Science.gov

Sample records for core limiting conditions

  1. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE AND...

  2. Performance limitation and the role of core temperature when wearing light-weight workwear under moderate thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Philipp; Burtscher, Martin; Heinrich, Dieter; Bottoni, Giuliamarta; Caven, Barnaby; Bechtold, Thomas; Teresa Herten, Anne; Hasler, Michael; Faulhaber, Martin; Nachbauer, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to achieve an understanding about the relationship between heat stress and performance limitation when wearing a two-layerfire-resistant light-weight workwear (full-clothed ensemble) compared to an one-layer short sports gear (semi-clothed ensemble) in an exhaustive, stressful situation under moderate thermal condition (25°C). Ten well trained male subjects performed a strenuous walking protocol with both clothing ensembles until exhaustion occurred in a climatic chamber. Wearing workwear reduced the endurance performance by 10% (p=0.007) and the evaporation by 21% (p=0.003), caused a more pronounced rise in core temperature during submaximal walking (0.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.4°C; p≤0.001) and from start till exhaustion (1.4±0.3 vs. 1.8±0.5°C; p=0.008), accelerated sweat loss (13±2 vs. 15±3gmin(-1); p=0.007), and led to a significant higher heart rate at the end of cool down (103±6 vs. 111±7bpm; p=0.004). Correlation analysis revealed that core temperature development during submaximal walking and evaporation may play important roles for endurance performance. However, a critical core temperature of 40°C, which is stated to be a crucial factor for central fatigue and performance limitation, was not reached either with the semi-clothed or the full-clothed ensemble (38.3±0.4 vs. 38.4±0.5°C). Additionally, perceived exertion did not increase to a higher extent parallel with the rising core temperature with workwear which would substantiate the critical core temperature theory. In conclusion, increased heat stress led to cardiovascular exercise limitation rather than central fatigue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local...-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF...

  4. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local...-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER...

  5. Dislocation core radii near elastic stability limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies of transition metal alloys with compositions that place them near their limits of elastic stability [e.g., near the body-centered-cubic (BCC) to hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) transition] suggest interesting behavior for the dislocation cores. Specifically, the dislocation core size is predicted to diverge as the stability limit is approached. Here a simple analysis rooted in elasticity theory and the computation of ideal strength is used to analyze this divergence. This analysis indicates that dislocation core radii should diverge as the elastic limits of stability are approached in the BCC, HCP, and face-centered-cubic (FCC) structures. Moreover, external stresses and dislocation-induced stresses also increase the core radii. Density functional theory based total-energy calculations are combined with anisotropic elasticity theory to compute numerical estimates of dislocation core radii.

  6. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  7. Limits on the Core Mass of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The core is here defined as the central concentration of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium (it need not be solid and it need not be purely heavy elements and it will not have a sharp boundary). Its determination is a major goal of the Juno mission (2016-17) and it will be difficult to determine because it is expected to be only a few percent of the total mass. It has long been known that there is no prospect of determining the nature of this core (e.g., its density) from gravity measurements, even though the mass can be estimated. By consideration of simple models that are nonetheless faithful to the essential physics, it is further shown that should the core be contaminated with light elements (hydrogen and helium) then the gravity data can tell us the core mass as defined (with some caveats about the fuzziness of its boundary) but not the total mass within some small radius (which could include any light elements mixed in). This is both good and bad news: Good in that the core is thought to be diagnostic of the conditions under which the planet formed but bad in that the admixture also tells us more about both formation process and core erosion. Further, a linear perturbation theory has been developed that provides an easy approximate way of determining how errors in the equation of state (EOS) propagate into errors in the estimated core mass or envelope enrichment in heavies in models that nonetheless satisfy all observables. This theory does not require detailed models of the planet but provides an integral mapping from changes in the EOS into approximate changes in radius at fixed mass, and low degree gravity (or moment of inertia, MOI). This procedure also shows that there exist perturbations that leave the radius, mass and MOI unchanged but cause a change in J2, though in practice the non-uniqueness of structure by this consideration (~0.2% or less in MOI for example) is less than the non-uniqueness arising from likely EOS uncertainties (~1% in total

  8. Fault current limiter with shield and adjacent cores

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony; Moriconi, Franco; Hodge, Eoin Patrick

    2013-10-22

    In a fault current limiter (FCL) of a saturated core type having at least one coil wound around a high permeability material, a method of suppressing the time derivative of the fault current at the zero current point includes the following step: utilizing an electromagnetic screen or shield around the AC coil to suppress the time derivative current levels during zero current conditions.

  9. RIA Limits Based On Commercial PWR Core Response To RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Charles L.; Mitchell, David B.; Slagle, William H.

    2006-07-01

    Reactivity insertion accident (RIA) limits have been under intense review by regulators since 1993 with respect to what should be the proper limit as a function of burnup. Some national regulators have imposed new lower limits while in the United States the limits are still under review. The data being evaluated with respect to RIA limits come from specialized test reactors. However, the use of test reactor data needs to be balanced against the response of a commercial PWR core in setting reasonable limits to insure the health and safety of the public without unnecessary restrictions on core design and operation. The energy deposition limits for a RIA were set in the 1970's based on testing in CDC (SPERT), TREAT, PBF and NSRR test reactors. The US limits given in radially averaged enthalpy are 170 cal/gm for fuel cladding failure and 280 cal/gm for coolability. Testing conducted in the 1990's in the CABRI, NSRR and IGR test reactors have demonstrated that the cladding failure threshold is reduced with burnup, with the primary impact due to hydrogen pickup for in-reactor corrosion. Based on a review of this data very low enthalpy limits have been proposed. In reviewing proposed limits from RIL-0401(1) it was observed that much of the data used to anchor the low allowable energy deposition levels was from recent NSRR tests which do not represent commercial PWR reactor conditions. The particular characteristics of the NSRR test compared to commercial PWR reactor characteristics are: - Short pulse width: 4.5 ms vs > 8 ms; - Low temperature conditions: < 100 deg. F vs 532 deg. F. - Low pressure environment: atmospheric vs {approx} 2200 psi. A review of the historical RIA database indicates that some of the key NSRR data used to support the RIL was atypical compared to the overall RIA database. Based on this detailed review of the RIA database and the response of commercial PWR core, the following view points are proposed. - The Failure limit should reflect local fuel

  10. Conditionally Active Min-Max Limit Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay (Inventor); May, Ryan D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A conditionally active limit regulator may be used to regulate the performance of engines or other limit regulated systems. A computing system may determine whether a variable to be limited is within a predetermined range of a limit value as a first condition. The computing system may also determine whether a current rate of increase or decrease of the variable to be limited is great enough that the variable will reach the limit within a predetermined period of time with no other changes as a second condition. When both conditions are true, the computing system may activate a simulated or physical limit regulator.

  11. Effect of coring conditions on temperature rise in bone.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Wang, Xiaodu

    2017-01-01

    Coring is a surgical procedure in bone biopsy retrieval and dental/orthopaedic procedures, which may cause thermal damage to bone tissues adjacent to the coring zone. This study was performed to determine the temperature rise in bone by coring using a semi-empirical thermocouple approach. Concurrently, a custom-made dynamometer was used to measure the cutting and thrust forces during coring bovine cortical bone samples. The experimental results indicated that the cutting force, cutting speed, and depth of cut significantly affect the temperature rise in the cutting zone during coring process. In addition, acute temperature rises in the cutting zone occurred when the cutting speed exceeded threshold levels. The limited capacity of heat dissipation during coring is most likely responsible for such a sharp temperature rise with increasing cutting speed. Moreover, it was observed that the maximum size of potential thermal damage zone could reach to 3.0 mm in depth from the surface of the coring hole, assuming that thermal damage would occur when the temperature is greater than 47°C. Thus, proper cutting conditions need to be selected to avoid the potential thermal damage to bone during the coring procedures.

  12. Critical conditions for core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Uri; Balberg, Shmuel

    2012-06-22

    The explosion of a core-collapse supernova can be approximated by the breakdown of steady-state solutions for accretion onto a proto-neutron star (PNS). We analytically show that as the neutrino luminosity exceeds a critical value L(c), the neutrinosphere pressure exceeds the hydrostatic limit even for an optimal shock radius R. This yields L(c) [proportionally] M(2)T(2) (with logarithmic corrections) and R [proportionally] M/T, in agreement with numerical results, where M and T are the PNS mass and neutrino temperature, respectively. The near-critical flow can be approximated as a ballistic shell on top of an isothermal layer.

  13. Ecological limits on diversification of the Himalayan core Corvoidea.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jonathan D; Weir, Jason T; Hooper, Daniel M; Tietze, D Thomas; Martens, Jochen; Price, Trevor D

    2012-08-01

    Within regions, differences in the number of species among clades must be explained by clade age, net diversification rate, or immigration. We examine these alternatives by assessing historical causes of the low diversity of a bird parvorder in the Himalayas (the core Corvoidea, 57 species present), relative to its more species rich sister clade (the Passerida, ∼400 species present), which together comprise the oscine passerines within this region. The core Corvoidea contain ecologically diverse species spanning a large range of body sizes and elevations. Despite this diversity, on the basis of ecological, morphological, and phylogenetic information, we infer that the best explanation for the low number of species within the Himalayan core Corvoidea is one in which ecology limits diversification and/or immigration. Within the core Corvoidea, body size is correlated with elevation: large species are found at high elevations, and small species at lower elevations. This contrasts with the presence of many small-bodied species spanning all elevations in the Passerida and many large bodied species at low elevations in the other orders of birds (the nonpasserines). Cladogenetic events leading to ecological differences between species in body size and shape mostly occurred millions of years ago, and the rate of evolutionary change has declined toward the present. Elevational distributions have been evolutionarily more labile, but are also associated with ancient cladogenetic events. We suggest the core Corvoidea occupy a restricted volume of ecological space in competition with other bird species, and this has limited in situ diversification and/or immigration. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Petrophysical core characterization at supercritical geothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Raab, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing scientific interest in the exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs to increase the efficiency of geothermal power plants. The utilisation of geothermal energy requires in any case the detailed knowledge of the reservoir. In reservoir engineering, the characterisation of the geothermal system by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a common geophysical exploration and monitoring strategy. For a realistic interpretation of the field measurements it is necessary to know both, the physical properties of the rock and those of the interacting fluid at defined temperature and pressure conditions. While there have been made great effort in determine the physical and chemical properties of water above its critical point (Tcritical = 374.21° C and pcritical = 221.2 bar), the influence of fluid-rock interactions on petrophysical properties in supercritical aqueous systems is nearly unknown. At supercritical conditions the viscosity of the fluid is low, which enhances the mass transfer and diffusion-controlled chemical reactions. This may have considerable effects on the porosity and hydraulic properties of a rock. To investigate high-enthalpy fluid-rock systems, in the framework of the EU-funded project IMAGE we have built a new percolation set-up, which allows for the measurement of electrical resistivity and permeability of rock samples at controlled supercritical conditions of aqueous fluids (pore pressure = 400 bar and a temperature = 400° C). First results will be presented.

  15. Optical Limiting in Solid-Core Holey Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Stacey R.; Butler, J.; Montgomery, S.; Shirk, J.; Flom, S.; Pong, R.; Wright, B.; Tauney, T.; Rosenberg, A.; Menyuk, C.; Hu, J.

    2006-12-01

    High intensity lasers play a major role in our current technical society. Military and telecommunication systems are prone to critical damage from powerful lasers, therefore it is imperative to find ways to provide protection from these lasers. Optical limiters are devices that reduce transmission of high intensity light and can be used to protect these systems. Our goal is to develop optical limiters that are compatible with current fiber optic devices. This work focused on the optical properties of solid-core holey fibers where the fiber holes were filled with a solution that exhibited a strong nonlinear absorption. We observed optical limiting at visible wavelengths due to the interaction of the nonlinear absorber with the evanescent tails of the propagating mode. Experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations of the modal profiles of the holey fiber. Dr. Stephen Hall is the AAPT sponsor for this presentation.

  16. Properties of iron alloys under the Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, Guillaume; Andrault, Denis; Antonangeli, Daniele; Bouchet, Johann

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's core is constituted of iron and nickel alloyed with lighter elements. In view of their affinity with the metallic phase, their relative high abundance in the solar system and their moderate volatility, a list of potential light elements have been established, including sulfur, silicon and oxygen. We will review the effects of these elements on different aspects of Fe-X high pressure phase diagrams under Earth's core conditions, such as melting temperature depression, solid-liquid partitioning during crystallization, and crystalline structure of the solid phases. Once extrapolated to the inner-outer core boundary, these petrological properties can be used to constrain the Earth's core properties.

  17. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-04-11

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core.

  18. Core stability training: applications to sports conditioning programs.

    PubMed

    Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, fitness practitioners have increasingly recommended core stability exercises in sports conditioning programs. Greater core stability may benefit sports performance by providing a foundation for greater force production in the upper and lower extremities. Traditional resistance exercises have been modified to emphasize core stability. Such modifications have included performing exercises on unstable rather than stable surfaces, performing exercises while standing rather than seated, performing exercises with free weights rather than machines, and performing exercises unilaterally rather than bilaterally. Despite the popularity of core stability training, relatively little scientific research has been conducted to demonstrate the benefits for healthy athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to critically examine core stability training and other issues related to this topic to determine useful applications for sports conditioning programs. Based on the current literature, prescription of core stability exercises should vary based on the phase of training and the health status of the athlete. During preseason and in-season mesocycles, free weight exercises performed while standing on a stable surface are recommended for increases in core strength and power. Free weight exercises performed in this manner are specific to the core stability requirements of sports-related skills due to moderate levels of instability and high levels of force production. Conversely, during postseason and off-season mesocycles, Swiss ball exercises involving isometric muscle actions, small loads, and long tension times are recommended for increases in core endurance. Furthermore, balance board and stability disc exercises, performed in conjunction with plyometric exercises, are recommended to improve proprioceptive and reactive capabilities, which may reduce the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  19. Limiting conditions for decay in wood systems

    Treesearch

    Paul I. Morris; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2002-01-01

    Hygrothermal models can predict temperature and moisture conditions in wall components subjected to real weather data, but specific data and a fundamental understanding of how temperature and wood moisture content dictate the progression of decay under these conditions is required for modellers to predict consequences of decay on building performance. It is well...

  20. An integral condition for core-collapse supernova explosions

    DOE PAGES

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-01-10

    Here, we derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in CCSN theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that the shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for spherically symmetric shock expansion, vs > 0. One of the most useful one-dimensional explosion conditions is the neutrino luminosity and mass-accretion rate (more » $${L}_{\

  1. Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin under Water-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Jong Wha; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillation in water-organic mixtures has been widely studied to understand the effect of protein-solvent interactions on the fibrillation process. In this study, we monitored insulin fibrillation in formamide and its methyl derivatives (formamide, N-methyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl formamide) in the presence and absence of water. These model solvent systems mimic the cellular environment by providing denaturing conditions and a hydrophobic environment with limited water content. Thioflavin T (ThT) assay revealed that binary mixtures of water with formamide and its methyl derivatives enhanced fibrillation rates and β-sheet abundance, whereas organic solvents suppressed insulin fibrillation. We utilized solution small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the correlation between protein-solvent interactions and insulin fibrillation. SAXS experiments combined with simulated annealing of the protein indicated that the degree of denaturation of the hydrophobic core region at residues B11–B17 determines the fibrillation rate. In addition, DSC experiments suggested a crucial role of hydrophobic interactions in the fibrillation process. These results imply that an environment with limited water, which imitates a lipid membrane system, accelerates protein denaturation and the formation of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions during amyloid fibrillation. PMID:25418175

  2. Fault current limiter-predominantly resistive behavior of a BSCCO shielded-core reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, M. G.; Tobin, T. J.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.

    2000-06-30

    Tests were conducted to determine the electrical and magnetic characteristics of a superconductor shielded core reactor (SSCR). The results show that a closed-core SSCR is predominantly a resistive device and an open-core SSCR is a hybrid resistive/inductive device. The open-core SSCR appears to dissipate less than the closed-core SSCR. However, the impedance of the open-core SSCR is less than that of the closed-core SSCR. Magnetic and thermal diffusion are believed to be the mechanism that facilitates the penetration of the superconductor tube under fault conditions.

  3. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of concrete sewer pipe condition.

    PubMed

    Stanić, N; de Haan, C; Tirion, M; Langeveld, J G; Clemens, F H L R

    2013-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management. Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection by closed circuit television (CCTV) and core sampling are among the methods mostly applied to assess sewer pipe condition. This paper compares visual inspection and drill core analysis in order to enhance further understanding of the limitations and potentials of both methods. Both methods have been applied on a selected sewer reach in the city of The Hague, which was reportedly subject to pipe corrosion. Results show that both methods, visual inspection and core sampling, are associated with large uncertainties and that there is no obvious correlation between results of visual inspection and results of drill core analysis.

  4. Gravitational collapse of a rotating iron stellar core: The limiting case of transparency to neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imshennik, V. S.; Molokanov, V. O.

    2010-10-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the collapse of a rotating iron stellar core is used to determine the neutrino spectra in the limiting case of total transparency to neutrino emission (without any deposition effect). The derived spectra allow the previously constructed spectra used to theoretically estimate the number of events in the LSD underground neutrino detector from SN 1987A to be refined. At typical iron stellar core parameters, including those that characterize the core rotation specified in the initial conditions of the model, this number has turned out to be 1.6, which is close in order of magnitude to its experimental value of 5. Here, we compare in detail these results by assuming that the transparency of the collapsing iron core itself could be attributable to the development of its three-dimensional dynamical instability—the subject of future theoretical studies. The physical formulation of the problem coincides closely with the collapse model proposed in our previous paper, where the above number of events turned out to be 0.5. We have confirmed the previously published results with regard to the neutrino spectra, including the significant superiority of electron neutrinos over electron antineutrinos in them. The hydrostatically equilibrium configuration (a rotating collapsar) obtained in our model calculation is discussed in comparison with self-similar solutions that are close in physical formulation of the problem. This result seems a nontrivial consequence of the included rotation effects that hinder nonstop collapse established in the mentioned self-similar solutions.

  5. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  6. Lower limit on the heat capacity of the neutron star core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Brown, Edward F.; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Page, Dany; Reddy, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    We show that observations of the core temperature of transiently accreting neutron stars combined with observations of an accretion outburst give a lower limit to the neutron star core heat capacity. For the neutron stars in the low mass x-ray binaries KS 1731-260, MXB 1659-29, and XTE J1701-462, we show that the lower limit is a factor of a few below the core heat capacity expected if neutrons and protons in the core are paired, so that electrons provide the dominant contribution to the heat capacity. This limit rules out a core dominated by a quark color-flavor-locked phase, which would have a much lower heat capacity. Future observations of or limits on cooling during quiescence will further constrain the core heat capacity.

  7. [Value of core needle biopsy in preoperative diagnostics of soft tissue tumors: possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A

    2014-11-01

    The differential diagnosis of soft tissue swellings encompasses a variety of benign, intermediate, low-grade malignant and high-grade neoplastic lesions in addition to tumor-like reactive processes. As treatment of these heterogeneous conditions varies greatly from conservative observation and simple local excision up to extensive radical surgical resection, treatment decisions are based mainly on a precise preoperative histological diagnosis on limited biopsy material. Even for clinically unequivocal sarcomas, the importance of the preoperative histological diagnosis has been increasingly emphasized as different therapeutic regimens have been established for different sarcoma types and the indications for preoperative treatment is influenced by the tumor grade and by the entity itself. Other factors positively influencing the increasing use of core needle biopsy for preoperative tumor diagnosis in soft tissue pathology are the availability of modern high-resolution imaging modalities as well as the establishment of several new second generation immunohistochemical markers and the discovery of entity-specific translocations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in several sarcoma subtypes. In this review it will be shown that a targeted approach for processing core needle biopsies oriented towards the characteristic topographical, demographic, cytomorphological and architectural features of soft tissue lesions facilitates a precise diagnosis of soft tissue neoplasms in most cases. However, profound knowledge of the different aspects of soft tissue tumor diagnostics and familiarity with the frequent as well as the less common and rare tumor entities and variants is a prerequisite for appropriate interpretation of core needle biopsy findings and for selecting a limited but well-suited marker panel. The utilization of modern immunohistochemistry and/or FISH methods is highly useful for establishing the diagnosis of rare and unusual neoplasms in core

  8. Limitations in Life Participation and Independence Due to Secondary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The effects of secondary conditions across adults with autism, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy were explored in terms of overall limitation in life participation and independence, changes over time, and the degree and nature of limitation in specific secondary conditions. Information was obtained for 35 adults with autism, 49 with Down syndrome,…

  9. Limitations in Life Participation and Independence Due to Secondary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The effects of secondary conditions across adults with autism, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy were explored in terms of overall limitation in life participation and independence, changes over time, and the degree and nature of limitation in specific secondary conditions. Information was obtained for 35 adults with autism, 49 with Down syndrome,…

  10. Limited dissemination of the wastewater treatment plant core resistome

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Christian; Albertsen, Mads; Telke, Amar; Ellabaan, Mostafa; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. However, the contribution of the dominant members of the WWTP resistome to resistance in human pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we use a combination of metagenomic functional selections and comprehensive metagenomic sequencing to uncover the dominant genes of the WWTP resistome. We find that this core resistome is unique to the WWTP environment, with <10% of the resistance genes found outside the WWTP environment. Our data highlight that, despite an abundance of functional resistance genes within WWTPs, only few genes are found in other environments, suggesting that the overall dissemination of the WWTP resistome is comparable to that of the soil resistome. PMID:26419330

  11. Potential and limitations of marine and ice core sea ice proxies: an example from the Indian Ocean sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röthlisberger, Regine; Crosta, Xavier; Abram, Nerilie J.; Armand, Leanne; Wolff, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    Diatom assemblages in marine cores and sea salt deposition fluxes in ice cores have been used as sea ice proxies in the southern hemisphere. Here, a marine and an ice core proxy record for the Indian Ocean covering the last two glacial cycles are compared in order to illustrate their potential and limitations. The marine core was extracted in a location completely ice free under present-day conditions, and therefore was unable to record changes to the recent sea ice extent. Similarly, no sea ice was recorded at that location during the previous interglacial period. During the last glacial period, however, the site was seasonally covered by sea ice, and the diatom assemblages allowed an estimation of average seasonal sea ice presence. The ice core data originated from the East Antarctic plateau. The marine sodium present in the ice core was used as a proxy of the sea-ice coverage and, on average, a larger sea ice surface led to an increased sea-salt aerosol flux, seen e.g. at the last glacial inception. However, the response of the sea salt flux to increasing sea ice extent diminished during peak glacial conditions when only minimal variability was recorded in the ice core record. A first-order approximation is used to take this non-linear response of the ice core sea ice proxy into account. Based on the ice core proxy record, sea ice extent was reduced considerably during the warm episodes of the previous two interglacial periods compared to modern sea ice extent, in particular during the peak warmth of the Last Interglacial. The ice core proxy also showed a very strong precessional variability (pronounced spectral peak at 23 ka period) over the past 240 ka. The advantage of combining the two proxy records lies in the complementary nature of their response. While the ice core proxy showed limited sensitivity during full glacial conditions, the marine proxy recorded the seasonal sea-ice coverage. Once the sea ice retreated south of the location of the marine core

  12. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  13. An Integral Condition for Core-collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in CCSN theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that the shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for spherically symmetric shock expansion, vs > 0. One of the most useful one-dimensional explosion conditions is the neutrino luminosity and mass-accretion rate ({L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }}) critical curve. Below this curve, steady-state stalled solutions exist, but above this curve, there are no stalled solutions. Burrows & Goshy suggested that the solutions above this curve are dynamic and explosive. In this manuscript, we take one step closer to proving this supposition; we show that all steady solutions above this curve have vs > 0. Assuming that these steady vs > 0 solutions correspond to explosion, we present a new dimensionless integral condition for explosion, Ψ > 0. Ψ roughly describes the balance between pressure and gravity, and we show that this parameter is equivalent to the τ condition used to infer the {L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }} critical curve. The illuminating difference is that there is a direct relationship between Ψ and vs. Below the critical curve, Ψ may be negative, positive, and zero, which corresponds to receding, expanding, and stalled-shock solutions. At the critical curve, the minimum Ψ solution is zero; above the critical curve, Ψmin > 0, and all steady solutions have vs > 0. Using one-dimensional simulations, we confirm our primary assumptions and verify that Ψmin > 0 is a reliable and accurate explosion diagnostic.

  14. Field condition limitations for thermography of marine composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas S.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been shown to be very effective in revealing damage in glass fiber composite boat hull structure for both solid laminate and foam core construction hulls. This paper addresses some of the parameters which can impact the effectiveness of the infrared thermal approach for these applications. Effects associated with surface condition, viewing angle, field-of-view, heat source type and intensity, and other conditions are discussed. An approach to providing a simple demonstration of the particular test approach is also discussed.

  15. Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food

    PubMed Central

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F.; Santos, Laurie R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants’ domains of knowledge. PMID:19409538

  16. Core knowledge and its limits: the domain of food.

    PubMed

    Shutts, Kristin; Condry, Kirsten F; Santos, Laurie R; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2009-07-01

    Adults, preschool children, and nonhuman primates detect and categorize food objects according to substance information, conveyed primarily by color and texture. In contrast, they perceive and categorize artifacts primarily by shape and rigidity. The present experiments investigated the origins of this distinction. Using a looking time procedure, Experiment 1 extended previous findings that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) generalize learning about novel food objects by color over changes in shape. Six additional experiments then investigated whether human infants show the same signature patterns of perception and generalization. Nine-month-old infants failed to detect food objects in accord with their intrinsic properties, in contrast to rhesus monkeys tested in previous research with identical displays. Eight-month-old infants did not privilege substance information over other features when categorizing foods, even though they detected and remembered this information. Moreover, infants showed the same property generalization patterns when presented with foods and tools. The category-specific patterns of perception and categorization shown by human adults, children, and adult monkeys therefore were not found in human infants, providing evidence for limits to infants' domains of knowledge.

  17. Condition for the formation of micron-sized dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of micron-sized grains in dense cores of molecular clouds. This is motivated by the detection of mid-infrared emission from deep inside a number of dense cores, the so-called `coreshine,' which is thought to come from scattering by micron (μm)-sized grains. Based on numerical calculations of coagulation starting from the typical grain-size distribution in the diffuse interstellar medium, we obtain a conservative lower limit to the time t to form μm-sized grains: t/tff > 3(5/S)(nH/105 cm-3)-1/4 (where tff is the free-fall time at hydrogen number density nH in the core and S the enhancement factor of the grain-grain collision cross-section to account for non-compact aggregates). At the typical core density nH = 105 cm-3, it takes at least a few free-fall times to form the μm-sized grains responsible for coreshine. The implication is that those dense cores observed in coreshine are relatively long-lived entities in molecular clouds, rather than dynamically transient objects that last for one free-fall time or less.

  18. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea.

  19. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  20. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  1. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  2. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  3. Generation and Characterization of States of Matter at Solar Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The equation-of-state (EOS) of matter at solar core conditions is important to stellar evolution models and understanding the origin of high Z elements. Temperatures, densities and pressures of stellar cores are, however, orders of magnitude greater than those obtained in state-of-the-art laboratory EOS experiments and therefore such conditions have been limited to observational astronomy and theoretical models. Here we present a method to generate and diagnose these conditions in the laboratory, which is the first step towards characterizing the EOS of such extreme states of matter. By launching a converging shock wave into a deuterated plastic sphere (CD2) we produce solar core conditions (R /RSun < 0.2) which are initiated when the shock reaches the center of the CD2 sphere and extends during transit of the reflected wave until the temperature drops to a level where the neutron production and x-ray self emission drop below threshold levels of the detectors. These conditions are diagnosed by both, the neutron spectral data from D-D nuclear reactions, and temporal, spatial, and spectral x-ray emission data. We will discuss how these observables can be measured and used to help our understanding of dense plasma states that reach well into the thermonuclear regime of stellar cores. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development Grant No. 13-ERD-073.

  4. Formation Conditions of Presolar TIC Core-Graphite Mantle Spherules in the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigai, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kozasa, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    Formation of TiC and graphite grains in the gas outflows from carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is investigated to reveal the formation conditions of presolar TiC core-graphite mantle spherules extracted from the Murchison meteorite. We employ the nonequilibrium condensation theory involving chemical reactions in nucleation and grain growth to derive the formation conditions not only from the condensation sequence for realizing the core-mantle structure but also from the sizes of observed TiC cores and graphite mantles. The results of calculations show that the sizes of TiC cores constrain the mass-loss rate Ṁ and the gas outflow velocity v at the formation sites to satisfy the relation 2.5×10-3limits the C/O abundance ratio ε to less than 1.26-1.48 for Ṁ=10-6 to 10-4 Msolar yr-1. The more stringent constraint on Ṁ and v at the formation sites expressed by 2.5×10-3conditions necessary for reproducing the range of the observed sizes of TiC cores and graphite mantles simultaneously. The derived total gas pressure in the range of 2×10-3cores seem to be consistent with the picture of steady state dust-driven winds around carbon-rich AGB stars. The discrepancy between the observed and the predicted size ratios of graphite mantles to TiC cores would be closely related to the detailed formation process of graphite mantles on TiC cores.

  5. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus was the study of star-forming regions through high spectral- and spatial resolution observations of mm-wavelength lines, and through models of the observations. The main accomplishments were a) demonstration that more than 15 starless cores show substantial evidence of extended inward motion at about half the sound speed; b) observations of infall asymmetry in several cores, in lines of N2H(+) and DCO(+), low- depletion tracers of the "inner core"; c) observation of "infall asymmetry" of spectral lines over approx. 0.5 pc in the NGC1333 cluster-forming region; d) observations indicating that cores are nearly at rest with respect to their envelopes; and e) development of analytic, power-series solutions to the equations of motions for condensing 1-D systems (layers, cylinders and spheres).

  6. General neck condition for the limit shape of budding vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pan; Du, Qiang; Tu, Z. C.

    2017-04-01

    The shape equation and linking conditions for a vesicle with two phase domains are derived. We refine the conjecture on the general neck condition for the limit shape of a budding vesicle proposed by Jülicher and Lipowsky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2964 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.70.2964; Phys. Rev. E 53, 2670 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.53.2670], and then we use the shape equation and linking conditions to prove that this conjecture holds not only for axisymmetric budding vesicles, but also for asymmetric ones. Our study reveals that the mean curvature at any point on the membrane segments adjacent to the neck satisfies the general neck condition for the limit shape of a budding vesicle when the length scale of the membrane segments is much larger than the characteristic size of the neck but still much smaller than the characteristic size of the vesicle.

  7. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  8. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  9. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  10. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  11. On the entropy conditions for some flux limited diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselles, V.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we give a characterization of the notion of entropy solutions of some flux limited diffusion equations for which we can prove that the solution is a function of bounded variation in space and time. This includes the case of the so-called relativistic heat equation and some generalizations. For them we prove that the jump set consists of fronts that propagate at the speed given by Rankine-Hugoniot condition and we give on it a geometric characterization of the entropy conditions. Since entropy solutions are functions of bounded variation in space once the initial condition is, to complete the program we study the time regularity of solutions of the relativistic heat equation under some conditions on the initial datum. An analogous result holds for some other related equations without additional assumptions on the initial condition.

  12. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  13. Thermodynamic considerations and computer simulations on the formation of core-shell nanoparticles under electrochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, O A; Leiva, E P M; Mariscal, M M

    2008-06-28

    We report on thermodynamic modeling and computer simulations on the electrochemical generation of metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) by means of quenched molecular dynamics (QMD). The present results suggest that the spontaneous formation of core-shell NPs depends on several factors, i.e. size and shape of the core, chemical composition of the system, and under-/oversaturation conditions. Homo- and heteroatomic prototypical systems were considered. The former systems were Au and Pt. The latter were Ag(core)/Au(shell), Pt(core)/Au(shell), Au(core)/Ag(shell) and Au(core)/Pt(shell).

  14. Crosstalk analysis in homogeneous multi-core two-mode fiber under bent condition.

    PubMed

    Chang, J H; Choi, H G; Bae, S H; Sim, D H; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Y C

    2015-04-20

    We analyze the inter-core crosstalk in homogeneous multi-core two-mode fibers (MC-TMFs) under bent condition by using the coupled-mode equations. In particular, we investigate the effects of the intra-core mode coupling on the inter-core crosstalk for two different types of MC-TMFs at various bending radii. The results show that the inter-core homo-mode crosstalk of LP(11) mode is dominant under the gentle fiber bending condition due to its large effective area. However, as the fiber bending becomes tight, the intra-core mode coupling is significantly enhanced and consequently makes all the inter-core crosstalk levels comparable to each other regardless of the mode. A similar tendency is observed at a reduced bending radius when the difference in the propagation constants between modes is large and core pitch is small.

  15. Core-halo limit and internal dynamics of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Valette, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pichoff, N.; Uriot, D.

    2015-08-15

    The dynamics of high-intensity beams largely depends on their internal space charge forces. These forces are responsible of non-linear coupling, emittance growth, and halo generation. They contribute to shape the beam density profile. As a consequence, an analysis of this profile can be a precious indicator capable of revealing the internal dynamics of the beam. This paper recalls the precise core-halo limit determination proposed earlier, then studies its behavior through a wide range of beam profiles, and finally shows its relevance as an indicator of the limit separating the two space charge field regimes of the core and the halo.

