55-61 kyr BP fit best. Oxygen isotope values in the core were then used to constrain the source elevation of the snow in the core, and hence the velocities in a simple flow line model. We inverted the ice core surface age, age span and origin site and their confidence intervals in a sensitivity study of flow model parameter space. The flow line model predicts good matches to the core by reducing glacial flow rates to 70% of present-day, accumulation rates by 45% with 10% confidence intervals. The modeled surface age for the whole meteorite field yields maximum surface ages of about 90 kyr, which is consistent with known, but poorly constrained, tephra dating, meteorite terrestrial ages and the frequency of meteorite discoveries. This approach can be used quite generally to link deep ice cores to surface outcrops on blue ice fields.

  11. Quantum Tunneling Model of a P-N Junction in Silvaco

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    electrical characteristics of materials on a large scale. According to Niels Bohr , atoms are comprised of three subatomic particles: a negative...shell, known as the valence shell, can be occupied. Modeling the simplest of atomic structures, the hydrogen atom, Bohr assumes that an electron...electric charge and therefore electric current. Similar to the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the electrons within a Si atom only occur at

  12. Modeling of Operating Temperature Performance of Triple Junction Solar Cells Using Silvaco’s ATLAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Portion of periodic table of elements [after 11] ..................................... 6 Figure 5. Using the bond model, visualization of (a) defect or...shell electrons called valence electrons. Group I-V elements (see Figure 4 [11] for periodic table of elements ), such as Si, have four valence...Portion of periodic table of elements [after 11] 7 Figure 5. Using the bond model, visualization of (a) defect or missing atom and (b) an electron

  13. The limiting problem of the drift-diffusion-Poisson model with discontinuous p-n-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Songzhe; Yuan, Hongjun; Cao, Chunling; Gao, Wenjie

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, the authors consider the limiting problem of the drift-diffusion-Poisson model for semiconductors. Different from previous papers, the model considered involve some special doping profiles D which have the property that the function is allowed to have a jump-discontinuity and sign changing property but D2 is required to be Lipschitz continuous. The existence, uniqueness and large-time asymptotic behavior of the global (in time) solutions are given.

  14. Structural and Functional Abnormalities of the Neuromuscular Junction in the Trembler-J Homozygote Mouse Model of Congenital Hypomyelinating Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scurry, Alexandra N; Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Gephart, Gregory B; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) result in the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A. This hereditary peripheral neuropathy is characterized by dysmyelination of peripheral nerves, reduced nerve conduction velocity, and muscle weakness. APMP22 point mutation in L16P (leucine 16 to proline) underlies a form of human CMT1A as well as the Trembler-J mouse model of CMT1A. Homozygote Trembler-J mice (Tr(J)) die early postnatally, fail to make peripheral myelin, and, therefore, are more similar to patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy than those with CMT1A. Because recent studies of inherited neuropathies in humans and mice have demonstrated that dysfunction and degeneration of neuromuscular synapses or junctions (NMJs) often precede impairments in axonal conduction, we examined the structure and function of NMJs in Tr(J)mice. Although synapses appeared to be normally innervated even in end-stage Tr(J)mice, the growth and maturation of the NMJs were altered. In addition, the amplitudes of nerve-evoked muscle endplate potentials were reduced and there was transmission failure during sustained nerve stimulation. These results suggest that the severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy that characterizes Tr(J)mice results in structural and functional deficits of the developing NMJ. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly pressurized partially miscible liquid-liquid flow in a micro-T-junction. II. Theoretical justifications and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ning; Wen, John Z.; Ren, Carolyn L.

    2017-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part study on a partially miscible liquid-liquid flow (carbon dioxide and deionized water) that is highly pressurized and confined in a microfluidic T-junction. In the first part of this study, we reported experimental observations of the development of flow regimes under various flow conditions and the quantitative characteristics of the drop flow including the drop length, after-generation drop speed, and periodic spacing development between an emerging drop and the newly produced one. Here in part II we provide theoretical justifications to our quantitative studies on the drop flow by considering (1) C O2 hydration at the interface with water, (2) the diffusion-controlled dissolution of C O2 molecules in water, and (3) the diffusion distance of the dissolved C O2 molecules. Our analyses show that (1) the C O2 hydration at the interface is overall negligible, (2) a saturation scenario of the dissolved C O2 molecules in the vicinity of the interface will not be reached within the contact time between the two fluids, and (3) molecular diffusion does play a role in transferring the dissolved molecules, but the diffusion distance is very limited compared with the channel geometry. In addition, mathematical models for the drop length and the drop spacing are developed based on the observations in part I, and their predictions are compared to our experimental results.

  16. Consistent treatment of viscoelastic effects at junctions in one-dimensional blood flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lucas O.; Leugering, Günter; Blanco, Pablo J.

    2016-06-01

    While the numerical discretization of one-dimensional blood flow models for vessels with viscoelastic wall properties is widely established, there is still no clear approach on how to couple one-dimensional segments that compose a network of viscoelastic vessels. In particular for Voigt-type viscoelastic models, assumptions with regard to boundary conditions have to be made, which normally result in neglecting the viscoelastic effect at the edge of vessels. Here we propose a coupling strategy that takes advantage of a hyperbolic reformulation of the original model and the inherent information of the resulting system. We show that applying proper coupling conditions is fundamental for preserving the physical coherence and numerical accuracy of the solution in both academic and physiologically relevant cases.

  17. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon’s core

    PubMed Central

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth’s core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon’s inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon’s core. PMID:25775531

  18. Modeling and design of multiple buried junctions detectors for color systems development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Annick; Sou, Gerard; Ben Chouikha, Mohamed; Sedjil, Mohamed; Lu, Guo N.; Alquie, George

    2000-04-01

    Two novel integrated optical detectors called BDJ detector and BTJ detector have been developed in our laboratory. These two detectors have different applications: the BDJ detector elaborated in CMOS process can be used for wavelength or light flux detection while the BTJ detector based on a bipolar structure gives the trichromatics components of a light. To develop microsystems, we need simulation tools as SPICE model. So, we have elaborated a physical mode, proposed a parameters extraction method and study influence of different parameters for BDJ detectors. Simulations and measurements have validated these models. More, we prose a design of BTJ detectors for developing new color imaging systems.

  19. Simplified tight-binding model for conductance calculation with phonon scattering for atomic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Xia, H.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2015-11-01

    Intrigued by the high demand of fast design and development of nanoscale electronic devices, electronic transport across atomic dimensions becomes an important theoretical and computational problem. In this paper we present a tight-binding based model specially tailed for calculating realistic tunneling structures with scattering region dimensions of several nanometers. The proposed model allows for a proper treatment of the electron-phonon coupling effects in a tractable manner. By greatly reducing the complexity of the phonon-involved problem down to a quadratic level, transmission calculation for large-scale systems, including both planar structures and quantum wire structures, becomes practically feasible.

  20. Bulk Earth Compositional Models Require the Presence of Potassium in Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westrenen, W.; Rama Murthy, V.

    2006-12-01

    Constraining the concentration of radioactive potassium-40 as a heat source in Earth's metallic core is crucial for the development of accurate models for the formation and dynamic evolution of the core and lower mantle. A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that significant amounts of potassium can be incorporated into sulphur-bearing iron melts at relatively low pressure (e.g. Rama Murthy et al., Nature 2003), and in sulphur-free iron melts at high pressure (e.g. Lee and Jeanloz, GRL 2003; Hirao et al., GRL 2006), at concentrations consistent with recent core/mantle thermal evolution studies (e.g. Nimmo et al., GJI 2004; Nakagawa and Tackley, G3 2005; Costin and Butler, PEPI 2006). In spite of these studies, the notion of core K has been questioned in the context of current geochemical models for the composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) and Earth's core (e.g. McDonough, Treatise on Geochemistry 2003). Arguments against the presence of potassium in the core are based on: (1) Trends in the elemental composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) compared to the composition of CI carbonaceous chondrite (CC) as a function of element condensation temperatures, (2) Systematics of K/U versus Rb/Sr concentration ratios in BSE and chondrites, and (3) The mantle abundance of Ca relative to other refractory lithophile elements on the presumption that K entry into the core also extracts Ca. Here we show that none of these arguments are valid. Crucially, an updated cosmochemical model of bulk Earth composition, using recent data compilations of CC / BSE compositions and condensation temperatures, requires the presence of ± 250 ppm K in the core, while still being fully consistent with clearly non-linear chondrite K/U - Rb/Sr trends. We conclude that both experimental data and geochemical Bulk Earth models allow for the presence of K in Earth's core.

  1. Drosophila Nesprin-1 controls glutamate receptor density at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Morel, Véronique; Lepicard, Simon; Rey, Alexandre N; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Schaeffer, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Nesprin-1 is a core component of a protein complex connecting nuclei to cytoskeleton termed LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton). Nesprin-1 is anchored to the nuclear envelope by its C-terminal KASH domain, the disruption of which has been associated with neuronal and neuromuscular pathologies, including autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Here, we describe a new and unexpected role of Drosophila Nesprin-1, Msp-300, in neuromuscular junction. We show that larvae carrying a deletion of Msp-300 KASH domain (Msp-300 (∆KASH) ) present a locomotion defect suggestive of a myasthenia, and demonstrate the importance of muscle Msp-300 for this phenotype, using tissue-specific RNAi knock-down. We show that Msp-300 (∆KASH) mutants display abnormal neurotransmission at the larval neuromuscular junction, as well as an imbalance in postsynaptic glutamate receptor composition with a decreased percentage of GluRIIA-containing receptors. We could rescue Msp-300 (∆KASH) locomotion phenotypes by GluRIIA overexpression, suggesting that the locomotion impairment associated with the KASH domain deletion is due to a reduction in junctional GluRIIA. In summary, we found that Msp-300 controls GluRIIA density at the neuromuscular junction. Our results suggest that Drosophila is a valuable model for further deciphering how Nesprin-1 and LINC disruption may lead to neuronal and neuromuscular pathologies.