  16. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice... hospice or under arrangements made by the hospice as specified in § 418.100. These services must...

  17. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice must ensure that the services described in § 418.72 through § 418.78 are...

  18. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice must ensure that the services described in § 418.72 through § 418.78 are...

  19. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice... hospice or under arrangements made by the hospice as specified in § 418.100. These services must...

  20. 42 CFR 418.70 - Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.70 Condition of participation: Furnishing of non-core services. A hospice must ensure that the services described in § 418.72 through § 418.78 are...

  1. Flammability Limits of Gases Under Low Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this combustion science investigation is to determine the effect of zero, fractional, and super gravity on the flammability limits of a premixed methane air flame in a standard 51 mm diameter flammability tube and to determine, if possible, the fluid flow associated with flame passage under zero-g conditions and the density (and hence, temperature) profiles associated with the flame under conditions of incipient extinction. This is accomplished by constructing an appropriate apparatus for placement in NASA's Lewis Research Center Lear Jet facility and flying the prescribed g-trajectories while the experiment is being performed. Data is recorded photographically using the visible light of the flame. The data acquired is: (1) the shape and propagation velocity of the flame under various g-conditions for methane compositions that are inside the flammable limits, and (2) the effect of gravity on the limits. Real time accelerometer readings for the three orthogonal directions are displayed in full view of the cameras and the framing rate of the cameras is used to measure velocities.

  2. Measurements of Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Iron Under Earth's Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Yagi, T.; Hirose, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Secular cooling of the Earth's core induces the convection of the conductive liquid outer core, which generates the geomagnetic field, and the growth of the solid inner core. Since iron is the primary component of the Earth's core, the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron in both solid and liquid states are key pieces of information for estimating the transport properties of the core. We performed electrical and thermal conductivity measurements on iron under core conditions in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our electrical conductivity measurements on iron clearly show resistivity saturation phenomena in iron under high pressure and high temperature conditions as predicted in a recent laboratory-based model for the core conductivity (Gomi et al., 2013). Direct measurements of thermal diffusivity of iron have been also preformed at high pressures by using the pulsed light heating thermoreflectance technique, which enable us to confirm the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law toward transition metal under high pressure.

  3. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  4. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy (≲0.4 kB nucleon-1) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy (≳6 kB nucleon-1) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy (˜4 × 1050 erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  5. Equation of State of Fe3S and Limits on the Sulfur Content of Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Mattillion, A.; Bausch, H.; Tecklenburg, S.; Fischer, R. A.; Chidester, B.; Prakapenka, V.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfur is a common component of protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites, and it is likely to be a significant alloying component with iron in Earth's core as well, along with silicon, oxygen, and perhaps other light elements. Cosmochemical limits on the sulfur content of Earth's core, based on the relative volatilities of sulfur and other elements, are weakened by the observation that this approach fails to accurately predict the sulfur content in iron meteorite parent bodies. To better understand the geophysical consequences of sulfur addition to Earth's core, we report equation of state measurements of Fe3S to pressures and temperatures exceeding 140 GPa and 2000 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. New room temperature measurements are also reported, improved by the use of a neon pressure medium. With this P-V-T equation of state for Fe3S, along with an assumed 2% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, the PREM density in the outer core can be matched with 14 wt% sulfur, which should be considered an upper bound because of the likely additional presence of other light elements.

  6. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%.

  7. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  8. Hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1995-01-01

    The main results of the grant were (1) finishing the manuscript of a proof of completeness of the Poincare modes in an incompressible nonviscous fluid corotating with a rigid ellipsoidal boundary, (2) partial completion of a manuscript describing a definition of helicity that resolved questions in the literature about calculating the helicities of vector fields with complicated topologies, and (3) the beginning of a reexamination of the inverse problem of inferring properties of the geomagnetic field B just outside the core-mantle boundary (CMB) from measurements of elements of B at and above the earth's surface. This last work has led to a simple general formalism for linear and nonlinear inverse problems that appears to include all the inversion schemes so far considered for the uniqueness problem in geomagnetic inversion. The technique suggests some new methods for error estimation that form part of this report.

  9. Paediatric life-limiting conditions: coping and adjustment in siblings.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Cathy; Hugh-Jones, Siobhan; Aldridge, Jan

    2013-06-01

    A total of 31 siblings, aged between 5 and 16 years, of children with a life-limiting condition, participated in a longitudinal, mixed method study. Data collection included standardised psychometric measures and visual and participatory qualitative methods. Emotional functioning and perceptions of self-worth were normative on standardised measures. Qualitative data indicated distinct psychosocial strategies that appeared to underpin functioning, positioning themselves as adults within the family, adopting a role of 'social glue' in key relationships and thereby diminishing their own needs, and compartmentalising home and school life. Some strategies appeared adaptive in the short term but may be limiting in the longer term. The implications for professionals working to support families are discussed.

  10. An analysis of the proposed MITR-III core to establish thermal-hydraulic limits at 10 MW. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.; Meyer, J.E.; Henry, A.F.

    1997-06-01

    The 5 MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) is expected to operate under a new license beginning in 1999. Among the options being considered is an upgrade in the heat removal system to allow operation at 10 MW. The purpose of this study is to predict the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits for the upgraded reactor (MITR-III). The MITR Multi-Channel Analysis Code was written to analyze the response of the MITR system to a series of anticipated transients in order to determine the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits under various operating conditions. The MIT Multi-Channel Analysis Code models the primary and secondary systems, with special emphasis placed on analyzing the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the core. The code models each MITR fuel element explicitly in order to predict the behavior of the system during flow instabilities. The results of the code are compared to experimental data from MITR-II and other sources. New definitions are suggested for the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits. MITR Limit Diagrams are included for three different heat removal system configurations. It is concluded that safe, year-round operating at 10 MW is possible, given that the primary and secondary flow rates are both increased by approximately 40%.

  11. THE STRUCTURE OF GAS-ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS AND THE CONDITION OF THE CRITICAL CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N {<=} 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  12. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. USE OF SEDIMENT CORES TO ESTABLISH REFERENCE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the degree to which integrity of waterbodies have been degraded, comparisons are made to "reference" conditions. Finding systems with similar ecological components, but absent the specific stressors of concern, may often be difficult or even impossible. An alt...

  14. USE OF SEDIMENT CORES TO ESTABLISH REFERENCE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the degree to which integrity of waterbodies have been degraded, comparisons are made to "reference" conditions. Finding systems with similar ecological components, but absent the specific stressors of concern, may often be difficult or even impossible. An alt...

  15. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  16. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant in the past year we have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas. In this area, our results include (1) in 67 starless dense cores, some 19 show clear evidence of spatially extended inward motions, with typical line-of-sight inward speed 0.05-0.09 km s(sup -1) and with typical plane-of-the-sky extent 0.1-0.3 pc, (2) In some 40 nearby regions with embedded groups and clusters, we see extended infall asymmetry in lines of CS and HCO(+) clearly in 4 regions and less clearly in 4 others, (3) Using finer resolution (15 arcsec or 0.01-0.02 pc) and lines tracing higher density, we see spatial concentration of infall asymmetry near the protostars in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and B, L483, and L1251B, and with still finer resolution (2 arcsec or 0.003 pc or 600 AU) we detect inverse P Cyg profiles, indicating absorption of continuum emission from the protostellar envelope by infalling gas in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and 4B. Further, at high resolution we identify regions of stellar mass and low turbulence ("kernels") which are good candidates to become the next generation of stars in embedded clusters. In addition we have completed a survey for the OH Zeeman effect in absorption against nearby H II regions, indicating that the large-scale magnetic field may be nearly critical if it typically threads a flattened structure. We have also developed a model of spatially extended infall motions based on dissipation of turbulence in a magnetized, selfgravitating layer. In the following we describe some of these results in more detail.

  17. Pushing the Limits of Geochemical Tephra Analysis from Ice Core Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, S.; Kurbatov, A.; Dunbar, N.; Yates, M. G.; Iverson, N. A.; Griessbach, S.; Self, S.

    2016-12-01

    Analyzing ice cores offers a unique insight to paleoclimate studies. When the ice core is correctly dated, paleoclimate proxies can provide invaluable information about past climate shifts, perturbations or interactions of various climate forcers. In addition to other dating methods, it is common to use volcanic sulfate signals as independent time markers to which the ice core timescale is forced. Furthermore, compared to other depositional settings, ice cores preserve very fine volcanic ejecta without post-depositional alterations. However, recent studies have shown temporal disconnects between volcanic sulfate and tephra deposition from the same volcanic eruption. In a number of ice cores, some sequences show a lack of a sulfate aerosols signal where a layer of volcanic ash is present. Because of sample preparation and mounting limitations, only the geochemical composition of ash particles >25 microns were used in source volcano identification in the past. It resulted in very limited identification of particles from large, climatically significant but remote volcanic eruptions. In order to improve our understanding of paleoclimate records, the refinement of the current Antarctica tephrochronology framework (AntT) is necessary. By improving existing sample preparation methods with new techniques, we effectively captured over 99% of suspended particles >2 microns. The new mounting technique also ensures flexibility for analysis, using scanning electron microscopy - electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) or electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Using this new methodology, guided by developed volcano-chemical time series, ultra fine volcanic ash samples in different ice cores were prepared and analyzed. We found that in addition to major tropical eruptions, small, high-latitude eruptions could be an additional source of volcanic products in Antarctic ice cores. For example, in the interval of 1963 - 1965 C.E., (Mt. Agung eruption in Bali, Indonesia) several

  18. Current limiting behavior in three-phase transformer-type SFCLs using an iron core according to variety of fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Sun; Jung, Byung-Ik; Ha, Kyoung-Hun; Choi, Soo-Geun; Park, Hyoung-Min; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    To apply the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to the power system, the reliability of the fault-current-limiting operation must be ensured in diverse fault conditions. The SFCL must also be linked to the operation of the high-speed recloser in the power system. In this study, a three-phase transformer-type SFCL, which has a neutral line to improve the simultaneous quench characteristics of superconducting elements, was manufactured to analyze the fault-current-limiting characteristic according to the single, double, and triple line-to-ground faults. The transformer-type SFCL, wherein three-phase windings are connected to one iron core, reduced the burden on the superconducting element as the superconducting element on the sound phase was also quenched in the case of the single line-to-ground fault. In the case of double or triple line-to-ground faults, the flux from the faulted phase winding was interlinked with other faulted or sound phase windings, and the fault-current-limiting rate decreased because the windings of three phases were inductively connected by one iron core.

  19. Social Interest and the Core Conditions: Could It Be that Adler Influenced Rogers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Richard E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents primary source documentation highlighting the similarities between Alfred Adler's social interest construct and the counselor-oriented core conditions of Carl Rogers. Implications of the similarities are discussed. (Author)

  20. Social Interest and the Core Conditions: Could It Be that Adler Influenced Rogers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Richard E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents primary source documentation highlighting the similarities between Alfred Adler's social interest construct and the counselor-oriented core conditions of Carl Rogers. Implications of the similarities are discussed. (Author)

  1. Pesticides water decontamination in oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicoleta Alina; Ferrari, Federico; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Merli, Annalisa; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a laboratory bioreactor, with a functioning principle similar with that of biobed systems but working in oxygen-limited conditions, suitable for decontaminating wastewater mixtures with pesticides. The system is composed by two cylindrical plastic containers. The first one, where the pesticides solution is collected, is open, whereas the second one, where the biomass is disposed, is closed. The pesticides solution was pumped at the biomass surface and subsequently recollected and disposed in the first container. Four pesticides with different physical-chemical characteristics were tested. The results obtained showed a relatively good capacity of the developed prototype to decontaminate waste water containing the mixture of pesticides. The time of the experiment, the number of cycles that the solution made in the system and the environmental temperature have a significantly influence for the decontamination of acetochlor and chlorpyrifos whereas for the decontamination of terbuthylazine and metalaxyl no significant influence was observed. Even if the present prototype could represent a valid solution to manage the water pesticides residues in a farm and to increase the confidence of bystanders and residents, the practical difficulties when replacing the biomass could represent a limit of the system.

  2. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  3. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-02

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  4. First-wall and limiter conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.H.

    1984-10-01

    A progress report on the experimental studies of vacuum vessel conditioning during the first year of TFTR operation is presented. A previous paper described the efforts expended to condition the TFTR vessel prior to and during the initial plasma start-up experiments. During the start-up phase, discharge cleaning was performed with the vessel at room temperature. For the second phase of TFTR operations, which was directed towards the optimization of ohmically heated plasmas, the vacuum vessel could be heated to 150/sup 0/C. The internal configuration of the TFTR vessel was more complex during the second phase with the addition of a TiC/C moveable limiter array, Inconel bellows cover plates, and ZrAl getter pumps. A quantitative comparison is given on the effectiveness of vessel bakeout, glow discharge cleaning, and pulse discharge cleaning in terms of the total quantity of removed carbon and oxygen, residual gas base pressures and the resulting plasma impurity levels as measured by visible, uv, and soft x-ray spectroscopy. The initial experience with hydrogen isotope changeover in TFTR is presented including the results of the attempt to hasten the changeover time by using a glow discharge to precondition the vessel with the new isotope.

  5. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  6. Thermodynamic evaluation of the solidification phase of molten core-concrete under estimated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Ogino, Hideki; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    The solidification phases of molten core-concrete under the estimated molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) conditions in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 were predicted using the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool, FactSage 6.2, and the NUCLEA database in order to contribute toward the 1F decommissioning work and to understand the accident progression via the analytical results for the 1F MCCI products. We showed that most of the U and Zr in the molten core-concrete forms (U,Zr)O2 and (Zr,U)SiO4, and the formation of other phases with these elements is limited. However, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 requires a relatively long time because it involves a change in the crystal structure from fcc-(U,Zr)O2 to tet-(U,Zr)O2, followed by the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 by reaction with SiO2. Therefore, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 is limited under quenching conditions. Other common phases are the oxide phases, CaAl2Si2O8, SiO2, and CaSiO3, and the metallic phases of the Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys. The solidification phenomenon of the crust under quenching conditions and that of the molten pool under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the 1F MCCI progression are discussed.

  7. The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) postulated limiting event initial and building source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L F

    1992-08-01

    As part of the update of the Safety analysis Report (SAR) for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), operational limiting events under the category of inadvertent withdrawal of an experiment while at power or during a power pulse were determined to be the most limiting event(s) for this reactor. This report provides a summary of the assumptions, modeling, and results in evaluation of: Reactivity and thermal hydraulics analysis to determine the amount of fuel melt or fuel damage ratios; The reactor inventories following the limiting event; A literature review of post NUREG-0772 release fraction experiment results on severe fuel damages; Decontamination factors due to in-pool transport; and In-building transport modeling and building source term analysis.

  8. Phosphorus cycling and limitation under modified conditions that represent potential future conditions with a changing climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, K.; Paytan, A.; Field, C. B.; Lecher, A.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Peek, S.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient in terrestrial systems. It has recently been proposed to play an even greater role in ecosystems experiencing some of the many predicted effects of climate change, in particular release from nitrogen limitation. To investigate the potential for P limitation, and P cycling under various controlled conditions we participated in the ongoing Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE). For 18 years the JRGCE has been manipulating four key parameters predicted to change in the future in a Californian grassland system. Elevated Nitrogen deposition, increased precipitation, increased pCO2, and increased temperature are applied and monitored in a split plot system at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. In this study we utilize the oxygen isotopes of phosphate to investigate P cycling in soils at JRGCE in conjunction with phosphate enzyme activity and other parameters to attempt to elucidate factors influencing P limitation and cycling. A fractional soil extraction process for phosphate enables separation of several operationally defined P pools, and provides auxiliary information regarding the relative concentrations of bio-available P, and relevant minerals in this grassland system under the various conditions.

  9. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-06-01

    Methodology and procedures for the study of hydrate cores are detailed. Topics discussed are the (1) equipment and procedures for the formation and evaluation of hydrate cores in the laboratory, (2) the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates, (3) the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation, (4) conditions in the earth where hydrates can form, (5) kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, and (6) heat transfer to gas hydrates. Empirical correlations for these properties and kinetic behavior are given. 24 references, 39 figures, 10 tables.

  10. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions Note: The...

  11. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Cavallo, R M; Edwards, M J; Ho, D D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H E; Lasinski, B F; McNaney, J M; Pollaine, S M; Smith, R F

    2004-04-15

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P{sub max} > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (kT < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  12. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Lasinski, B. F.; Lorenz, K. T.; Lorenzana, H. E.; McNaney, J. M.; Pollaine, S. M.; Smith, R. F.

    2005-07-01

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P max > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (T < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  13. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Lasinski, B. F.; Lorenz, K. T.; Lorenzana, H. E.; McNaney, J. M.; Pollaine, S. M.; Smith, R. F.

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (Pmax > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (T < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  14. A Novel Biaxial Testing Apparatus for the Determination of Forming Limit under Hot Stamping Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhutao; Li, Nan

    2017-04-04

    The hot stamping and cold die quenching process is increasingly used to form complex shaped structural components of sheet metals. Conventional experimental approaches, such as out-of-plane and in-plane tests, are not applicable to the determination of forming limits when heating and rapid cooling processes are introduced prior to forming for tests conducted under hot stamping conditions. A novel in-plane biaxial testing system was designed and used for the determination of forming limits of sheet metals at various strain paths, temperatures, and strain rates after heating and cooling processes in a resistance heating uniaxial testing machine. The core part of the biaxial testing system is a biaxial apparatus, which transfers a uniaxial force provided by the uniaxial testing machine to a biaxial force. One type of cruciform specimen was designed and verified for the formability test of aluminum alloy 6082 using the proposed biaxial testing system. The digital image correlation (DIC) system with a high-speed camera was used for taking strain measurements of a specimen during a deformation. The aim of proposing this biaxial testing system is to enable the forming limits of an alloy to be determined at various temperatures and strain rates under hot stamping conditions.

  15. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-01

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO2 show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 1011-1013 Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of electron acceptors.

  16. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of

  17. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  18. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  19. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  20. Experimental determination of the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Hirose, K.; Shimizu, K.; Ohishi, Y.; Yagi, T.; Suehiro, S.

    2016-12-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial (Konôpková et al., 2016; Ohta et al., 2016). We measured the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (Ohta et al., 2016). The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. Combination of the low electrical resistivity of iron and Wiedemann-Franz law indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. We recently performed direct measurements of thermal conductivity of iron at high pressures by using the pulsed light heating thermoreflectance technique, which enable us to confirm the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law under high-pressure conditions. Preliminary results show pressure dependent Lorenz number for hcp iron at 300 K, which infers lower thermal conductivity value than the value predicted from the electrical resistivity and Wiedemann-Franz law with constant Lorenz number.

  1. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion... Access and Renewability of Coverage, and Limitations on Preexisting Condition Exclusion Periods § 146.111 Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period. (a) Preexisting condition exclusion—(1) Defined (i)...

  2. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  3. Excitation energy transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the PSI core or the PSII core under conditions mimicking state transitions.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M; Dinc, Emine; Croce, Roberta; Dekker, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of excitation energy in photosynthetic membranes is achieved by a dense network of pigment-protein complexes. These complexes fulfill specific functions and interact dynamically with each other in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we studied how in the intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C.r.) the lack of the photosystem I (PSI) core or the photosystem II (PSII) core affects these interactions. To that end the mutants F15 and M18 (both PSI-deficient) and FUD7 (PSII-deficient) were incubated under conditions known to promote state transitions in wild-type. The intact cells were then instantly frozen to 77K and the full-spectrum time-resolved fluorescence emission of the cells was measured by means of streak camera. In the PSI-deficient mutants excitation energy transfer (EET) towards light-harvesting complexes of PSI (Lhca) occurs in less than 0.5 ns, and fluorescence from Lhca decays in 3.1 ns. Decreased trapping by PSII and increased fluorescence of Lhca upon state 1 (S1)→state 2 (S2) transition appears in the F15 and less in the M18 mutant. In the PSII-deficient mutant FUD7, quenched (0.5 ns) and unquenched (2 ns) light-harvesting complexes of PSII (LHCII) are present in both states, with the quenched form more abundant in S2 than in S1. Moreover, EET of 0.4 ns from the remaining LHCII to PSI increases upon S1→S2 transition. We relate the excitation energy kinetics observed in F15, M18 and FUD7 to the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants under S1 and S2 conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective conditions for the neutron flux density at axial boundaries of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristarkhova, E. A.; Malofeev, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Analytical expressions for elements of the triangular matrix of effective conditions at the boundary of the core with a multiregion reflector are derived in the few-group diffusion approximation. The developed technique is verified using the example of fuel assemblies of a light-water reactor with an intermediate neutron spectrum.

  5. Effective conditions for the neutron flux density at axial boundaries of the core

    SciTech Connect

    Aristarkhova, E. A. Malofeev, V. M.

    2016-12-15

    Analytical expressions for elements of the triangular matrix of effective conditions at the boundary of the core with a multiregion reflector are derived in the few-group diffusion approximation. The developed technique is verified using the example of fuel assemblies of a light-water reactor with an intermediate neutron spectrum.

  6. Biological effects of extreme environmental conditions. [considering limits of biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imshenetskiy, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Actions of extreme physical and chemical space factors on microorganisms and plants are elaborated in order to establish limits for the biosphere. Considered are effects of low and high temperatures; ionizing and ultraviolet radiation; various gases; and effects of vibration, desiccation and acceleration.

  7. Biological effects of extreme environmental conditions. [considering limits of biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imshenetskiy, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Actions of extreme physical and chemical space factors on microorganisms and plants are elaborated in order to establish limits for the biosphere. Considered are effects of low and high temperatures; ionizing and ultraviolet radiation; various gases; and effects of vibration, desiccation and acceleration.

  8. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... limitations. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 62696, Dec. 1, 2009. (a) No pilot may take off an... authorized by the Administrator. (b) No certificate holder may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot... expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed all applicable training as required...

  9. Advances and limitations of visual conditioning protocols in harnessed bees.

    PubMed

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Mota, Theo

    2016-12-18

    Bees are excellent invertebrate models for studying visual learning and memory mechanisms, because of their sophisticated visual system and impressive cognitive capacities associated with a relatively simple brain. Visual learning in free-flying bees has been traditionally studied using an operant conditioning paradigm. This well-established protocol, however, can hardly be combined with invasive procedures for studying the neurobiological basis of visual learning. Different efforts have been made to develop protocols in which harnessed honey bees could associate visual cues with reinforcement, though learning performances remain poorer than those obtained with free-flying animals. Especially in the last decade, the intention of improving visual learning performances of harnessed bees led many authors to adopt distinct visual conditioning protocols, altering parameters like harnessing method, nature and duration of visual stimulation, number of trials, inter-trial intervals, among others. As a result, the literature provides data hardly comparable and sometimes contradictory. In the present review, we provide an extensive analysis of the literature available on visual conditioning of harnessed bees, with special emphasis on the comparison of diverse conditioning parameters adopted by different authors. Together with this comparative overview, we discuss how these diverse conditioning parameters could modulate visual learning performances of harnessed bees.

  10. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  11. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-02

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  12. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion... preexisting condition exclusion period. (a) Preexisting condition exclusion—(1) Defined—(i) A preexisting condition exclusion means a limitation or exclusion of benefits relating to a condition based on the...

  13. Cytotoxicity of post and core composites as a function of environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Spinell, Thomas; Graf, Alexandra; Wutzel, Harald; Liska, Robert; Watts, David C; Moritz, Andreas; Schedle, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    In the revised version of ISO 7405 there are so far no detailed recommendations concerning temperature and humidity during specimen production for light curing and chemically setting dental materials. The main objective of the present study was to observe if different environmental conditions during specimen production influence cytotoxicity and degree of conversion of four post and core composite materials and to investigate if cytotoxicity of post and core materials is influenced by their corresponding bonding substances. Specimens of four different post and core composite materials (LuxaCore - Dual, Core X-Flow, Flow White and MultiCore Flow) were produced in a climate test chamber at 23°C/50% relative humidity or 37°C/95% relative humidity and were dual-cured or self-cured, with or without their corresponding bonding substances. Specimens were added to cell cultures immediately after production or after preincubation for 7 days. Specimens were incubated with L-929 fibroblasts for 72h and cell numbers determined by a flow cytometer. FTIR spectroscopic measurements of post and core materials were performed at the same temperature conditions as for the cytotoxicity assay (23°C or 37°C). Dual-cured specimens of all post and core composites exhibited less cytotoxicity under both environmental conditions than self-cured specimens. All self-cured specimens manufactured at 37°C/95% showed less cytotoxicity than specimens produced at 23°C/50%. All dual-cured specimens showed similar cytotoxicity at both environmental conditions. After 7 days of preincubation most dual-cured specimens produced at 23°C/50% showed less cytotoxicity than self-cured specimens (with the exception of Flow White). Compared to fresh specimens, 7-day aged specimens of most materials showed reduced cytotoxicity. Materials already showing low cytotoxicity as fresh specimens did not further reduce their cytotoxicity after 7 days of preincubation. For dual-cured materials the degree of

  14. Energy Deposition and Condition of the Metal Core in Exploding Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.; McDaniel, D. H.; Waisman, E. M.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of the Joule energy deposition into exploding wire and its relation with condition of the expanding wire core are presented. Wires of nine different metals with diameters of 10-30 microns, have been exploded by fast 150A/ns and slow 20A/ns pulses, in vacuum and in air. It has been shown by interferometry and light emission that expanding wire core has different conditions. The substances with small atomization enthalpy (Ag, Al, Cu, Au) demonstrate full vaporization of the wire core. The refractory metals (Ti, Pt, Mo, W) demonstrates that core consists from vapor and small and hot microparticles. In this case we observe "firework effect" when large radiation from the wire exceed the energy deposition time in a three order of magnitude. For non-refractory metals radiation dropping fast in 100 ns time scale due to effective adiabatic cooling. It is possible if main part of the metal core was vaporized. The interferometrical investigation of the refraction coefficient of expanding metal core is proof this conclusion. It has been shown that energy deposition before surface breakdown dependent strongly from current rate, surface coatings, environment, wire diameter and radial electric field. The regime of wire explosion in vacuum without shunting plasma shell has been realized for fast exploding mode. In this case we observe anomaly high energy deposition in to the wire core exceeding regular value in almost 20 times. The experimental results for Al wire have been compared with ALEGRA 2D MHD simulations. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  15. Thermopyhsical conditions for the onset of a core dynamo in Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Angelis, Simone; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Magni, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a study on the magnetization of the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 [1] has suggested the possibility that, in its primordial history, Vesta had an active core dynamo. The magnetic field associated could have preserved Vesta from the space-weathering. In this work, using a parametrized thermal convection method, we verified the thermophysical conditions for the onset of a core dynamo. The starting point is a post-differentiated structure [2,3,4], made of a metallic core, silicate mantle and rocky crust. We explored four different fully differentiated configurations of Vesta [5], characterized by different chondritic composition, with the constraints on the core size and density provided by [6]. We also explored three different scaling laws for the core velocity (mixing-length theory, MAC and an intermediate case). Core and mantle have both a temperature-dependent viscosity, which is the parameter that largely influences the magnetic Reynolds number and the dynamo duration. Our results suggest that Vesta had an active dynamo, whose duration lies in the range 150-500 Myr and the more appropriate scaling law for the core velocity is that given by the mixing-length theory. The maximum strength of the primordial core magnetic field is compatible with the estimations provided by [1]. [1] Fu, R. et al, 2012, Science 338, 238 [2] Ghosh, A. and McSween, H.Y., 1998, Icarus, 134, 187 [3] Formisano, M. et al., 2013, Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 48, 2316 [4] Neumann, W., et al., 2014, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 395, 267 [5] Toplis, M.J., et al., 2013, Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 48, 2300 [6] Ermakov, A.I., et al.2014, Icarus, 240, 146

  16. Towards an ICF Core Set for chronic musculoskeletal conditions: commonalities across ICF Core Sets for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, low back pain and chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, S R; Ewert, T; Dreinhöfer, K E; Cieza, A; Stucki, G

    2008-11-01

    The objective of the study was to identify commonalities among the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets of osteoarthritis (OA), osteoporosis (OP), low back pain (LBP), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim is to identify relevant categories for the development of a tentative ICF Core Set for musculoskeletal and pain conditions. The ICF categories common to the five musculoskeletal and pain conditions in the Brief and Comprehensive ICF Core Sets were identified in three steps. In a first step, the commonalities across the Brief and Comprehensive ICF Core Sets for these conditions were examined. In a second and third step, we analysed the increase in commonalities when iteratively excluding one or two of the five conditions. In the first step, 29 common categories out of the total number of 120 categories were identified across the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets of all musculoskeletal and pain conditions, primarily in the component activities and participation. In the second and third step, we found that the exclusion of CWP across the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets increased the commonalities of the remaining four musculoskeletal conditions in a maximum of ten additional categories. The Brief ICF Core Sets of all musculoskeletal and pain conditions contain four common categories out of a total number of 62 categories. The iterative exclusion of a singular condition did not significantly increase the commonalities in the remaining. Based on our analysis, it seems possible to develop a tentative Comprehensive ICF Core Set across a number of musculoskeletal conditions including LBP, OA, OP and RA. However, the profile of functioning in people with CWP differs considerably and should not be further considered for a common ICF Core Set.

  17. Competitive swimming illness and injury: common conditions limiting participation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James N

    2003-10-01

    Illness and injury can significantly limit a swimmer's participation in training and competition. Catastrophic injuries to the neck and risk of drowning are life threatening. Infectious illness can cause significant time out of the water and an even longer convalescence. When injuries to the shoulder, back, and knee become chronic, these overuse injuries can affect performance despite continued cross-training. By identifying the risks for swimming injury and illness, and implementing prevention strategies, the physician can help keep swimmers in the water.

  18. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issues a 401 water quality certification which includes special conditions, the division engineer will... without prejudice until the state issues an individual 401 water quality certification or waives its right... state action on the individual section 401 water quality certification. If a state issues a...

  19. The Limits of Knowledge Management in Contemporary Corporate Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on Jean-François Lyotard's (1984) seminal study "The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge" to reflect on two macro-level catastrophes: the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2009 (and its continuing effects throughout the Eurozone and elsewhere) and Fukushima. These two case studies probe aspects of these grand…

  20. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 74 FR 62696, Dec. 1, 2009. (a) No pilot may take off an airplane that has frost, ice, or snow... authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has...

  1. The Limits of Knowledge Management in Contemporary Corporate Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on Jean-François Lyotard's (1984) seminal study "The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge" to reflect on two macro-level catastrophes: the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2009 (and its continuing effects throughout the Eurozone and elsewhere) and Fukushima. These two case studies probe aspects of these grand…

  2. Metadynamics study of iron phases at the Earth's inner core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Oganov, A. R.

    2007-12-01

    Iron is the main element in the Earth core and the stable phase of iron in the Earth's solid inner core is still highly controversial (Sambridge, 2003). In order to predict the properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures, here, we use a novel simulation technique, first-principles metadynamics (Martonak et al., 2003, see also Oganov et al., 2005 ), to unveil the stepwise mechanism of the pressure-induced (350 GPa) transformations between bcc, fcc and hcp iron at the temperatures of 2000 K and 6000 K respectively. We predicted the bcc \\{110\\}, fcc \\{111\\} and hcp \\{111\\} slip planes at the Earth inner core conditions. We also predicted some metastable iron phases (e.g. R-3M and P-6M2 structures) on the pathway of the phase transition. The c/a ratios of the iron structures are also calculated at the simulated conditions. Implications of these results for seismic anisotropy in the Earth inner core will be discussed (Zhang, 2007). References: [1] Sambridge M., (2003) An Ensemble View of Earth's Inner Core. Science, 299, 529-530; [2] Martonak R., Laio A., and Parrinello M., (2003). Predicting crystal structures: The Parrinello-Rahman method revisited. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 075503; [3] Oganov A.R., Martonak R., Laio A., Raiteri P., Parrinello M. (2005). Anisotropy of Earth's D" layer and stacking faults in the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase. Nature 438, 1142-1144; [4] Zhang F. & Oganov A.R., (2007) Metadynamics study of iron phases at the Earth's inner core conditions. (in prep.)

  3. Core formation by giant impacts: Conditions for intact melt region formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    Among the many effects of high-speed, giant impacts is widescale melting that can potentially trigger catastrophic core formation. If the projectile is sufficiently large, the melt pools to form an intact melt region. The dense phase then segregates from the melt, forming a density anomoly at the melt region's base. If the anomoly produces a differential stress larger than a certain minimum, it overcomes the mantle's long-term elastic strength and rapidly forms a core. It was previously shown that giant impacts effectively trigger core formation in silicate bodies by the time they grow to the mass of Mercury and in icy bodies by the time they grow larger than Triton. In order for this process to be viable, an intact melt region must be formed. Conditions under which this occurs is examined in more detail than previously published.

  4. 29 CFR 2590.701-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period. 2590... Coverage Portability, Nondiscrimination, and Renewability § 2590.701-3 Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period. (a) Preexisting condition exclusion—(1) Defined—(i) A preexisting condition...

  5. Nucleus Accumbens Core and Shell are Necessary for Reinforcer Devaluation Effects on Pavlovian Conditioned Responding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Teghpal; McDannald, Michael A; Haney, Richard Z; Cerri, Domenic H; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NA) has been hypothesized to be part of a circuit in which cue-evoked information about expected outcomes is mobilized to guide behavior. Here we tested this hypothesis using a Pavlovian reinforcer devaluation task, previously applied to assess outcome-guided behavior after damage to regions such as the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala that send projections to NA. Rats with sham lesions or neurotoxic lesions of either the core or shell subdivision of NA were trained to associate a 10-s CS+ with delivery of three food pellets. After training, half of the rats in each lesion group received food paired with illness induced by LiCl injections; the remaining rats received food and illness unpaired. Subsequently, responding to the CS+ was assessed in an extinction probe test. Both sham and lesioned rats conditioned to the CS+ and formed a conditioned taste aversion. However only sham rats reduced their conditioned responding as a result of reinforcer devaluation; devalued rats with lesions of either core or shell showed levels of responding that were similar to lesioned, non-devalued rats. This impairment was not due to the loss of motivational salience conferred to the CS+ in lesioned rats as both groups responded similarly for the cue in conditioned reinforcement testing. These data suggest that NA core and shell are part of a circuit necessary for the use of cue-evoked information about expected outcomes to guide behavior.

  6. Nucleus Accumbens Core and Shell are Necessary for Reinforcer Devaluation Effects on Pavlovian Conditioned Responding

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Teghpal; McDannald, Michael A.; Haney, Richard Z.; Cerri, Domenic H.; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NA) has been hypothesized to be part of a circuit in which cue-evoked information about expected outcomes is mobilized to guide behavior. Here we tested this hypothesis using a Pavlovian reinforcer devaluation task, previously applied to assess outcome-guided behavior after damage to regions such as the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala that send projections to NA. Rats with sham lesions or neurotoxic lesions of either the core or shell subdivision of NA were trained to associate a 10-s CS+ with delivery of three food pellets. After training, half of the rats in each lesion group received food paired with illness induced by LiCl injections; the remaining rats received food and illness unpaired. Subsequently, responding to the CS+ was assessed in an extinction probe test. Both sham and lesioned rats conditioned to the CS+ and formed a conditioned taste aversion. However only sham rats reduced their conditioned responding as a result of reinforcer devaluation; devalued rats with lesions of either core or shell showed levels of responding that were similar to lesioned, non-devalued rats. This impairment was not due to the loss of motivational salience conferred to the CS+ in lesioned rats as both groups responded similarly for the cue in conditioned reinforcement testing. These data suggest that NA core and shell are part of a circuit necessary for the use of cue-evoked information about expected outcomes to guide behavior. PMID:21088698

  7. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Woo, K M; Betti, R; Campbell, E M; Mangino, D; Christopherson, A R; McCrory, R L; Nora, R; Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  8. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  9. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-07

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  10. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; ...

    2016-07-07

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117,more » 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.« less

  11. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-07

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  12. Transition from the adiabatic to the sudden limit in core-electron photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Lars; Michiels, John; Inglesfield, John

    1998-12-01

    Experimental results for core-electron photoemission Jk(ω) are often compared with the one-electron spectral function Ac(ɛk-ω), where ω is the photon energy, ɛk is the photoelectron energy, and the optical transition matrix elements are taken as constant. Since Jk(ω) is nonzero only for ɛk>0, we must actually compare it with Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk). For metals Ac(ω) is known to have a quasiparticle (QP) peak with an asymmetric power-law [theories of Mahan, Nozières, de Dominicis, Langreth, and others (MND)] singularity due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. The QP peak starts at the core-electron energy ɛc, and is followed by an extended satellite (shakeup) structure at smaller ω. For photon energies ω just above threshold, ωth=-ɛc, Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk) as a function of ɛk (ω constant) is cut just behind the quasiparticle peak, and neither the tail of the MND line nor the plasmon satellites are present. The sudden (high-energy) limit is given by a convolution of Ac(ω) and a loss function, i.e., by the Berglund-Spicer two-step expression. Thus Ac(ω) alone does not give the correct photoelectron spectrum, neither at low nor at high energies. We present an extension of the quantum-mechanical (QM) models developed earlier by Inglesfield, and by Bardyszewski and Hedin to calculate Jk(ω). It includes recoil and damping, as well as shakeup effects and extrinsic losses, is exact in the high-energy limit, and allows calculations of Jk(ω) including the MND line and multiple plasmon losses. The model, which involves electrons coupled to quasibosons, is motivated by detailed arguments. As an illustration we have made quantitative calculations for a semi-infinite jellium with the density of aluminum metal and an embedded atom. The coupling functions (fluctuation potentials) between the electron and the quasibosons are related to the random-phase-approximation dielectric function, and different levels of approximations are evaluated numerically. The differences

  13. Do ICF core sets for low back pain include patients' self-reported activity limitations because of back problems?

    PubMed

    Lygren, Hildegunn; Strand, Liv Inger; Anderson, Bodil; Magnussen, Liv Heide

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate content validity of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for low back pain (LBP), by examining whether common activities reported as difficult to perform are included in the Core Sets. A cross-sectional design was used. Ninety-eight patients with long-lasting back pain (>3 months) between 18 and 65 years of age were consecutively recruited from a Multidisciplinary Outpatient Spine Clinic. Difficulties with daily life and work task activities because of back pain were examined by asking the patients two questions: 1) can you specify activities that are difficult to perform because of your back pain? and 2) are there specific work tasks that you are unable to do because of your back pain? Two raters independently classified the written responses according to the ICF Core Sets' component Activities and Participation. Activities and work tasks were linked to 15 of 29 categories (52%) in the Comprehensive Core Set, and 9 of 12 (75%) in the Brief Core Set, and the initial agreement between the two raters in coding the answers according to the Core Sets was (83%, k = 0.80) and (93%, k = 0.9), respectively, before consensus was reached. The Comprehensive Core Set for LBP to a large degree contains daily life and work-related activities frequently reported as difficult to perform by patients with long-lasting LBP. The categories, however, are very broad and do not provide specified descriptions of the most frequently reported activity limitations such as sitting, standing and walking. The Brief Core Set does not include categories for frequently reported activities such as pulling/pushing and leisure/recreation activities. ICF Core Sets for LBP seem suitable for obtaining a gross overview of the patients' functional limitations, but do not give sufficient information from a therapeutic point of view. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The recommended Threshold Limit Values for heat exposure fail to maintain body core temperature within safe limits in older working adults.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Meade, Robert D; D'Souza, Andrew W; Flouris, Andreas D; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-09-01

    The American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) Threshold Limit Values (TLV® guidelines) for work in the heat consist of work-rest (WR) allocations designed to ensure a stable core temperature that does not exceed 38°C. However, the TLV® guidelines have not been validated in older workers. This is an important shortcoming given that adults as young as 40 years demonstrate impairments in their ability to dissipate heat. We therefore evaluated body temperature responses in older adults during work performed in accordance to the TLV® recommended guidelines. On three occasions, 9 healthy older (58 ± 5 years) males performed a 120-min work-simulated protocol in accordance with the TLV® guidelines for moderate-to-heavy intensity work (360 W fixed rate of heat production) in different wet-bulb globe temperatures (WBGT). The first was 120 min of continuous (CON) cycling at 28.0°C WBGT (CON[28°C]). The other two protocols were 15-min intermittent work bouts performed with different WR cycles and WBGT: (i) WR of 3:1 at 29.0°C (WR3:1[29°C]) and (ii) WR of 1:1 at 30.0°C (WR1:1[30°C]). Rectal temperature was measured continuously. The rate of change in mean body temperature was determined via thermometry (weighting coefficients: rectal, 0.9; mean skin temperature, 0.1) and direct calorimetry. Rectal temperature exceeded 38°C in all participants in CON[28°C] and WR3:1[29°C] whereas a statistically similar proportion of workers exceeded 38°C in WR1:1[30°C] (χ(2); P = 0.32). The average time for rectal temperature to reach 38°C was: CON[28°C], 53 ± 7; WR3:1[29°C], 79 ± 11; and WR1:1[30°C], 100 ± 29 min. Finally, while a stable mean body temperature was not achieved in any work condition as measured by thermometry (i.e., >0°C·min(-1); all P<0.01), heat balance as determined by direct calorimetry was achieved in WR3:1[29°C] and WR1:1[30°C] (both P ≥ 0.08). Our findings indicate that the TLV® guidelines do not prevent

  15. Genomic regions associated with the nitrogen limitation response revealed in a global wheat core collection.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Jacques; Ravel, C; Jaubertie, J P; Duperrier, B; Gardet, O; Heumez, E; Pissavy, A L; Charmet, G; Le Gouis, J; Balfourier, F

    2013-03-01

    Modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in Western Europe have mainly been bred, and selected in conditions where high levels of nitrogen-rich fertilizer are applied. However, high input crop management has greatly increased the risk of nitrates leaching into groundwater with negative impacts on the environment. To investigate wheat nitrogen tolerance characteristics that could be adapted to low input crop management, we supplied 196 accessions of a wheat core collection of old and modern cultivars with high or moderate amounts of nitrogen fertilizer in an experimental network consisting of three sites and 2 years. The main breeding traits were assessed including grain yield and grain protein content. The response to nitrogen level was estimated for grain yield and grain number per m(2) using both the difference and the ratio between performance at the two input levels and the slope of joint regression. A large variability was observed for all the traits studied and the response to nitrogen level. Whole genome association mapping was carried out using 899 molecular markers taking into account the five ancestral group structure of the collection. We identified 54 main regions involving almost all chromosomes that influence yield and its components, plant height, heading date and grain protein concentration. Twenty-three regions, including several genes, spread over 16 chromosomes were involved in the response to nitrogen level. These chromosomal regions may be good candidates to be used in breeding programs to improve the performance of wheat varieties at moderate nitrogen input levels.

  16. CENTRAL LIMIT THEOREMS FOR CONDITIONALLY LINEAR RANDOM PROCESSES WITH APPLICATIONS TO MODELS OF RADAR CLUTTER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    models are called conditionally linear processes, and the description of the correlator output requires a central limit theorem for sums of dependent...random variables. The conditions for the central limit theorem are related to physically reasonable conditions on the model. The results of the study

  17. Transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions: The effect of spin disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drchal, V.; Kudrnovský, J.; Wagenknecht, D.; Turek, I.; Khmelevskyi, S.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic and thermal transport properties of the Earth's core are crucial for many geophysical models such as the geodynamo model of the Earth's magnetic field and of its reversals. Here we show, by considering bcc iron and an iron-rich iron-silicon alloy as a representative of the Earth's core composition and applying first-principles modeling, that the spin disorder at the Earth's core conditions not considered previously provides an essential contribution, of order 20 μ Ω cm, to the electrical resistivity. This value is comparable in magnitude with the electron-phonon and with the recently estimated electron-electron scattering contributions. The origin of the spin-disorder resistivity (SDR) consists of the existence of fluctuating local moments that are stabilized at high temperatures by the magnetic entropy even at pressures at which the ground state of iron is nonmagnetic. We find that electron-phonon and SDR contributions are not additive at high temperatures. We thus observe a large violation of the Matthiessen rule, not common in conventional metallic alloys at ambient conditions.

  18. Configurational thermodynamics of Fe-Ni alloys at Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekholm, M.; Mikhaylushkin, A. S.; Simak, S. I.; Johansson, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2011-08-01

    By means of ab-initio calculations, we perform an analysis of the configurational thermodynamics, effects of disorder, and structural energy differences in Fe-Ni alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth's core. We show from ab-initio calculations that the ordering energies of fcc and hcp-structured Fe-Ni solid solutions at these conditions depend sensitively on the alloy configuration, i.e., on the degree of chemical disorder, and are on a scale comparable with the structural energy differences. From configurational thermodynamic simulations we find that a distribution of Fe and Ni atoms in the solutions should be very close to completely disordered at these conditions. Using this model of the Fe-Ni system, we have calculated the fcc-hcp structural free energy difference in a wide pressure-temperature range of 120-360 GPa and 1000-6600 K. Our calculations show that alloying of Fe with Ni below 3000 K favours stabilisation of the fcc phase over the hcp, in agreement with experiments. However, above 3000 K the effect is reversed, and at conditions corresponding to those of the Earth's inner core, Ni acts as an agent to stabilise the hcp phase.

  19. Conditioned pressure spectra and coherence measurements in the core of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple and partial coherence functions and the corresponding conditioned coherent output spectra are computed between fluctuating pressures measured at two locations within the tailpipe of a turbofan engine and far-field acoustic pressure. The results are compared with the ordinary coherent output spectrum as obtained between a single tailpipe pressure measurement and the far-field acoustic pressure. The comparison indicates apparent additional "coherent output" (i.e., core-noise) beyond that detectable with an ordinary coherent measurement, thus suggesting the tailpipe as a core-noise source region. Further evidence suggests, however, that these differences may be attributed to the presence of transverse acoustic modes in the tailpipe and that the tailpipe is not, in fact, a significant source region.

  20. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  1. High Temperature Simulations of the Seismic Wave Velocities on FeNi Alloys at the Conditions of Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell Masip, B.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I. G.; Vocadlo, L.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the Earth's core is a key step in the study of the evolution and dynamics of our planet. The Earth's inner core is a solid Fe-Ni alloy at high temperature (~6000 K) and high pressure (330core, it has been suggested that light elements must also be present. While the effect of light elements on the properties of iron have been the subject of an extensive literature, the effect of nickel on the properties of iron has often been overlooked, possibly due to the expectation that the properties of Ni and Fe will be similar. This expectation was not true in the athermal limit (results presented in AGU 2011), where 12.5% Ni decreased the compressional and shear velocities (Vp and Vs) more than 2 and 7% respectively respect to pure iron. Encouraged by this result, we performed abinitio molecular dynamics simulations coupled with periodic plane-wave density functional within the generalized gradient approximation on the fcc and hcp structures of Fe1-XNiX alloys (X= 0, 0.0625, 0.125) in order to obtain the high temperature elastic properties and wave propagation velocities at 5500 K and 360 GPa [1]. At 5500 K, the previously mentioned reduction in the wave velocities disappears and the velocities of hcp and fcc Fe-Ni alloys remain very similar to those of pure iron throughout the range of compositions studied. Moreover, at 5500K the values for Vp and Vs are too high in comparison with PREM. To solve this we have performed simulations at higher temperature, closer to the melting point of Fe (6300 K at 330 GPa from GGA calculations [2]). Finally, the evaluation of maximum anisotropy in Vp at 5500 K in hcp and fcc structure shows that neither the temperature nor the Ni has an important effect, although it is dependent on the structure studied. We conclude, therefore, that Ni does indeed behave similarly to Fe and can safely be ignored when considering

  2. Leg exercise and core cooling in an insulated immersion suit under severe environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Faerevik, Hilde; Reinertsen, Randi E; Giesbrecht, Gordon G

    2010-11-01

    This study was conducted to examine whether the greater rate of heat production through intermittent leg exercise would offset an elevated rate of heat loss and thereby decrease the rate of core cooling during immersion in severe conditions when wearing an insulated immersion suit. On two separate days, seven male subjects were immersed in 2 degrees C water with air temperature of -2 degreesC, wind speed of 5 m x s(-1), and waves of 30-40 cm high. Subjects wore wool underwear, flight suits, and neoprene immersion suits. They were immersed for 180 min while remaining passive (NonEx) or performing moderate leg exercise for 5 min every 20 min (LegEx). Metabolism, rectal and skin temperatures, and skin heat flux were measured. Subjective evaluation of thermal and physical comfort was obtained. After 180 min core cooling was less in LegEx (0.3 degrees C) compared to NonEx (0.9 degrees C). This was attributed to a 31% increase in total heat production, but there was only a 21% increase in total heat loss when performing leg exercise compared to lying still. Leg exercise also improved thermal and physical comfort. The results suggest that wearing an insulated immersion suit under extreme environmental conditions and 5 min of leg exercise every 20 min might improve heat balance, resulting in a net heat gain (10%) compared to lying still in the water. As a result, shivering intensity is reduced, core cooling rate, and thermal and physical comfort is improved. This procedure potentially provides a practically significant survival advantage at sea and also under severe conditions.

  3. Electronic properties and magnetism of iron at the Earth's inner core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.; Miyake, T.; Simak, S. I.; Ruban, A. V.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We employ state-of-the-art ab initio simulations within the dynamical mean-field theory to study three likely phases of iron (hcp, fcc, and bcc) at the Earth's core conditions. We demonstrate that the correction to the electronic free energy due to correlations can be significant for the relative stability of the phases. The strongest effect is observed in bcc Fe, which shows a non-Fermi-liquid behavior, and where a Curie-Weiss behavior of the uniform susceptibility hints at a local magnetic moment still existing at 5800 K and 300 GPa. We predict that all three structures have sufficiently high magnetic susceptibility to stabilize the geodynamo.

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Examples...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  8. Low Temperature Limit of the Vortex Core Radius and the Kramer-Pesch Effect in NbSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. I.; Kiefl, R. F.; Brewer, J. H.; Chakhalian, J.; Dunsiger, S.; Morris, G. D.; Sonier, J. E.; Macfarlane, W. A.

    2000-08-01

    Muon spin rotation ( μSR) has been used to measure the magnetic field distribution in the vortex state of the type-II superconductor NbSe2 ( Tc = 7.0 K) below T = 2 K. The distribution is consistent with a highly ordered hexagonal vortex lattice with a well resolved high-field cutoff associated with the finite size of the vortex cores. The temperature dependence of the core radius is much weaker than the temperature dependence predicted from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Furthermore, the vortex radius measured by μSR near the low temperature quantum limit is about an order of magnitude larger than predicted.

  9. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE...

  10. What Conditions Limit Sports Participation? Experience with 10,540 Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnes, Scott A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Researchers evaluated results from five years of preseason examinations on student athletes to determine which conditions limited sports participation. Hypertension, ophthalmologic and genitourinary abnormalities, and musculoskeletal problems were the most common limiting conditions. Preseason examinations need to follow guidelines based on…

  11. 42 CFR 424.90 - Court ordered assignments: Conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Court ordered assignments: Conditions and limitations. 424.90 Section 424.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Assignment and Reassignment of Claims § 424.90 Court ordered assignments: Conditions and limitations. (a...

  12. 42 CFR 424.90 - Court ordered assignments: Conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Court ordered assignments: Conditions and limitations. 424.90 Section 424.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Limitations on Assignment and Reassignment of Claims § 424.90 Court ordered assignments: Conditions and...

  13. Foam Core Particleboards with Intumescent FRT Veneer: Cone Calorimeter Testing With Varying Adhesives, Surface Layer Thicknesses, and Processing Conditions

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Johannes Welling; Ali Shalbafan

    2014-01-01

    Intumescent FRT Veneers adhered to the surface of foam core particleboard to provide adequate fire protection were evaluated by means of cone calorimeter tests (ASTM E1354). The foam core particleboards were prepared with variations in surface layer treatment, adhesives, surface layer thicknesses, and processing conditions. Ignitability, heat release rate profile, peak...

  14. Magnetic field in molecular cloud cores: Limits on field strengths and linewidths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary observations by others indicate that the magnetic field strength in dense molecular cloud cores is on the order of 30 micro G, much closer to the background field strength than to the flux-freezing prediction for this density. This result implies that some process must exist to decrease the magnetic field strength in these regions to much less than its flux-frozen value, e.g., ambipolar diffusion. At these moderate field strengths, magnetohydrodynamic waves in the cores provide a good explanation of observed supra-thermal molecular linewidths.

  15. 77 FR 69785 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... a public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at one time in Area B of the Presidio of San Francisco (Presidio) for consideration (Commercial Dog Walkers). The limit will require any...

  16. 78 FR 6273 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... requesting public comment on a proposed public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at one time in Area B of the Presidio of San Francisco for consideration (Commercial Dog Walkers). The limit...

  17. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit..., the engine mounts and the supporting structures must be designed to withstand a ``limit engine torque load imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are...

  18. First-principles study on hcp Fe under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, X.; Cohen, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the lattice dynamical, thermal equation of state and elastic properties of hcp Fe at high temperatures and high pressures using both linear-response Linear-Muffin-Tin-Orbital and particle-in-cell model calculations. The phonon dispersion and phonon density of states have been calculated at different volumes, different c/a axial ratios and different volume-conserving strains, and show good agreement with available experimental data. We carefully examine the thermal effects on lattice strain and sound velocities of the hot dense iron. The PIC approximation describes well the vibrational behavior away from the instability, and thus is a reasonable approach to compute high temperature properties of materials. The compressional-wave velocities Vp and shear velocities Vs of hcp Fe both show a strong decrease with temperature. Vp and Vs at high pressures and temperatures can not be fitted to a linear relation to the densities, thus the Birch's law which has been widely used to extrapolate measured sound velocities to the deep interior of the Earth might fail at extreme high temperature and high pressure conditions. This is consistent with recent experimental study. Both bulk modulus and shear modulus under the core's conditions have been calculated, and show good agreements with inner core results. This work was supported by US Department of Energy ASCI/ASAP subcontract to Caltech, Grant DOE W-7405-ENG-48 (to REC).

  19. Achievement of Core Conditions for Alpha Heating in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; Theobald, W.; Campbell, E. M.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Nora, R.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown for the first time that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion extrapolated to a 1.9-MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions. This conclusion is reached using an analytic scaling as well as direct numerical simulations of energy-scaled targets. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Deception of ambient and body core temperature improves self paced cycling in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul C; Maxwell, Neil; Allchorn, Alan; Mauger, Alexis R; White, Danny K

    2012-01-01

    We used incorrect visual feedback of ambient and core temperature in the heat to test the hypothesis that deception would alleviate the decrement in cycling performance compared to a no deception trial. Seven males completed three 30 min cycling time trials in a randomised order on a Kingcycle ergometer. One time trial was in temperate, control conditions (CON: 21.8 ± 0.6°C; 43.3 ± 4.3%rh), the others in hot, humid conditions (HOT: 31.4 ± 0.3°C; 63.9 ± 4.5%rh). In one of the hot, humid conditions (31.6 ± 0.5°C; 65.4 ± 4.3%rh), participants were deceived (DEC) into thinking the ambient conditions were 26.0°C; 60.0%rh and their core temperature was 0.3°C lower than it really was. Compared to CON (16.63 ± 2.43 km) distance covered was lower in HOT (15.88 ± 2.75 km; P < 0.05), but DEC ameliorated this (16.74 ± 2.87 km; P < 0.05). Mean power output was greater in DEC (184.4 ± 60.4 W) than HOT (168.1 ± 54.1 W; P < 0.05) and no difference was observed between CON and DEC. Rectal temperature and iEMG of the vastus lateralis were not different, but RPE in the third minute was lower in DEC than HOT (P < 0.05). Deception improved performance in the heat by creating a lower RPE, evidence of a subtle mismatch between the subconscious expectation and conscious perception of the task demands.

  1. Chronologies of marine sediment cores during the Last Interglacial: strengths and limitations of commonly used climato-stratigraphic alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govin, Aline; Capron, Emilie

    2015-04-01

    The Last Interglacial (LIG, ~129-116 thousand of years, ka) is relatively well documented in marine sediment cores retrieved across the globe. However, these records exhibit very few absolute age markers such as magnetic events and dated tephra layers, which limits the definition of independent and precise LIG age models. As a result, age models of marine sediments are defined using various methods based on the (i) synchronisation or (ii) climato-stratigraphic alignment of marine records to dated "reference" records, assuming simultaneous regional changes for a given climate variable (e.g. foraminiferal δ18O, temperature). The use of different "reference" chronologies (e.g. LR04, speleothem or ice core chronologies) also limits a precise investigation of climatic sequences across the LIG. Here, we evaluate the underlying hypotheses, strengths and limitations, and age uncertainties of methods commonly used in marine sediments during the LIG: i.e. benthic δ18O alignment to the LR04 benthic δ18O stack, temperature alignment to ice core or to speleothem records. We compare the resulting age models using examples from the North Atlantic core MD95-2042 and the Southern Ocean core MD02-2488. We show a lack of remarkable tie-points within the LIG, which limits the study of the sub-millennial-scale climate variability. We also report age offsets up to 4 ka when different reference chronologies (e.g. ice cores vs. speleothems) or different types of aligned records (e.g. SST vs. planktonic δ18O) are used. These results highlight the need for careful estimates of age uncertainties when defining age models in marine sediments. They also emphasize the fact that LIG chronologies should be considered with care. A clear statement on the reference chronology, the method of alignment and the type of tracers that are used should be given when investigating the LIG sequence of climatic events from various sediment cores or when comparing LIG marine records and climate model

  2. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... agreement with that agency or organization. The agreement must set forth the FWS work conditions. The...'s employer, the student's work must be governed by employment conditions, including pay, that...

  3. The Role of Carbon in Core Formation Under Highly Reducing Conditions With Implications for the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E..; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Draper, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of carbon on the surface of Mercury. Furthermore, the X-Ray Spectrometer on board MESSENGER measured elevated abundances of sulfur and low abundances of iron, suggesting the planet's oxygen fugacity (fO2) is several log10 units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) buffer. Similar to the role of other volatiles (e.g. sulfur) on highly reducing planetary bodies, carbon is expected to behave differently than it would under higher fO2. As discussed by Nittler et al. and Hauck et al., under such highly reducing conditions, the majority of the iron partitions into the core. On Mercury, this resulted in a relatively large core and a thin mantle. Using a composition similar to the largest volcanic field on the planet (the northern volcanic plains), Vander Kaaden and McCubbin conducted sink-float experiments to determine the density of melts and minerals on Mercury. They showed that graphite would be the only buoyant mineral in a mercurian magma ocean. Therefore, Vander Kaaden and McCubbin proposed a possible primary flotation crust on the planet composed of graphite. Concurrently, Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 1.4 +/- 0.9 wt%. However, as this result was only at the one-sigma detection limit, possible carbon abundances at the three-sigma detection limit for Mercury range from 0 to 4.1 wt% carbon. Additionally, Murchie et al. investigated the possible darkening agent on Mercury and concluded that coarse-grained graphite could darken high reflectance plains to the low reflectance material. To further test the possibility of elevated abundances of carbon in Mercury's crust, Peplowski et al. used the low-altitude MESSENGER data to show that carbon is the only material consistent with both the visible to near-infrared spectra and the neutron measurements of low

  4. The role of dopamine in the accumbens core in the expression of Pavlovian-conditioned responses.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Benjamin T; Robinson, Terry E

    2012-08-01

    The role of dopamine in reward is a topic of debate. For example, some have argued that phasic dopamine signaling provides a prediction-error signal necessary for stimulus-reward learning, whereas others have hypothesized that dopamine is not necessary for learning per se, but for attributing incentive motivational value ('incentive salience') to reward cues. These psychological processes are difficult to tease apart, because they tend to change together. To disentangle them we took advantage of natural individual variation in the extent to which reward cues are attributed with incentive salience, and asked whether dopamine (specifically in the core of the nucleus accumbens) is necessary for the expression of two forms of pavlovian-conditioned approach behavior--one in which the cue acquires powerful motivational properties (sign-tracking) and another closely related one in which it does not (goal-tracking). After acquisition of these conditioned responses (CRs), intra-accumbens injection of the dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol markedly impaired the expression of a sign-tracking CR, but not a goal-tracking CR. Furthermore, dopamine antagonism did not produce a gradual extinction-like decline in behavior, but maximally impaired expression of a sign-tracking CR on the very first trial, indicating the effect was not due to new learning (i.e. it occurred in the absence of new prediction-error computations). The data support the view that dopamine in the accumbens core is not necessary for learning stimulus-reward associations, but for attributing incentive salience to reward cues, transforming predictive conditional stimuli into incentive stimuli with powerful motivational properties.

  5. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect.

  6. Extinction and reinstatement of phasic dopamine signals in the nucleus accumbens core during Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sunsay, Ceyhun; Rebec, George V

    2014-10-01

    The prediction-error model of dopamine (DA) signaling has largely been confirmed with various appetitive Pavlovian conditioning procedures and has been supported in tests of Pavlovian extinction. Studies have repeatedly shown, however, that extinction does not erase the original memory of conditioning as the prediction-error model presumes, putting the model at odds with contemporary views that treat extinction as an episode of learning rather than unlearning of conditioning. Here, we combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) with appetitive Pavlovian conditioning to assess DA release directly during extinction and reinstatement. DA was monitored in the nucleus accumbens core, which plays a key role in reward processing. Following at least 4 daily sessions of 16 tone-food pairings, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was performed while rats received additional tone-food pairings followed by tone alone presentations (i.e., extinction). Acquisition memory was reinstated with noncontingent presentations of reward and then tested with cue presentation. Tone-food pairings produced transient (1- to 3-s) DA release in response to tone. During extinction, the amplitude of the DA response decreased significantly. Following presentation of 2 noncontingent food pellets, subsequent tone presentation reinstated the DA signal. Our results support the prediction-error model for appetitive Pavlovian extinction but not for reinstatement.

  7. Partitioning of Phosphorus and Molybdenum between the Earth's Mantle and Core and the Conditions of Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuff, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Lee, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    There are several hypotheses on the specific processes that might have occurred during the formation of the Earth. One hypothesis that has been proposed is that early in the Earth's formation, there was a magma ocean present, and within this body, siderophile elements separated out of the silicate liquid to form the metal core. This study addresses this hypothesis. P and Mo are moderately siderophile elements that are present in both the mantle and the core. The concentrations of P and Mo in silicate vs. metal can be measured and in turn used to determine the temperatures, pressures, oxygen fugacity and melt composition required to achieve the same concentrations as observed in the mantle. The data here include eight experiments examining the partitioning of P and Mo between metallic liquid and silicate liquid. The purpose of the experiments has been to gain a greater understanding of core-mantle separation during the Earth formation process and examines temperature effect on P and Mo, which has not been systematically studied before.

  8. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  9. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin Zhang, Xiangyi; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ∼1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  10. The financial repercussions of new work-limiting health conditions for older workers.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Jody; Stapleton, David C

    2012-01-01

    This analysis used propensity score matching to construct a comparison sample that is observationally similar at baseline interview to older workers who later experience the onset of a medical condition that limits their ability to work. Using these matched onset and comparison samples, we studied trajectories in earnings and income around onset of the work limitation. Earnings two years after onset for the work-limitation group were 50% lower and poverty rates were nearly double. Income from unemployment insurance, workers' compensation, and retirement and disability benefits offset only a small amount of the earnings declines, resulting in decreased overall household income after onset of the work-limiting condition.

  11. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  12. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T to... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... disorders may restrict or limit occupational exposure to hyperbaric conditions depending on severity, presence of residual effects, response to therapy, number of occurrences, diving mode, or degree and...

  13. Justification of Filter Selection for Robot Balancing in Conditions of Limited Computational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momot, M. V.; Politsinskaia, E. V.; Sushko, A. V.; Semerenko, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers the problem of mathematical filter selection, used for balancing of wheeled robot in conditions of limited computational resources. The solution based on complementary filter is proposed.

  14. Evaluation of a conditioning method to improve core-veneer bond strength of zirconia restorations.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jili; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao; Liang, Xing

    2012-06-01

    The high strength and fracture toughness of zirconia have supported its extensive application in esthetic dentistry. However, the fracturing of veneering porcelains remains one of the primary causes of failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, with shear bond strength testing, the effect of a simple and novel surface conditioning method on the core-veneer bond strength of a zirconia ceramic system. The shear bond strength of a zirconia core ceramic to the corresponding veneering porcelain was tested by the Schmitz-Schulmeyer method. Thirty zirconia core specimens (10 × 5 × 5 mm) were layered with a veneering porcelain (5 × 3 × 3 mm). Three different surface conditioning methods were evaluated: polishing with up to 1200 grit silicon carbide paper under water cooling, airborne-particle abrasion with 110 μm alumina particles, and modification with zirconia powder coating before sintering. A metal ceramic system was used as a control group. All specimens were subjected to shear force in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The shear bond strength values were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). The fractured specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope to observe the failure mode. The mean (SD) shear bond strength values in MPa were 47.02 (6.4) for modified zirconia, 36.66 (8.6) for polished zirconia, 39.14 (6.5) for airborne-particle-abraded zirconia, and 46.12 (7.1) for the control group. The mean bond strength of the control (P=.028) and modified zirconia groups (P=.014) was significantly higher than that of the polished zirconia group. The airborne-particle-abraded group was not significantly different from any other group. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation showed that cohesive fracture in the veneering porcelain was the predominant failure mode of modified zirconia, while the other groups principally fractured at the interface. Modifying the zirconia surface

  15. Health conditions and role limitation in three European Regions: a public-health perspective.

    PubMed

    Barbaglia, Gabriela; Adroher, Núria D; Vilagut, Gemma; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Bunting, Brentan; Caldas de Almeida, José Miguel; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Kovess-Masfety, Vivianne; Matschinger, Herbert; Alonso, Jordi

    To describe the distribution of role limitation in the European population aged 18-64 years and to examine the contribution of health conditions to role limitation using a public-health approach. Representative samples of the adult general population (n=13,666) aged 18-64 years from 10 European countries of the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys Initiative, grouped into three regions: Central-Western, Southern and Central-Eastern. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) was used to assess six mental disorders and standard checklists for seven physical conditions. Days with full and with partial role limitation in the month previous to the interview were reported (WMH-WHODAS). Population Attributable Fraction (PAFs) of full and partial role limitation were estimated. Health conditions explained a large proportion of full role limitation (PAF=62.6%) and somewhat less of partial role limitation (46.6%). Chronic pain was the single condition that consistently contributed to explain both disability measures in all European Regions. Mental disorders were the most important contributors to full and partial role limitation in Central-Western and Southern Europe. In Central-Eastern Europe, where mental disorders were less prevalent, physical conditions, especially cardiovascular diseases, were the highest contributors to disability. The contribution of health conditions to role limitation in the three European regions studied is high. Mental disorders are associated with the largest impact in most of the regions. There is a need for mainstreaming disability in the public health agenda to reduce the role limitation associated with health conditions. The cross-regional differences found require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Electron mobility limited by optical phonons in wurtzite InGaN/GaN core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. H.; Qu, Y.; Ban, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Based on the force-balance and energy-balance equations, the optical phonon-limited electron mobility in InxGa1-xN/GaN core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) is discussed. It is found that the electrons tend to distribute in the core of the CSNWs due to the strong quantum confinement. Thus, the scattering from first kind of the quasi-confined optical (CO) phonons is more important than that from the interface (IF) and propagating (PR) optical phonons. Ternary mixed crystal and size effects on the electron mobility are also investigated. The results show that the PR phonons exist while the IF phonons disappear when the indium composition x < 0.047, and vice versa. Accordingly, the total electron mobility μ first increases and then decreases with indium composition x, and reaches a peak value of approximately 3700 cm2/(V.s) when x = 0.047. The results also show that the mobility μ increases as increasing the core radius of CSNWs due to the weakened interaction between the electrons and CO phonons. The total electron mobility limited by the optical phonons exhibits an obvious enhancement as decreasing temperature or increasing line electron density. Our theoretical results are expected to be helpful to develop electronic devices based on CSNWs.