  2. Overall Features of EAST Operation Space by Using Simple Core-SOL-Divertor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Hatayama, A.; Zhu, Sizheng; Takizuka, T.; Tomita, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A simple Core-SOL-Divertor (C-S-D) model has been developed to investigate qualitatively the overall features of the operational space for the integrated core and edge plasma. To construct the simple C-S-D model, a simple core plasma model of ITER physics guidelines and a two-point SOL-divertor model are used. The simple C-S-D model is applied to the study of the EAST operational space with lower hybrid current drive experiments under various kinds of trade-off for the basic plasma parameters. Effective methods for extending the operational space are also presented. From this study for the EAST operational space, it is evident that the C-S-D model is a useful tool for understanding qualitatively the overall features of the plasma operational space.

  3. SAPHIR: a physiome core model of body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S Randall; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave, Julie; Françoise, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, François; Hannaert, Patrick; Hernández, Alfredo; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mazière, Pierre; Tahi, Fariza; White, Ronald J

    2008-09-13

    We present the current state of the development of the SAPHIR project (a Systems Approach for PHysiological Integration of Renal, cardiac and respiratory function). The aim is to provide an open-source multi-resolution modelling environment that will permit, at a practical level, a plug-and-play construction of integrated systems models using lumped-parameter components at the organ/tissue level while also allowing focus on cellular- or molecular-level detailed sub-models embedded in the larger core model. Thus, an in silico exploration of gene-to-organ-to-organism scenarios will be possible, while keeping computation time manageable. As a first prototype implementation in this environment, we describe a core model of human physiology targeting the short- and long-term regulation of blood pressure, body fluids and homeostasis of the major solutes. In tandem with the development of the core models, the project involves database implementation and ontology development.

  4. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainties in Modeling: Assessment of Phase I Lattice to Core Model Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxelin, Pascal Nicolas; Strydom, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Best-estimate plus uncertainty analysis of reactors is replacing the traditional conservative (stacked uncertainty) method for safety and licensing analysis. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications, a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) have several features that require techniques not used in light-water reactor analysis (e.g., coated-particle design and large graphite quantities at high temperatures). The International Atomic Energy Agency has therefore launched the Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling to study uncertainty propagation in the HTGR analysis chain. The benchmark problem defined for the prismatic design is represented by the General Atomics Modular HTGR 350. The main focus of this report is the compilation and discussion of the results obtained for various permutations of Exercise I 2c and the use of the cross section data in Exercise II 1a of the prismatic benchmark, which is defined as the last and first steps of the lattice and core simulation phases, respectively. The report summarizes the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) best estimate results obtained for Exercise I 2a (fresh single-fuel block), Exercise I 2b (depleted single-fuel block), and Exercise I 2c (super cell) in addition to the first results of an investigation into the cross section generation effects for the super-cell problem. The two dimensional deterministic code known as the New ESC based Weighting Transport (NEWT) included in the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.1.2 package was used for the cross section evaluation, and the results obtained were compared to the three dimensional stochastic SCALE module KENO VI. The NEWT cross section libraries were generated for several permutations of the current benchmark super-cell geometry and were then provided as input to the Phase II core calculation of the stand alone neutronics Exercise

  5. Characterization of behavioral and neuromuscular junction phenotypes in a novel allelic series of SMA mouse models.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Melissa; Gomez, Daniel; Feng, Zhihua; McEwen, Corissa; Beltran, Jose; Cirillo, Kim; El-Khodor, Bassem; Lin, Ming-Yi; Li, Yun; Knowlton, Wendy M; McKemy, David D; Bogdanik, Laurent; Butts-Dehm, Katherine; Martens, Kimberly; Davis, Crystal; Doty, Rosalinda; Wardwell, Keegan; Ghavami, Afshin; Kobayashi, Dione; Ko, Chien-Ping; Ramboz, Sylvie; Lutz, Cathleen

    2012-10-15

    A number of mouse models for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have been genetically engineered to recapitulate the severity of human SMA by using a targeted null mutation at the mouse Smn1 locus coupled with the transgenic addition of varying copy numbers of human SMN2 genes. Although this approach has been useful in modeling severe SMA and very mild SMA, a mouse model of the intermediate form of the disease would provide an additional research tool amenable for drug discovery. In addition, many of the previously engineered SMA strains are multi-allelic by design, containing a combination of transgenes and targeted mutations in the homozygous state, making further genetic manipulation difficult. A new genetic engineering approach was developed whereby variable numbers of SMN2 sequences were incorporated directly into the murine Smn1 locus. Using combinations of these alleles, we generated an allelic series of SMA mouse strains harboring no, one, two, three, four, five, six or eight copies of SMN2. We report here the characterization of SMA mutants in this series that displayed a range in disease severity from embryonic lethal to viable with mild neuromuscular deficits.

  6. Asymmetry in the expression of the Azores mantle heterogeneity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Results from a numerical model of plume-triple junction interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Mantle plumes may significantly influence nearby spreading centers, imparting seafloor anomalies in bathymetry, geochemistry, and gravity. Near some plumes, such as Iceland, Azores, and Amsterdam-St. Paul, along-axis anomalies are asymmetric about the inferred upwelling conduit. This study focuses on the Azores plume-ridge system, where observed Mid-Atlantic Ridge axial anomalies extend farther to the south of the postulated location of the mantle heterogeneity than to the north. Near the Azores hotspot, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Terceira Rift form a triple junction, joining the North American, Eurasian, and African plates. We use a series of steady-state finite element numerical models to determine how the divergence of three surface plates away from a triple junction point affects the dispersion of buoyant material simulating a mantle plume. Model-prescribed plate motion vectors approximate the kinematics of the Azores triple junction during a main phase of plateau formation approximately 5-10 Ma. Models incorporate pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity as well as thermal buoyancy. The plume conduit is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly where maximum temperatures occur at the center and decay in a Gaussian fashion to zero at an assumed radius. Guided by published seismic tomography studies, we test the sensitivity of the upper mantle plume material distribution to the location of the plume conduit with respect to the triple junction. We also vary plume buoyancy flux: maximum temperatures modeled range from 50-180 deg. C, while maximum radii vary from 50 to 150 km. In general, we find that the divergence directions of the overlying plates tend to drive plume material preferentially southward, consistent with observed seafloor anomalies.

  7. Positive field-cooled dc susceptibility in granular superconductors interpreted through numerical simulations on a simple Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect

    Auletta, C.; Raiconi, G.; De Luca, R.; Pace, S.

    1995-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of a field-cooled dc susceptibility experiment carried out for granular superconductors by modeling these systems with a simple Josephson-junction array proposed by the authors. By this analysis the temperature dependence of the positive field-cooled susceptibility at very low values of the applied magnetic field, observed by Braunisch {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1908 (1992)] for some ceramic superonductors, has been reproduced and interpreted.

  8. A liquid sodium model of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, Daniel; Adams, Matthew; Stone, Douglas; Doan, Minh

    2016-11-01

    We present results from the three meter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment at full speed (4 Hz outer sphere rotation rate and a range of inner sphere rates). The experiment is geometrically similar with the earth's core. We study hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic phenomena in rapidly rotating turbulence, as well as magnetic field induction by those flows. Two external electromagnets apply dipole or quadrupole magnetic fields, while an array of 31 external Hall sensors measure the resulting induced magnetic field. This allows us to study dynamo gain (as we yet have no self-generating magnetic dynamo) and broader range of rotating turbulence phenomena. We report substantial magnetic field gain for a variety of flow states. One of these states exhibits bistability in the hydrodynamic flow with magnetic field gain only in one of the two states. Zonal flow shear drives large azimuthal magnetic fields, prompting a need to measure the zonal flows. This has prompted us to develop acoustic mode velocimetry measurements adapted from helioseismology. Prior to measurements in the larger experiment, we develop this technique in our 60 cm diameter spherical Couette experiment in nitrogen gas. There, we compare acoustic mode frequency splittings with theoretical predictions for solid body flow and turbulent flow, and obtain excellent agreement. We also use this technique to estimate the zonal shear in those experiments. NSF EAR 1417148.

  9. Defining the Estimated Core Genome of Bacterial Populations Using a Bayesian Decision Model

    PubMed Central

    van Tonder, Andries J.; Mistry, Shilan; Bray, James E.; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Cody, Alison J.; Farmer, Chris L.; Klugman, Keith P.; von Gottberg, Anne; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Brueggemann, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial core genome is of intense interest and the volume of whole genome sequence data in the public domain available to investigate it has increased dramatically. The aim of our study was to develop a model to estimate the bacterial core genome from next-generation whole genome sequencing data and use this model to identify novel genes associated with important biological functions. Five bacterial datasets were analysed, comprising 2096 genomes in total. We developed a Bayesian decision model to estimate the number of core genes, calculated pairwise evolutionary distances (p-distances) based on nucleotide sequence diversity, and plotted the median p-distance for each core gene relative to its genome location. We designed visually-informative genome diagrams to depict areas of interest in genomes. Case studies demonstrated how the model could identify areas for further study, e.g. 25% of the core genes with higher sequence diversity in the Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria meningitidis genomes encoded hypothetical proteins. The core gene with the highest p-distance value in C. jejuni was annotated in the reference genome as a putative hydrolase, but further work revealed that it shared sequence homology with beta-lactamase/metallo-beta-lactamases (enzymes that provide resistance to a range of broad-spectrum antibiotics) and thioredoxin reductase genes (which reduce oxidative stress and are essential for DNA replication) in other C. jejuni genomes. Our Bayesian model of estimating the core genome is principled, easy to use and can be applied to large genome datasets. This study also highlighted the lack of knowledge currently available for many core genes in bacterial genomes of significant global public health importance. PMID:25144616

  10. Defining the estimated core genome of bacterial populations using a Bayesian decision model.

    PubMed

    van Tonder, Andries J; Mistry, Shilan; Bray, James E; Hill, Dorothea M C; Cody, Alison J; Farmer, Chris L; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J; Brueggemann, Angela B

    2014-08-01

    The bacterial core genome is of intense interest and the volume of whole genome sequence data in the public domain available to investigate it has increased dramatically. The aim of our study was to develop a model to estimate the bacterial core genome from next-generation whole genome sequencing data and use this model to identify novel genes associated with important biological functions. Five bacterial datasets were analysed, comprising 2096 genomes in total. We developed a Bayesian decision model to estimate the number of core genes, calculated pairwise evolutionary distances (p-distances) based on nucleotide sequence diversity, and plotted the median p-distance for each core gene relative to its genome location. We designed visually-informative genome diagrams to depict areas of interest in genomes. Case studies demonstrated how the model could identify areas for further study, e.g. 25% of the core genes with higher sequence diversity in the Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria meningitidis genomes encoded hypothetical proteins. The core gene with the highest p-distance value in C. jejuni was annotated in the reference genome as a putative hydrolase, but further work revealed that it shared sequence homology with beta-lactamase/metallo-beta-lactamases (enzymes that provide resistance to a range of broad-spectrum antibiotics) and thioredoxin reductase genes (which reduce oxidative stress and are essential for DNA replication) in other C. jejuni genomes. Our Bayesian model of estimating the core genome is principled, easy to use and can be applied to large genome datasets. This study also highlighted the lack of knowledge currently available for many core genes in bacterial genomes of significant global public health importance.

  11. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  12. Spatial Resolution of Core Surface Flow Models Derived From Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymin, C.; Hulot, G.

    Core surface flows are usually computed from observations of the internal magnetic field and its secular variation. With observatory based secular variation models, the spatial resolution of core surface flows was mainly limited by the resolution of the secular variation model itself. This resolution dramatically improved with magnetic satellite data and for the first time the main limitation on core surface flow compu- tations comes from the hiding of the smallest length scale of the internal magnetic field by the crust. Indeed, the invisible small scale magnetic field may interact with core flows to produce large scale secular variation. This interaction cannot be taken into account during the flow computation process and may alter the computed flow models, even for large length scales. We investigate here the effects of the truncation of the internal magnetic field with known flow models using two different and inde- pendent core surface flow computation methods. In particular, we try to estimate the amplitude of the error introduced by this truncation and the spatial resolution that can be obtained with the new satellite data for core surface flows.

  13. Testing baryon-induced core formation in ΛCDM: A comparison of the DC14 and coreNFW dark matter halo models on galaxy rotation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaert, F.; Gentile, G.; Baes, M.

    2017-09-01

    Recent cosmological hydrodynamical simulations suggest that baryonic processes, and in particular supernova feedback following bursts of star formation, can alter the structure of dark matter haloes and transform primordial cusps into shallower cores. To assess whether this mechanism offers a solution to the long-standing cusp-core controversy, simulated haloes must be compared to real dark matter haloes inferred from galaxy rotation curves. For this purpose, two new dark matter density profiles were recently derived from simulations of galaxies in complementary mass ranges: the DC14 halo (1010 < Mhalo/M⊙ < 8 × 1011) and the coreNFW halo (107 < Mhalo/M⊙ < 109). Both models have individually been found to give good fits to observed rotation curves. For the DC14 model, however, the agreement of the predicted halo properties with cosmological scaling relations was confirmed by one study, but strongly refuted by another. A next important question is whether, despite their different approaches, the two models converge to the same solution in the mass range where both should be appropriate. To investigate this, we tested the DC14 and coreNFW halo models on the rotation curves of a selection of galaxies with halo masses in the range 4 × 109M⊙ - 7 × 1010M⊙ and compared their predictions. We further applied the DC14 model to a set of rotation curves at higher halo masses, up to 9 × 1011M⊙, to verify the agreement with the cosmological scaling relations. Both models are generally able to reproduce the observed rotation curves, in line with earlier results, and the predicted dark matter haloes are consistent with the cosmological c-Mhalo and M∗-Mhalo relations. We find that the DC14 and coreNFW models are also in fairly good agreement with each other, even though DC14 tends to predict slightly less extended cores and somewhat more concentrated haloes than coreNFW. While the quality of the fits is generally similar for both halo models, DC14 does perform

  14. Entropy-Driven Folding of an RNA Helical Junction: An Isothermal Titration Calorimetric Analysis of the Hammerhead Ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Takach, Jennifer C.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Helical junctions are extremely common motifs in naturally occurring RNAs, but little is known about the thermodynamics that drive their folding. Studies of junction folding face several challenges: non-two-state folding behavior, superposition of secondary and tertiary structural energetics, and drastically opposing enthalpic and entropic contributions to folding. Here we describe a thermodynamic dissection of the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme, a three-way RNA helical junction, by using isothermal titration calorimetry of bimolecular RNA constructs. By using this method, we show that tertiary folding of the hammerhead core occurs with a highly unfavorable enthalpy change, and is therefore entropically driven. Furthermore, the enthalpies and heat capacities of core folding are the same whether supported by monovalent or divalent ions. These properties appear to be general to the core sequence of bimolecular hammerhead constructs. We present a model for the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead core that is similar to those advanced for the folding of much larger RNAs, involving ion-induced collapse to a structured, non-native state accompanied by rearrangement of core residues to produce the native fold. In agreement with previous enzymological and structural studies, our thermodynamic data suggest that the hammerhead structure is stabilized in vitro predominantly by diffusely bound ions. Our approach addresses several significant challenges that accompany the study of junction folding, and should prove useful in defining the thermodynamic determinants of stability in these important RNA motifs. PMID:15134461

  15. Entropy-driven folding of an RNA helical junction: an isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, Peter J; Takach, Jennifer C; Feig, Andrew L

    2004-05-18

    Helical junctions are extremely common motifs in naturally occurring RNAs, but little is known about the thermodynamics that drive their folding. Studies of junction folding face several challenges: non-two-state folding behavior, superposition of secondary and tertiary structural energetics, and drastically opposing enthalpic and entropic contributions to folding. Here we describe a thermodynamic dissection of the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme, a three-way RNA helical junction, by using isothermal titration calorimetry of bimolecular RNA constructs. By using this method, we show that tertiary folding of the hammerhead core occurs with a highly unfavorable enthalpy change, and is therefore entropically driven. Furthermore, the enthalpies and heat capacities of core folding are the same whether supported by monovalent or divalent ions. These properties appear to be general to the core sequence of bimolecular hammerhead constructs. We present a model for the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead core that is similar to those advanced for the folding of much larger RNAs, involving ion-induced collapse to a structured, non-native state accompanied by rearrangement of core residues to produce the native fold. In agreement with previous enzymological and structural studies, our thermodynamic data suggest that the hammerhead structure is stabilized in vitro predominantly by diffusely bound ions. Our approach addresses several significant challenges that accompany the study of junction folding, and should prove useful in defining the thermodynamic determinants of stability in these important RNA motifs.

  16. Disruption of Tight Junctions by Cellulose Sulfate Facilitates HIV Infection: Model of Microbicide Safety

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Cheshenko, Natalia; Wilson, Sarah S.; Mhatre, Mohak; Guzman, Esmeralda; Fakioglu, Esra; Keller, Marla J.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The lack of biomarkers that are predictive of safety is a critical gap in the development of microbicides. The present experiments were designed to evaluate the predictive value of in vitro models of microbicide safety. Methods Changes in the epithelial barrier were evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) after exposure of human epithelial cells to candidate microbicides in a dual-chamber system. The significance of observed changes was addressed by challenging cultures with human immuodeficiency virus (HIV) and measuring the ability of virus to cross the epithelium and infect target T cells cultured in the lower chamber. Results Exposure to nonoxynol-9 (N-9) or cellulose sulfate (CS), but not 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (also referred to as tenofovir) or PRO2000, resulted in a rapid and sustained reduction in TER and a marked increase in HIV infection of T cells cultured in the lower chamber. Moreover, CS triggered nuclear factor κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and increased HIV replication in chronically infected U1 cells. Conclusions Epithelial barrier disruption and enhanced viral replication may have contributed to the increased risk of HIV acquisition observed in phase 3 trials of N-9 and CS. Expansion of in vitro safety testing to include these models would provide a more stringent preclinical assessment of microbicide safety and may prove to be more predictive of clinical outcomes. PMID:19586414

  17. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  18. Neuronal gap junctions play a role in the secondary neuronal death following controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Andrei B; Wang, Yongfu; Song, Ji-Hoon; Denisova, Janna V; Berman, Nancy E; Fontes, Joseph D

    2012-08-22

    In the mammalian CNS, excessive release of glutamate and overactivation of glutamate receptors are responsible for the secondary (delayed) neuronal death following neuronal injury, including ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and epilepsy. Recent studies in mice showed a critical role for neuronal gap junctions in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia-mediated neuronal death. Here, using controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult mice, as a model of TBI, and Fluoro-Jade B staining for analysis of neuronal death, we set to determine whether neuronal gap junctions play a role in the CCI-mediated secondary neuronal death. We report that 24h post-CCI, substantial neuronal death is detected in a number of brain regions outside the injury core, including the striatum. The striatal neuronal death is reduced both in wild-type mice by systemic administration of mefloquine (a relatively selective blocker of neuronal gap junctions) and in knockout mice lacking connexin 36 (neuronal gap junction protein). It is also reduced by inactivation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (with LY341495) which, as reported previously, control the rapid increase in neuronal gap junction coupling following different types of neuronal injury. The results suggest that neuronal gap junctions play a critical role in the CCI-induced secondary neuronal death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure and thermodynamics of core-softened models for alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-06-07

    The phase behavior and the fluid structure of coarse-grain models for alcohols are studied by means of reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we model ethanol and 1-propanol as linear rigid chains constituted by three (trimers) and four (tetramers) partially fused spheres, respectively. Thermodynamic properties of these models are examined in the RISM context, by employing closed formulæ for the calculation of free energy and pressure. Gas-liquid coexistence curves for trimers and tetramers are reported and compared with already existing data for a dimer model of methanol. Critical temperatures slightly increase with the number of CH{sub 2} groups in the chain, while critical pressures and densities decrease. Such a behavior qualitatively reproduces the trend observed in experiments on methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol and suggests that our coarse-grain models, despite their simplicity, can reproduce the essential features of the phase behavior of such alcohols. The fluid structure of these models is investigated by computing radial distribution function g{sub ij}(r) and static structure factor S{sub ij}(k); the latter shows the presence of a low−k peak at intermediate-high packing fractions and low temperatures, suggesting the presence of aggregates for both trimers and tetramers.