  17. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology position stand: The use of instability to train the core in athletic and nonathletic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Drinkwater, Eric J; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Cowley, Patrick M

    2010-02-01

    The use of instability devices and exercises to train the core musculature is an essential feature of many training centres and programs. It was the intent of this position stand to provide recommendations regarding the role of instability in resistance training programs designed to train the core musculature. The core is defined as the axial skeleton and all soft tissues with a proximal attachment originating on the axial skeleton, regardless of whether the soft tissue terminates on the axial or appendicular skeleton. Core stability can be achieved with a combination of muscle activation and intra-abdominal pressure. Abdominal bracing has been shown to be more effective than abdominal hollowing in optimizing spinal stability. When similar exercises are performed, core and limb muscle activation are reported to be higher under unstable conditions than under stable conditions. However, core muscle activation that is similar to or higher than that achieved in unstable conditions can also be achieved with ground-based free-weight exercises, such as Olympic lifts, squats, and dead lifts. Since the addition of unstable bases to resistance exercises can decrease force, power, velocity, and range of motion, they are not recommended as the primary training mode for athletic conditioning. However, the high muscle activation with the use of lower loads associated with instability resistance training suggests they can play an important role within a periodized training schedule, in rehabilitation programs, and for nonathletic individuals who prefer not to use ground-based free weights to achieve musculoskeletal health benefits.

  18. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  19. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - X. A suggested evolutionary diagram for pre-stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R. J.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2011-10-01

    We propose an evolutionary path for pre-stellar cores on the radius-mass diagram, which is analogous to stellar evolutionary paths on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations of L1688 in the Ophiuchus star-forming complex, we analyse the HCO+ (J= 4 → 3) spectral line profiles of pre-stellar cores. We find that of the 58 cores observed, 14 show signs of infall in the form of a blue-asymmetric double-peaked line profile. These 14 cores all lie beyond the Jeans mass line for the region on a radius-mass plot. Furthermore, another 10 cores showing tentative signs of infall, in their spectral line profile shapes, appear on or just over the Jeans mass line. We therefore propose the manner in which a pre-stellar core evolves across this diagram. We hypothesize that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasi-statically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability, it begins to collapse, decreasing in radius, towards the region of the diagram where protostellar cores are seen.

  20. Pontine Stimulation Overcomes Developmental Limitations in the Neural Mechanisms of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H., Jr; Rabinak, Christine A.; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2005-01-01

    Pontine neuronal activation during auditory stimuli increases ontogenetically between postnatal days (P) P17 and P24 in rats. Pontine neurons are an essential component of the conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway for eyeblink conditioning, providing mossy fiber input to the cerebellum. Here we examined whether the developmental limitation in pontine…

  1. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the purpose...

  2. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the purpose...

  3. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the purpose...

  4. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the purpose...

  5. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the purpose...

  6. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  7. Different precore/core mutations of hepatitis B interact with, limit, or favor liver fibrosis severity.

    PubMed

    Ducancelle, Alexandra; Pivert, Adeline; Bertrais, Sandrine; Boursier, Jérôme; Balan, Viorica; Veillon, Pascal; le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Thibault, Vincent; Castelain, Sandrine; Roquebert, Bénédicte; Coste-Burel, Marianne; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Larrat, Sylvie; Maylin, Sarah; Alain, Sophie; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Gordien, Emmanuel; Gozlan, Joël; Brodard, Véronique; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Calès, Paul; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise

    2016-10-01

    The impact of basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) mutants of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) on liver disease severity remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to screen BCP and PC mutations in 252 HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive carriers in France and to assess relationships between these mutations and severe fibrosis. Direct sequencing of the precore/core gene was used to detect A1762T/G1764A and G1757A mutations in the BCP and G1896A and G1899A mutations in the PC region. The prevalences of A1762T/G1764A, G1757A, G1896A, and G1899A mutations were 34.1%, 38.7%, 54.9%, and 29.3% (P < 0.001), respectively. The independent predictors of severe fibrosis (≥F3 Metavir) were older age (P < 0.001), male gender (P = 0.012), elevated alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.001), and the double A1762T/G1764A mutant with no other mutations (P = 0.011). Interestingly, the association of the G1899A mutation with the double A1762T/G1764A mutant significantly counteracted the deleterious effect of the sole double A1762T/G1764A mutant (odds ratio [OR] = 0.28 vs. OR = 3.55, respectively, P = 0.028). Patients with the A1762T/G1764A mutation have a higher risk of severe fibrosis. The G1899A mutation is a protective factor against severe fibrosis that counteracted the deleterious effect of the A1762T/G1764A mutation. Finally, host phenotypic and HBV genotypic markers independently predict fibrosis severity. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  9. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  10. Atmospheric synoptic conditions of snow precipitation in East Antarctica using ice core and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Ciardini, Virginia; Bonazza, Mattia; Frezzotti, Massimo; Stenni, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences (IPCS) initiatives the GV7 site (70°41' S - 158°51' E) in East Antarctica was chosen as the new drilling site for the Italian contribution to the understanding of the climatic variability in the last 2000 years (IPICS 2k Array). Water stable isotopes and snow accumulation (SMB) values from a shallow firn core, obtained at GV7 during the 2001-2002 International Trans-Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE) traverse, are analyzed and compared with different meteorological model output in order to characterize the atmospheric synoptic conditions driving precipitation events at the site. On annual basis, ECMWF +24h forecasted snowfalls (SF) seem to well reproduce GV7 SMB values trend for the period from 1980 to 2005. Calculated air mass back-trajectories show that Eastern Indian - Western Pacific oceans represent the main moisture path toward the site during autumn - winter season. Analysis of the ECMWF 500 hPa Geopotential height field (GP500) anomalies shows that atmospheric blocking events developing between 130° E and 150° W at high latitudes drive the GV7 SMB by blocking zonal flow and conveying warm and moist deep air masses from ocean into the continental interior. On inter-annual basis, The SF variability over GV7 region follows the temporal oscillation of the third CEOF mode (CEOF3 10% of the total explained variance) of a combined complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) performed over GP500 and SF field. The CEOF3 highlights an oscillating feature, with wavenumber 2, in GP500 field over the Western Pacific-Eastern Indian Oceans and propagating westward. The pattern is deeply correlated with the Indian Dipole Oscillation and ENSO and their associated quasi-stationary Rossby waves propagating from the lower toward the higher latitudes.

  11. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  12. A new 10Be record recovered from an Antarctic ice core: validity and limitations to record the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Mélanie; Bard, Edouard; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides provide the only possibility to document solar activity over millennia. Carbon-14 (14C) and beryllium-10 (10Be) records are retrieved from tree rings and ice cores, respectively. Recently, 14C records have also proven to be reliable to detect two large Solar Proton Events (SPE) (Miyake et al., Nature, 2012, Miyake et al., Nat. Commun., 2013) that occurred in 774-775 A.D. and in 993-994 A.D.. The origin of these events is still under debate but it opens new perspectives for the interpretation of 10Be ice core records. We present a new 10Be record from an ice core from Dome C (Antarctica) covering the last millennium. The chronology of this new ice core has been established by matching volcanic events on the WAIS Divide ice core (WDC06A) that is the best dated record in Antarctica over the Holocene (Sigl et al., JGR, 2013, Sigl et al., Nat. Clim. Change, 2014). The five minima of solar activity (Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton) are detected and characterized by a 10Be concentration increase of ca. 20% above average in agreement with previous studies of ice cores drilled at South Pole and Dome Fuji in Antarctica (Bard et al., EPSL, 1997; Horiuchi et al., Quat. Geochrono., 2008) and at NGRIP and Dye3 in Greenland (Berggren et al., GRL, 2009). The high resolution, on the order of a year, allows the detection of the 11-year solar cycle. Sulfate concentration, a proxy for volcanic eruptions, has also been measured in the very same samples, allowing a precise comparison of both 10Be and sulfate profiles. We confirm the systematic relationship between stratospheric eruptions and 10Be concentration increases, first evidenced by observations of the stratospheric volcanic eruptions of Agung in 1963 and Pinatubo in 1991 (Baroni et al., GCA, 2011). This relationship is due to an increase in 10Be deposition linked to the role played by the sedimentation of volcanic aerosols. In the light of these new elements, we will discuss the limitations and

  13. Unconditional efficient one-sided confidence limits for the odds ratio based on conditional likelihood.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Chris J; Moldovan, Max V

    2007-12-10

    We compare various one-sided confidence limits for the odds ratio in a 2 x 2 table. The first group of limits relies on first-order asymptotic approximations and includes limits based on the (signed) likelihood ratio, score and Wald statistics. The second group of limits is based on the conditional tilted hypergeometric distribution, with and without mid-P correction. All these limits have poor unconditional coverage properties and so we apply the general transformation of Buehler (J. Am. Statist. Assoc. 1957; 52:482-493) to obtain limits which are unconditionally exact. The performance of these competing exact limits is assessed across a range of sample sizes and parameter values by looking at their mean size. The results indicate that Buehler limits generated from the conditional likelihood have the best performance, with a slight preference for the mid-P version. This confidence limit has not been proposed before and is recommended for general use, especially when the underlying probabilities are not extreme. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Survey of X-Ray Luminosity Limits for Unobserved Compact Stellar Remnants in Core-Collapse SNRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Anthony Glenn; Herbst, Ashley; Clark, Nina; Thongkham, Paul; Cooper, Eric; Carino, Alexandria; Mathews, Robert; Schenck, Andrew; Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook

    2017-01-01

    Based on archival Chandra data, we revisit a number of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way Galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud. While the core-collapse explosion of a massive star (M > 8 M_sun) has been established or suggested for the origin of some of those SNRs, the compact stellar remnant has yet to be detected within their boundaries. We estimate upper limits on the X-ray luminosity for several of those putative compact remnants. We compare our results with previous estimates, where available, and briefly entertain physical implications of our estimates.

  15. Core-shell Si/Cu nanocomposites synthesized by self-limiting surface reaction as anodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaiqi; Zhang, Zhizhen; Su, Wei; Huang, Xuejie

    Core-shell Si/Cu nanocomposites were synthesized via a flexible self-limiting surface reaction without extra reductant for the first time. The nano Si was uniformly coated with Cu nanoparticles with a diameter of 5-10nm, which can enhance the electronic conductivity of the nanocomposites and buffer the huge volume change during charge/discharge owing to its high ductility. Benefited from the unique structure, the Si/Cu nanocomposites exhibited a good electrochemical performance as anodes for lithium ion batteries, which exhibited a capacity retention of 656mAh/g after 50 cycles and a coulombic efficiency of more than 99%.

  16. Conditioning of the graphite bumper limiter for enhanced confinement discharges in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Ulrickson, M.; Goldston, R.J.; Heifetz, D.B.; Hill, K.W.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1987-05-01

    A strong pumping effect has been observed with plasma operation on the toroidal graphite bumper limiter on TFTR. The pumping effect was induced by conditioning the limiter with a short series (10 to 20) of low density deuterium- or helium-initiated discharges. The density decay constant (tau/sub p/*) for gas-fueled ohmic discharges was reduced from tau/sub p/* > 10 s before conditioning to a minimum value of tau/sub p/* = 0.15 s after conditioning, corresponding to a reduction in the global recycling coefficient from approx.100% to less than 50%. Coincident with the low recycling conditions, low current neutral-beam-fueled discharges show global energy confinement times which are enhanced by a factor of two over results with an unconditioned limiter. Two models are proposed for the observed pumping effects: (1) a depletion model based on pumping of hydrogenic species in the near-surface region of the limiter after depletion of the normally saturated surface layer by (carbon and helium) ion-induced desorption; and (2) a codeposition model based on pumping of hydrogenic species in carbon films sputtered from the limiter by the conditioning process.

  17. Effect of a core conditioning intervention on tests of trunk muscular endurance in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brett A; Hannon, James C; Burns, Ryan D; Williams, Skip M

    2014-07-01

    Trunk and core muscular development has been advocated to increase athletic performance and for maintenance of musculoskeletal health, especially related to the prevention of low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a simple core conditioning routine on tests of trunk and core muscular endurance in school-aged children. Participants included 164 students (86 girls, 78 boys; mean age, 11.5 ± 2.5 years) recruited from a grade school in a metropolitan area located in the southwestern United States. Students performed an equipment-free, moderate-to-high intensity, dynamic core conditioning warm-up routine once a week for a period of 6 weeks during the start of their physical education classes. The intervention consisted of 10 different dynamic core conditioning exercises performed at a 30-second duration per exercise totaling 5 minutes per session. Pre- and post-assessments of muscular endurance consisted of 5 different trunk and core muscular endurance tests: Parallel Roman Chair Dynamic Back Extension, Prone Plank, Lateral Plank, Dynamic Curl-Up, and Static Curl-up. A generalized estimation equation was used to analyze differences in pre- and post-intervention muscular fitness assessments controlling for gender and grade level. Analysis of the data revealed significant increases in muscular fitness test performance for each of the 5 measured outcomes (p < 0.001). Because risk factors of LBP are thought to commence during childhood, results of this study suggest that it may be desirable for children and adolescents to perform moderate-to-high intensity dynamic core exercises during physical education warm-up to improve trunk and core muscular endurance.

  18. Reducing Conservatism in Aircraft Engine Response Using Conditionally Active Min-Max Limit Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Current aircraft engine control logic uses a Min-Max control selection structure to prevent the engine from exceeding any safety or operational limits during transients due to throttle commands. This structure is inherently conservative and produces transient responses that are slower than necessary. In order to utilize the existing safety margins more effectively, a modification to this architecture is proposed, referred to as a Conditionally Active (CA) limit regulator. This concept uses the existing Min-Max architecture with the modification that limit regulators are active only when the operating point is close to a particular limit. This paper explores the use of CA limit regulators using a publicly available commercial aircraft engine simulation. The improvement in thrust response while maintaining all necessary safety limits is demonstrated in a number of cases.

  19. Analysis on Reactor Criticality Condition and Fuel Conversion Capability Based on Different Loaded Plutonium Composition in FBR Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Saputra, Geby; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Reactor criticality condition and fuel conversion capability are depending on the fuel arrangement schemes, reactor core geometry and fuel burnup process as well as the effect of different fuel cycle and fuel composition. Criticality condition of reactor core and breeding ratio capability have been investigated in this present study based on fast breeder reactor (FBR) type for different loaded fuel compositions of plutonium in the fuel core regions. Loaded fuel of Plutonium compositions are based on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of light water reactor (LWR) for different fuel burnup process and cooling time conditions of the reactors. Obtained results show that different initial fuels of plutonium gives a significant chance in criticality conditions and fuel conversion capability. Loaded plutonium based on higher burnup process gives a reduction value of criticality condition or less excess reactivity. It also obtains more fuel breeding ratio capability or more breeding gain. Some loaded plutonium based on longer cooling time of LWR gives less excess reactivity and in the same time, it gives higher breeding ratio capability of the reactors. More composition of even mass plutonium isotopes gives more absorption neutron which affects to decresing criticality or less excess reactivity in the core. Similar condition that more absorption neutron by fertile material or even mass plutonium will produce more fissile material or odd mass plutonium isotopes to increase the breeding gain of the reactor.

  20. Analysis of a mutant exhibiting conditional sorting to dense core secretory granules in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, G R; Turkewitz, A P

    2001-01-01

    The formation of dense core granules (DCGs) requires both the sorting of granule contents from other secretory proteins and a postsorting maturation process. The Tetrahymena thermophila strain SB281 fails to synthesize DCGs, and previous analysis suggested that the defect lay at or near the sorting step. Because this strain represents one of the very few mutants in this pathway, we have undertaken a more complete study of the phenotype. Genetic epistasis analysis places the defect upstream of those in two other characterized Tetrahymena mutants. Using immunofluorescent detection of granule content proteins, as well as GFP tagging, we describe a novel cytoplasmic compartment to which granule contents can be sorted in growing SB281 cells. Cell fusion experiments indicate that this compartment is not a biosynthetic intermediate in DCG synthesis. Sorting in SB281 is strongly conditional with respect to growth. When cells are starved, the storage compartment is degraded and de novo synthesized granule proteins are rapidly secreted. The mutation in SB281 therefore appears to affect DCG synthesis at the level of both sorting and maturation. PMID:11779800

  1. Analysis of a mutant exhibiting conditional sorting to dense core secretory granules in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Bowman, G R; Turkewitz, A P

    2001-12-01

    The formation of dense core granules (DCGs) requires both the sorting of granule contents from other secretory proteins and a postsorting maturation process. The Tetrahymena thermophila strain SB281 fails to synthesize DCGs, and previous analysis suggested that the defect lay at or near the sorting step. Because this strain represents one of the very few mutants in this pathway, we have undertaken a more complete study of the phenotype. Genetic epistasis analysis places the defect upstream of those in two other characterized Tetrahymena mutants. Using immunofluorescent detection of granule content proteins, as well as GFP tagging, we describe a novel cytoplasmic compartment to which granule contents can be sorted in growing SB281 cells. Cell fusion experiments indicate that this compartment is not a biosynthetic intermediate in DCG synthesis. Sorting in SB281 is strongly conditional with respect to growth. When cells are starved, the storage compartment is degraded and de novo synthesized granule proteins are rapidly secreted. The mutation in SB281 therefore appears to affect DCG synthesis at the level of both sorting and maturation.

  2. Electronic correlations in Fe at Earth's inner core conditions: Effects of alloying with Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilova, O. Yu.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phases of Fe alloyed with 25 at.% of Ni at Earth's core conditions using an ab initio local density approximation + dynamical mean-field theory approach. The alloys have been modeled by ordered crystal structures based on the bcc, fcc, and hcp unit cells with the minimum possible cell size allowing for the proper composition. Our calculations demonstrate that the strength of electronic correlations on the Fe 3 d shell is highly sensitive to the phase and local environment. In the bcc phase, the 3 d electrons at the Fe site with Fe only nearest neighbors remain rather strongly correlated, even at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, with the local and uniform magnetic susceptibility exhibiting a Curie-Weiss-like temperature evolution and the quasiparticle lifetime Γ featuring a non-Fermi-liquid temperature dependence. In contrast, for the corresponding Fe site in the hcp phase, we predict a weakly correlated Fermi-liquid state with a temperature-independent local susceptibility and a quadratic temperature dependence of Γ. The iron sites with nickel atoms in the local environment exhibit behavior in the range between those two extreme cases, with the strength of correlations gradually increasing along the hcp-fcc-bcc sequence. Further, the intersite magnetic interactions in the bcc and hcp phases are also strongly affected by the presence of Ni nearest neighbors. The sensitivity to the local environment is related to modifications of the Fe partial density of states due to mixing with Ni 3 d states.

  3. Model-based condition monitoring of PEM fuel cell using Hotelling T 2 control limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Tang, J.; Sammes, N.; Ding, Y.

    Although a variety of design and control strategies have been proposed to improve the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems, temporary faults in such systems still might occur during operations due to the complexity of the physical process and the functional limitations of some components. The development of an effective condition monitoring system that can detect these faults in a timely manner is complicated by the operating condition variation, the significant variability/uncertainty of the fuel cell system, and the measurement noise. In this research, we propose a model-based condition monitoring scheme that employs the Hotelling T 2 statistical analysis for fault detection of PEM fuel cells. Under a given operating condition, the instantaneous load current, the temperature and fuel/gas source pressures of the fuel cell are measured. These measurements are then fed into a lumped parameter dynamic fuel cell model for the establishment of the baseline under the same operating condition for comparison. The fuel cell operation is simulated under statistical sampling of parametric uncertainties with specified statistics (mean and variance) that account for the system variability/uncertainty and measurement noise. This yields a group of output voltages (under the same operating condition but with uncertainties) as the baseline. Fault detection is facilitated by comparing the real-time measurement of the fuel cell output voltage with the baseline voltages by employing the Hotelling T 2 statistical analysis. The baseline voltages are used to evaluate the output T 2 statistics under normal operating condition. Then, with a given confidence level the upper control limit can be specified. Fault condition will be declared if the T 2 statistics of real-time voltage measurement exceeds the upper control limit. This model-based robust condition monitoring scheme can deal with the operating condition variation, various uncertainties in a fuel cell

  4. Functional limitations in women at midlife: the role of health conditions, behavioral and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Pope, S K; Sowers, M F; Welch, G W; Albrecht, G

    2001-01-01

    This study examined risk factors for functional limitations in a community-based sample of 16,065 women from 5 ethnic groups, aged 40-55 years, enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Almost 20% of this sample reported physical-functioning limitations. Functional limitations were associated with numerous disease conditions, including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack or angina, arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer, and with several behavioral and environmental risk factors, including body mass index, difficulty paying for basics, and high levels of perceived stress. Consistent with findings in older women, this study shows that in addition to health conditions, potentially modifiable risk factors including high body mass index, difficulty paying for basics, and high levels of stress are associated with physical-functioning limitations of women at midlife.

  5. Temperature limits for LMFBR fuel cladding under upset and emergency operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Govindarajan, S.; Chetal, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    LMFBR fuel pin cladding tube is subjected to high transient temperatures during incidents such as pump trip, pump to grid plate pipe rupture etc. It is required to know temperature limits under such transient operating conditions for components involved while analyzing such incidents. A methodology for deriving such limits for fuel clad tube is worked out in this paper by making use of the transient damage correlation proposed by W.F. Brizes et. al.

  6. GATA3 is a reliable marker for neuroblastoma in limited samples, including FNA Cell Blocks, core biopsies, and touch imprints.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Austin Blackburn; Karrs, Jeremiah Xavier; Pitt, Susan; Almenara, Jorge; Powers, Celeste N; Smith, Steven Christopher

    2017-10-04

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) are the most common solid cancer of childhood and infancy; however, in poorly differentiated forms, they present diagnostic challenges. GATA3 has been implicated functionally in NB differentiation, and limited data support its use as an immunohistochemical biomarker for NBs in resection specimens. GATA3 was tested retrospectively in 30 consecutive archival NB samples, including archival cytopathology needle cores and cell blocks (n = 6), scant surgical biopsy specimens and 2-mm NB tissue cores (n = 16), and air-dried touch imprints (n = 8) to evaluate the utility of this marker. Immunostaining was performed per the institutional standard, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-compliant automated staining protocol. GATA3 nuclear staining was scored qualitatively for its intensity and proportion of positivity. All 30 NB specimens showed diffuse nuclear positivity with GATA3. Each sample revealed either strong (n = 26) or moderate nuclear staining (n = 4) in more than 75% of NB cells, regardless of the presence or lack of stromata or necrosis or the degree of differentiation. GATA3 is a reliable diagnostic marker for NBs not only in scant/limited surgical specimens but also in cytologic samples, including air-dried touch imprints, which have previously been undescribed for this marker. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Effect of surface conditioning modalities on the repair bond strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Pereira, Sarina Maciel; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pekkan, Gurel

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4

  8. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  9. Modelling reference conditions for the upper limit of Posidonia oceanica meadows: a morphodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Matteo; Misson, Gloria; Montefalcone, Monica; Archetti, Renata; Nike Bianchi, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The upper portion of the meadows of the protected Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica occurs in the region of the seafloor mostly affected by surf-related effects. Evaluation of its status is part of monitoring programs, but proper conclusions are difficult to draw due to the lack of definite reference conditions. Comparing the position of the meadow upper limit with the beach morphodynamics (i.e. the distinctive type of beach produced by topography and wave climate) provided evidence that the natural landwards extension of meadows can be predicted. Here we present an innovative predictive cartographic approach able to identify the seafloor portion where the meadow upper limit should naturally lies (i.e. its reference conditions). The conceptual framework of this model is based on 3 essential components: i) Definition of the breaking depth geometry: the breaking limit represents the major constrain for the landward meadow development. We modelled the breaking limit (1 year return time) using the software Mike 21 sw. ii) Definition of the morphodynamic domain of the beach using the surf scaling index ɛ; iii) Definition of the P. oceanica upper limit geometry. We coupled detailed aerial photo with thematic bionomic cartography. In GIS environment, we modelled the seafloor extent where the meadow should naturally lies according to the breaking limit position and the morphodynamic domain of the beach. Then, we added the GIS layer with the meadow upper limit geometry. Therefore, the final output shows, on the same map, both the reference condition and the actual location of the upper limit. It make possible to assess the status of the landward extent of a given P. oceanica meadow and quantify any suspected or observed regression caused by anthropic factors. The model was elaborated and validated along the Ligurian coastline (NW Mediteraanean) and was positively tested in other Mediterranean areas.

  10. The role of the nucleus accumbens in instrumental conditioning: Evidence of a functional dissociation between accumbens core and shell.

    PubMed

    Corbit, L H; Muir, J L; Balleine, B W

    2001-05-01

    In three experiments we examined the effect of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the nucleus accumbens core or shell subregions on instrumental performance, outcome devaluation, degradation of the instrumental contingency, Pavlovian conditioning, and Pavlovian-instrumental transfer. Rats were food deprived and trained to press two levers, one delivering food pellets and the other a sucrose solution. All animals acquired the lever-press response although the rate of acquisition and overall response rates in core-lesioned animals were depressed relative to that in the shell- or sham-lesioned animals. Furthermore, in shell- and sham-lesioned rats, post-training devaluation of one of the two outcomes using a specific satiety procedure produced a selective reduction in performance on the lever that, in training, delivered the prefed outcome. In contrast, the core-lesioned rats failed to show a selective devaluation effect and reduced responding on both levers. Subsequent tests revealed that these effects of core lesions were not caused by an impairment in their ability to recall the devalued outcome, to discriminate the two outcomes, or to encode the instrumental action-outcome contingencies to which they were exposed. Additionally, the core lesions did not have any marked effect on Pavlovian conditioning or on Pavlovian-instrumental transfer. Importantly, although shell-lesioned rats showed no deficit in any test of instrumental conditioning or in Pavlovian conditioning, they failed to show any positive transfer in the Pavlovian-instrumental transfer test. This double dissociation suggests that nucleus accumbens core and shell differentially mediate the impact of instrumental and Pavlovian incentive processes, respectively, on instrumental performance.

  11. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...-new, two- engine jet transport airplane with an executive cabin interior. The maximum takeoff weight..., Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads...

  12. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  13. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  14. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  15. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  16. Quantitative study on exact reconstruction sampling condition by verifying solution uniqueness in limited-view CT.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bin; Zhang, Wenkun; Li, Lei; Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan

    2016-10-01

    In limited-view computed tomography reconstruction, iterative image reconstruction with sparsity-exploiting methods, such as total variation (TV) minimization, inspired by compressive sensing, potentially claims large reductions in sampling requirements. However, a quantitative notion of this claim is non-trivial because of the ill-defined reduction in sampling achieved by the sparsity-exploiting method. In this paper, exact reconstruction sampling condition for limited-view problem is studied by verifying the uniqueness of solution in TV minimization model. Uniqueness is tested by solving a convex optimization problem derived from the sufficient and necessary condition of solution uniqueness. Through this method, the sufficient sampling number of exact reconstruction is quantified for any fixed phantom and settled geometrical parameter in the limited-view problem. This paper provides a reference to quantify the sampling condition. Three phantoms are tested to study the sampling condition of limited view exact reconstruction in this paper. The experiment results show the quantified sampling number and indicate that an object would be accurately reconstructed as the scanning range becomes narrower by increasing sampling number. The increased samplings compensate for the deficiency of the projection angle. However, the lower bound of the scanning range corresponding to three different phantoms are presented, in which an exact reconstruction cannot be obtained once the projection angular is narrowed to this extent no matter how to increase sampling. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prediction of the transport of sand in channels armored with gravel downstream of dams is difficult but necessary for the range of bed conditions from supply limited to capacity transport. Previous work has shown that information on the mean elevation of the sand relative to the gravel and on the s...

  18. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  19. Organisational Conditions to Boost or Limit Professional Development in the Cypriot Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loizou, Florentia

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I examine which organisational conditions can promote or limit the professional development of teachers in the Cypriot primary school. The discussion builds on findings from a study I conducted about Cypriot primary school teachers' reflective practices (Loizou 2011). The study was qualitative and used semi-structured interviews…

  20. Determining the minimum conditions for soda-anthraquinone pulping of kenaf bast, core, and whole stalk fibers

    Treesearch

    James S. Han; Thomas A. Rymsza

    1999-01-01

    Chemical pulping of kenaf fiber is comparatively new. In this study, bast, core, and whole stalk kenaf fibers were pulped using a soda-AQ pulping process and various pulping conditions. Handsheets were evaluated for density, Canadian standard freeness, brightness, opacity, smoothness, and tensile, burst, and tear indexes and strength. The results indicate that...

  1. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on convection and dynamos in early and present earth-like cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, K.; Wicht, J.; Dietrich, W.; Christensen, U. R.

    2012-12-01

    The early dynamos of Earth and Mars probably operated without an inner core being present. They were thus exclusively driven by secular cooling and radiogenic heating, whereas the present geodynamo is thought to be predominantly driven by buoyancy fluxes which arise from the release of latent heat and the compositional enrichment associated with inner core solidification. Dynamo simulations model the secular cooling by volumetric internal buoyancy sources and the inner core-related driving by bottom sources. The impact of the inner core growth on the ancient geodynamo has been discussed extensively but is still controversial. As for Mars, the Mars Global Surveyor detected a strong northern-southern dichotomy in the crustal magnetization. A scenario proposed so far is due to such an ancient dynamo, where thermal heterogeneities at the core mantle boundary (CMB) were imposed by the lower mantle structure. A key issue here is how easily influence of the boundary anomalies emerges. Here we show that the dynamos without inner core solidification are much more sensitive to the CMB heat flows imposed by the lower mantle structure. We compare three-dimensional convection-driven MHD dynamo simulations either driven by homogeneously distributed internal heat sources or by buoyancy sources at the inner core boundary (ICB). Several different boundary heat-flux patterns are used. The effects are found even when boundaries are homogeneous. The impact of the outer boundary condition, fixed temperature or fixed heat flux, is large when convection is predominantly driven by volumetric internal heating. In the dynamos driven by ICB buoyancy sources, the lower boundary condition becomes more important. In both cases, a fixed flux condition promotes larger convective scales than a fixed temperature condition. A dipolar magnetic field can further increase the flow scale. This different sensitivity may also extend to cases when CMB heat flows are laterally inhomogeneous. In the dynamos

  2. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  3. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  4. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    PubMed

    Dinkins, Jonathan B; Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Kirol, Christopher P; Pratt, Aaron C; Conover, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m), while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between areas within

  5. Computing cellular automata spectra under fixed boundary conditions via limit graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruivo, Eurico L. P.; de Oliveira, Pedro P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata are fully discrete complex systems with parallel and homogeneous behavior studied both from the theoretical and modeling viewpoints. The limit behaviors of such systems are of particular interest, as they give insight into their emerging properties. One possible approach to investigate such limit behaviors is the analysis of the growth of graphs describing the finite time behavior of a rule in order to infer its limit behavior. Another possibility is to study the Fourier spectrum describing the average limit configurations obtained by a rule. While the former approach gives the characterization of the limit configurations of a rule, the latter yields a qualitative and quantitative characterisation of how often particular blocks of states are present in these limit configurations. Since both approaches are closely related, it is tempting to use one to obtain information about the other. Here, limit graphs are automatically adjusted by configurations directly generated by their respective rules, and use the graphs to compute the spectra of their rules. We rely on a set of elementary cellular automata rules, on lattices with fixed boundary condition, and show that our approach is a more reliable alternative to a previously described method from the literature.

  6. Comparison of Irradiation Conditions of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel and Surveillance Specimens for Various Core Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukanov, V. N.; Diemokhin, V. L.; Grytsenko, O. V.; Vasylieva, O. G.; Pugach, S. M.

    2009-08-01

    The comparative analysis of irradiation conditions of surveillance specimens and pressure vessel of VVER-1000 reactor has been carried out for various configurations of the core. It is proved the fluences onto specimens and a pressure vessel don't correlate with each other but only the spectral indexes do. It is revealed that in the case of the specimen reconstitution technique application the data on the assembly orientation to the reactor core is sufficient to complete four representative groups from the samples of any container assembly. It is shown that the standard surveillance program of VVER-1000 allows obtaining reliable information on the reactor pressure vessel state.

  7. The core of tau-paired helical filaments studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Martin; Barghorn, Stefan; Müller, Shirley A; Pickhardt, Marcus; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Davies, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2006-05-23

    In Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intracellular paired helical filaments (PHFs). The filaments formed in vivo consist mainly of full-length molecules of the six different isoforms present in adult brain. The substructure of the PHF core is still elusive. Here we applied scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and limited proteolysis to probe the mass distribution of PHFs and their surface exposure. Tau filaments assembled from the three repeat domain have a mass per length (MPL) of approximately 60 kDa/nm and filaments from full-length tau (htau40DeltaK280 mutant) have approximately 160 kDa/nm, compared with approximately 130 kDa/nm for PHFs from Alzheimer's brain. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin accelerate assembly but are not incorporated into PHFs. Limited proteolysis combined with N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of fragments reveals a protease-sensitive N-terminal half and semiresistant PHF core starting in the first repeat and reaching to the C-terminus of tau. Continued proteolysis leads to a fragment starting at the end of the first repeat and ending in the fourth repeat. PHFs from tau isoforms with four repeats revealed an additional cleavage site within the middle of the second repeat. Probing the PHFs with antibodies detecting epitopes either over longer stretches in the C-terminal half of tau or in the fourth repeat revealed that they grow in a polar manner. These data describe the physical parameters of the PHFs and enabled us to build a model of the molecular arrangement within the filamentous structures.

  8. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  9. Evaluation of post-surface conditioning to improve interfacial adhesion in post-core restorations.

    PubMed

    Sumitha, Mylswamy; Kothandaraman, Rajkumar; Sekar, Mahalaxmi

    2011-01-01

    To examine the influence of different post-surface treatments on the interfacial strength between epoxy resin-based fiber posts and methacrylate-based resin composites that are employed as core build-up materials. Forty clear posts were divided into four groups of 10 each. The different surface treatments used were etching with alkaline potassium permanganate, 10% hydrogen peroxide, 37% phosphoric acid, and silanization alone. After etching and thorough rinsing, a single layer of silane was applied to the post surface. Then the post was placed in a rectangular plastic matrix and core bulid-up was done using Multi Core, a dual cured composite resin. A slab of uniform thickness, with the post in the center and the core build-up composite on either side was created. The specimens were cut so as to obtain microtensile sticks that were loaded in tension at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and the paired T test for post-hoc comparisons. The results achieved with potassium permanganate had a significant influence on microtensile interfacial bond strength values with the tested material. Surface chemical treatments of the resin phase of fiber posts enhance the silanization efficiency of the quartz fiber phase, so that the adhesion in the post/core unit may be considered as a net sum of chemical and micromechanical retention.

  10. Strong premelting effect in the elastic properties of hcp-Fe under inner-core conditions.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Benjamí; Vocadlo, Lidunka; Brodholt, John; Wood, Ian G

    2013-10-25

    The observed shear-wave velocity VS in Earth's core is much lower than expected from mineralogical models derived from both calculations and experiments. A number of explanations have been proposed, but none sufficiently explain the seismological observations. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we obtained the elastic properties of hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) at 360 gigapascals up to its melting temperature Tm. We found that Fe shows a strong nonlinear shear weakening just before melting (when T/Tm > 0.96), with a corresponding reduction in VS. Because temperatures range from T/Tm = 1 at the inner-outer core boundary to T/Tm ≈ 0.99 at the center, this strong nonlinear effect on VS should occur in the inner core, providing a compelling explanation for the low VS observed.

  11. Changes in divertor conditions in response to changing core density with RMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briesemeister, A. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Canik, J. M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Frerichs, H.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J. D.; Leonard, A. W.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Schmitz, O.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wang, H. Q.; Watkins, J. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of changes in core density on divertor electron temperature, density and heat flux when resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied are presented, notably a reduction in RMP induced secondary radial peaks in the electron temperature profile at the target plate is observed when the core density is increased, which is consistent with modeling. RMPs is used here to indicate non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations, created using in-vessel control coils, which have at least one but typically many resonances with the rotational transform of the plasma (Evans et al 2006 Phys. Plasmas 13 056121). RMPs are found to alter inter-ELM heat flux to the divertor by modifying the core plasma density. It is shown that applying RMPs reduces the core density and increases the inter-ELM heat flux to both the inner and outer targets. Using gas puffing to return the core density to the pre-RMP levels more than eliminates the increase in inter-ELM heat flux, but a broadening of the heat flux to the outer target remains. These measurements were made at a single toroidal location, but the peak in the heat flux profile was found near the outer strike point where simulations indicate little toroidal variation should exist and tangentially viewing diagnostics showed no evidence of strong asymmetries. In experiments where divertor Thomson scattering measurements were available it is shown that local secondary peaks in the divertor electron temperature profile near the target plate are reduced as the core density is increased, while peaks in the divertor electron density profile near the target are increased. These trends observed in the divertor electron temperature and density are qualitatively reproduced by scanning the upstream density in EMC3-Eirene modeling. Measurements are presented showing that higher densities are needed to induce detachment of the outer strike point in a case where an increase in electron temperature, likely due to a change in MHD activity

  12. Changes in divertor conditions in response to changing core density with RMPs

    DOE PAGES

    Briesemeister, Alexis R.; Ahn, Joon -Wook; Canik, John M.; ...

    2017-06-07

    The effects of changes in core density on divertor electron temperature, density and heat flux when resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied are presented, notably a reduction in RMP induced secondary radial peaks in the electron temperature profile at the target plate is observed when the core density is increased, which is consistent with modeling. RMPs is used here to indicated non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations, created using in-vessel control coils, which have components which has at least one but typically many resonances with the rotational transform of the plasma. RMPs are found to alter inter-ELM heat flux to the divertormore » by modifying the core plasma density. It is shown that applying RMPs reduces the core density and increases the inter-ELM heat flux to both the inner and outer targets. Using gas puffing to return the core density to the pre-RMP levels more than eliminates the increase in inter-ELM heat flux, but a broadening of the heat flux to the outer target remains. These measurements were made at a single toroidal location, but the peak in the heat flux profile was found near the outer strike point where simulations indicate little toroidal variation should exist and tangentially viewing diagnostics showed no evidence of strong asymmetries. In experiments where divertor Thomson scattering measurements were available it is shown that, local secondary peaks in the divertor electron temperature profile near the target plate are reduced as the core density is increased, while peaks in the divertor electron density profile near the target are increased. Furthermore, these trends observed in the divertor electron temperature and density are qualitatively reproduced by scanning the upstream density in EMC3-Eirene modeling. Measurements are presented showing that higher densities are needed to induce detachment of the outer strike point in a case where an increase in electron temperature, likely due to a change in MHD activity

  13. Physiological requirements for growth and competitiveness of Dekkera bruxellensis under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Johanna; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Passoth, Volkmar

    2012-07-01

    The effect of glucose and oxygen limitation on the growth and fermentation performances of Dekkera bruxellensis was investigated in order to understand which factors favour its propagation in ethanol or wine plants. Although D. bruxellensis has been described as a facultative anaerobe, no growth was observed in mineral medium under complete anaerobiosis while growth was retarded under severe oxygen limitation. In a continuous culture with no gas inflow, glucose was not completely consumed, most probably due to oxygen limitation. When an air/nitrogen mixture (O(2)-content ca. 5%) was sparged to the culture, growth became glucose-limited. In co-cultivations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol yields/g consumed sugar were not affected by the co-cultures as compared to the pure cultures. However, different population responses were observed in both systems. In oxygen-limited cultivation, glucose was depleted within 24 h after challenging with S. cerevisiae and both yeast populations were maintained at a stable level. In contrast, the S. cerevisiae population constantly decreased to about 1% of its initial cell number in the sparged glucose-limited fermentation, whereas the D. bruxellensis population remained constant. To identify the requirements of D. bruxellensis for anaerobic growth, the yeast was cultivated in several nitrogen sources and with the addition of amino acids. Yeast extract and most of the supplied amino acids supported anaerobic growth, which points towards a higher nutrient demand for D. bruxellensis compared to S. cerevisiae in anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  15. Arabidopsis plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase is required for nitrogen metabolism under nitrate-limited condition in darkness.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongyan; Xu, Bosi; Zhang, Chunyi; Jiang, Ling

    2017-01-08

    Folates play an important role in plant metabolism. Here we report a T-DNA insertion mutant (atdfb-3) of the plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene (AtDFB) was defective in folate metabolism and nitrogen metabolism under nitrate-limited conditions in darkness. Exogenous applied 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-F-THF) completely restored nitrogen content, soluble protein, total amino acids, individual amino acids including Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, Pro, Arg and Met, nitrate, and endogenous 5-F-THF in atdfb-3 to the wild-type level. At the same time the application of 5-F-THF partially restored the content of Ser and nitrite in the mutant. Taken together, these results indicated that intact folate metabolism was necessary for nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana under nitrate-limited condition in darkness, providing novel insights into function of folate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A water use and growth model for Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    To investigate the environmental impact of plantation forestry using fast-growing tree species in southern India, a program of field studies was initiated in 1987 specifically to measure the water use, nutrient uptake and growth rates of the plantations. A water use and growth (WAG) model is proposed for calculating transpiration and growth of Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions. The model is based on the measured relationships between transpiration rate and basal cross-sectional area and soil moisture availability. The volume growth rate (in water-limited conditions) is assumed to be proportional to the volume of water transpired. The model is calibrated using (deuterium tracing) measurements of transpiration and measurements of growth recorded at the Puradal experimental plantation, Karnataka, southern India.

  17. Bayesian methodology to estimate and update safety performance functions under limited data conditions: a sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Shahram; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Lord, Dominique; Fu, Liping

    2014-03-01

    In road safety studies, decision makers must often cope with limited data conditions. In such circumstances, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), which relies on asymptotic theory, is unreliable and prone to bias. Moreover, it has been reported in the literature that (a) Bayesian estimates might be significantly biased when using non-informative prior distributions under limited data conditions, and that (b) the calibration of limited data is plausible when existing evidence in the form of proper priors is introduced into analyses. Although the Highway Safety Manual (2010) (HSM) and other research studies provide calibration and updating procedures, the data requirements can be very taxing. This paper presents a practical and sound Bayesian method to estimate and/or update safety performance function (SPF) parameters combining the information available from limited data with the SPF parameters reported in the HSM. The proposed Bayesian updating approach has the advantage of requiring fewer observations to get reliable estimates. This paper documents this procedure. The adopted technique is validated by conducting a sensitivity analysis through an extensive simulation study with 15 different models, which include various prior combinations. This sensitivity analysis contributes to our understanding of the comparative aspects of a large number of prior distributions. Furthermore, the proposed method contributes to unification of the Bayesian updating process for SPFs. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the developed methodology. Therefore, the suggested approach offers considerable promise as a methodological tool to estimate and/or update baseline SPFs and to evaluate the efficacy of road safety countermeasures under limited data conditions.

  18. End of life care for infants, children and young people with life-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-01

    Essential facts According to the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the UK has one of the worst child mortality rates in western Europe, with more than 2,000 children and young people dying in 2012. In addition, it is estimated that about 50,000 children and young people in the UK have a life-limiting condition that may need palliative care.

  19. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giao N; Rothstein, Steven J; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed.

  20. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Giao N.; Rothstein, Steven J.; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed. PMID:26322069

  1. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  2. Resonant condition for storage ring short wavelength FEL with power exceeding Renieri limit

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Wu, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of operating a storage ring FEL with resonant conditions providing for preservation of electron beam structure on an optical wave scale. We suggest tuning the storage ring betatron and synchrotron tunes on one of the high (N-th) order resonances to compensate dynamic diffusion of optical phase. This mode of operation does not require isochronicity of the ring lattice. In these conditions optical phase will be restored after N turns around the ring and stochastic conditions used in the derivation of Renieri limit are no longer applicable. We discuss the influence of high order terms in electron motion, RF frequency stability, and synchrotron radiation effects on preservation of optical phase.

  3. Biogenic Growth of Alloys and Core-Shell Nanostructures Using Urease as a Nanoreactor at Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhagwati; Mandani, Sonam; Sarma, Tridib K.

    2013-01-01

    Biomineralization is an extremely efficient biologically guided process towards the advancement of nano-bio integrated materials. As a prime module of the natural world, enzymes are expected to play a major role in biogenic growth of inorganic nanostructures. Although there have been developments in designing enzyme-responsive nanoparticle systems or generation of inorganic nanostructures in an enzyme-stimulated environment, reports regarding action of enzymes as reducing agents themselves for the growth of inorganic nanoparticles still remains elusive. Here we present a mechanistic investigation towards the synthesis of metal and metallic alloy nanoparticles using a commonly investigated enzyme, Jack bean urease (JBU), as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent under physiological conditions. The catalytic functionality of urease was taken advantage of towards the development of metal-ZnO core-shell nanocomposites, making urease an ideal bionanoreactor for synthesizing higher order nanostructures such as alloys and core- shell under ambient conditions. PMID:24018831

  4. Analysis and Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter in Ice Cores as Indicators of Past Environmental Conditions Using High Resolution FTICR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Grannas, A. M.; Willoughby, A. S.; Catanzano, V.; Hatcher, P.

    2015-12-01

    With rapid changes in global temperatures, research aimed at better understanding past climatic events in order to predict future trends is an area of growing importance. Carbonaceous gases stored in ice cores are known to correlate with temperature change and provide evidence of such events. However, more complex forms of carbon preserved in ice cores such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) can provide additional information relating to changes in environmental conditions over time. The examination of ice core samples presents unique challenges including detection of ultra-low concentrations of organic material and extremely limited sample amounts. In this study, solid phase extraction techniques combined with ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR-MS) were utilized to successfully extract, concentrate and analyze the low concentrations of DOM in only 100 mL of ice core samples originating from various regions of Antarctica and Greenland. We characterize the DOM composition in each sample by evaluating elemental ratios, molecular formula distribution (CHO, CHON, CHOS and CHNOS) and compound class composition (lignin, tannin, lipid, condensed aromatic, protein and unsaturated hydrocarbon content). Upon characterization, we identified molecular trends in ice core DOM chemistry that correlated with past climatic events in addition to observing possible photochemical and microbial influences affecting DOM chemistry. Considering these samples range in age from 350-1175 years old, thus being formed during the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age, we observed that DOM properties reflected anticipated changes in composition as influenced by warming and cooling events occurring during that time period.

  5. The elastic properties of hcp-Fe1 - xSix at Earth's inner-core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell, Benjamí; Wood, Ian G.; Brodholt, John; Vočadlo, Lidunka

    2016-10-01

    inner-core conditions and (ii) the use of a velocity-density relationship for pure hcp-iron that is now considered to be incorrect.

  6. Shear relaxation in iron under the conditions of earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, A B; Bryk, T; Rosengren, A

    2010-06-18

    Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of iron at high pressure and temperature are performed to investigate the physics of shear softening. A solid 16×10(6) atoms sample of iron is grown out of the liquid with a small solid immersed in it at the start of simulation. We observe that diffusion in the sheared solid is similar to that in liquid, even though at different time scales. This allows us to describe the time dependence of shear stress in terms of elastic and hydrodynamic relaxation. The elastic response of the sample is close to the elastic response of Earth's inner core. This explains the abnormally low shear modulus in the core. The reason for the low shear modulus is the presence of defects of the crystal structure.

  7. Core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability conditions.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Martin, Julio; Martin, Fernando; Flandez, Jorge; Colado, Juan C

    2015-07-01

    Literature that provides progression models based on core muscle activity and postural manipulations is scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability levels and additional elastic resistance. A descriptive study of electromyography (EMG) was performed with forty-four healthy subjects that completed 12 exercises in a random order. Exercises were performed unipedally or bipedally with or without elastic tubing as resistance on various unstable (uncontrolled multiaxial and uniaxial movement) and stable surfaces. Surface EMG on the lumbar multífidus spinae (LM), thoracic multífidus spinae (TM), lumbar erector spinae (LE), thoracic erector spinae (TE) and gluteus maximus (GM), on the dominant side of the body were collected to quantify the amount of muscle activity and were expressed as a % of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Significant differences (p<.001) were found between exercises. The three unipedal standing exercises with additional elastic resistance generated the greatest EMG values, ranging from 19% MVIC to 30% MVIC. Postural manipulations with additional elastic resistance and/or unstable devices increase core muscle activity. An adequate exercise progression based on global core EMG could start with seated positions, progressing to bipedal standing stance (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface). Following this, unipedal standing positions may be performed (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface) and finally, elastic resistance must be added in order to increase EMG levels (i.e., from stable surface progressing to any of the used unstable surfaces). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mass spectrometric characterization of limited proteolysis activity in human plasma samples under mild acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingzhi; Röwer, Claudia; Koy, Cornelia; Ruß, Manuela; Rüger, Christopher P; Zimmermann, Ralf; von Fritschen, Uwe; Bredell, Marius; Finke, Juliane C; Glocker, Michael O

    2015-11-01

    We developed a limited proteolysis assay for estimating dynamics in plasma-borne protease activities using MALDI ToF MS analysis as readout. A highly specific limited proteolysis activity was elicited in human plasma by shifting the pH to 6. Mass spectrometry showed that two singly charged ion signals at m/z 2753.44 and m/z 2937.56 significantly increased in abundance under mild acidic conditions as a function of incubation time. For proving that a provoked proteolytic activity in mild acidic solution caused the appearance of the observed peptides, control measurements were performed (i) with pepstatin as protease inhibitor, (ii) with heat-denatured samples, (iii) at pH 1.7, and (iv) at pH 7.5. Mass spectrometric fragmentation analysis showed that the observed peptides encompass the amino acid sequences 1-24 and 1-26 from the N-terminus of human serum albumin. Investigations on peptidase specificities suggest that the two best candidates for the observed serum albumin cleavages are cathepsin D and E. Reproducibility, robustness, and sensitivity prove the potential of the developed limited proteolysis assay to become of clinical importance for estimating dynamics of plasma-borne proteases with respect to associated pathophysiological tissue conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen-Limiting Conditions Enrich for Fimbriate Cells of Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Lane, M. Chelsea; Li, Xin; Pearson, Melanie M.; Simms, Amy N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    MR/P fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis undergo invertible element-mediated phase variation whereby an individual bacterium switches between expressing fimbriae (phase ON) and not expressing fimbriae (phase OFF). Under different conditions, the percentage of fimbriate bacteria within a population varies and could be dictated by either selection (growth advantage of one phase) or signaling (preferentially converting one phase to the other in response to external signals). Expression of MR/P fimbriae increases in a cell-density dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. However, rather than the increased cell density itself, this increase in fimbrial expression is due to an enrichment of fimbriate bacteria under oxygen limitation resulting from increased cell density. Our data also indicate that the persistence of MR/P fimbriate bacteria under oxygen-limiting conditions is a result of both selection (of MR/P fimbrial phase variants) and signaling (via modulation of expression of the MrpI recombinase). Furthermore, the mrpJ transcriptional regulator encoded within the mrp operon contributes to phase switching. Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli, which are likewise subject to phase variation via an invertible element, also increase in expression during reduced oxygenation. These findings provide evidence to support a mechanism for persistence of fimbriate bacteria under oxygen limitation, which is relevant to disease progression within the oxygen-restricted urinary tract. PMID:19114498

  10. Limiting conditions of the horizontal transmission of the Drosophila C virus in its host ( D. melanogaster)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomariz-Zilber, Eliane; Jeune, Bernard; Thomas-Orillard, Michèle

    1998-04-01

    We carried out experiments with virus infected females on the horizontal transmission of Drosophila C virus on artificial culture medium and under controlled conditions. The numerical results made it possible to build up an empirical model. We tested the values of the rearing parameters under nearly natural conditions in boxes containing pieces of rotting apple. A good agreement between observed and estimated values led to the following conclusions: (i) The horizontal transmission of the Drosophila C virus is facilitated via the contamination of the nutritive medium by the cadavers or the feces of virus-infected females (ii) The contamination depends on the richness of viral particles of the contaminating flies. We also confirmed under 'natural' conditions the insufficient contamination of the male flies which justifies the use of females as 'reservoirs' of the virus. The estimation of the biological limiting conditions for horizontal transfer of the virus is the following: a minimum of two contaminating females have to stay for at least two days on an initially uninfected milieu so that a durable contamination of at least some females results. Under these conditions, the richness in viral particles in the contaminated flies is lower than that in the contaminating females and therefore the long term virus infection remains problematical.

  11. Best estimate plus uncertainty analysis of departure from nucleate boiling limiting case with CASL core simulator VERA-CS in response to PWR main steam line break event

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Cameron S.; Zhang, Hongbin; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Sung, Yixing

    2016-09-07

    VERA-CS (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, Core Simulator) is a coupled neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics subchannel code under development by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS was used to simulate a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) full core response with 17x17 fuel assemblies for a main steam line break (MSLB) accident scenario with the most reactive rod cluster control assembly stuck out of the core. The accident scenario was initiated at the hot zero power (HZP) at the end of the first fuel cycle with return to power state points that were determined by a system analysis code and the most limiting state point was chosen for core analysis. The best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analysis method was applied using Wilks’ nonparametric statistical approach. In this way, 59 full core simulations were performed to provide the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR) at the 95/95 (95% probability with 95% confidence level) tolerance limit. The results show that this typical PWR core remains within MDNBR safety limits for the MSLB accident.

  12. Best estimate plus uncertainty analysis of departure from nucleate boiling limiting case with CASL core simulator VERA-CS in response to PWR main steam line break event

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Cameron S.; Zhang, Hongbin; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; ...

    2016-09-07

    VERA-CS (Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, Core Simulator) is a coupled neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics subchannel code under development by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). VERA-CS was used to simulate a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) full core response with 17x17 fuel assemblies for a main steam line break (MSLB) accident scenario with the most reactive rod cluster control assembly stuck out of the core. The accident scenario was initiated at the hot zero power (HZP) at the end of the first fuel cycle with return to power state points that were determined by amore » system analysis code and the most limiting state point was chosen for core analysis. The best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) analysis method was applied using Wilks’ nonparametric statistical approach. In this way, 59 full core simulations were performed to provide the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR) at the 95/95 (95% probability with 95% confidence level) tolerance limit. The results show that this typical PWR core remains within MDNBR safety limits for the MSLB accident.« less

  13. Carbon Solution in Core-Forming Magma Ocean Conditions: Implications for the Origin and Distribution of Terrestrial Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Chi, H.; Walker, D.; Shimizu, N.; Buono, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    The origin of bulk silicate Earth carbon inventory is poorly known and the fate of the element during the early Earth differentiation and core formation is a missing link in the evolution of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we present high pressure-temperature experiments that simulate metal-silicate equilibria in a shallow magma ocean. Experiments were performed at 1-5 GPa, 1600-2100 °C on mixtures of synthetic or natural silicates (tholeiitic basalt/ alkali basalt/ komatiite/ fertile peridotite) and Fe-Ni-C±Co±S contained in graphite or MgO capsules. All the experiments produced immiscible Fe-rich metallic and silicate melts at oxygen fugacity (fO2) between ~IW-1.5 and IW-1.9. Carbon and hydrogen concentrations of basaltic glasses and non-glassy quenched silicate melts were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and speciation of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in silicate glasses was constrained using Raman spectroscopy. Carbon contents of metallic melts were determined using both electron microprobe and SIMS. Our experiments indicate that at core-forming, reduced conditions, carbon in mafic-ultramafic magmas dissolves primarily as various hydrogenated species and the total carbon storage capacity, although is significantly higher than solubility of CO2 under similar conditions, remains low (<500 ppm). The total carbon content in our reduced melts at graphite saturation increases with increasing melt depolymerization (NBO/T), consistent with recent spectroscopic studies [1], and modestly with increasing hydration. Carbon behaves as a metal loving element during core-mantle separation and metal/silicate carbon partition coefficient, DC varies between ~3500 and ≥150 and increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature and melt NBO/T. Extrapolation of our data to the plausible conditions of core-mantle equilibration suggest that if only a trace amount of carbon (~730 ppm C; [2]) was available during early Earth

  14. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  15. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  16. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  17. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  18. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  19. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  20. The effect of Si on metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements and implications for the conditions of core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuff, James; Wood, Bernard J.; Wade, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We have determined the liquid metal-liquid silicate partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W, V, Cr and Nb at 1.5 GPa/1923 K and 6 GPa/2123 K under conditions of constant silicate melt composition with variable amounts of Si in the Fe-rich metallic liquid. Partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W and V is sensitive to the Si content of the metal with, in all five cases, increasing Si tending to make the element more lithophile than for conditions where the metal is Si-free. In contrast, metal-silicate partitioning of Cr and Nb is, at constant silicate melt composition, insensitive to the Si content of the metal. The implications of our data are that if, as indicated by the Si isotopic composition of the silicate Earth ( Georg et al., 2007; Fitoussi et al., 2009), the core contains significant amounts of Si, the important siderophile elements Ni, Co, W and Mo were more lithophile during accretion and core formation than previously believed. We use our new data in conjunction with published metal-silicate partitioning results to develop a model of continuous accretion and core segregation taking explicit account of the partitioning of Si (this study) and O (from Ozawa et al., 2008) between metal and silicate and their effects on metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements. We find that the effect of Si on the siderophile characteristics of Ni, Co and W means that the pressures of core segregation estimated from these elements are ˜5 GPa lower than those derived from experiments in which the metal contained negligible Si (e.g., Wade and Wood, 2005). The core-mantle partitioning of Cr and Nb requires that most of Earth accretion took place under conditions which were much more reducing than those implied by the current FeO content of the mantle and that the oxidation took place late in the accretionary process. Paths of terrestrial accretion, oxidation state and partitioning which are consistent with the current mantle contents of Ni, Co, W, V, Cr and Nb lead to Si and O contents

  1. Pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition: The impact of communication and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuqi; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui; Shan, Jingjing

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition based on the social force approach. It is assumed that there are two types of pedestrians: Informed individuals know the exit location whereas uninformed individuals do not. The uninformed individuals can communicate with the informed ones within their perceptual fields, thus learning to know and memorize the exit location. We consider cases with and without communication/memory. The simulations show communication and memory are able to enhance the evacuation efficiency. We also investigate the impact of communication on the efficiency of an emergency exit.

  2. A necessary condition for applying MUSIC algorithm in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taehoon; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-09-01

    Throughout various results of numerical simulations, it is well-known that MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm can be applied in the limited-view inverse scattering problems. However, the application is somehow heuristic. In this contribution, we identify a necessary condition of MUSIC for imaging of collection of small, perfectly conducting cracks. This is based on the fact that MUSIC imaging functional can be represented as an infinite series of Bessel function of integer order of the first kind. Numerical experiments from noisy synthetic data supports our investigation.

  3. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  4. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-F; Zhou, D; Guo, J; Manter, D K; Reardon, K F; Vivanco, J M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest soil on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth-promoting effects on Arabidopsis (Col-0). Four selected isolates including one Bacillus subtilis, two B. atrophaeus and one B. pumilus significantly promoted growth of Zea mays L. and Solanum lycopersicum under greenhouse conditions. Moreover, the PGPRs significantly promoted growth of S. lycopersicum in both low and nitrogen-amended soil conditions. These PGPR strains were further studied to obtain insights into possible mechanisms of plant growth promotion. Volatile chemicals from those isolates promoted Arabidopsis growth, and the expression of genes related to IAA production was induced in the Arabidopsis plants treated with PGPRs. Further, selected PGPR strains triggered induced systemic resistance (ISR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 in Arabidopsis. PGPR strains isolated from the rainforest soil promoted the plant growth of Arabidopsis, corn and tomato. New PGPR that have wider adaptability to different crops, soils and environmental conditions are needed to decrease our reliance on agricultural amendments derived from fossil-based fuels. The PGPRs isolated from a nonagricultural site constitute new plant growth-promoting strains that could be developed for agricultural uses. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1991-01-01

    The Final Report on contributions from geomagnetic inverse theory to the study of hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is presented. The original proposal was to study five questions concerning what the surface and satellite magnetic data imply about hydromagnetic and electromagnetic conditions near the CMB. The five questions are: (1) what do the surface and satellite data imply about the geomagnetic field B near the surface of the earth; (2) how does one extrapolate B down through the conducting mantle to the CMB; (3) if B on the CMB is visible, how accurately does it satisfy the frozen-flux approximation; (4) if frozen flux is a good approximation on the CMB, what can be inferred about the fluid velocity v in the upper core; and (5) if v at the CMB is visible, does it suggest any dynamical properties of the core, such as vertical advection, Alfven-inertial waves, link instabilities, or mantle effects. A summary of the research is provided.

  6. In-situ Density and Thermal Expansion Measurements of Fe and Fe-S Alloying Liquids Under Planetary Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Chantel, J.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid iron is likely the dominant constituent in the cores of terrestrial planets and icy satellites such as Earth, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Ganymede, and Io. Suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations, light elements such as S, C, Si, etc., are likely present in planetary cores. These light elements can significantly reduce the density and melting temperature of the Fe cores, and hence their abundances are crucial to our understanding of the structure and thermal history of planetary cores, as well as the generation of intrinsic magnetic fields. Knowledge on the density of Fe-light element alloying liquids at high pressures is critical to place constraints on the composition of planetary cores. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited in pressure and composition and are sometimes controversial. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-rich liquids by measuring the density of Fe, Fe-10wt%S, Fe-20wt%S, Fe-27wt%S, and FeS liquids using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. An ion chamber (1D-detector) and a CCD camera (2D-detector) were used to measure intensities of transmitted monochromatic X-rays through molten samples, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The densities were then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients, calibrated by solid standards using X-ray diffraction. At each pressure, density measurements were conducted at a range of temperatures above the liquidus of the samples, enabling the determination of thermal expansion. Combined with our previous results on the sound velocity of Fe and Fe-S liquids at high pressures (Jing et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 396, 78-87), these data provide tight constraints on the equation of state and thermodynamic properties such as the adiabatic temperature gradient for Fe-S liquids. We will discuss these results with implications to planetary

  7. A high sensitivity wear debris sensor using ferrite cores for online oil condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Chong; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Detecting wear debris and measuring the increasing number of wear debris in lubrication oil can indicate abnormal machine wear well ahead of machine failure, and thus are indispensable for online machine health monitoring. A portable wear debris sensor with ferrite cores for online monitoring is presented. The sensor detects wear debris by measuring the inductance change of two planar coils wound around a pair of ferrite cores that make the magnetic flux denser and more uniform in the sensing channel, thereby improving the sensitivity of the sensor. Static testing results showed this wear debris sensor is capable of detecting 11 µm and 50 µm ferrous debris in 1 mm and 7 mm diameter fluidic pipes, respectively; such a high sensitivity has not been achieved before. Furthermore, a synchronized sampling method was also applied to reduce the data size and realize real-time data processing. Dynamic testing results demonstrated that the sensor is capable of detecting wear debris in real time with a high throughput of 750 ml min-1 the measured debris concentration is in good agreement with the actual concentration.

  8. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  9. Enhancing patient-professional communication about end-of-life issues in life-limiting conditions: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sarah; Gardiner, Clare; Gott, Merryn; Payne, Sheila; Chady, Becky; Small, Neil; Seamark, David; Halpin, David

    2012-12-01

    The End of Life Care Strategy for England highlights effective communication between patients and professionals as key to facilitating patient involvement in advance care planning. The strategy emphasizes that, currently, communication in patients with noncancer life-limiting conditions is likely to be inadequate, and research has identified that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure have a poor understanding of their condition. To identify existing interventions of patient-professional communication developed for life-limiting conditions and explore the applicability of interventions developed within a cancer framework to other diagnostic groups. A comprehensive literature review of studies describing communication interventions for patients receiving end-of-life care was undertaken. Ten electronic databases were searched. Inclusion criteria were all English language studies relating to patient-professional communication interventions for patients with life-limiting conditions receiving end-of-life care. Of the 755 articles initially identified, 16 met the inclusion criteria. Three core themes emerged from the synthesis of the literature: using education to enhance professional communication skills, using communication to improve patient understanding, and using communication skills to facilitate advance care planning. Although limited, evidence relating to the development and evaluation of communication interventions for patients with life-limiting illnesses would suggest that a successful intervention should include combined components of training, patient discussion, and education. In a context of limited resources and an increasing number of patients living and dying with chronic life-limiting conditions, the need for appropriate and effective communication strategies should be seen as a priority for both research and policy. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure and Deformation Conditions at the 15deg 45N Oceanic Core Complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Escartin, J.; McCaig, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    We have surveyed and sampled in detail the corrugated massif exposed at 15deg 45N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (ODP Site 1275) in order to understand better the structure and deformation conditions that operate at oceanic core complexes. Supplemented by 23 dredge hauls, we obtained 63 drill cores from the surface and flanks of the 15deg 45N massif. The cores were taken using the BRIDGE seabed rock drill, which takes metre-length samples with full geographical orientation. This offers a significant advantage for structural geological studies over dredge, submersible or ODP samples, which are non- or at best partially-orientated. Reorientating the BRIDGE drill cores has allowed us to constrain the kinematics of deformation of fault rocks that we recovered everywhere from the corrugated surface of the massif. Fault rocks are dominated by talc-, chlorite- and/or tremolite-schists, predominantly derived from an ultramafic protolith, indicating that deformation of mantle peridotite occurred in the greenschist facies. Fluid pressures and silica activity must have been high. High temperature deformation is all but absent, and is not associated directly with the detachment fault that evidently forms the surface of the 15deg 45N massif. Synkinematic emplacement of diabase dykes into the fault zone from an immediately subjacent gabbro pluton in the footwall implies that the detachment must have been active as a low-angle fault surface at very shallow levels directly beneath the ridge axis. Our observations do not support 'rolling hinge' models for core complex formation. Instead, strain localisation occurred in response to the weakening of a range of hydrous secondary minerals at a very early stage, possibly along some kind of alteration front, and was highly efficient. Deformation at deeper levels within the lithosphere, below the inferred alteration front, must have been accommodated by a different mechanism, one spatially unrelated to the observed detachment fault zone.