  20. Structure and thermodynamics of core-softened models for alcohols.

    PubMed

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-06-07

    The phase behavior and the fluid structure of coarse-grain models for alcohols are studied by means of reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we model ethanol and 1-propanol as linear rigid chains constituted by three (trimers) and four (tetramers) partially fused spheres, respectively. Thermodynamic properties of these models are examined in the RISM context, by employing closed formulæ for the calculation of free energy and pressure. Gas-liquid coexistence curves for trimers and tetramers are reported and compared with already existing data for a dimer model of methanol. Critical temperatures slightly increase with the number of CH2 groups in the chain, while critical pressures and densities decrease. Such a behavior qualitatively reproduces the trend observed in experiments on methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol and suggests that our coarse-grain models, despite their simplicity, can reproduce the essential features of the phase behavior of such alcohols. The fluid structure of these models is investigated by computing radial distribution function gij(r) and static structure factor Sij(k); the latter shows the presence of a low-k peak at intermediate-high packing fractions and low temperatures, suggesting the presence of aggregates for both trimers and tetramers.

  1. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  2. Updated Outer Core Reference Model from a Bayesian Inversion of Normal Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, Sanne; Irving, Jessica; Lekic, Vedran

    2017-04-01

    The outer core is arguably Earth's most dynamic region, and consists of an iron-nickel liquid with an unknown combination of lighter alloying elements. Frequencies of Earth's normal modes provide the strongest constraints on the radial profiles of compressional wavespeed, VΦ, and density, ρ, in the outer core. Recent great earthquakes have yielded new normal mode measurements; however, mineral physics experiments and calculations are often compared to the Preliminary Reference Earth model (PREM), which is 35 years old and does not provide uncertainties. Here we investigate the thermo-elastic properties of the outer core using Earth's free oscillations and a Bayesian framework. To estimate radial structure of the outer core and its uncertainties, we choose to exploit recent datasets of normal mode centre frequencies. Under the self-coupling approximation, centre frequencies are unaffected by lateral heterogeneities in the Earth, for example in the mantle. Normal modes are sensitive to both VΦ and ρ in the outer core, with each mode's specific sensitivity depending on its eigenfunctions. We include a priori bounds on outer core models that ensure compatibility with measurements of mass and moment of inertia as well as satisfying other physical requirements. We use Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain techniques to explore different choices in parameterizing the outer core, each of which represents different a priori constraints. We test how results vary assuming a smooth polynomial parametrization (similar to PREM), or assuming an Equation-of-State and adiabaticity and inverting directly for thermo-elastic parameters. Independent of the parameterisation we find that the top of the outer core is denser and has a steeper velocity profile than suggested by PREM. The velocity model we propose from our inversion of normal modes is in good agreement with velocity models based purely on body waves.

  3. Quasi-geostrophic models of core dynamics in the equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jault, D.; Schaeffer, N.

    2016-12-01

    Previous quasi-geostrophic models of core dynamics relied on the hypothesis that the height of the core-mantle boundary above the equatorial plane does not vary rapidly with the distance to the rotation axis. Using a weak formalism, we have recently derived a quasi-geostrophic (QG) model that is not limited by this hypothesis and is even valid in the equatorial region (Labbé & al., 2015). It can be extended to apply when the core-mantle boundary is non-spherical. Initially, the model also included an evolution equation for the magnetic field under the restrictive hypothesis that the mantle can be considered as a perfect conductor. In this respect, it sets the study of torsional Alfvén waves that carry the core angular momentum in a general framework. We shall now apply the model to the related questions of the electromagnetic and topographic core-mantle coupling and of the evolution of MHD waves in the equatorial region. In order to validate the model with a finite electrical conductivity of the mantle, we compare numerical solutions of the reduced QG model and of the primitive 3D equations.

  4. Competency Model 101. The Process of Developing Core Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, Lisa Wright; Hewlett, Peggy O'Neill

    1999-01-01

    The Mississippi Competency Model defines nurses' roles as provider (caregiver, teacher, counselor, advocate), professional (scholar, collaborator, ethicist, researcher), and manager (leader, facilitator, intrapreneur, decision maker, technology user) for four levels of nursing: licensed practical nurse, associate degree, bachelor's degree, and…

  5. Structural synergy in a core-shell spin crossover nanoparticle investigated by an electroelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimani, Ahmed; Khemakhem, Hamadi; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how surrounding environments act on the functional properties of switchable nano-objects across extended and multiple length scales is of growing interest in many areas of material science. Here, we examine in details, using a microscopic model, the interplay between the structural properties of an inert shell and a spin-active spin-crossover (SCO) core, composed of atoms which can switch thermally between the low-spin (LS) and high-spin (HS) states, a transition which is accompanied with a volume expansion. To come closer to realistic experimental data, we considered a shell having the lattice parameter of the HS state. Intensive Monte Carlo simulations, running on the spin states and atomic positions, are performed on the core-shell spin-crossover nanoparticle using an electroelastic model based on a compressible 2D lattice. A detailed analysis of the effect of the shell's size and rigidity on the magnetostructural properties of the core allows us to address the following issues: (i) the heteroelastic properties of the lattice induce a spatially inhomogeneous pressure (negative in the shell and positive in the core) which strongly distorts the lattice when the core is in the LS state, creating a visible spatial deflection of the shell/core interface; (ii) the thermally-induced first-order SCO transition of the core is significantly affected by the increase of the shell size, which lowers the transition temperature and reduces the thermal hysteresis width; (iii) the shell's rigidity dependence of the thermal hysteresis of the nanoparticle exhibited a resonance behavior when the shell's rigidity equals that of the core, a feature that is analyzed on the basis of acoustic impedance mismatch between the core and the shell. All these outcomes reflect the crucial influence of the surrounding environment on the structural properties of the nanoparticle and provide potentialities in the control of the bistability and cooperativity of the SCO nanoparticles

  6. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer.

  7. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  8. Global/Regional Integrated Model System (GRIMs): Double Fourier Series (DFS) Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, M.; Hong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A multi-scale atmospheric/oceanic model system with unified physics, the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) has been created for use in numerical weather prediction, seasonal simulations, and climate research projects, from global to regional scales. It includes not only the model code, but also the test cases and scripts. The model system is developed and practiced by taking advantage of both operational and research applications. We outlines the history of GRIMs, its current applications, and plans for future development, providing a summary useful to present and future users. In addition to the traditional spherical harmonics (SPH) dynamical core, a new spectral method with a double Fourier series (DFS) is available in the GRIMs (Table 1). The new DFS dynamical core with full physics is evaluated against the SPH dynamical core in terms of short-range forecast capability for a heavy rainfall event and seasonal simulation framework. Comparison of the two dynamical cores demonstrates that the new DFS dynamical core exhibits performance comparable to the SPH in terms of simulated climatology accuracy and the forecast of a heavy rainfall event. Most importantly, the DFS algorithm guarantees improved computational efficiency in the cluster computer as the model resolution increases, which is consistent with theoretical values computed from the dry primitive equation model framework of Cheong (Fig. 1). The current study shows that, at higher resolutions, the DFS approach can be a competitive dynamical core because the DFS algorithm provides the advantages of both the spectral method for high numerical accuracy and the grid-point method for high performance computing in the aspect of computational cost. GRIMs dynamical cores

  9. CAM-SE: A scalable spectral element dynamical core for the Community Atmosphere Model.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, John; Edwards, Jim; Evans, Kate J; Guba, O; Lauritzen, Peter; Mirin, Art; St.-Cyr, Amik; Taylor, Mark; Worley, Patrick H

    2012-01-01

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5 includes a spectral element dynamical core option from NCAR's High-Order Method Modeling Environment. It is a continuous Galerkin spectral finite element method designed for fully unstructured quadrilateral meshes. The current configurations in CAM are based on the cubed-sphere grid. The main motivation for including a spectral element dynamical core is to improve the scalability of CAM by allowing quasi-uniform grids for the sphere that do not require polar filters. In addition, the approach provides other state-of-the-art capabilities such as improved conservation properties. Spectral elements are used for the horizontal discretization, while most other aspects of the dynamical core are a hybrid of well tested techniques from CAM's finite volume and global spectral dynamical core options. Here we first give a overview of the spectral element dynamical core as used in CAM. We then give scalability and performance results from CAM running with three different dynamical core options within the Community Earth System Model, using a pre-industrial time-slice configuration. We focus on high resolution simulations of 1/4 degree, 1/8 degree, and T340 spectral truncation.

  10. Developing a theory of the strategic core of teams: a role composition model of team performance.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Stephen E; Morgeson, Frederick P; Mannor, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Although numerous models of team performance have been articulated over the past 20 years, these models have primarily focused on the individual attribute approach to team composition. The authors utilized a role composition approach, which investigates how the characteristics of a set of role holders impact team effectiveness, to develop a theory of the strategic core of teams. Their theory suggests that certain team roles are most important for team performance and that the characteristics of the role holders in the "core" of the team are more important for overall team performance. This theory was tested in 778 teams drawn from 29 years of major league baseball (1974'-2002). Results demonstrate that although high levels of experience and job-related skill are important predictors of team performance, the relationships between these constructs and team performance are significantly stronger when the characteristics are possessed by core role holders (as opposed to non-core role holders). Further, teams that invest more of their financial resources in these core roles are able to leverage such investments into significantly improved performance. These results have implications for team composition models, as they suggest a new method for considering individual contributions to a team's success that shifts the focus onto core roles. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Chemical modeling of the L1498 and L1517B prestellar cores: CO and HCO+ depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, S.; Bergin, E. A.; Tafalla, M.

    2013-11-01

    Prestellar cores exhibit a strong chemical differentiation, which is mainly caused by the freeze-out of molecules onto the grain surfaces. Understanding this chemical structure is important, because molecular lines are often used as probes to constrain the core physical properties. Here we present new observations and analysis of the C18O (1-0) and H13CO+ (1-0) line emission in the L1498 and L1517B prestellar cores, located in the Taurus-Auriga molecular complex. We model these observations with a detailed chemistry network coupled to a radiative transfer code. Our model successfully reproduces the observed C18O (1-0) emission for a chemical age of a few 105 years. On the other hand, the observed H13CO+ (1-0) is reproduced only if cosmic-ray desorption by secondary photons is included, and if the grains have grown to a bigger size than average ISM grains in the core interior. This grain growth is consistent with the infrared scattered light ("coreshine") detected in these two objects, and is found to increase the CO abundance in the core interior by about a factor four. According to our model, CO is depleted by about 2-3 orders of magnitude in the core center. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. TRPV4 Regulates Tight Junctions and Affects Differentiation in a Cell Culture Model of the Corneal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rendón, Jacqueline; Sánchez-Guzmán, Erika; Rueda, Angélica; González, James; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Aquino-Jarquín, Guillermo; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; García-Villegas, Refugio

    2017-07-01

    TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 4) is a cation channel activated by hypotonicity, moderate heat, or shear stress. We describe the expression of TRPV4 during the differentiation of a corneal epithelial cell model, RCE1(5T5) cells. TRPV4 is a late differentiation feature that is concentrated in the apical membrane of the outmost cell layer of the stratified epithelia. Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that TRPV4 activation with GSK1016790A produced an influx of calcium that was blunted by the specific TRPV4 blocker RN-1734. We analyzed the involvement of TRPV4 in RCE1(5T5) epithelial differentiation by measuring the development of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as an indicator of the tight junction (TJ) assembly. We showed that TRPV4 activity was necessary to establish the TJ. In differentiated epithelia, activation of TRPV4 increases the TER and the accumulation of claudin-4 in cell-cell contacts. Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) up-regulates the TER of corneal epithelial cultures, and we show here that TRPV4 activation mimicked this EGF effect. Conversely, TRPV4 inhibition or knock down by specific shRNA prevented the increase in TER. Moreover, TRPP2, an EGF-activated channel that forms heteromeric complexes with TRPV4, is also concentrated in the outmost cell layer of differentiated RCE1(5T5) sheets. This suggests that the EGF regulation of the TJ may involve a heterotetrameric TRPV4-TRPP2 channel. These results demonstrated TRPV4 activity was necessary for the correct establishment of TJ in corneal epithelia and as well as the regulation of both the barrier function of TJ and its ability to respond to EGF. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1794-1807, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gap Junctions as Common Cause of High-Frequency Oscillations and Epileptic Seizures in a Computational Cascade of Neuronal Mass and Compartmental Modeling.

    PubMed

    Helling, Robert M; Koppert, Marc M J; Visser, Gerhard H; Kalitzin, Stiliyan N

    2015-09-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFO) appear to be a promising marker for delineating the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with localization related epilepsy. It remains, however, a purely observational phenomenon and no common mechanism has been proposed to relate HFOs and seizure generation. In this work we show that a cascade of two computational models, one on detailed compartmental scale and a second one on neural mass scale can explain both the autonomous generation of HFOs and the presence of epileptic seizures as emergent properties. To this end we introduce axonal-axonal gap junctions on a microscopic level and explore their impact on the higher level neural mass model (NMM). We show that the addition of gap junctions can generate HFOs and simultaneously shift the operational point of the NMM from a steady state network into bistable behavior that can autonomously generate epileptic seizures. The epileptic properties of the system, or the probability to generate epileptic type of activity, increases gradually with the increase of the density of axonal-axonal gap junctions. We further demonstrate that ad hoc HFO detectors used in previous studies are applicable to our simulated data.

  14. Increased intestinal permeability and tight junction disruption by altered expression and localization of occludin in a murine graft versus host disease model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly performed for hematologic diseases. As a major side effect, acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) with serious gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding and high mortality can be observed. Because surveillance and biopsies of human gastrointestinal GvHD are difficult to perform, rare information of the alterations of the gastrointestinal barrier exists resulting in a need for systematic animal models. Methods To investigate the effects of GvHD on the intestinal barrier of the small intestine we utilized an established acute semi allogenic GvHD in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice. Results By assessing the differential uptake of lactulose and mannitol in the jejunum, we observed an increased paracellular permeability as a likely mechanism for disturbed intestinal barrier function. Electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and PCR analysis indicated profound changes of the tight-junction complex, characterized by downregulation of the tight junction protein occludin without any changes in ZO-1. Furthermore TNF-α expression was significantly upregulated. Conclusions This analysis in a murine model of GvHD of the small intestine demonstrates serious impairment of intestinal barrier function in the jejunum, with an increased permeability and morphological changes through downregulation and localization shift of the tight junction protein occludin. PMID:21977944

  15. The utility of a multimaterial 3D printed model for surgical planning of complex deformity of the skull base and craniovertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Donato; Tanweer, Omar; Berman, Phillip; Harter, David H

    2016-11-01

    Utilizing advanced 3D printing techniques, a multimaterial model was created for the surgical planning of a complex deformity of the skull base and craniovertebral junction. The model contained bone anatomy as well as vasculature and the previously placed occipital cervical instrumentation. Careful evaluation allowed for a unique preoperative perspective of the craniovertebral deformity and instrumentation options. This patient-specific model was invaluable in choosing the most effective approach and correction strategy, which was not readily apparent from standard 2D imaging. Advanced 3D multimaterial printing provides a cost-effective method of presurgical planning, which can also be used for both patient and resident education.

  16. Hydrothermal alteration of granite rock cores: experiments and kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, T.; Mueller, T.; Renner, J.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics of water-rock interactions at elevated temperatures is key for understanding the dynamic evolution of porosity and permeability in natural and industrial systems. The implementation of rate data in numerical models simulating reactive transport is crucial to reliably predict subsurface fluid flow. The vast majority of data are constrained by single phase powder experiments inhering unrealistically high surface areas and hampering consideration of microstructural effects on reaction progress. We present experimental results of batch experiments conducted at 200 °C for up to 60 days on a quartz-monzodiorite and pure water that bridge the gap between powder experiments and complex natural systems. The effect of reactive surface area was modelled by using bulk-rock powders, intact, and thermally cracked rock cubes. Fluid composition was monitored (ICP-MS) and solid products were analysed after each experiment (SEM, EMPA). The evolution of fluid and solid compositions was compared to a self-coded geochemical transport model accounting for dissolution, nucleation, growth and reactive surface area. Experimental and modelling results indicate a fast increase of Na, Ca, K and Si in the fluid related to kinetically controlled dissolution of feldspar (plg and kfs) and quartz. Maximum concentrations of Al, Mg, and Fe are reached within two days followed by a rapid decrease induced by secondary mineral precipitation. The amount and type of secondary phases strongly depend on the host substrate indicating that local fluid composition and substrate surface are the controlling parameters. Observed reaction rates differ strongly between powder and rock cube experiments due to differences in reactive surface area. Combining kinetic data, gained by modelling the experimental results, with new information on substrate-precipitate relationship will aid large scale-transport models to realistically predict chemo-mechanical changes and fluid flow in subsurface systems.

  17. PolCat: Modelling submillimetre polarization of molecular cloud cores using successive parametrized coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzmann, E. L.; Fiege, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a software package called PolCat for modelling magnetized molecular cloud cores using submillimetre linear polarization and continuum intensity maps from thermal dust emission. Our PolCat modelling software builds a three-dimensional triaxial core model via the use of consecutive parametrized coordinate transformations, and produces simulated polarization maps to fit to observational datasets. We utilize a multi-objective evolutionary optimizer to search the parameter space to simultaneously minimize χ2 for the intensity and polarization position angle maps. The aim of this paper is to test PolCat by applying it to several artificial data sets, characterizing the capabilities and performance of the code using approximately 400 test runs. We find that PolCat is able to distinguish between polarization maps of twisted and non-twisted field geometries and identify the symmetry of the twist when one exists in the data. PolCat generally obtains the correct shapes of cores when fit to models with the correct field geometry. We characterized the degeneracy of our models due to orientation, finding that there are at least eight degenerate core orientations that produce identical polarization maps for the case of triaxial cores. The degeneracy increases with core symmetry. We expect PolCat to be a useful tool for modelling observational polarization data sets. Our tests demonstrate that the code can often eliminate incorrect field configurations, while finding a range or potential models that can explain the data. Physical considerations can often further reduce the set of allowed models, resulting in reasonable constraints on field geometry.

  18. Benchmark calculation of no-core Monte Carlo shell model in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T.; Shimizu, N.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Otsuka, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2011-05-06

    The Monte Carlo shell model is firstly applied to the calculation of the no-core shell model in light nuclei. The results are compared with those of the full configuration interaction. The agreements between them are within a few % at most.

  19. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} mouse model of core myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-04-24

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1{sup I4895T/wt} (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed.

  20. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  1. Synaptic Deficits at Neuromuscular Junctions in Two Mouse Models of Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2d

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Emily L.; Sleigh, James N.; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Pinter, Martin J.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2D (CMT2D), caused by dominant mutations in Glycl tRNA synthetase (GARS), present with progressive weakness, consistently in the hands, but often in the feet also. Electromyography shows denervation, and patients often report that early symptoms include cramps brought on by cold or exertion. Based on reported clinical observations, and studies of mouse models of CMT2D, we sought to determine whether weakened synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is an aspect of CMT2D. Quantal analysis of NMJs in two different mouse models of CMT2D (GarsP278KY, GarsC201R), found synaptic deficits that correlated with disease severity and progressed with age. Results of voltage-clamp studies revealed presynaptic defects characterized by: (1) decreased frequency of spontaneous release without any change in quantal amplitude (miniature endplate current), (2) reduced amplitude of evoked release (endplate current) and quantal content, (3) age-dependent changes in the extent of depression in response to repetitive stimulation, and (4) release failures at some NMJs with high-frequency, long-duration stimulation. Drugs that modify synaptic efficacy were tested to see whether neuromuscular performance improved. The presynaptic action of 3,4 diaminopyridine was not beneficial, whereas postsynaptic-acting physostigmine did improve performance. Smaller mutant NMJs with correspondingly fewer vesicles and partial denervation that eliminates some release sites also contribute to the reduction of release at a proportion of mutant NMJs. Together, these voltage-clamp data suggest that a number of release processes, while essentially intact, likely operate suboptimally at most NMJs of CMT2D mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have uncovered a previously unrecognized aspect of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in mouse models of CMT2D. Synaptic dysfunction contributes to impaired neuromuscular performance and disease progression. This

  2. Degradation modeling of InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, S. I.; Lumb, M. P.; Messenger, S. R.; Hoheisel, R.; Affouda, C.; Scheiman, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Lorentzen, J.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental results on triple-junction solar cells irradiated by 3 MeV proton irradiation to very high damage levels are presented. The minority carrier transport properties were obtained through quantum efficiency and EBIC measurements and an analytical drift-diffusion solver was used in understanding the results for different degradation levels where multiple damage mechanisms are evident.