  11. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  12. Growth and physiology of Thiobacillus novellus under nutrient-limited mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Leefeldt, R H; Matin, A

    1980-01-01

    Thiobacillus novellus was cultivated in a chemostate under the individual limitations of thiosulfate, glucose, and thiosulfate plus glucose. At dilution rate (D) of 0.05 h-1 or lower, the steady-state biomass concentration in mixotrophic medium was additive of the heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass at corresponding D values. The ambient concentrations of thiosulfate, glucose, or both in the various cultures were low and were very similar in mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic environments at a given D value. At D = 0.05 h-1, mixotrophic cells possessed higher activities of sulfite oxidase and thiosulfate oxidation compared to autotrophic cells, as well as higher activities of glucose enzymes and glucose oxidation than heterotrophic cells. Thus, in contrast to nutrient-excess conditions, in nutrient-limited mixotrophic environments at these D values, T. novellus did not exhibit characteristics of uncoupled substrate oxidation, inhibition of substrate utilization, and repression of enzymes of energy metabolism. It is concluded that T. novellus responds to mixotrophic growth conditions differently in environments of different nutritional status, and the ecological and physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:7380804

  13. Strength of thawed and frozen soils of dam cores under conditions of triaxial independent loading by tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, I.M.; Sinyakov, L.N.; Mel'nikov, V.A.

    1988-07-01

    A method is proposed to solve the problem of tension cracking of dam cores which includes testing soil samples in thawed and frozen states, calculating the stress-strain state of the dam, determining the extent and spatial orientation of tension cracks, and establishing the extent of open cracks. The results of such investigations are given for evaluating cracking on the crests of the cores of two dams: one being constructed under northern conditions with a height of 132 m and one being planned for construction in the southern region of the country with a height of 330 m. The method can be used when solving problems of stability, investigating the failure possibility of deformable foundations by tension, and determining pressure on a structure.

  14. Microbial lipid production by Rhodosporidium toruloides under sulfate-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siguo; Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hongwei; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2011-01-01

    Novel biochemical approaches remain to be developed to improve microbial lipid technology. This study demonstrated that sulfate limitation was effective to promote accumulating substantial amounts of intracellular lipid by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Y4. When it was cultivated using a medium with an initial carbon-to-sulfur (C/S) molar ratio of 46,750, cellular lipid content reached up to 58.3%. The time courses of cell growth, lipid accumulation and nutrient depletion were analyzed and discussed in terms of lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, lipid accumulation under sulfate-limited conditions was effective regardless of the presence of a high concentration of nitrogen sources. Thus, lipid contents almost held constant at near 57% in the media with an initial C/S molar ratio of 11,380 although the carbon-to-nitrogen molar ratio ranged from 28.3 to 5.7. Taken together, our results established the sulfate-limitation approach to control lipid biosynthesis, which should be valuable to explore nitrogen-rich raw materials as the feedstock for lipid production.

  15. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores.

    PubMed

    Assis, Jorge; Zupan, Mirta; Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo I; McQuaid, Christopher D; Serrão, Ester A

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role.

  16. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Serrão, Ester A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role. PMID:26114766

  17. The effect of medical conditions on the functional limitations of Mexican-American elderly.

    PubMed

    Markides, K S; Stroup-Benham, C A; Goodwin, J S; Perkowski, L C; Lichtenstein, M; Ray, L A

    1996-09-01

    We examined the relationship of self-reported functional status to common medical conditions using a probability sample of 3050 noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 or older and residing in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas). All subjects were interviewed in person (n = 2,873) or by proxy (n = 177) in their homes during late 1993 and early 1994. The questionnaire obtained information on self-reported functional status and prevalence of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, stroke, heart attack, and hip fracture. The prevalence of medical conditions ranged from 4.1% for hip fracture to 40.8% for arthritis. Prevalence of impairments in seven activities of daily living ranged from 5.4% for eating to 11.7% for bathing, while 25.1% could not walk up and down stairs, and 28.9% could not walk a half mile without help. In multiple logistic regression analyses, previous diagnoses of stroke and hip fracture were most predictive of functional limitations, though all conditions examined (arthritis, cancer, diabetes, stroke, heart attack, and hip fracture) were independently associated with increased odds of impairment in some activities of daily living. In general, the odds for functional impairment associated with specific medical conditions were higher than those previously published for non-Hispanic white populations. The fact that Mexican-American elderly who live in the community and who have medical conditions, especially stroke and hip fracture, are at high risk for functional impairment probably reflects the low rate of institutionalization in this population and has implications for the provision of community-based long-term care services for Mexican-American elderly.

  18. Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

    It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against

  19. The terrestrial green macroalga Prasiola calophylla (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta): ecophysiological performance under water-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Herburger, Klaus; Blaas, Kathrin; Lewis, Louise A; Karsten, Ulf

    2017-07-01

    The phylogenetic placement of Prasiola calophylla, from an anthropogenic habitat previously shown to contain a novel UV sunscreen compound, was confirmed by analysis of its rbcL gene. This alga has the capacity to tolerate strong water-limiting conditions. The photosynthetic performance and ultrastructural changes under desiccation and osmotic stress were investigated. Freshly harvested thalli showed an effective quantum yield of PSII [Y(II)] of 0.52 ± 0.06 that decreased to ∼60% of the initial value at 3000 mM sorbitol, and 4000 mM sorbitol led to a complete loss of Y(II). The Y(II) of thalli exposed to controlled desiccating conditions at 60% relative humidity (RH) ceased within 240 min, whereas zero values were reached after 120 min at 20% RH. All investigated samples completely recovered Y(II) within ∼100 min after rehydration. Relative electron transport rates (rETR) were temperature dependent, increasing from 5, 10, to 25 °C but strongly declining at 45 °C. Transmission electron microscopy of samples desiccated for 2.5 h showed an electron dense appearance of the entire cytoplasm when compared to control samples. Thylakoid membranes were still visible in desiccated cells, corroborating the ability to recover. Control and desiccated cells contained numerous storage lipids and starch grains, providing reserves. Overall, P. calophylla showed a high capacity to cope with water-limiting conditions on a physiological and structural basis. A lipophilic outer layer of the cell walls might contribute to reduce water evaporation in this poikilohydric organism.

  20. Floral resource limitation severely reduces butterfly survival, condition and flight activity in simplified agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Julie; Wesselingh, Renate A; Van Dyck, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural intensification has a strong negative impact on farmland biodiversity (including flower-visiting insects), but understanding the mechanisms involved in this requires experimental work. We document the impact of nectar limitation on the performance of a flower-visiting insect, the meadow brown butterfly Maniola jurtina. We conducted two types of experiments: a field experiment in agricultural landscapes with grasslands of different management intensity and an experiment in outdoor flight cages in which the nectar supply was simulated. For the field experiment, we introduced an array of nectar resources in intensively managed, nectar-poor meadows and in extensively managed, flower-rich grasslands and counted flower visitors. Despite higher butterfly abundance in the extensive meadows, our introduced nectar sources were more frequently visited in intensive meadows, indicating the lack of floral resources. The 48-h confinement under nectar-poor conditions in the flight cages had a strong negative effect on body condition, flight activity and lifetime survival compared to butterflies under nectar-rich conditions. Female lifespan was reduced by 22% and male lifespan even by 43%. Agricultural landscapes that provide limited amounts of floral nectar, and no high-quality, preferred nectar sources relative to the needs of the flower-visiting species, may create ecological sinks. Regards an insect's performance, the simple presence of nectar is not necessarily functionally adequate. The effectiveness of agri-environmental schemes for flower-visiting insects (e.g. flower strips) could be improved based on ecological and evolutionary insights on the effects of specific nectar quantities and qualities.

  1. [Possibilities and limitations of the surgery of the eye's posterior segment under the outpatient conditions].

    PubMed

    Dolezalová, J; Karel, I; Záhlava, J; Lesták, J

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this article was to analyze possibilities of the vitreoretinal surgery under the outpatient conditions and to set its limitations. During the period January 1st-September 30th, 2004, there were performed 95 operations of 78 eyes in 77 patients. Number of men and women was practically equal; the age ranged 17-86 years (average 62.6 years). We operated on mostly the retinal detachment. These as well as other procedures, including also the extreme surgery with relaxing retinectomy, extraction of the subretinal tractions and membranes, silicone oil implantation or extraction, or operations combined with the cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation. Surgeries were performed under local anesthesia combined with analgesia and sedation introduced by anesthesiologist, who was always present and monitored the patient. Surgeries were performed by means of A.V.I. lens and Biom as well, with the assistance of a doctor, and later on, solely of a theatre nurse. The surgeon performed the operations by herself and long-term followed up the patients. The variety of vitreoretinal procedures did not differ from those performed at the departments of ophthalmology at university hospitals. The retinal detachment surgery was more often performed by means of cryosurgical procedure than pars plana vitrectomy undoubtedly because of early recognition of the beginning detachment. All vitreoretinal procedures may be performed on the outpatient basis. The only limiting factors are the physical condition of the patient and an acute ocular disease demanding urgent surgery in a facility with permanent service. Vitreoretinal surgery in outpatient facility performed under local anesthesia is well tolerated by the patients and the postoperative care under outpatient conditions is of equal quality as in inpatient facilities.

  2. MYB10 and MYB72 Are Required for Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christine M.; Hindt, Maria N.; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  3. Conditions for shock revival by neutrino heating in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-Th.

    2001-03-01

    Energy deposition by neutrinos can rejuvenate the stalled bounce shock and can provide the energy for the supernova explosion of a massive star. This neutrino-heating mechanism, though investigated by numerical simulations and analytic studies, is not finally accepted or proven as the trigger of the explosion. Part of the problem is that different groups have obtained seemingly discrepant results, and the complexity of the hydrodynamic models often hampers a clear and simple interpretation of the results. This demands a deeper theoretical understanding of the requirements of a successful shock revival. A toy model is developed here for discussing the neutrino heating phase analytically. The neutron star atmosphere between the neutrinosphere and the supernova shock can well be considered to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a layer of net neutrino cooling below the gain radius and a layer of net neutrino heating above. Since the mass infall rate to the shock is in general different from the rate at which gas is advected into the neutron star, the mass in the gain layer varies with time. Moreover, the gain layer receives additional energy input by neutrinos emitted from the neutrinosphere and the cooling layer. Therefore the determination of the shock evolution requires a time-dependent treatment. To this end the hydrodynamical equations of continuity and energy are integrated over the volume of the gain layer to obtain conservation laws for the total mass and energy in this layer. The radius and velocity of the supernova shock can then be calculated from global properties of the gain layer as solutions of an initial value problem, which expresses the fact that the behavior of the shock is controlled by the cumulative effects of neutrino heating and mass accumulation in the gain layer. The described toy model produces steady-state accretion and mass outflow from the nascent neutron star as special cases. The approach is useful to illuminate the conditions that can

  4. Local magnetic moments in iron and nickel at ambient and Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausoel, A.; Karolak, M.; Şaşɩoğlu, E.; Lichtenstein, A.; Held, K.; Katanin, A.; Toschi, A.; Sangiovanni, G.

    2017-07-01

    Some Bravais lattices have a particular geometry that can slow down the motion of Bloch electrons by pre-localization due to the band-structure properties. Another known source of electronic localization in solids is the Coulomb repulsion in partially filled d or f orbitals, which leads to the formation of local magnetic moments. The combination of these two effects is usually considered of little relevance to strongly correlated materials. Here we show that it represents, instead, the underlying physical mechanism in two of the most important ferromagnets: nickel and iron. In nickel, the van Hove singularity has an unexpected impact on the magnetism. As a result, the electron-electron scattering rate is linear in temperature, in violation of the conventional Landau theory of metals. This is true even at Earth's core pressures, at which iron is instead a good Fermi liquid. The importance of nickel in models of geomagnetism may have therefore to be reconsidered.

  5. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jennifer R.; Vucetich, Leah M.; Hedrick, Philip W.; Peterson, Rolf O.; Vucetich, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions. PMID:21450731

  6. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer R; Vucetich, Leah M; Hedrick, Philip W; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2011-11-22

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions.

  7. Core functional traits of bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River show limited variation in response to land cover.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of environmental microbial communities via high-throughput DNA sequencing has revealed that patterns in microbial biogeography affect community structure. However, shifts in functional diversity related to variation in taxonomic composition are poorly understood. To overcome limitations due to the prohibitive cost of high-depth metagenomic sequencing, tools to infer functional diversity based on phylogenetic distributions of functional traits have been developed. In this study we characterized functional microbial diversity at 11 sites along the Mississippi River in Minnesota using both metagenomic sequencing and functional-inference-based (PICRUSt) approaches. This allowed us to determine how distance and variation in land cover throughout the river influenced the distribution of functional traits, as well as to validate PICRUSt inferences. The distribution and abundance of functional traits, by metagenomic analysis, were similar among sites, with a median standard deviation of 0.0002% among tier 3 functions in KEGG. Overall inferred functional variation was significantly different (P ≤ 0.035) between two water basins surrounded by agricultural vs. developed land cover, and abundances of bacterial orders that correlated with functional traits by metagenomic analysis were greater where abundances of the trait were inferred to be higher. PICRUSt inferences were significantly correlated (r = 0.147, P = 1.80 × 10(-30)) with metagenomic annotations. Discrepancies between metagenomic and PICRUSt taxonomic-functional relationships, however, suggested potential functional redundancy among abundant and rare taxa that impeded the ability to accurately assess unique functional traits among rare taxa at this sequencing depth. Results of this study suggest that a suite of "core functional traits" is conserved throughout the river and distributions of functional traits, rather than specific taxa, may shift in response to environmental heterogeneity.

  8. Core functional traits of bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River show limited variation in response to land cover

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J.; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of environmental microbial communities via high-throughput DNA sequencing has revealed that patterns in microbial biogeography affect community structure. However, shifts in functional diversity related to variation in taxonomic composition are poorly understood. To overcome limitations due to the prohibitive cost of high-depth metagenomic sequencing, tools to infer functional diversity based on phylogenetic distributions of functional traits have been developed. In this study we characterized functional microbial diversity at 11 sites along the Mississippi River in Minnesota using both metagenomic sequencing and functional-inference-based (PICRUSt) approaches. This allowed us to determine how distance and variation in land cover throughout the river influenced the distribution of functional traits, as well as to validate PICRUSt inferences. The distribution and abundance of functional traits, by metagenomic analysis, were similar among sites, with a median standard deviation of 0.0002% among tier 3 functions in KEGG. Overall inferred functional variation was significantly different (P ≤ 0.035) between two water basins surrounded by agricultural vs. developed land cover, and abundances of bacterial orders that correlated with functional traits by metagenomic analysis were greater where abundances of the trait were inferred to be higher. PICRUSt inferences were significantly correlated (r = 0.147, P = 1.80 × 10−30) with metagenomic annotations. Discrepancies between metagenomic and PICRUSt taxonomic-functional relationships, however, suggested potential functional redundancy among abundant and rare taxa that impeded the ability to accurately assess unique functional traits among rare taxa at this sequencing depth. Results of this study suggest that a suite of “core functional traits” is conserved throughout the river and distributions of functional traits, rather than specific taxa, may shift in response to environmental

  9. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  10. Upper limit for the D2H+ ortho-to-para ratio in the prestellar core 16293E (CHESS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, C.; Caselli, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Lis, D. C.; Caux, E.; Codella, C.; Beckwith, J. A.; Ridley, T.

    2012-11-01

    The H_3^+ ion plays a key role in the chemistry of dense interstellar gas clouds where stars and planets are forming. The low temperatures and high extinctions of such clouds make direct observations of H_3^+ impossible, but lead to large abundances of H2D+ and D2H+, which are very useful probes of the early stages of star and planet formation. The ground-state rotational ortho-D2H+ 11,1-00,0 transition at 1476.6 GHz in the prestellar core 16293E has been searched for with the Herschel HIFI instrument, within the CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions) Key Program. The line has not been detected at the 21 mK km s-1 level (3σ integrated line intensity). We used the ortho-H2D+ 11,0-11,1 transition and para-D2H+ 11,0-10,1 transition detected in this source to determine an upper limit on the ortho-to-para D2H+ ratio as well as the para-D2H+/ortho-H2D+ ratio from a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. The comparison between our chemical modeling and the observations suggests that the CO depletion must be high (larger than 100), with a density between 5 × 105 and 106 cm-3. Also the upper limit on the ortho-D2H+ line is consistent with a low gas temperature (~11 K) with a ortho-to-para ratio of 6 to 9, i.e. 2 to 3 times higher than the value estimated from the chemical modeling, making it impossible to detect this high frequency transition with the present state of the art receivers. The chemical network is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A33Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. The role of psychosocial working conditions on burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims To analyze the association between psychosocial working conditions and burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion, a systematic literature review was undertaken including cohort studies, case–control studies, and randomized controlled trials. Methods The literature search in Medline and PsycInfo was based on a defined search string and strict exclusion and inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the 5,599 initially identified search hits by two independent reviewers and a detailed quality assessment resulted in six methodologically adequate cohort studies considering the relationship between psychosocial working conditions and burnout (one study) as well as the burnout core component emotional exhaustion (five studies). Results The results of our systematic review point to a relationship between psychosocial working conditions and the development of emotional exhaustion/burnout. Particularly high job demands seem to play a role in the development of emotional exhaustion. However, strong intercorrelations between workplace factors, as a matter of principle, make the identification of a single psychosocial workplace factor (being associated with an especially high or low risk of burnout) difficult. Conclusions Multidimensional approaches including reduction of work demands, enhancement of decision latitude and improving the social climate might be promising for preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. However, methodologically adequate intervention studies are urgently needed to prove the effectiveness of workplace interventions. PMID:24628839

  12. Medicare's policy to limit payment for hospital-acquired conditions: the impact on safety net providers.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Megan; Martin, Timothy C; Orwat, John; Dyke, Kevin Van

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, Medicare implemented a policy limiting reimbursement to hospitals for treating avoidable hospital-acquired conditions (HACs). Although the policy will expand nationally to Medicaid programs in 2011, little is known about the impact on safety-net hospitals. Using data from the 2006 American Hospital Association Annual Survey and MEDPAR, we compared the incidence of cases that met the HACs criteria at safety-net and non-safety-net hospitals. We found that safety-net hospitals had an average of 65.5 HACs per 1,000 Medicare discharges compared with 57.6 at non-safety-net hospitals. Hospitals in the lowest quintile for financial margins had higher rates of HACs on average than other hospitals. Safety-net hospitals and hospitals with the lowest financial margins may be more likely than others to be affected by policies that reduce payment for HACs.

  13. Biocorrosion and biofilm formation in a nutrient limited heating system subjected to alternating microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, B V; Kjeldsen, K U; Lopes, F; Abildgaard, L; Ingvorsen, K; Frølund, B; Sowers, K R; Nielsen, P H

    2009-11-01

    Severe biofilm formation and biocorrosion have been observed in heating systems even when the water quality complied with existing standards. The coupling between water chemistry, biofilm formation, species composition, and biocorrosion in a heating system was investigated by adding low concentrations of nutrients and oxygen under continuous and alternating dosing regimes. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments demonstrated that the amendments did not cause changes in the overall bacterial community composition. The combined alternating dosing of nutrients and oxygen caused increased rates of pitting (bio-) corrosion. Detection of bacteria involved in sulfide production and oxidation by retrieval of the functional dsrAB and apsA genes revealed the presence of Gram-positive sulfate- and sulfite-reducers and an unknown sulfur-oxidizer. Therefore, to control biocorrosion, sources of oxygen and nutrients must be limited, since the effect of the alternating operational conditions apparently is more important than the presence of potentially corrosive biofilm bacteria.

  14. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    clay content and with study site as a random effect. (III) Threshold values of texture and climatc effects were identified using a regression tree. Three mean annual temperature classes for texture dependent BSC growth limitation were identified: (1) <9 °C with a threshold value of 25% silt and clay (limited growth on coarser soils), (2) 9-19 °C, where texture did have no influence on relative crust biomass, and (3) >19 °C at soils with <4 or >17% silt and clay. Because biocrust development is limited under certain climatic and soil texture conditions, it is suggested to consider soil texture for biocrust rehabilitation purposes and in biogeochemical modeling of cryptogamic ground covers. References Belnap, J. & Eldridge, D. 2001. Disturbance and Recovery of Biological Soil Crusts. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Biological Soil Crusts: Structure, Function, and Management, Springer, Berlin. Belnap, J. 2001. Biological Soil Crusts and Wind Erosion. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Fischer, T., Subbotina, M. 2014. Climatic and soil texture threshold values for cryptogamic cover development: a meta analysis. Biologia 69/11:1520-1530,

  15. Limitations of ichnofossil approach for evaluating paleo-bottom-water redox conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Savrda, C.E.; Bottjer, D.

    1987-05-01

    Information on trace fossil diversity, burrow size, and depth of burrow penetration has been incorporated into an ichnofossil tiering model designed for the evaluation of paleo-bottom-water redox conditions. Previous applications to a variety of Phanerozoic strata indicate that this trace fossil approach is more effective than previously emphasized criteria for reconstructing relative degree of oxygenation as well as rates and magnitudes of temporal change in oxygenation. However, the trace fossil model is not without limitations. Presently, they recognize four factors that could limit the accuracy of ichnology-based redox reconstructions: (1) information loss - increases in penetration depth (associated with reoxygenation) that occur at rates in excess of sedimentation rate will destroy a portion of the previous record of oxygenation whereas extended residence times of deep-tier organisms may mask the record through excessive overprinting; (2) inadequate structure visibility - required information on trace fossil assemblage composition and cross cutting relationships is unobtainable for strata where original or diagenetically enhanced contrast between burrows and surrounding sediments is lacking; (3) complexity introduced by rapid deposition - periodic turbidite deposition can mask the desired oxygen signal through substrate modification, temporary modification of faunal composition and behavior, and/or temporary water chemistry changes; and (4) changes in substrate consistency - temporal variation in substrate stiffness (e.g., development of firmgrounds) may result in intrastratal variation in trace fossil tiering structure. The success of future applications of the ichnologic approach depends upon thorough consideration of these factors.

  16. Investing in Uncertainty: Young Adults with Life-Limiting Conditions Achieving Their Developmental Goals.

    PubMed

    Cook, Karen A; Jack, Susan M; Siden, Hal; Thabane, Lehana; Browne, Gina

    2016-08-01

    With improvements in pediatric care and technology, more young adults (YAs) with life-limiting conditions (LLCs) are surviving into adulthood. However, they have limited expectations to live beyond the first decade of adulthood. This study describes the monumental efforts required for YAs with LLCs to achieve their goals in an abbreviated life. The experiences and aspirations of YAs with LLCs to achieve their goals are relatively unknown. This report focuses on their experiences of living with uncertainty and its impact on achieving developmental goals. This study is one component of a larger descriptive study using an innovative bulletin board focus group to examine life experiences of YAs with LLCs. YAs with LLCs share the aspirations and goals of all YAs. Some participants demonstrated a striking capacity to navigate system barriers and achieve their goals, whereas others "got stuck" resulting in lost opportunities. Successful personal life investments were possible if resources were made available, coordinated, navigable, and responsive to new and special requests. Transformative changes to health, social care, and community services are necessary to support their YA ambitions. This study gave voice to those who were previously unheard and demonstrates the monumental hurdles YAs with LLCs face to achieve their goals. A palliative approach to care can mitigate unnecessary hardships and support their goals.

  17. Baclofen, raclopride, and naltrexone differentially affect intake of fat and sucrose under limited access conditions.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Rebecca L; Wojnicki, Francis H

    2009-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and opioids are implicated in impulse control, addiction and binge eating. Recent evidence suggests that sucrose alters the effects of GABAergic, dopaminergic, and opioid receptor ligands on consumption of a fatty food in a rat limited-access binge protocol. This study determined the independent effects of fat and sucrose on the efficacy of these ligands under limited-access conditions. Nonfood-deprived male Sprague-Dawley rats had 1 h access to fat (vegetable shortening) or sucrose (3.2, 10, or 32% w/v). Half had intermittent access (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) and half had daily access. Effects of baclofen (GABAB agonist), SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist), raclopride (D2 antagonist), and naltrexone (opioid antagonist) were assessed. Baclofen and naltrexone reduced fat intake regardless of the access schedule. Baclofen had no effect on sucrose intake; naltrexone reduced sucrose intake at higher doses than were required to reduce fat intake. Raclopride stimulated fat intake in intermittent-access rats and had no effect in daily-access rats; raclopride reduced sucrose intake in all groups. SCH 23390 reduced intake in a nonspecific manner. The results indicate the involvement of GABAB receptors in fat but not sucrose intake, and of D2 receptor dysfunction in rats with a history of bingeing on fat.

  18. Structure of curved crystals in the thermodynamic limit and the perfect screening condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travesset, Alex

    2016-12-01

    The dislocation and disclination density defining the structure of a crystal constrained on a general curved background is computed analytically in the thermodynamic limit, when the number of particles is arbitrarily large. It is shown that the minimum of the elastic energy, where strains are optimally close to zero, can be formulated in terms of a connection (a rule on how to parallel transport vectors), which allows to provide an explicit solution in the thermodynamic limit that consists of disclinations surrounded by scars (grain boundaries with variable spacing). The approach allows to compute the interaction potential. For a sphere, a full characterization of the scars is provided, and it is shown that the potential of interaction among disclinations "dressed" by scars is inversely proportional to the sinus of the geodesic distance and that the ground state consists of 12 dressed disclinations that display icosahedral symmetry. The case of a torus is also considered. More generally, the thermodynamic solution implements a "perfect screening" condition, where defects completely screen the Gaussian curvature. Implications for the problem of melting are discussed.

  19. Simulating herbicide volatilization from bare soil affected by atmospheric conditions and limited solubility in water.

    PubMed

    Yates, S R

    2006-11-15

    A numerical model that simulates pesticide fate was developed to predictthe behavior of triallate after application to a field soil. The model has options that allow water and/ or heat transport and can limit simulated aqueous-phase concentrations to triallate solubility in water. Several methods for describing the volatilization boundary condition were tested to assess the accuracy in predicting the volatilization rate, including an approach that requires no atmospheric information and an approach that couples soil and atmospheric processes. Four scenarios were constructed and simulated, to compare with measured volatilization rates. The peak measured volatilization rate (168 g ha(-1) h(-1)) was most accurately predicted with the scenario that included the most complex model (100 g ha(-1) h(-1)). The simplest model overpredicted the peak rate (251 g ha(-1) h(-1)), and the others underpredicted the peak rate (16-67 g ha(-1) h(-1)). The simulations that limited aqueous solubility provided relatively similar values for the total emissions (21-37% of applied triallate), indicating that simplified models may compare well with measurements (31% of applied). A prospective simulation over a period of 100 days showed that applying triallate to the soil surface would ultimately lead to atmospheric emissions of 80% of the applied material with 6% remaining in soil. Incorporating triallate to a depth of 10 cm would reduce emissions to less than 5% and lead to 41% remaining in soil.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity of dechlorinating bacteria and limiting factors for in situ trichloroethene dechlorination revealed by analyses of sediment cores from a polluted field site.

    PubMed

    Dowideit, Kerstin; Scholz-Muramatsu, Heidrun; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Vigelahn, Lothar; Freygang, Martina; Dohrmann, Anja B; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2010-03-01

    Microbiological analyses of sediment samples were conducted to explore potentials and limitations for bioremediation of field sites polluted with chlorinated ethenes. Intact sediment cores, collected by direct push probing from a 35-ha contaminated area, were analyzed in horizontal layers. Cultivation-independent PCR revealed Dehalococcoides to be the most abundant 16S rRNA gene phylotype with a suspected potential for reductive dechlorination of the major contaminant trichloroethene (TCE). In declining abundances, Desulfitobacterium, Desulfuromonas and Dehalobacter were also detected. In TCE-amended sediment slurry incubations, 66% of 121 sediment samples were dechlorinating, among them one-third completely and the rest incompletely (end product cis-1,2-dichloroethene; cDCE). Both PCR and slurry analyses revealed highly heterogeneous horizontal and vertical distributions of the dechlorination potentials in the sediments. Complete reductive TCE dechlorination correlated with the presence of Dehalococcoides, accompanied by Acetobacterium and a relative of Trichococcus pasteurii. Sediment incubations under close to in situ conditions showed that a low TCE dechlorination activity could be stimulated by 7 mg L(-1) dissolved carbon for cDCE formation and by an additional 36 mg carbon (lactate) L(-1) for further dechlorination. The study demonstrates that the highly heterogeneous distribution of TCE degraders and their specific requirements for carbon and electrons are key issues for TCE degradation in contaminated sites.

  1. Diffusion modeling of fission product release during depressurized core conduction cooldown conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model for diffusion through the silicon carbide layer of TRISO particles is applied to the data for accident condition testing of fuel spheres for the High-Temperature Reactor program of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Categorization of sphere release of {sup 137}Cs based on fast neutron fluence permits predictions of release with an accuracy comparable to that of the US/FRG accident condition fuel performance model. Calculations are also performed for {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 110m}Ag. Diffusion of cesium through SiC suggests that models of fuel failure should consider fuel performance during repeated accident condition thermal cycling. Microstructural considerations in models in fission product release are discussed. The neutron-induced segregation of silicon within the SiC structure is postulated as a mechanism for enhanced fission product release during accident conditions. An oxygen-enhanced SiC decomposition mechanism is also discussed. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Cultivar Mixture Cropping Increased Water Use Efficiency in Winter Wheat under Limited Irrigation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunqi; Zhang, Yinghua; Ji, Wei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Bin; Li, Jinpeng; Han, Meikun; Xu, Xuexin; Wang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cultivar mixture cropping on yield, biomass, and water use efficiency (WUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were investigated under non-irrigation (W0, no irrigation during growth stage), one time irrigation (W1, irrigation applied at stem elongation) and two times irrigation (W2, irrigation applied at stem elongation and anthesis) conditions. Nearly 90% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments experienced an increase in grain yield as compared with the mean of the pure stands under W0, those for W1 and W2 were 80% and 85%, respectively. Over 75% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments got greater biomass than the mean of the pure stands under the three irrigation conditions. Cultivar mixture cropping cost more water than pure stands under W0 and W1, whereas the water consumption under W2 decreased by 5.9%–6.8% as compared with pure stands. Approximately 90% of cultivar mixtures showed an increase of 5.4%–34.5% in WUE as compared with the mean of the pure stands, and about 75% of cultivar mixtures had 0.8%–28.5% higher WUE than the better pure stands under W0. Similarly, there were a majority of mixture cropping treatments with higher WUE than the mean and the better one of the pure stands under W1 and W2. On the whole, proper cultivar mixture cropping could increase yield and WUE, and a higher increase in WUE occurred under limited irrigation condition. PMID:27362563

  3. Changes in exercise and post-exercise core temperature under different clothing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Glen P.; Reardon, Francis D.; Thoden, Jim S.; Giesbrecht, Gordon G.; Kenny, G.