  3. Primary cultures of embryonic chick lens cells as a model system to study lens gap junctions and fiber cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Linda S

    2012-07-01

    A major limitation in lens gap junction research has been the lack of experimentally tractable ex vivo systems to study the formation and regulation of fiber-type gap junctions. Although immortalized lens-derived cell lines are amenable to both gene transfection and siRNA-mediated knockdown, to our knowledge none are capable of undergoing appreciable epithelial-to-fiber differentiation. Lens central epithelial explants have the converse limitation. A key advance in the field was the development of a primary embryonic chick lens cell culture system by Drs. Sue Menko and Ross Johnson. Unlike central epithelial explants, these cultures also include cells from the peripheral (preequatorial and equatorial) epithelium, which is the most physiologically relevant population for the study of fiber-type gap junction formation. We have modified the Menko/Johnson system and refer to our cultures as dissociated cell-derived monolayer cultures (DCDMLs). We culture DCDMLs without serum to mimic the avascular lens environment and on laminin, the major matrix component of the lens capsule. Here, I review the features of the DCDML system and how we have used it to study lens gap junctions and fiber cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate the power of DCDMLs to generate new findings germane to the mammalian lens and how these cultures can be exploited to conduct experiments that would be impossible, prohibitively expensive and/or difficult to interpret using transgenic animals in vivo.

  4. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-07-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  5. Entropic interfaces in hard-core model amphiphilic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Brader, Joseph M; Schmidt, Matthias

    2005-01-15

    We investigate bulk and interfacial properties of a recently proposed hard-body model for a ternary mixture of amphiphilic particles, spheres and needles using density functional theory. The simple model amphiphiles are formed by bonding a vanishingly thin needle tail radially to a hard-sphere head group. Such particles provide a natural amphiphile when added to a binary mixture of spheres and needles. As all interactions are hard, we seek to find whether amphiphilic effects can be driven by entropy without the need to invoke attractive interactions. In order to assess the amphiphilic character of the model we first examine the spatial and orientational distribution of the amphiphiles at the free interface between demixed needle-rich and amphiphile-rich fluid phases of the binary amphiphile-needle subsystem. We then consider the free interface between sphere-rich and needle-rich phases upon adding amphiphiles with low concentration to the demixed system. In both cases the orientational distribution of the particles in the interface provides strong evidence that amphiphilic properties can arise purely from geometrical packing effects.

  6. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    SciTech Connect

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  7. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B.; Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A.; Bechta, S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  8. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  9. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  10. Atomically informed nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro model for planar core dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guisen; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Jian; Chen, Kaiguo; Shen, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of Peierls stress associated with dislocation glide is of fundamental concern in understanding and designing the plasticity and mechanical properties of crystalline materials. Here, we develop a nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro (SVPN) model by incorporating the nonlocal atomic interactions into the semi-discrete variational Peierls framework. The nonlocal kernel is simplified by limiting the nonlocal atomic interaction in the nearest neighbor region, and the nonlocal coefficient is directly computed from the dislocation core structure. Our model is capable of accurately predicting the displacement profile, and the Peierls stress, of planar-extended core dislocations in face-centered cubic structures. Our model could be extended to study more complicated planar-extended core dislocations, such as <110> {111} dislocations in Al-based and Ti-based intermetallic compounds. PMID:28252102

  11. Atomically informed nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro model for planar core dislocations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guisen; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Jian; Chen, Kaiguo; Shen, Yao

    2017-03-02

    Prediction of Peierls stress associated with dislocation glide is of fundamental concern in understanding and designing the plasticity and mechanical properties of crystalline materials. Here, we develop a nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro (SVPN) model by incorporating the nonlocal atomic interactions into the semi-discrete variational Peierls framework. The nonlocal kernel is simplified by limiting the nonlocal atomic interaction in the nearest neighbor region, and the nonlocal coefficient is directly computed from the dislocation core structure. Our model is capable of accurately predicting the displacement profile, and the Peierls stress, of planar-extended core dislocations in face-centered cubic structures. Our model could be extended to study more complicated planar-extended core dislocations, such as <110> {111} dislocations in Al-based and Ti-based intermetallic compounds.

  12. Atomically informed nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro model for planar core dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guisen; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Jian; Chen, Kaiguo; Shen, Yao

    2017-03-01

    Prediction of Peierls stress associated with dislocation glide is of fundamental concern in understanding and designing the plasticity and mechanical properties of crystalline materials. Here, we develop a nonlocal semi-discrete variational Peierls-Nabarro (SVPN) model by incorporating the nonlocal atomic interactions into the semi-discrete variational Peierls framework. The nonlocal kernel is simplified by limiting the nonlocal atomic interaction in the nearest neighbor region, and the nonlocal coefficient is directly computed from the dislocation core structure. Our model is capable of accurately predicting the displacement profile, and the Peierls stress, of planar-extended core dislocations in face-centered cubic structures. Our model could be extended to study more complicated planar-extended core dislocations, such as <110> {111} dislocations in Al-based and Ti-based intermetallic compounds.

  13. Dressed fluxon in a Josephson window junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Jean Guy; Flytzanis, Nikos; Devoret, Michel

    1994-09-01

    The static fluxon solutions of a Josephson window junction have been studied numerically. We show that the effect of the idle region surrounding the junction is to ``dress'' the fluxon causing its energy to increase. This effect can be predicted accurately by a simple model.

  14. The Accuracy of the ABAQUS FE Numerical Modeling for Sandwich Beams with Foam Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakaliatakis, G. E.; Karavagelas, N.

    2009-08-01

    The foam of the sandwich core is a compressible material and in ABAQUS FEA is modelled using the crushable foam model. There are crushable foam models with volumetric hardening and with isotropic hardening in ABAQUS standard analysis and the same models for the ABAQUS explicit analysis, for isotropic compressible materials. Also, the Hill's plasticity model for general anisotropic incompressible solids, is available in ABAQUS. All the above modelling cases were performed for sandwich beams with composite faces and PVC foam cores. The specimens were subjected to three-point bending, under quasi-static loading, using the experimental load-deflection curves to compare with ABAQUS FEA predictions. The best modelling case is suggested.

  15. Motor deficit in a tauopathy model is induced by disturbances of axonal transport leading to dying-back degeneration and denervation of neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Van Hees, Laura; Suain, Valérie; Yilmaz, Zehra; Poncelet, Luc; Leroy, Karelle; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by both cognitive and motor deficits associated with accumulation of tau aggregates in brain, brainstem, and spinal cord. The Tg30 murine tauopathy model expresses a human tau protein bearing two frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 pathogenic mutations and develops a severe motor deficit and tau aggregates in brain and spinal cord. To investigate the origin of this motor deficit, we analyzed the age-dependent innervation status of the neuromuscular junctions and mutant tau expression in Tg30 mice. The human transgenic tau was detected from postnatal day 7 onward in motoneurons, axons in the sciatic nerve, and axon terminals of the neuromuscular junctions. The development and maturation of neuromuscular junctions were not disrupted in Tg30 mice, but their maintenance was disturbed in adult Tg30 mice, resulting in a progressive and severe muscle denervation. This muscle denervation was associated with early electrophysiological signs of muscle spontaneous activities and histological signs of muscle degeneration. Early loss of synaptic vesicles in axon terminals preceding motor deficits, accumulation of Gallyas-positive aggregates, and cathepsin-positive vesicular clusters in axons in the sciatic nerve suggest that this denervation results from disturbances of axonal transport. This physiopathological mechanism might be responsible for motor signs observed in some human tauopathies, and for synaptic dysfunction resulting from alterations at the presynaptic level in these diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  17. The spectral element dynamical core in the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    2013-11-01

    I will describe our work developing CAM-SE, a highly scalable version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). CAM-SE solves the hydrostatic equations with a spectral element horizontal descritization and the hybrid coordinate Simmons & Burridge (1981) vertical discretization. It uses a mimetic formulation of spectral elements which preserves the adjoint and annihilator properties of the divergence, gradient and curl operations. These mimetic properties result in local conservation (to machine precision) of mass, tracer mass and (2D) potential vorticity, and semi-discrete conservation (exact with exact time-discretization) of total energy. Hyper-viscsoity is used for all numerical dissipation. The spectral element method naturally supports unstructured/variable resolution grids. We are using this capability to perform simulations with 1/8 degree resolution over the central U.S., transitioning to 1 degree over most of the globe. This is a numerically efficient way to study the resolution sensitivity of CAM's many subgrid parameterizations.

  18. On the joint inversion of geophysical data for models of the coupled core-mantle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1991-01-01

    Joint inversion of magnetic, earth rotation, geoid, and seismic data for a unified model of the coupled core-mantle system is proposed and shown to be possible. A sample objective function is offered and simplified by targeting results from independent inversions and summary travel time residuals instead of original observations. These data are parameterized in terms of a very simple, closed model of the topographically coupled core-mantle system. Minimization of the simplified objective function leads to a nonlinear inverse problem; an iterative method for solution is presented. Parameterization and method are emphasized; numerical results are not presented.

  19. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K; Sung, Yixing; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Xu, Yiban; Cao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  20. A semi-analytic dynamical friction model that reproduces core stalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petts, J. A.; Gualandris, A.; Read, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for dynamical friction based on Chandrasekhar's formalism. The key novelty is the introduction of physically motivated, radially varying, maximum and minimum impact parameters. With these, our model gives an excellent match to full N-body simulations for isotropic background density distributions, both cuspy and shallow, without any fine tuning of the model parameters. In particular, we are able to reproduce the dramatic core-stalling effect that occurs in shallow/constant-density cores, for the first time. This gives us new physical insight into the core-stalling phenomenon. We show that core stalling occurs in the limit in which the product of the Coulomb logarithm and the local fraction of stars with velocity lower than the infalling body tends to zero. For cuspy backgrounds, this occurs when the infalling mass approaches the enclosed background mass. For cored backgrounds, it occurs at larger distances from the centre, due to a combination of a rapidly increasing minimum impact parameter and a lack of slow moving stars in the core. This demonstrates that the physics of core stalling is likely the same for both massive infalling objects and low-mass objects moving in shallow-density backgrounds. We implement our prescription for dynamical friction in the direct summation code NBODY6 as an analytic correction for stars that remain within the Roche volume of the infalling object. This approach is computationally efficient, since only stars in the inspiralling system need to be evolved with direct summation. Our method can be applied to study a variety of astrophysical systems, including young star clusters orbiting near the Galactic Centre; globular clusters moving within the Galaxy; and dwarf galaxies orbiting within dark matter haloes.

  1. Investigation of approximations in thermal-hydraulic modeling of core conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Patrick L.; Hanan, Nelson A.

    2008-07-15

    Neutronics analyses for core conversions are usually fairly detailed, for example representing all 4 flats and all 4 corners of all 6 tubes of all 20 IRT-3M or -4M fuel assemblies in the core of the VVR-SM reactor in Uzbekistan. The coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analysis for safety analysis transients is usually less detailed, for example modeling only a hot and an average fuel plate and the associated coolant. Several of the approximations have been studied using the RELAP5 and PARET computer codes in order to provide assurance that the lack of full detail is not important to the safety analysis. Two specific cases studied are (1) representation of a core of same- type fuel assemblies by a hot and an average assembly each having multiple channels as well as by merely a hot and average channel and (2) modeling a core containing multiple fuel types as the sum of fractional core models for each fuel type. (author)

  2. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  3. Endophenotype Network Models: Common Core of Complex Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Menche, Jörg; Chasman, Daniel I.; Giulianini, Franco; Wang, Ruisheng; Ricchiuto, Piero; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Müller, Christian; Zeller, Tania; Sharma, Amitabh; Wild, Philipp; Lackner, Karl; Singh, Sasha; Ridker, Paul M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Barabási, Albert-László; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Historically, human diseases have been differentiated and categorized based on the organ system in which they primarily manifest. Recently, an alternative view is emerging that emphasizes that different diseases often have common underlying mechanisms and shared intermediate pathophenotypes, or endo(pheno)types. Within this framework, a specific disease’s expression is a consequence of the interplay between the relevant endophenotypes and their local, organ-based environment. Important examples of such endophenotypes are inflammation, fibrosis, and thrombosis and their essential roles in many developing diseases. In this study, we construct endophenotype network models and explore their relation to different diseases in general and to cardiovascular diseases in particular. We identify the local neighborhoods (module) within the interconnected map of molecular components, i.e., the subnetworks of the human interactome that represent the inflammasome, thrombosome, and fibrosome. We find that these neighborhoods are highly overlapping and significantly enriched with disease-associated genes. In particular they are also enriched with differentially expressed genes linked to cardiovascular disease (risk). Finally, using proteomic data, we explore how macrophage activation contributes to our understanding of inflammatory processes and responses. The results of our analysis show that inflammatory responses initiate from within the cross-talk of the three identified endophenotypic modules.

  4. A rare nucleotide base tautomer in the structure of an asymmetric DNA junction.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Patricia; Ho, P Shing

    2009-08-25

    The single-crystal structure of a DNA Holliday junction assembled from four unique sequences shows a structure that conforms to the general features of models derived from similar constructs in solution. The structure is a compact stacked-X form junction with two sets of stacked B-DNA-type arms that coaxially stack to form semicontinuous duplexes interrupted only by the crossing of the junction. These semicontinuous helices are related by a right-handed rotation angle of 56.5 degrees, which is nearly identical to the 60 degree angle in the solution model but differs from the more shallow value of approximately 40 degrees for previous crystal structures of symmetric junctions that self-assemble from single identical inverted-repeat sequences. This supports the model in which the unique set of intramolecular interactions at the trinucleotide core of the crossing strands, which are not present in the current asymmetric junction, affects both the stability and geometry of the symmetric junctions. An unexpected result, however, is that a highly wobbled A.T base pair, which is ascribed here to a rare enol tautomer form of the thymine, was observed at the end of a CCCC/GGGG sequence within the stacked B-DNA arms of this 1.9 A resolution structure. We suggest that the junction itself is not responsible for this unusual conformation but served as a vehicle for the study of this CG-rich sequence as a B-DNA duplex, mimicking the form that would be present in a replication complex. The existence of this unusual base lends credence to and defines a sequence context for the "rare tautomer hypothesis" as a mechanism for inducing transition mutations during DNA replication.

  5. Contribution to modeling of the reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core using PRELUDE experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G.; Quintard, M.; Fleurot, J.

    2012-07-01

    In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ significantly from original rod-bundle geometry. Any attempt to inject water after significant core degradation can lead to further fragmentation of core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods may result in the formation of a 'debris bed'. The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), i.e., a high permeability porous medium. The French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' is developing experimental programs (PEARL and PRELUDE) and simulation tools (ICARE-CATHARE and ASTEC) to study and optimize the severe accident management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of in-vessel core degradation. It is shown that the quench front exhibits either a ID behaviour or a 2D one, depending on injection rate or bed characteristics. The PRELUDE experiment covers a rather large range of variation of parameters, for which the developed model appears to be quite predictive. (authors)

  6. Porphyrin-Cored Polymer Nanoparticles: Macromolecular Models for Heme Iron Coordination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kyle J; Hanlon, Ashley M; Lyon, Christopher K; Cole, Justin P; Tuten, Bryan T; Tooley, Christian A; Berda, Erik B; Pazicni, Samuel

    2016-10-03

    Porphyrin-cored polymer nanoparticles (PCPNs) were synthesized and characterized to investigate their utility as heme protein models. Created using collapsible heme-centered star polymers containing photodimerizable anthracene units, these systems afford model heme cofactors buried within hydrophobic, macromolecular environments. Spectroscopic interrogations demonstrate that PCPNs display redox and ligand-binding reactivity similar to that of native systems and thus are potential candidates for modeling biological heme iron coordination.

  7. A model for enhancing Internet medical document retrieval with "medical core metadata".

    PubMed

    Malet, G; Munoz, F; Appleyard, R; Hersh, W

    1999-01-01

    Finding documents on the World Wide Web relevant to a specific medical information need can be difficult. The goal of this work is to define a set of document content description tags, or metadata encodings, that can be used to promote disciplined search access to Internet medical documents. The authors based their approach on a proposed metadata standard, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which has recently been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force. Their model also incorporates the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary and MEDLINE-type content descriptions. The model defines a medical core metadata set that can be used to describe the metadata for a wide variety of Internet documents. The authors propose that their medical core metadata set be used to assign metadata to medical documents to facilitate document retrieval by Internet search engines.

  8. Comparing Jupiter interior structure models to Juno gravity measurements and the role of a dilute core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, S. M.; Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.; Guillot, T.; Miguel, Y.; Movshovitz, N.; Kaspi, Y.; Helled, R.; Reese, D.; Galanti, E.; Levin, S.; Connerney, J. E.; Bolton, S. J.

    2017-05-01

    The Juno spacecraft has measured Jupiter's low-order, even gravitational moments, J2-J8, to an unprecedented precision, providing important constraints on the density profile and core mass of the planet. Here we report on a selection of interior models based on ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures. We demonstrate that a dilute core, expanded to a significant fraction of the planet's radius, is helpful in reconciling the calculated Jn with Juno's observations. Although model predictions are strongly affected by the chosen equation of state, the prediction of an enrichment of Z in the deep, metallic envelope over that in the shallow, molecular envelope holds. We estimate Jupiter's core to contain a 7-25 Earth mass of heavy elements. We discuss the current difficulties in reconciling measured Jn with the equations of state and with theory for formation and evolution of the planet.

  9. Solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model fluid.

    PubMed

    Mausbach, Peter; Ahmed, Alauddin; Sadus, Richard J

    2009-11-14

    The solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model are determined using the GWTS [J. Ge, G.-W. Wu, B. D. Todd, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11017 (2003)] algorithm, which combines equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first reported use of the GWTS algorithm for a fluid system displaying a reentrant melting scenario. Using the GWTS algorithm, the phase envelope of the Gaussian core model can be calculated more precisely than previously possible. The results for the low-density and the high-density (reentrant melting) sides of the solid state are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in conjunction with calculations of the solid free energies. The common point on the Gaussian core envelope, where equal-density solid and liquid phases are in coexistence, could be determined with high precision.

  10. A low resolution model for the chromatin core particle by neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Suau, Pedro; Kneale, G.Geoff; Braddock, Gordon W.; Baldwin, John P.; Bradbury, E.Morton

    1977-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies have been applied to chromatin core particles in solution, using the contrast variation technique. On the basis of the contrast dependance of the radius of gyration and the radial distribution function it is shown that the core particle consists of a core containing most of the histone around which is wound the DNA helix,following a path with a mean radius of 4.5 nm,in association with a small proportion of the histones. Separation of the shape from the internal structure, followed by model calculations shows that the overall shape of the particle is that of a flat cylinder with dimensions ca. 11×11×6 nm. Further details of the precise folding of the DNA cannot be deduced from the data, but detailed model calculations support concurrent results from crystallographic studies25. Images PMID:593885

  11. A Model for Enhancing Internet Medical Document Retrieval with “Medical Core Metadata”

    PubMed Central

    Malet, Gary; Munoz, Felix; Appleyard, Richard; Hersh, William

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Finding documents on the World Wide Web relevant to a specific medical information need can be difficult. The goal of this work is to define a set of document content description tags, or metadata encodings, that can be used to promote disciplined search access to Internet medical documents. Design: The authors based their approach on a proposed metadata standard, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which has recently been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force. Their model also incorporates the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary and Medline-type content descriptions. Results: The model defines a medical core metadata set that can be used to describe the metadata for a wide variety of Internet documents. Conclusions: The authors propose that their medical core metadata set be used to assign metadata to medical documents to facilitate document retrieval by Internet search engines. PMID:10094069

  12. Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model''

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  13. A dissolution model that accounts for coverage of mineral surfaces by precipitation in core floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Janne; Jettestuen, Espen; Madland, Merete V.; Hildebrand-Habel, Tania; Korsnes, Reidar I.; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a model for evolution of reactive surface area of minerals due to surface coverage by precipitating minerals. The model is used to interpret results from an experiment where a chalk core was flooded with MgCl2 for 1072 days, giving rise to calcite dissolution and magnesite precipitation. The model successfully describes both the long-term behavior of the measured effluent concentrations and the more or less homogeneous distribution of magnesite found in the core after 1072 days. The model also predicts that precipitating magnesite minerals form as larger crystals or aggregates of smaller size crystals, and not as thin flakes or as a monomolecular layer. Using rate constants obtained from literature gave numerical effluent concentrations that diverged from observed values only after a few days of flooding. To match the simulations to the experimental data after approximately 1 year of flooding, a rate constant that is four orders of magnitude lower than reported by powder experiments had to be used. We argue that a static rate constant is not sufficient to describe a chalk core flooding experiment lasting for nearly 3 years. The model is a necessary extension of standard rate equations in order to describe long term core flooding experiments where there is a large degree of textural alteration.