    This study evaluates the effect of different levels of insulation on esophageal (Tes) and rectal (Tre) temperature responses during and following moderate exercise. Seven subjects completed three 18-min bouts of treadmill exercise (75% VO2max, 22°C ambient temperature) followed by 30 min of recovery wearing either: (1) jogging shoes, T-shirt and shorts (athletic clothing); (2) single-knit commercial coveralls worn over the athletic clothing (coveralls); or (3) a Canadian Armed Forces nuclear, bacteriological and chemical warfare protective overgarment with hood, worn over the athletic clothing (NBCW overgarment). Tes was similar at the start of exercise for each condition and baseline Tre was 0.4°C higher than Tes. The hourly equivalent rate of increase in Tes during the final 5 min of exercise was 1.8°C, 3.0°C and 4.2°C for athletic clothing, coveralls and NBCW overgarment respectively (P<0.05). End-exercise Tes was significantly different between conditions [37.7°C (SEM 0.1°C), 38.2°C (SEM 0.2°C and 38.5°C (SEM 0.2°C) for athletic clothing, coveralls and NBCW overgarment respectively)] (P<0.05). No comparable difference in the rate of temperature increase for Tre was demonstrated, except that end-exercise Tre for the NBCW overgarment condition was significantly greater (0.5°C) than that for the athletic clothing condition. There was a drop in Tes during the initial minutes of recovery to sustained plateaus which were significantly (P<0.05) elevated above pre-exercise resting values by 0.6°C, 0.8°C and 1.0°C, for athletic clothing, coveralls, and NBCW overgarment, respectively. Post-exercise Tre decreased very gradually from end-exercise values during the 30-min recovery. Only the NBCW overgarment condition Tre was significantly elevated (0.3°C) above the athletic clothing condition (P<0.05). In conclusion, Tes is far more sensitive in reflecting the heat stress of different levels of insulation during exercise and post-exercise than Tre

  4. Hypoxic condition-selective upconversion via triplet-triplet annihilation based on POSS-core dendrimer complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Okada, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Wataru; Jeon, Jong-Hwan; Inafuku, Kenichi; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2013-05-15

    The influence on the efficiencies of the triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA)-supported upconversion by oxygen under biomimetic conditions was investigated. From the solution containing the dendrimer complexes based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-core dendrimer with the Pt complex of octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) and anthracene in PBS, the fluorescence emission of anthracene depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations via the TTA-supported upconversion was obtained with the excitation light at 540 nm. In particular, we observed strong emission only under hypoxic conditions. In addition, it was found that the emission intensity via TTA-supported upconversion can be reversibly regulated by the DO concentrations in the solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The elastic properties and stability of fcc-Fe and fcc-FeNi alloys at inner-core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell, Benjamí; Brodholt, John; Wood, Ian G.; Vočadlo, Lidunka

    2015-07-01

    The agreement between shear wave velocities for the Earth's inner core observed from seismology with those derived from mineral physics is considerably worse than for any other region of the Earth. Furthermore, there is still debate as to the phase of iron present in the inner core, particularly when alloying with nickel and light elements is taken into account. To investigate the extent to which the mismatch between seismology and mineral physics is a function of either crystal structure and/or the amount of nickel present, we have used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the elastic constants and seismic velocities (Vp and Vs) of face centred cubic (fcc) iron at Earth's inner core pressures (360 GPa) and at temperatures up to ˜7000 K. We find that Vp for fcc iron (fcc-Fe) is very similar to that for hexagonal close packed (hcp) iron at all temperatures. In contrast, Vs for fcc-Fe is significantly higher than in hcp-Fe, with the difference increasing with increasing temperature; the difference between Vs for the core (from seismology) and Vs for fcc-Fe exceeds 40 per cent. These results are consistent with previous work at lower temperatures. We have also investigated the effect of 6.5 and 13 atm% Ni in fcc-Fe. We find that Ni only slightly reduces Vp and Vs (e.g. by 2 per cent in Vs for 13 atm% Ni at 5500 K), and cannot account for the difference between the velocities observed in the core and those of pure fcc-Fe. We also tried to examine pre-melting behaviour in fcc-Fe, as reported in hcp-Fe by extending the study to very high temperatures (at which superheating may occur). However, we find that fcc-Fe spontaneously transforms to other hcp-like structures before melting; two hcp-like structures were found, both of hexagonal symmetry, which may most easily be regarded as being derived from an hcp crystal with stacking faults. That the structure did not transform to a true hcp phase is likely as a consequence of the limited size of the

  6. Core temperature responses and match running performance during intermittent-sprint exercise competition in warm conditions.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Rob; Coutts, Aaron J; Quinn, John

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the thermoregulatory responses and match running performance of elite team sport competitors (Australian Rules football) during preseason games in a warm environment. During 2 games in dry bulb temperatures above 29 degrees C (>27 degrees C wet bulb globe temperature), 10 players were monitored for core temperature (Tcore) via a telemetric capsule, in-game motion patterns, blood lactate ([La]), body mass changes, urine specific gravity, and pre- and postgame vertical jump performance. The results showed that peak Tcore was achieved during the final quarter at 39.3 +/- 0.7 degrees C and that several players reached values near 40.0 degrees C. Further, the largest proportion of the total rise in Tcore (2.1 +/- 0.7 degrees C) occurred during the first quarter of the match, with only small increases during the remainder of the game. The game distance covered was 9.4 +/- 1.5 km, of which 2.7 +/- 0.9 km was at high-intensity speeds (>14.4 km x h(-1)). The rise in Tcore was correlated with first-quarter high-intensity running velocity (r = 0.72) and moderate-intensity velocity (r = 0.68), second-quarter Tcore and low-intensity activity velocity (r = -0.90), second-quarter Tcore and moderate-intensity velocity (r = 0.88), fourth-quarter rise in Tcore and very-high-intensity running distance (r = 0.70), and fourth-quarter Tcore and moderate-intensity velocity (r = 0.73). Additional results included mean game [La-] values of 8.7 +/- 0.1 mmol x L(-1), change in body mass of 2.1 +/- 0.8 kg, and no change (p > 0.05) in pre- to postgame vertical jump. These findings indicate that the plateau in Tcore may be regulated by the reduction in low-intensity activity and that pacing strategies may be employed during competitive team sports in the heat to ensure control of the internal heat load.

  7. Permeability Changes of Coal Cores and Briquettes under Tri-Axial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Mirosław; Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-12-01

    The paper is dealing with the permeability of coal in triaxial state of stress. The permeability of coal, besides coal's methane capacity, is the main parameter determining the quantity of methane inflow into underground excavations. The stress in a coal seam is one of the most important factors influencing coal permeability therefore the permeability measurements were performed in tri-axial state of stress. The hydrostatic three-axial state of stress was gradually increased from 5 MPa with steps of 5 MPa up to a maximum of 30 MPa. Nitrogen was applied as a gas medium in all experiments. The results of the permeability measurements of coal cores from the "Zofiówka" mine, Poland, and three mines from the Czech Republic are presented in this paper. As a "reference", permeability measurements were also taken for coal briquettes prepared from coal dust with defined porosity. It was confirmed that the decreasing porosity of coal briquettes affects the decreasing permeability. The advantage of experimentation on coal briquettes is its good repeatability. From the experimental results, an empirical relation between gas permeability and confining pressure has also been identified. The empirical relation for coal briquettes is in good correspondence with published results. However, for coal cores, the character of change differs. The influence of confining pressure has a different character and the decrease in permeability is stronger due to the increasing confining pressure Przepuszczalność węgla, oprócz pojemności sorpcyjnej względem metanu jest głównym parametrem określającym dopływ metanu do podziemnych wyrobiskach górniczych. W warunkach naturalnych wartość przepuszczalności jest ściśle związana ze stanem naprężenia w pokładzie węgla. W pracy przedstawiono wyniki pomiarów przepuszczalności wykonanych w trójosiowym stanie naprężenia. Hydrostatyczny trójosiowy stan naprężenia stopniowo zwiększano od 5 MPa do maksymalnie 30 MPa z krokiem

  8. Transcriptional Characterization of a Widely-Used Grapevine Rootstock Genotype under Different Iron-Limited Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vannozzi, Alessandro; Donnini, Silvia; Vigani, Gianpiero; Corso, Massimiliano; Valle, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Bonghi, Claudio; Zocchi, Graziano; Lucchin, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Iron chlorosis is a serious deficiency that affects orchards and vineyards reducing quality and yield production. Chlorotic plants show abnormal photosynthesis and yellowing shoots. In grapevine iron uptake and homeostasis are most likely controlled by a mechanism known as "Strategy I," characteristic of non-graminaceous plants and based on a system of soil acidification, iron reduction and transporter-mediated uptake. Nowadays, grafting of varieties of economic interest on tolerant rootstocks is widely used practice against many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, many interspecific rootstocks, and in particular those obtained by crossing exclusively non-vinifera genotypes, can show limited nutrient uptake and transport, in particular for what concerns iron. In the present study, 101.14, a commonly used rootstock characterized by susceptibility to iron chlorosis was subjected to both Fe-absence and Fe-limiting conditions. Grapevine plantlets were grown in control, Fe-deprived, and bicarbonate-supplemented hydroponic solutions. Whole transcriptome analyses, via mRNA-Seq, were performed on root apices of stressed and unstressed plants. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) confirmed that Strategy I is the mechanism responsible for iron uptake in grapevine, since many orthologs genes to the Arabidopsis "ferrome" were differentially regulated in stressed plant. Molecular differences in the plant responses to Fe absence and presence of bicarbonate were also identified indicating the two treatments are able to induce response-mechanisms only partially overlapping. Finally, we measured the expression of a subset of genes differentially expressed in 101.14 (such as IRT1, FERRITIN1, bHLH38/39) or known to be fundamental in the "strategy I" mechanism (AHA2 and FRO2) also in a tolerant rootstock (M1) finding important differences which could be responsible for the different degrees of tolerance observed.

  9. Transcriptional Characterization of a Widely-Used Grapevine Rootstock Genotype under Different Iron-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vannozzi, Alessandro; Donnini, Silvia; Vigani, Gianpiero; Corso, Massimiliano; Valle, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Bonghi, Claudio; Zocchi, Graziano; Lucchin, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    Iron chlorosis is a serious deficiency that affects orchards and vineyards reducing quality and yield production. Chlorotic plants show abnormal photosynthesis and yellowing shoots. In grapevine iron uptake and homeostasis are most likely controlled by a mechanism known as “Strategy I,” characteristic of non-graminaceous plants and based on a system of soil acidification, iron reduction and transporter-mediated uptake. Nowadays, grafting of varieties of economic interest on tolerant rootstocks is widely used practice against many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, many interspecific rootstocks, and in particular those obtained by crossing exclusively non-vinifera genotypes, can show limited nutrient uptake and transport, in particular for what concerns iron. In the present study, 101.14, a commonly used rootstock characterized by susceptibility to iron chlorosis was subjected to both Fe-absence and Fe-limiting conditions. Grapevine plantlets were grown in control, Fe-deprived, and bicarbonate-supplemented hydroponic solutions. Whole transcriptome analyses, via mRNA-Seq, were performed on root apices of stressed and unstressed plants. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) confirmed that Strategy I is the mechanism responsible for iron uptake in grapevine, since many orthologs genes to the Arabidopsis “ferrome” were differentially regulated in stressed plant. Molecular differences in the plant responses to Fe absence and presence of bicarbonate were also identified indicating the two treatments are able to induce response-mechanisms only partially overlapping. Finally, we measured the expression of a subset of genes differentially expressed in 101.14 (such as IRT1, FERRITIN1, bHLH38/39) or known to be fundamental in the “strategy I” mechanism (AHA2 and FRO2) also in a tolerant rootstock (M1) finding important differences which could be responsible for the different degrees of tolerance observed. PMID:28105035

  10. Synthesis of Xenon and Iron/Nickel Intermetallic Compounds Under the Thermodynamic Conditions of the Earth's Core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J. M.; Crowhurst, J.; Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Prakapenka, V.; Prescher, C.; Yao, Y.; Liu, H.; Dai, Z.; Oleynik, I.; Steele, B.; Cong, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The lower Xe abundance in Earth's atmosphere, in comparison to other noble gases like Ar and Kr, is one of the most challenging open questions in geosciences [1]. The origin of the so-called "missing Xe paradox" is usually attributed to the inclusion of Xe in the interior of Earth[2]. Although Xe is known to form compounds (e.g. with hydrogen, oxygen), none of them can be related with Earth's interior. Indeed, only a very low amount of Xe can be incorporated in silica at <1 GPa and 500K [3]. On the other hand, experimental attempts have failed to trace possible formation of Fe-Xe compounds up to 155 GPa and bellow 2500K [4]. A very recent theoretical study, suggests that Xe-Ni and Xe-Fe compounds can form at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's outer core [5]. Here we explored the possible formation of stable compounds in the Xe-Fe/Ni system at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's outer core starting from the following mixtures: a) Xe-Fe, b) Xe-Ni and c) Xe and an Fe/Ni alloy representative of Earth's core (ca 6% Ni). Using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy we report the formation of: a) a XeNi3 compound, in the form of a CrNi3-type FCC solid solution, above 150 GPa and 1500K, b) a Xe(Fe/Ni)3 compound, tentatively characterized as an orthorhombic NbPd3-type solid solution, above 190 GPa and 2000K and c) a still not completely characterized XeFexcompound above 180 GPa and 2000K. This work provides a plausible explanation of the "missing Xe paradox", and underscores the importance of understanding the novel rules of high-pressure chemistry for an improved understanding of the structure and chemistry of the Earth's core. [1] E. Anders, E. and T. Owen, Science 198, 453 (1977). [2] Caldwell, W. A. et al.,Science 277, 930 (1997). [3] C. Sanloup et al.,Science 310, 1174(2005). [4] D. Nishio-Hamane et al.,Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L04302 (2010). [5] L. Zhu et al., Nature chemistry 6, 664 (2014).

  11. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  12. Super-channel oriented routing, spectrum and core assignment under crosstalk limit in spatial division multiplexing elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Chunhui; Yu, Xiaosong; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Binglin; Zhang, Jie

    2017-07-01

    With the capacity increasing in optical networks enabled by spatial division multiplexing (SDM) technology, spatial division multiplexing elastic optical networks (SDM-EONs) attract much attention from both academic and industry. Super-channel is an important type of service provisioning in SDM-EONs. This paper focuses on the issue of super-channel construction in SDM-EONs. Mixed super-channel oriented routing, spectrum and core assignment (MS-RSCA) algorithm is proposed in SDM-EONs considering inter-core crosstalk. Simulation results show that MS-RSCA can improve spectrum resource utilization and reduce blocking probability significantly compared with the baseline RSCA algorithms.

  13. The Occurrence of Core Muscle Fatigue During High-Intensity Running Exercise and its Limitation to Performance: The Role of Respiratory Work

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tomas K.; Wu, Shing; Nie, Jinlei; Baker, Julien S.; Lin, Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of core muscle fatigue during high-intensity running exercise and its limitation to exercise performance. A secondary aim was to investigate whether respiratory muscle work performed during intense running periods, would contribute to core muscle fatigue. Nine male recreational runners were recruited for two reasons; (1) to perform a continuous treadmill run at 85% VO2max with and without core muscle fatigue in the CR_F and CR trials, respectively; and (2) to mimic the treadmill run-induced respiratory response recorded in the CR trial while subjects were free of whole-body exercise (Mimic trial). The changes in global core muscle function with fatigue in this study were evaluated by performing a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT), and the associated influence on running performance was examined by comparing the time to exhaustion during the treadmill run between the CR and CR_F trials. Subsequent to the treadmill run in the CR trial, SEPT (255.7 ± 85.3 vs 177.3 ± 80.6 s) was reduced from baseline in all runners. The reduction correlated (r = 0.67) with the concomitant decline in inspiratory muscle function revealed by maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax: 151.3 ± 18.2 vs 133.3 ± 17.2 cmH2O, p < 0.05). In the Mimic trial, similar results in SEPT (212.3 ± 90.2 s), PImax (129.0 ± 26.7 cmH2O), and correlation (r = 0.77, p < 0.05) were observed following voluntary hyperpneic activity. With the preceded fatigued core muscle workout in the CR_F trial, the running capacity was impaired significantly (10.7 ± 4.5 vs 6.5 ± 2.0 min, p < 0.05). The impairment was correlated (r=0.72) to the SEPT reduction resulting from the workout. The results suggest that a high-intensity maximum run may induce core muscle fatigue in runners. The core muscle fatigue, which may be partly attributed to the corresponding respiratory work, may limit their running endurance. Inspiratory muscle function appears to be essential for core

  14. Constraints on Earth’s inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth’s inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density–sound velocity data of Earth’s core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (VP) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch’s law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the VP of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth’s inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller VP than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth’s core are required to explain Earth’s core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth’s core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  15. First-principles Exploration of Crystal Structures of Pure Iron at Earth’s Inner Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2009-12-01

    Determining the structure of Earth’s inner core has been a long standing challenge for geoscience. Iron has been considered as a main composition of the inner core and expected to exist as an iron-nickel-light elements alloy there. In order to get some information about the structure of the inner core, pure iron has been also investigated by many experimental and ab-initio studies. Pure iron has been expected to take the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at the inner core conditions (Jephcoat and Olson, Nature 325, 332-335, 1987.; Mao et al., Nature 396, 741-743, 1998.; Fiquet et al., Science 291, 468-471, 2001.; Uchida et al., J. Geophys. Res. 106, 21799-21810, 2001.). On the other hand, the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (Mikhaylushkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 165505-165508, 2007.) and the body-centered cubic structure (Vocadlo et al., Phys. Earth Planet In. 170, 52-59, 2008.) have been also considered as the candidate structures. In this study, first we explored the crystal structures of pure iron at 400 GPa by our originally developing algorithm for the structure exploration, Free Energy Surface Trekking (FEST). In FEST, using a minus sign of driving force acting on a simulation cell, we force a system to climb up to a ridge of a free energy surface (ascent-run). Then, flipping the negative driving force to an original one, we make the system go down to a neighboring potential well (descent-run). The more different directions we examine in the ascent-run, the more accurate topography we capture of free energy surface. For the exploration of the ultrahigh-pressure structures of pure iron, we used 16 atoms supercell and explored 64 pathways around the initial local minimum corresponding to hcp. As the result, 30 pathways lead to a complex hcp (chcp) structure, which has ABCACABCBCAB stacking with 12 layers. Other 33 pathways lead to hcp and 1 pathway fcc. The enthalpy of chcp was found higher than that of hcp but only by 4 mRy/atom and lower than

  16. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel 'attack box' method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance by I. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed Central

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel ‘attack box’ method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance byI. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. PMID:25417785

  18. Kinetically limited weathering at low denudation rates in semiarid climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Christl, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Biogeochemical cycling within the Critical Zone depends on the interactions between minerals and fluids controlling chemical weathering and physical erosion rates. In this study, we explore the role of water availability in controlling soil chemical weathering in semiarid climatic conditions. Weathering rates and intensities were evaluated for nine soil profiles located on convex ridge crests of three mountain ranges in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. We combine a geochemical mass balance with 10Be cosmogenic nuclides to constrain chemical weathering intensities and long-term denudation rates. As such, this study presents new data on chemical weathering and 10Be-derived denudation for understudied semiarid climate systems. In the Betic Cordillera, chemical weathering intensities are relatively low (~5 to 30% of the total denudation of the soil) and negatively correlated with the magnitude of the water deficit in soils. Chemical mass losses are inversely related to denudation rates (14-109 mm/kyr) and positively to soil thickness (14-58 cm); these results are consistent with kinetic limitation of chemical weathering rates. A worldwide compilation of chemical weathering data suggests that soil water balance may regulate the coupling between chemical weathering and physical erosion by modulating soil solute fluxes. Therefore, future landscape evolution models that seek to link chemical weathering and physical erosion should include soil water flux as an essential driver of weathering.

  19. Liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption 6: separation of a four-component polymer blend.

    PubMed

    Berek, Dušan; Macová, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Baseline separation was achieved of a model four-component polymer blend of polystyrene-poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) in a single chromatographic run with help of the unconventional method of liquid chromatography under limiting conditions of desorption. Narrow barriers of liquids were employed, which selectively decelerated elution of particular kinds of macromolecules. Bare silica gel was the column packing, and the eluent was a mixture of dimethylformamide/tetrahydrofuran/toluene 30:50:20 w/w/w. Barrier compositions were neat toluene, B#1, neat tetrahydrofuran, B#2, and dimethylformamide/tetrahydrofuran/toluene 15:55:30, B#3. Minor blend constituents (∼1%) could be identified, as well. The result represents a step toward the separation and molecular characterization of triblock-copolymers, many of which are expected to contain besides both parent homopolymers also the diblock chains and thus they are in fact four-component polymer blends. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The limiting conditional probability distribution in a stochastic model of T cell repertoire maintenance.

    PubMed

    Stirk, Emily R; Lythe, Grant; van den Berg, Hugo A; Hurst, Gareth A D; Molina-París, Carmen

    2010-04-01

    The limiting conditional probability distribution (LCD) has been much studied in the field of mathematical biology, particularly in the context of epidemiology and the persistence of epidemics. However, it has not yet been applied to the immune system. One of the characteristic features of the T cell repertoire is its diversity. This diversity declines in old age, whence the concepts of extinction and persistence are also relevant to the immune system. In this paper we model T cell repertoire maintenance by means of a continuous-time birth and death process on the positive integers, where the origin is an absorbing state. We show that eventual extinction is guaranteed. The late-time behaviour of the process before extinction takes place is modelled by the LCD, which we prove always exists for the process studied here. In most cases, analytic expressions for the LCD cannot be computed but the probability distribution may be approximated by means of the stationary probability distributions of two related processes. We show how these approximations are related to the LCD of the original process and use them to study the LCD in two special cases. We also make use of the large N expansion to derive a further approximation to the LCD. The accuracy of the various approximations is then analysed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Bayesian Approach for Reconstructing the Past Ocean Circulation from a Limited Number of Sediment-Core Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Paleoceanographers are faced with the problem of making inferences about the ventilation of the ocean in the past from localized benthic and planktonic radiocarbon measurements obtained from a small number of sediment cores, which leads to an underdetermined problem. With the goal of moving beyond testing the null hypothesis that the sediment core data are consistent with the modern circulation we seek to reconstruct the most probable paleocirculation based on our knowledge of ocean dynamics and available constraints from sediment-core radiocarbon records. We propose a Bayesian inversion approach in which we use a modern circulation estimate constrained by modern radiocarbon data to define the mean of the prior probability distribution for the unknown paleocirculation. The approach resolves the indeterminacy of the inverse problem by choosing a paleocirculation that is minimally different from the modern circulation while still being consistent with the available sediment-core radiocarbon records. In this talk we will present the general formulation of the method as well as various approximations to reduce the computational challenge.

  2. Conditions of Core Formation in the Early Earth: Single Stage or Heterogeneous Accretion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Since approx.1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients [D(met/sil)] for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions [1,2]. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth [3,4]. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements (> 80 experiments published for Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd). At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in Earth's mantle: a) shallow depth magma ocean 25-30 GPa [3,5]; b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa [6,7], and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean [8,9]. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to identify issues that have lead to a difference in interpretation, and to present updated predictive expressions based on new experimental data. The resulting expressions will be applied to the siderophile element depletions in Earth's upper mantle.

  3. Financial burdens and barriers to care among nonelderly adults: The role of functional limitations and chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Didem; Selden, Thomas; Yeh, Susan

    2016-04-01

    People with functional limitations and chronic conditions account for the greatest resource use within the health care system. To examine financial burdens and barriers to care among nonelderly adults, focusing on the role of functional limitations and chronic conditions. High financial burden is defined as medical spending exceeding 20 percent of family income. Financial barriers are defined as delaying care/being unable to get care for financial reasons, and reporting that delaying care/going without was a big problem. Data are from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2008-2012). Functional limitations are associated with increased prevalence of financial burdens. Among single adults, the frequency of high burdens is 20.3% for those with functional limitations, versus 7.8% for those without. Among those with functional limitations, those with 3 or more chronic conditions are twice as likely to have high burdens compared to those without chronic conditions (22.2% versus 11.1%, respectively). Similar patterns occur among persons in multi-person families whose members have functional limitations and chronic conditions. Having functional limitations and chronic conditions is also strongly associated with financial barriers to care: 40.2% among the uninsured, 21.9% among those with public coverage, and 13.6% among those with private group insurance were unable to get care. Functional limitations and chronic conditions are associated with increased prevalence of burdens and financial barriers in all insurance categories, with the exception that an association between functional limitations and the prevalence of burdens was not observed for public coverage. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Electron-electron scattering and thermal conductivity of ɛ-iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.; Mravlje, J.; Georges, A.; Simak, S. I.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic state and transport properties of hot dense iron are of the utmost importance for the understanding of Earth’s interior. Combining state-of-the-art density functional and dynamical mean field theories we study the impact of electron correlations on the electrical and thermal resistivity of hexagonal close-packed ɛ-Fe at Earth’s core conditions and show that the electron-electron scattering in ɛ-Fe exhibit a nearly perfect Fermi-liquid (FL) behavior. Accordingly, the quadratic dependence of the scattering rate, typical of FLs, leads to a modification of the Wiedemann-Franz law and suppresses the thermal conductivity with respect to the electrical one. The consequence is a significant increase of the electron-electron thermal resistivity, which is found to be of comparable magnitude to the electron-phonon one.

  5. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-7 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited...

  6. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-7 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited...

  7. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-7 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited...

  8. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-7 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited...

  9. The influence of MOVPE growth conditions on the shell of core-shell GaN microrod structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpke, Tilman; Avramescu, Adrian; Koller, Andreas; Fernando-Saavedra, Amalia; Hartmann, Jana; Ledig, Johannes; Waag, Andreas; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    A core-shell geometry is employed for most next-generation, three-dimensional opto-electric devices based on III-V semiconductors and grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Controlling the shape of the shell layers is fundamental for device optimization, however no detailed analysis of the influence of growth conditions has been published to date. We study homogeneous arrays of gallium nitride core-shell microrods with height and diameter in the micrometer range and grown in a two-step selective area MOVPE process. Changes in shell shape and homogeneity effected by deliberately altered shell growth conditions were accurately assessed by digital analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscope images. Most notably, two temperature regimes could be established, which show a significantly different behavior with regard to material distribution. Above 900 °C of wafer carrier temperature, the shell thickness along the growth axis of the rods was very homogeneous, however variations between vicinal rods increase. In contrast, below 830 °C the shell thickness is higher close to the microrod tip than at the base of the rods, while the lateral homogeneity between neighboring microrods is very uniform. This temperature effect could be either amplified or attenuated by changing the remaining growth parameters such as reactor pressure, structure distance, gallium precursor, carrier gas composition and dopant materials. Possible reasons for these findings are discussed with respect to GaN decomposition as well as the surface and gas phase diffusion of growth species, leading to an improved control of the functional layers in next-generation 3D V-III devices.

  10. Predicted limits for evaporative cooling in heat stress relief of cattle in warm conditions.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2009-10-01

    Evaporative cooling of ambient air (EC) is a main path for heat stress relief in cattle kept in the shade of semi-confining structures. Evaporative cooling is particularly efficient in hot dry climates. We examined the potential of EC for heat stress relief in cattle in moderately warm and humid climates. The feasibility was examined by the reduction in ambient temperature (T(ac)) produced by EC as a function of ambient temperature (T(a)) and humidity (RH(a)). A data set (n = 139) of temperature and relative humidity (RH) produced by EC over a range of air temperature (25 to 50 degrees C) and humidity (10 to 70% RH) was analyzed by polynomial second order regressions. The analyses produced equations for the relations between ambient air temperature and ambient humidity and between respective conditions in air cooled by EC (T(c), RH(c)). Linear regressions were computed for a narrower temperature range (30 to 40 degrees C). In all equations, R(2) were >0.94 and regression terms were statistically significant. The T(ac) obtained by EC diminished by 0.3 degrees C per degrees C rise in T(a), indicating a reduced efficiency of EC with rising T(a). The T(ac) obtained by EC also was markedly reduced by rising ambient humidity and increased by RH(c). An attempt to sustain T(ac) at greater RH(a) by allowing a rise in RH(c) would only restore 2/3 of the reduction in T(ac) because the coefficient for the RH(a) effect on T(ac) is 1.5 larger than that of RH(c). The T(ac) attained by EC partially depends on the humidity in the cooled environment. Elevated RH(c) may impede animal skin and respiratory evaporative heat loss and lead to moisture accumulation in bedding. If the upper desired limit for RH(c) is 70%, at RH(a) smaller than 45% (typical for hot-dry environments) the T(ac) is larger than 7.5 degrees C, at RH(a) greater than 55% T(ac) is reduced to less than 5 degrees C, and at RH(a) of 57.5 to 60% T(ac) is about 2.5 degrees C. Coupling EC with forced air movement when T

  11. Silicon enhances leaf remobilization of iron in cucumber under limited iron conditions.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Samardzic, Jelena; Kostic, Ljiljana; Laursen, Kristian H; Natic, Maja; Timotijevic, Gordana; Schjoerring, Jan K; Nikolic, Miroslav

    2016-08-01

    Retranslocation of iron (Fe) from source tissues enhances plant tolerance to Fe deficiency. Previous work has shown that silicon (Si) can alleviate Fe deficiency by enhancing acquisition and root to shoot translocation of Fe. Here the role of Si in Fe mobilization in older leaves and the subsequent retranslocation of Fe to young leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants growing under Fe-limiting conditions was investigated. Iron ((57)Fe or naturally occurring isotopes) was measured in leaves at different positions on plants hydroponically growing with or without Si supply. In parallel, the concentration of the Fe chelator nicotianamine (NA) along with the expression of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) involved in its biosynthesis and the expression of yellow stripe-like (YSL) transcripts mediating Fe-NA transport were also determined. In plants not receiving Si, approximately half of the total Fe content remained in the oldest leaf. In contrast, Si-treated plants showed an almost even Fe distribution among leaves with four different developmental stages, thus providing evidence of enhanced Fe remobilization from source leaves. This Si-stimulated Fe export was paralleled by an increased NA accumulation and expression of the YSL1 transporter for phloem loading/unloading of the Fe-NA complex. The results suggest that Si enhances remobilization of Fe from older to younger leaves by a more efficient NA-mediated Fe transport via the phloem. In addition, from this and previous work, a model is proposed of how Si acts to improve Fe homeostasis under Fe deficiency in cucumber. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  13. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  14. Silicon enhances leaf remobilization of iron in cucumber under limited iron conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Samardzic, Jelena; Kostic, Ljiljana; Laursen, Kristian H.; Natic, Maja; Timotijevic, Gordana; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Nikolic, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Retranslocation of iron (Fe) from source tissues enhances plant tolerance to Fe deficiency. Previous work has shown that silicon (Si) can alleviate Fe deficiency by enhancing acquisition and root to shoot translocation of Fe. Here the role of Si in Fe mobilization in older leaves and the subsequent retranslocation of Fe to young leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants growing under Fe-limiting conditions was investigated. Methods Iron (57Fe or naturally occurring isotopes) was measured in leaves at different positions on plants hydroponically growing with or without Si supply. In parallel, the concentration of the Fe chelator nicotianamine (NA) along with the expression of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) involved in its biosynthesis and the expression of yellow stripe-like (YSL) transcripts mediating Fe–NA transport were also determined. Key Results In plants not receiving Si, approximately half of the total Fe content remained in the oldest leaf. In contrast, Si-treated plants showed an almost even Fe distribution among leaves with four different developmental stages, thus providing evidence of enhanced Fe remobilization from source leaves. This Si-stimulated Fe export was paralleled by an increased NA accumulation and expression of the YSL1 transporter for phloem loading/unloading of the Fe–NA complex. Conclusions The results suggest that Si enhances remobilization of Fe from older to younger leaves by a more efficient NA-mediated Fe transport via the phloem. In addition, from this and previous work, a model is proposed of how Si acts to improve Fe homeostasis under Fe deficiency in cucumber. PMID:27371693

  15. Secreted Pyomelanin of Legionella pneumophila Promotes Bacterial Iron Uptake and Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; Chatfield, Christa H.; Liles, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical to the growth and virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Previously, we found that L. pneumophila uses both a ferrisiderophore pathway and ferrous iron transport to obtain iron. We now report that two molecules secreted by L. pneumophila, homogentisic acid (HGA) and its polymerized variant (HGA-melanin, a pyomelanin), are able to directly mediate the reduction of various ferric iron salts. Furthermore, HGA, synthetic HGA-melanin, and HGA-melanin derived from bacterial supernatants enhanced the ability of L. pneumophila and other species of Legionella to take up radiolabeled iron. Enhanced iron uptake was not observed with a ferrous iron transport mutant. Thus, HGA and HGA-melanin mediate ferric iron reduction, with the resulting ferrous iron being available to the bacterium for uptake. Upon further testing of L. pneumophila culture supernatants, we found that significant amounts of ferric and ferrous iron were associated with secreted HGA-melanin. Importantly, a pyomelanin-containing fraction obtained from a wild-type culture supernatant was able to stimulate the growth of iron-starved legionellae. That the corresponding supernatant fraction obtained from a nonpigmented mutant culture did not stimulate growth demonstrated that HGA-melanin is able to both promote iron uptake and enhance growth under iron-limiting conditions. Indicative of a complementary role in iron acquisition, HGA-melanin levels were inversely related to the levels of siderophore activity. Compatible with a role in the ecology and pathogenesis of L. pneumophila, HGA and HGA-melanin were effective at reducing and releasing iron from both insoluble ferric hydroxide and the mammalian iron chelates ferritin and transferrin. PMID:23980114

  16. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Sabir, Jamal S; Alfassi, Fahad A; Hajarah, Nahid H; Kabli, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Ashworth, Matt P; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock.

  17. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with <1mL of sample. This new approach provides a reliable and robust analytical method for the simultaneous determination of organic and inorganic anions, including fluoride, methanesulfonate, chloride, sulfate and nitrate anions. Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Valence and metal/silicate partitioning of Mo: Implications for conditions of Earth accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Shofner, G. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Lee, C.-T.