  14. A stochastic four-state model of contingent gating of gap junction channels containing two "fast" gates sensitive to transjunctional voltage.

    PubMed

    Paulauskas, Nerijus; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2009-05-20

    Connexins, a family of membrane proteins, form gap junction (GJ) channels that provide a direct pathway for electrical and metabolic signaling between cells. We developed a stochastic four-state model describing gating properties of homotypic and heterotypic GJ channels each composed of two hemichannels (connexons). GJ channel contain two "fast" gates (one per hemichannel) oriented opposite in respect to applied transjunctional voltage (V(j)). The model uses a formal scheme of peace-linear aggregate and accounts for voltage distribution inside the pore of the channel depending on the state, unitary conductances and gating properties of each hemichannel. We assume that each hemichannel can be in the open state with conductance gamma(h,o) and in the residual state with conductance gamma(h,res), and that both gamma(h,o) and gamma(h,res) rectifies. Gates can exhibit the same or different gating polarities. Gating of each hemichannel is determined by the fraction of V(j) that falls across the hemichannel, and takes into account contingent gating when gating of one hemichannel depends on the state of apposed hemichannel. At the single-channel level, the model revealed the relationship between unitary conductances of hemichannels and GJ channels and how this relationship is affected by gamma(h,o) and gamma(h,res) rectification. Simulation of junctions containing up to several thousands of homotypic or heterotypic GJs has been used to reproduce experimentally measured macroscopic junctional current and V(j)-dependent gating of GJs formed from different connexin isoforms. V(j)-gating was simulated by imitating several frequently used experimental protocols: 1), consecutive V(j) steps rising in amplitude, 2), slowly rising V(j) ramps, and 3), series of V(j) steps of high frequency. The model was used to predict V(j)-gating of heterotypic GJs from characteristics of corresponding homotypic channels. The model allowed us to identify the parameters of V(j)-gates under which

  15. Use of Z310 Cells as an In Vitro Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Model: Tight Junction Proteins and Transport Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Li, G. Jane; Wang, Shunzhen; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Immortalized rat choroidal epithelial Z310 cells have the potential to become an in vitro model for studying transport of materials at blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) (Shi and Zheng, Brain Research 1057:37-48, 2005). This study was designed to demonstrate the presence of tight junction properties in Z310 cells and the functionality of Z310 monolayer in transport of selected model compounds. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of claudin-1, ZO-1, and occludin in Z310 cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed a “tight junction” type of structure in the sub-apical lateral membranes between adjacent Z310 cells. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that Z310 cells expressed representative transporters such as DMT1, MTP1, TfR, p-glycoprotein, ATP7A, ZnT1, ABCC1, Oat3, OCT1 and OB-Ra. Moreover, Z310 cells cultured in a two-chamber Transwell device possessed the ability to transport zidovudine (anionic drug), thyroxine (hormone), thymidine (nucleoside), and leptin (large polypeptide) with kinetic properties similar to those obtained from the in vitro model based on primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells. Taken together, these data indicate that the Z310 BCB model expresses major tight junction proteins and forms a tight barrier in vitro. The model also exhibits the ability to transport substances of various categories across the barrier. PMID:17825520

  16. Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies. This paper is a report of a study to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale for baccalaureate nursing students. Baccalaureate nursing students receive basic nursing education and continue to build competency in practice settings after graduation. Nursing students today face great challenges. Society demands analytic, critical, reflective and transformative attitudes from graduates. It also demands that institutions of higher education take the responsibility to encourage students, through academic work, to acquire knowledge and skills that meet the needs of the modern workplace, which favours highly skilled and qualified workers. A survey of 802 senior nursing students in their last semester at college or university was conducted in Taiwan in 2007 using the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale. Half of the participants were randomly assigned either to principal components analysis with varimax rotation or confirmatory factor analysis. Principal components analysis revealed two components of core competencies that were named as humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. The initial model of confirmatory factor analysis was then converged to an acceptable solution but did not show a good fit; however, the final model of confirmatory factor analysis was converged to an acceptable solution with acceptable fit. The final model has two components, namely humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. Both components have four indicators. In addition, six indicators have their correlated measurement errors. Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale could be used to assess the core competencies of undergraduate nursing students. In addition, it should be used as a teaching guide to increase students' competencies to ensure quality patient care in hospitals.

  17. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. I. DEPENDENCE ON BASIC CORE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2011-05-20

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  18. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. I. Dependence on Basic Core Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2011-05-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  19. Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Winchester, Ben; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Cheng, X. X.; ...

    2015-08-03

    Here we employ phase-field modeling to explore the elastic properties of artificially created 1-D domain walls in (001)p-oriented BiFeO3 thin films, composed of a junction of the four polarization variants, all with the same out-of-plane polarization. It was found that these junctions exhibit peculiarly high electroelastic fields induced by the neighboring ferroelastic/ferroelectric domains. The vortex core exhibits a volume expansion, while the anti-vortex core is more compressive. We also discuss possible ways to control the electroelastic field, such as varying material constant and applying transverse electric field.

  20. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  1. Automatic Extraction of IndoorGML Core Model from OpenStreetMap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirvahabi, S. S.; Abbaspour, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Navigation has become an essential component of human life and a necessary component in many fields. Because of the increasing size and complexity of buildings, a unified data model for navigation analysis and exchange of information. IndoorGML describes an appropriate data model and XML schema of indoor spatial information that focuses on modelling indoor spaces. Collecting spatial data by professional and commercial providers often need to spend high cost and time, which is the major reason that VGI emerged. One of the most popular VGI projects is OpenStreetMap (OSM). In this paper, a new approach is proposed for the automatic generation of IndoorGML data core file from OSM data file. The output of this approach is the file of core data model that can be used alongside the navigation data model for navigation application of indoor space.

  2. Self-consistent core-pedestal transport simulations with neural network accelerated models

    DOE PAGES

    Meneghini, Orso; Smith, Sterling P.; Snyder, Philip B.; ...

    2017-07-12

    Fusion whole device modeling simulations require comprehensive models that are simultaneously physically accurate, fast, robust, and predictive. In this paper we describe the development of two neural-network (NN) based models as a means to perform a snon-linear multivariate regression of theory-based models for the core turbulent transport fluxes, and the pedestal structure. Specifically, we find that a NN-based approach can be used to consistently reproduce the results of the TGLF and EPED1 theory-based models over a broad range of plasma regimes, and with a computational speedup of several orders of magnitudes. These models are then integrated into a predictive workflowmore » that allows prediction with self-consistent core-pedestal coupling of the kinetic profiles within the last closed flux surface of the plasma. Finally, the NN paradigm is capable of breaking the speed-accuracy trade-off that is expected of traditional numerical physics models, and can provide the missing link towards self-consistent coupled core-pedestal whole device modeling simulations that are physically accurate and yet take only seconds to run.« less

  3. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect

    Theron, S. A.; Reitsma, F.

    2012-07-01

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  4. Self-consistent core-pedestal transport simulations with neural network accelerated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, O.; Smith, S. P.; Snyder, P. B.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Belli, E.; Lao, L.; Kostuk, M.; Luce, T.; Luda, T.; Park, J. M.; Poli, F.

    2017-08-01

    Fusion whole device modeling simulations require comprehensive models that are simultaneously physically accurate, fast, robust, and predictive. In this paper we describe the development of two neural-network (NN) based models as a means to perform a snon-linear multivariate regression of theory-based models for the core turbulent transport fluxes, and the pedestal structure. Specifically, we find that a NN-based approach can be used to consistently reproduce the results of the TGLF and EPED1 theory-based models over a broad range of plasma regimes, and with a computational speedup of several orders of magnitudes. These models are then integrated into a predictive workflow that allows prediction with self-consistent core-pedestal coupling of the kinetic profiles within the last closed flux surface of the plasma. The NN paradigm is capable of breaking the speed-accuracy trade-off that is expected of traditional numerical physics models, and can provide the missing link towards self-consistent coupled core-pedestal whole device modeling simulations that are physically accurate and yet take only seconds to run.

  5. Use of the shrinking core/exposure model to describe the leachability from cement stabilized wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinsenveld, M.; Bishop, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    Based on physical evidence and observation of the acid dependency of the leaching process, a shrinking core model seems to be an appropriate model for cement stabilized waste. It is argues that for cement stabilized wastes, the bulk diffusion model is likely to be in error. Recent findings will be used to support the concept of a shrinking core model. To be able to deal with varying acidities in the leachant, the concept of exposure will be introduced. The model will be derived for a flat surface to illustrate that, as in the ANS 16.1 model, a parabolic leaching behavior can be obtained. Some other characteristics of the model are indicated. It is shown that the shrinking core model, using the concept of exposure, adequately takes into account the physical observations as well as adequately correlates the leaching data for a mode specimen contaminated with lead. The findings indicate that kinetic factors may play a role in the release of metals. Their relevance for the interpretation of TCLP results is indicated.

  6. Model Core Teaching Standards: A Resource for State Dialogue. (Draft for Public Comment)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010

    2010-01-01

    With this document, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) offers for public dialogue and comment a set of model core teaching standards that outline what teachers should know and be able to do to help all students reach the goal of being college- and career-ready in today's world. These standards are an update of the 1992 Interstate…

  7. Using an Agricultural Model to Establish Core Occupational Competencies for Secondary Vocational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waidelich, William D.; Hillison, John

    A model was developed for determining critical secondary vocational occupational competencies as rated by industry representatives. The method used to generate the information was an item analysis of competencies that industry experts identified as core competencies in the Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) process. The study identified the…

  8. Can Cognitive Writing Models Inform the Design of the Common Core State Standards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, John R.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we compare the Common Core State Standards in Writing to the Hayes cognitive model of writing, adapted to describe the performance of young and developing writers. Based on the comparison, we propose the inclusion of standards for motivation, goal setting, writing strategies, and attention by writers to the text they have just…

  9. A Strong Core of Qualities--A Model of the Professional Educator that Moves beyond Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Karen; Coutts, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Consideration of the qualities of good teaching leads to a new model that emphasizes the importance of sense making to professional development. A strong core of qualities that assist teachers in using sense making includes strength, confidence, balance, ballast, and value maturity. (Contains 27 references.) (SK)