    2016-03-01

    To better understand and predict the partition coefficient of Mo at the conditions of the deep interior of Earth and other terrestrial planets or bodies, we have undertaken new measurements of the valence and partitioning of Mo. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) K-edge spectra for Mo have been measured in a series of Fe-bearing glasses produced at 1 bar and higher PT conditions. High pressure experiments have been carried out up to 19 GPa in order to better understand the effect of pressure on Mo partitioning. And, finally, a series of experiments at very low fO2 conditions and high Si content metallic liquids has been carried out to constrain the effect of Si on the partitioning of Mo between metallic liquids and silicate melt. The valence measurements demonstrate that Mo undergoes a transition from 4+ to 6+ near IW-1, in general agreement with previous 1 bar studies on FeO-free silicate melts. High pressure experiments demonstrate a modest pressure dependence of D (Mo) metal/silicate and, combined with previous results, show a significant decrease with pressure that must be quantified in any predictive expression. Finally, the effect of dissolved Si in Fe-rich metallic liquid is to decrease D (Mo) significantly, as suggested by previous work in metallurgical systems. The effect of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, metallic liquid composition, and silicate melt composition can be quantified by using multiple linear regression of available experimental data for Mo. Our XANES results show that Mo will be 4+ at conditions of core formation, so only experiments carried out at fO2 of IW-1 and lower were used in the regressions. Application of predictive expressions to Earth accretion shows that D (Mo) decreases to values consistent with an equilibrium scenario for early Earth core-mantle. The Mo content of the primitive upper mantle (PUM) can be attained by metal-silicate equilibrium involving S-, C-, and Si-bearing metallic liquid, and peridotite

  19. 40 CFR 122.44 - Establishing limitations, standards, and other permit conditions (applicable to State NPDES...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meeting the following requirements when applicable. (a)(1) Technology-based effluent limitations and... chapter. For new sources or new dischargers, these technology based limitations and standards are subject...-listed pollutants. (i) The Director may authorize a discharger subject to technology-based effluent...

  20. Vitamin B12 Production by Marine Bacteria in Organic Substrate Limited, Slow Growth Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Mendoza, J.; Cajal-Medrano, R.; Maske, H.

    2016-02-01

    The conditions and processes governing the B12 vitamin dissemination through planktonic organisms are little understood. It is generally assumed that bacteria produce B12 vitamin and the whole auxotrophic plankton community consumes it. We used natural marine bacteria communities and marine bacteria Dinoroseobacter shibae cultures, growing in substrate-limited continuous cultures at low specific growth rates [0.1 to 1 d-1] to measure intracellular and dissolved B12 production, bacterial and viral abundance, particulate organic carbon, and nitrogen, bacterial production, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, ETS activity, and taxonomic composition. We find dissolved B12 vitamin at concentrations between 0 to 1.4 pM with no relation to growth or respiration rates. The intracellular B12 vitamin normalized to cell volume ranged between 1x10-2 to 4.6x10-2 pmol μm3 showing a significant relationship with growth rate [y=0.02(m)1.07; r2=0.78; p≤0.05; y=intracellular B12 production, pmol μm3 day-1; m=specific growth rate, day-1], and respiration rates [y=2.4ln(x)-2.66; r2=0.87; p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The vitamin B12 producing bacteria D. shibae, showed a dissolved B12 concentration between 0 and 1.8 pM, whereas intracellular B12 normalized to cell volume varied between 1.1x10-2 to 1.8x10-2 pmol μm-3, responding significantly to growth rate [y=0.01(m)0.56; r2=0.85; p≤0.05], and to respiration rates [y=3.01ln(x)-7.56, r2=0.97, p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The lack of correlation of dissolved B12 vitamin with the metabolic activity suggests that the dissolved B12 concentration depends on the interactions among vitamin B12 producers and consumers while the bacterial metabolism is regulating the intracellular production of B12 vitamin.

  1. Low-recycling conditions and improved core confinement in steady-state operation scenarios in JET (Joint European Torus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Fonseca, A.; Chapman, I. T.; Jenko, F.; Marinucci, M.; Saarelma, S.; Smeulders, P.; Told, D.; Zagorski, R.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; De Angelis, R.; McDonald, D.; Challis, C.; Galli, A.; Mailloux, J.; Pericoli, V.; Zerbini, M.; EFDA-JET Contributors, the

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the phenomena that link particle recycling from the vessel walls in the L-mode during discharge start-up and the core confinement in the H-mode during the subsequent main heating phase. We consider available data of JET experiments that aimed at approaching fully non-inductive ITER-relevant steady-state conditions and show that the high electron temperature produced at the edge by a low recycling during start-up tends to favour the build-up of high normalized β(βN) regimes in the H-mode, the confinement being improved in a large plasma volume. To provide an insight into this complex phenomenon we have modelled the relation between particle recycling in the scrape-off layer and the evolution of plasma transport, plasma current density and shear as well as the stability properties for such experimental conditions. The results confirm the existence of a link between the confinement in the H-mode phase and the values at the edge of electron temperature, bootstrap current density and local magnetic shear during start-up. Such a link could favour these regimes to be self-sustained in time.

  2. Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Germino, Matthew J; Kueppers, Lara M

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is altering plant species distributions globally, and warming is expected to promote uphill shifts in mountain trees. However, at many cold-edge range limits, such as alpine treelines in the western United States, tree establishment may be colimited by low temperature and low moisture, making recruitment patterns with warming difficult to predict. We measured response functions linking carbon (C) assimilation and temperature- and moisture-related microclimatic factors for limber pine (Pinus flexilis) seedlings growing in a heating × watering experiment within and above the alpine treeline. We then extrapolated these response functions using observed microclimate conditions to estimate the net effects of warming and associated soil drying on C assimilation across an entire growing season. Moisture and temperature limitations were each estimated to reduce potential growing season C gain from a theoretical upper limit by 15-30% (c. 50% combined). Warming above current treeline conditions provided relatively little benefit to modeled net assimilation, whereas assimilation was sensitive to either wetter or drier conditions. Summer precipitation may be at least as important as temperature in constraining C gain by establishing subalpine trees at and above current alpine treelines as seasonally dry subalpine and alpine ecosystems continue to warm. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  4. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  5. On the nonradiative and quasistatic conditions and the limitations of circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zozaya, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    Field theory is used to analyze a simple circuit and to deduce the conditions for nonradiative and quasistatic fields. From the condition for quasistatic fields, which is the more stringent of the two, Kirchhoff's voltage equation and its range of validity are deduced. These conditions for the validity of circuit theory are not treated appropriately in the undergraduate curricula. A simple numerical problem is given to illustrate these ideas.

  6. Experimental evidence for self-limiting reactive flow through a fractured cement core: implications for time-dependent wellbore leakage.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Nicolas J; Hesse, Marc A; Bryant, Steven L; Strazisar, Brian R; Lopano, Christina L

    2013-01-02

    We present a set of reactive transport experiments in cement fractures. The experiments simulate coupling between flow and reaction when acidic, CO(2)-rich fluids flow along a leaky wellbore. An analog dilute acid with a pH between 2.0 and 3.15 was injected at constant rate between 0.3 and 9.4 cm/s into a fractured cement core. Pressure differential across the core and effluent pH were measured to track flow path evolution, which was analyzed with electron microscopy after injection. In many experiments reaction was restricted within relatively narrow, tortuous channels along the fracture surface. The observations are consistent with coupling between flow and dissolution/precipitation. Injected acid reacts along the fracture surface to leach calcium from cement phases. Ahead of the reaction front, high pH pore fluid mixes with calcium-rich water and induces mineral precipitation. Increases in the pressure differential for most experiments indicate that precipitation can be sufficient to restrict flow. Experimental data from this study combined with published field evidence for mineral precipitation along cemented annuli suggests that leakage of CO(2)-rich fluids along a wellbore may seal the leakage pathway if the initial aperture is small and residence time allows mobilization and precipitation of minerals along the fracture.

  7. Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through a Fractured Cement Core: Implications for Time-Dependent Wellbore Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, Nicolas J; Hesse, Marc A; Bryant, Steven L; Strazisar, Brian R; Lopano, Christina L

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of reactive transport experiments in cement fractures. The experiments simulate coupling between flow and reaction when acidic, CO{sub 2}-rich fluids flow along a leaky wellbore. An analog dilute acid with a pH between 2.0 and 3.15 was injected at constant rate between 0.3 and 9.4 cm/s into a fractured cement core. Pressure differential across the core and effluent pH were measured to track flow path evolution, which was analyzed with electron microscopy after injection. In many experiments reaction was restricted within relatively narrow, tortuous channels along the fracture surface. The observations are consistent with coupling between flow and dissolution/precipitation. Injected acid reacts along the fracture surface to leach calcium from cement phases. Ahead of the reaction front, high pH pore fluid mixes with calcium-rich water and induces mineral precipitation. Increases in the pressure differential for most experiments indicate that precipitation can be sufficient to restrict flow. Experimental data from this study combined with published field evidence for mineral precipitation along cemented annuli suggests that leakage of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids along a wellbore may seal the leakage pathway if the initial aperture is small and residence time allows mobilization and precipitation of minerals along the fracture.

  8. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prediction of the transport of sand in armored gravel reaches downstream of dams is complicated by variable bed conditions ranging from sand transported through gravel to sand in transport over buried gravel. Knowledge of the rate of sand transport in these conditions, however, is necessary for...

  9. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  10. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  11. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  12. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  13. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  14. Limited condition dependence of male acoustic signals in the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus

    PubMed Central

    Franzke, Alexandra; Reinhold, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In many animal species, male acoustic signals serve to attract a mate and therefore often play a major role for male mating success. Male body condition is likely to be correlated with male acoustic signal traits, which signal male quality and provide choosy females indirect benefits. Environmental factors such as food quantity or quality can influence male body condition and therefore possibly lead to condition-dependent changes in the attractiveness of acoustic signals. Here, we test whether stressing food plants influences acoustic signal traits of males via condition-dependent expression of these traits. We examined four male song characteristics, which are vital for mate choice in females of the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus. Only one of the examined acoustic traits, loudness, was significantly altered by changing body condition because of drought- and moisture-related stress of food plants. No condition dependence could be observed for syllable to pause ratio, gap duration within syllables, and onset accentuation. We suggest that food plant stress and therefore food plant quality led to shifts in loudness of male grasshopper songs via body condition changes. The other three examined acoustic traits of males do not reflect male body condition induced by food plant quality. PMID:22957192

  15. An Analysis of Sequential Variables in Pavlovian Conditioning Employing Extended and Limited Acquisition Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald Mellado; Capaldi, E. John

    2006-01-01

    Sequential theory's memory model of learning has been successfully applied in response contingent instrumental conditioning experiments (Capaldi, 1966, 1967, 1994; Capaldi & Miller, 2003). However, it has not been systematically tested in nonresponse contingent Pavlovian conditioning experiments. The present experiments attempted to determine if…

  16. An Analysis of Sequential Variables in Pavlovian Conditioning Employing Extended and Limited Acquisition Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald Mellado; Capaldi, E. John

    2006-01-01

    Sequential theory's memory model of learning has been successfully applied in response contingent instrumental conditioning experiments (Capaldi, 1966, 1967, 1994; Capaldi & Miller, 2003). However, it has not been systematically tested in nonresponse contingent Pavlovian conditioning experiments. The present experiments attempted to determine if…

  17. Effect of ZnO core electrodeposition conditions on electrochemical and photocatalytic properties of polypyrrole-graphene oxide shelled nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruna, A.; Shao, Q.; Kamruzzaman, M.; Li, Y. Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Pullini, D.; Busquets Mataix, D.; Ruotolo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybrid core-shell nanoarchitectures were fabricated by a simple two-step electrochemical approach: first ZnO nanorod core was electrodeposited from Zn(NO3)2 solution; further, the core nanoarray was coated with a shell based on polypyrrole hybridized with graphene oxide by electropolymerization. The properties of the core/shell nanoarchitectures were studied as a function of the core properties induced by electrodeposition parameters. The ZnO nanostructures showed improved crystallinity and c-axis preferred orientation with increasing cathodic deposition potential while the increased deposition duration resulted in a morphology transition from nanorod to pyramidal shape. The electrochemical activity of the core/shell arrays was found to increase with the deposition potential of ZnO core but decreased when morphology changed from nanorod to pyramid shape. The photocatalytic results showed improved activity for the core/hybrid shell nanoarrays with respect to ZnO and ZnO/PPy ones. The degradation rate for methylene blue decreased with prolonged deposition duration of the core. The obtained results highlight the importance of electrochemical tuning of ZnO-based core/shell nanoarrays for improved performance in electrochemical and photocatalytic applications.

  18. Condition and size of damselflies: a field study of food limitation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L

    1989-10-01

    Based on evidence from field manipulations, several authors have recently suggested that interference competition among larval odonates reduces individual growth rates and biomass by reducing foraging rates. This study was designed to test the effects of food shortage on "condition" (relative mass per unit head width) of larval Ischnura verticalis (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) under laboratory conditions and to use these results to estimate the degree of food shortage of larvae under naturally occurring field conditions. In the laboratory, there were marked differences in condition of larvae fed diets ranging from ad libitum feeding with worms to ad libitum feeding with Daphnia 1 day out of every 8. Condition of larvae collected from May through October from 17 different sites in southern Ontario indicated that, for most of the year, larvae had conditions similar to those fed ad libitum with Daphnia in the laboratory. There was no evidence that larval condition was related to population density. Condition of larvae in most sites during July was similar to that of larvae fed poor diets in the laboratory. It is unlikely that the low conditions were due to competition as there were no correlations with density across sites and population densities during July were at their lowest. Adult head widths showed a seasonal decline from mid June to the end of the flight season. There was no evidence that head widths were related to population density although there was some evidence that head widths of males were positively related to larval condition. My results do not support the hypothesis that competition is important in affecting foraging rates and subsequent development of larvae. Contrasts between my results and other studies may stem from difficulties with the interpretation of field experiments, that densities in my study may have been low due to fish predation, and/or that I. verticalis larvae are slow moving relative to other larvae and thus less likely to interact.

  19. Oxygen transfer rate during the production of alginate by Azotobacter vinelandii under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) and dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) play an important role in determining alginate production and its composition; however, no systematic study has been reported about the independent influence of the OTR and DOT. In this paper, we report a study about alginate production and the evolution of the molecular mass of the polymer produced by a wild-type A. vinelandii strain ATCC 9046, in terms of the maximum oxygen transfer rate (OTRmax) in cultures where the dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) was kept constant. Results The results revealed that in the two dissolved oxygen conditions evaluated, strictly controlled by gas blending at 0.5 and 5% DOT, an increase in the agitation rate (from 300 to 700 rpm) caused a significant increase in the OTRmax (from 17 to 100 mmol L-1 h-1 for DOT of 5% and from 6 to 70 mmol L-1 h-1 for DOT of 0.5%). This increase in the OTRmax improved alginate production, as well as the specific alginate production rate (SAPR), reaching a maximal alginate concentration of 3.1 g L-1 and a SAPR of 0.031 g alg g biom-1 h-1 in the cultures at OTRmax of 100 mmol L-1 h-1. In contrast, the mean molecular mass (MMM) of the alginate isolated from cultures developed under non-oxygen limited conditions increased by decreasing the OTRmax, reaching a maximal of 550 kDa at an OTRmax of 17 mmol L-1 h-1 . However, in the cultures developed under oxygen limitation (0.5% DOT), the MMM of the polymer was practically the same (around 200 kDa) at 300 and 700 rpm, and this remained constant throughout the cultivation. Conclusions Overall, our results showed that under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions, alginate production and its molecular mass are linked to the OTRmax, independently of the DOT of the culture. PMID:21352581

  20. Oxygen transfer rate during the production of alginate by Azotobacter vinelandii under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Esteban; Galindo, Enrique; Peña, Carlos F

    2011-02-27

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) and dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) play an important role in determining alginate production and its composition; however, no systematic study has been reported about the independent influence of the OTR and DOT. In this paper, we report a study about alginate production and the evolution of the molecular mass of the polymer produced by a wild-type A. vinelandii strain ATCC 9046, in terms of the maximum oxygen transfer rate (OTRmax) in cultures where the dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) was kept constant. The results revealed that in the two dissolved oxygen conditions evaluated, strictly controlled by gas blending at 0.5 and 5% DOT, an increase in the agitation rate (from 300 to 700 rpm) caused a significant increase in the OTRmax (from 17 to 100 mmol L(-1) h(-1) for DOT of 5% and from 6 to 70 mmol L(-1) h(-1) for DOT of 0.5%). This increase in the OTRmax improved alginate production, as well as the specific alginate production rate (SAPR), reaching a maximal alginate concentration of 3.1 g L(-1) and a SAPR of 0.031 g(alg) g(biom)(-1) h(-1) in the cultures at OTRmax of 100 mmol L(-1) h(-1). In contrast, the mean molecular mass (MMM) of the alginate isolated from cultures developed under non-oxygen limited conditions increased by decreasing the OTRmax, reaching a maximal of 550 kDa at an OTRmax of 17 mmol L(-1) h(-1). However, in the cultures developed under oxygen limitation (0.5% DOT), the MMM of the polymer was practically the same (around 200 kDa) at 300 and 700 rpm, and this remained constant throughout the cultivation. Overall, our results showed that under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions, alginate production and its molecular mass are linked to the OTRmax, independently of the DOT of the culture.

  1. Employment status, employment conditions, and limiting illness: prospective evidence from the British household panel survey 1991–2001

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, M; Sacker, A; Clarke, P

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the relation of the incidence of, and recovery from, limiting illness to employment status, occupational social class, and income over time in an initially healthy sample of working age men and women. Methods: Cox proportional hazards models. Results: There were large differences in the risk of limiting illness according to occupational social class, with men and women in the least favourable employment conditions nearly four times more likely to become ill than those in the most favourable. Unemployment and economic inactivity also had a powerful effect on illness incidence. Limiting illness was not a permanent state for most participants in the study. Employment status was also related to recovery. Conclusions: Having secure employment in favourable working conditions greatly reduces the risk of healthy people developing limiting illness. Secure employment increases the likelihood of recovery. These findings have considerable implications for both health inequality and economic policies. PMID:15143119

  2. Integrated core-log petrofacies analysis in the construction of a reservoir geomodel: A case study of a mature Mississippian carbonate reservoir using limited data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhattacharya, S.; Doveton, J.H.; Carr, T.R.; Guy, W.R.; Gerlach, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small independent operators produce most of the Mississippian carbonate fields in the United States mid-continent, where a lack of integrated characterization studies precludes maximization of hydrocarbon recovery. This study uses integrative techniques to leverage extant data in an Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) cherty carbonate reservoir in Kansas. Available data include petrophysical logs of varying vintages, limited number of cores, and production histories from each well. A consistent set of assumptions were used to extract well-level porosity and initial saturations, from logs of different types and vintages, to build a geomodel. Lacking regularly recorded well shut-in pressures, an iterative technique, based on material balance formulations, was used to estimate average reservoir-pressure decline that matched available drillstem test data and validated log-analysis assumptions. Core plugs representing the principal reservoir petrofacies provide critical inputs for characterization and simulation studies. However, assigning plugs among multiple reservoir petrofacies is difficult in complex (carbonate) reservoirs. In a bottom-up approach, raw capillary pressure (Pc) data were plotted on the Super-Pickett plot, and log- and core-derived saturation-height distributions were reconciled to group plugs by facies, to identify core plugs representative of the principal reservoir facies, and to discriminate facies in the logged interval. Pc data from representative core plugs were used for effective pay evaluation to estimate water cut from completions, in infill and producing wells, and guide-selective perforations for economic exploitation of mature fields. The results from this study were used to drill 22 infill wells. Techniques demonstrated here can be applied in other fields and reservoirs. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  3. System-Wide Adaptations of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 to Phosphate-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Florence; de Santiago-Torio, Ana; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Carlson, Hans K.; Watson, Nicki; Daye, Mirna; Summons, Roger E.; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of lipids devoid of phosphorus suggests that the availability of phosphorus limits microbial growth and activity in many anoxic, stratified environments. To better understand the response of anaerobic bacteria to phosphate limitation and starvation, this study combines microscopic and lipid analyses with the measurements of fitness of pooled barcoded transposon mutants of the model sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Phosphate-limited G20 has lower growth rates and replaces more than 90% of its membrane phospholipids by a mixture of monoglycosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG), glycuronic acid diacylglycerol (GADG) and ornithine lipids, lacks polyphosphate granules, and synthesizes other cellular inclusions. Analyses of pooled and individual mutants reveal the importance of the high-affinity phosphate transport system (the Pst system), PhoR, and glycolipid and ornithine lipid synthases during phosphate limitation. The phosphate-dependent synthesis of MGDG in G20 and the widespread occurrence of the MGDG/GADG synthase among sulfate reducing ∂-Proteobacteria implicate these microbes in the production of abundant MGDG in anaerobic environments where the concentrations of phosphate are lower than 10 μM. Numerous predicted changes in the composition of the cell envelope and systems involved in transport, maintenance of cytoplasmic redox potential, central metabolism and regulatory pathways also suggest an impact of phosphate limitation on the susceptibility of sulfate reducing bacteria to other anthropogenic or environmental stresses. PMID:28030630

  4. Assessment and treatment of nonpain conditions in life-limiting disease.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Alice E

    2011-05-01

    The "Pawspice" philosophy, which the author introduced at the 2000 American Veterinary Medical Association meeting, focuses on symptom management along with a kinder, gentler, or modified approach to standard therapy. Many veterinarians have preconceived bias or ingrained beliefs about aging, serious illness, multiple comorbidities, and cancer, which may cause a negative or dismissive approach toward palliative treatment, especially in geriatric pets. Veterinarians and their v-teams must overcome this insensitive attitude about life-limiting disease. This article describes assessment, treatment, and home management of some nonpainful life-limiting diseases, including cancer and age-related decline of vital functions in the Pawspice setting. 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

  6. Synthesis of branched cores by poly-O-alkylation reaction under phase transfer conditions. A systematic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeros, José M.; Silvestre, Hugo A.; Guadarrama, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    In the present paper is described a systematic study of poly-O-alkylation reactions of pentaerythritol (PE) and 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)ethane (TME) by 1,4 Michael addition, under phase transfer catalysis (PTC), considering the effect of: (1) the organophilicity of PTC (three different catalysts were tested), (2) PTC concentration (from catalytic to equimolar conditions), and (3) the regime of addition of reactants coexisting in the aqueous phase of the heterogeneous reaction system. The less organophilic transfer agent showed the best performance on these reactions. In our case, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (TEBAC) gathers the best features. The presence of NaOH as base, promotes the interfacial mechanism and not the bulk one. Out of the optimal range of concentration of NaOH (35-40%), competition between nucleophiles can occur, due to the saturation of the medium. Regarding the regime of addition of reactants, the scenario where NaOH and TEBAC are less time in contact, favors the formation of the desired products. Finally, the deprotection of tert-butyl groups of the poly-O-alkylated compounds is described, to get branched cores with terminal carboxylic acid groups in good yields (90-94%). Spectroscopic properties, such as IR, 1H and 13C NMR, of the synthesized compounds are also described.

  7. Comparison of electromagnetic shielding with polyaniline nanopowders produced in solvent-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Hesham Ramzy; Aston, D Eric; Smith, Jacob R; Young, Jeffrey L

    2013-06-12

    Nanoparticle synthesis (~10-50 nm) of HCl-doped polyaniline elucidates the impact of limiting solvent (water) and oxidizing agent (ammonium peroxydisulfate) on morphology (XRD and TEM), chemical structure (FTIR), conductivity (two-point DC) and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) in microwave frequencies (i.e., X-band S-parameter measurements). Detailed comparison of these properties with respect to three distinct polymerization environments indicate that a solvent-free or limited solvent polymerization accomplished through a wet grinding solid-phase reaction produces superior conductivity (27 S/cm) with intermediate crystallinity (66%) for the highest EM shielding-an order of magnitude improvement over conventional polymerization with respect to EM power transmission reduction for all loadings per shielding area (0.04 to 0.17 g/cm(2)). By contrast, the classic oxidation of aniline in a well-dispersed aqueous reaction phase with an abundance of available oxidant in free solution yielded low conductivity (3.3 S/cm), crystallinity (54%), and SE, whereas similar solvent-rich reactions with limiting oxidizer produced similar conductivity (2.9 S/cm) and significantly lower SE with the highest crystallinity (72%). This work is the first to demonstrate that limiting solvent and oxidizer enhances electromagnetic interactions for shielding microwaves in polyaniline nanopowders. This appears connected to having the highest overall extent of oxidation achieved in the wet solid-phase reaction.

  8. Inclusive and Integrated Schooling for Children with Limited Abilities: Problems and Conditions Necessary for Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liubavina, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    For more than twenty years now the system of education in Russia has been adopting the ideas of integrated schooling for children with limited abilities. The absence of positive outcomes has been confirmed by the results of numerous surveys (Malofeev 2007, 2011; Nazarova 1996, 2009). In this article, N. V. Liubavina writes that the time has now…

  9. Inclusive and Integrated Schooling for Children with Limited Abilities: Problems and Conditions Necessary for Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liubavina, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    For more than twenty years now the system of education in Russia has been adopting the ideas of integrated schooling for children with limited abilities. The absence of positive outcomes has been confirmed by the results of numerous surveys (Malofeev 2007, 2011; Nazarova 1996, 2009). In this article, N. V. Liubavina writes that the time has now…

  10. Dielectric response of II-VI semiconductor core-shell ensembles: Study of the lossless optical condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, R. M.; Kanyinda-Malu, C.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate optical properties of II-VI core-shell distribution mixtures made of two type-I sized-nanoshells as a plausible negative dielectric function material. The nonlocal optical response of the semiconductor QD is described by using a resonant excitonic dielectric function, while the shell response is modeled with Demangeot formula. Achieving the zero-loss at an optical frequency ω, i.e., ɛeff =ɛeff‧ + iɛeff″ with ɛeff‧ < 0 and ɛeff″ = 0, is of fundamental importance in nanophotonics. Resonant states in semiconductors provide a source for negative dielectric function provided that the dipole strength and the oscillator density are adequate to offset the background. Furthermore, the semiconductor offers the prospect of pumping, either optically or electrically, to achieve a gain mechanism that can offset the loss. We analyse optimal conditions that must be satisfied to achieve semiconductor-based negative index materials. By comparing with II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) previously reported in the literature, the inclusion of phonon and shell contributions in the ɛeff along with the finite barrier Effective Mass Approximation (EMA) approach, we found similar qualitative behaviours for the ɛeff. The lossless optical condition along with ɛeff‧ < 0 is discussed in terms of sizes, volume fractions and embedding medium of the mixtures' distributions. Furthermore, we estimated optical power to maintain nanocrystals density in excited states and this value is less than that previously obtained in II-VI semiconductor QDs.

  11. Measuring the Internal Structure and Physical Conditions in Star and Planet Forming Clouds Cores: Towards a Quantitative Description of Cloud Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2004-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular cloud cores and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of this program are to acquire, reduce and analyze deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds in order to determine the detailed initial conditions for star formation from quantitative measurements of the internal structure of starless cloud cores and to quantitatively investigate the evolution of such structure through the star and planet formation process.

  12. Measuring the Internal Structure and Physical Conditions in Star and Planet Forming Clouds Cores: Towards a Quantitative Description of Cloud Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2004-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular cloud cores and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of this program are to acquire, reduce and analyze deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds in order to determine the detailed initial conditions for star formation from quantitative measurements of the internal structure of starless cloud cores and to quantitatively investigate the evolution of such structure through the star and planet formation process.

  13. AJUBA LIM Proteins Limit Hippo Activity in Proliferating Cells by Sequestering the Hippo Core Kinase Complex in the Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Radhika; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Zhang, Kun; Loza, Andrew J.; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway controls organ growth and is implicated in cancer development. Whether and how Hippo pathway activity is limited to sustain or initiate cell growth when needed is not understood. The members of the AJUBA family of LIM proteins are negative regulators of the Hippo pathway. In mammalian epithelial cells, we found that AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo regulation of YAP, in proliferating cells only, by sequestering a cytosolic Hippo kinase complex in which LATS kinase is inhibited. At the plasma membranes of growth-arrested cells, AJUBA LIM proteins do not inhibit or associate with the Hippo kinase complex. The ability of AJUBA LIM proteins to inhibit YAP regulation by Hippo and to associate with the kinase complex directly correlate with their capacity to limit Hippo signaling during Drosophila wing development. AJUBA LIM proteins did not influence YAP activity in response to cell-extrinsic or cell-intrinsic mechanical signals. Thus, AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo pathway activity in contexts where cell proliferation is needed. PMID:27457617

  14. VLBI for Gravity Probe B. III. A Limit on the Proper Motion of the "Core" of the Quasar 3C 454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Lebach, D. E.; Lederman, J. I.; Petrov, L.; Ransom, R. R.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.

    2012-07-01

    We made very long baseline interferometry observations at 8.4 GHz between 1997 and 2005 to estimate the coordinates of the "core" component of the superluminal quasar, 3C 454.3, the ultimate reference point in the distant universe for the NASA/Stanford Gyroscope Relativity Mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B). These coordinates are determined relative to those of the brightness peaks of two other compact extragalactic sources, B2250+194 and B2252+172, nearby on the sky, and within a celestial reference frame (CRF), defined by a large suite of compact extragalactic radio sources, and nearly identical to the International Celestial Reference Frame 2 (ICRF2). We find that B2250+194 and B2252+172 are stationary relative to each other, and also in the CRF, to within 1σ upper limits of 15 and 30 μas yr-1 in α and δ, respectively. The core of 3C 454.3 appears to jitter in its position along the jet direction over ~0.2 mas, likely due to activity close to the putative supermassive black hole nearby, but on average is stationary in the CRF within 1σ upper limits on its proper motion of 39 μas yr-1 (1.0c) and 30 μas yr-1 (0.8c) in α and δ, respectively, for the period 2002-2005. Our corresponding limit over the longer interval, 1998-2005, of more importance to GP-B, is 46 and 56 μas yr-1 in α and δ, respectively. Some of 3C 454.3's jet components show significantly superluminal motion with speeds of up to ~200 μas yr-1 or 5c in the CRF. The core of 3C 454.3 thus provides for GP-B a sufficiently stable reference in the distant universe.

  15. Limiting conditions for applying the spherical section assumption in contact angle estimation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Jaideep

    2003-03-01

    The shape of liquid drops on solid surfaces deviates from the spherical as tension decreases and gravity effects start affecting the drop shape. This paper attempts to define this deviation and estimates the dimensionless Eotvos number limits above which the deviation becomes "significant." The use of these limiting values can facilitate estimation of contact angle in the following manner. It is well known that the equilibrium contact angle made by a liquid drop on a solid surface can be estimated from measurements of two drop parameters. These parameters can be any two chosen from the drop volume, height, and wetted radius. In case the effect of gravity on the drop shape is negligible, simple algebraic relations derived from the spherical section assumption exist, from which the contact angle can be estimated. In systems where the "spherical section" assumption is invalid, the Laplace equation for the drop shape has been solved numerically with any two of the above parameters as the constraints, to obtain the contact angle. In this paper, Eotvos numbers at which the deviation of the drop profile from the spherical is significant enough to result in contact angle deviation of 1 degrees are estimated. The limiting values of Eotvos number, expressed as a function of the original contact angle made by the spherical profile, are obtained by solving the Laplace equation for the drop shape with the drop volume and wetted radius constraints for decreasing values of Interfacial tension. These limiting values are also estimated for different drop sizes and for cases where the drop phase is heavier (sessile) and lighter (buoyant) than the surrounding fluid. The independence of the Eotvos number estimates from the sign of the density difference as well as the drop size is shown. These Eotvos number limits can be used to check if the spherical section assumption, with the resulting simple algebraic relations, can be used for contact angle estimation and other shape

  16. Healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Stuart; Bradford, Natalie; Herbert, Anthony; Danby, Susan; Yates, Patsy

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify and synthesize the best international qualitative evidence on healthcare users' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions. For the purposes of this review, "healthcare users" will be taken to include children who have life-limiting conditions and their families. The question to be addressed is:What are healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions? The prospect of the death of a child from an incurable medical condition is harrowing, yet finding a way to discuss this prospect is crucial to maximize the quality of life for such children and their families. High-quality communication is well recognized as a core skill health care professionals need to maximize the quality of care they provide. This skill is valued by service users, who consistently rate it as one of the highest priorities for the care they receive. Evidence suggests, however, that healthcare professionals can feel ill-equipped or uncomfortable communicating with and about such children. Therefore, it is important to understand what represents high-quality communication and what is involved in accomplishing this within pediatric palliative care.In recent decades there has been an increased focus on providing palliative care for children who have life-limiting conditions. These are conditions for which no cure is available and for which the probable outcome is premature death. Palliative care may also be appropriate for children who have life-threatening conditions; these are conditions where there is not only a high probability of premature death but also a chance of long-term survival into adulthood Although pediatric palliative care is underpinned by the same philosophy as adult palliative care, children who have life-limiting conditions and their families have particular needs that distinguish them from users of

  17. Monitoring strategies for re-establishment of ecological reference conditions: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alve, Elisabeth; Lepland, Aivo; Magnusson, Jan; Backer-Owe, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The ecological status of an environment should be evaluated by comparison with local "reference conditions", here defined as the pre-industrial ecological status of the 19th century. This pilot study illustrates how micropalaeontological monitoring, using benthic foraminifera (protists) and associated geochemical parameters preserved in inner Oslofjord (Norway) sediments, characterise local reference conditions. In order to optimise the usefulness of the ecological information held by foraminifera and enable characterisation of temporal changes in environmental quality beyond time intervals covered by biological time-series, the Norwegian governmental macrofauna-based classification system is applied on fossil benthic foraminiferal assemblages. Quantitative comparisons demonstrate deteriorating ecological status in response to increased anthropogenic forcing (eutrophication, micropollutants), including a 73% loss in number of foraminiferal species. Despite reduced pollution during the past decades and, at one site, capping of polluted sediments with clean clay, the reference conditions are far from re-established. Micropalaeontological monitoring requires net sediment accumulation basins and careful considerations of taphonomic processes.

  18. Seal mothers expend more on offspring under favourable conditions and less when resources are limited.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Clive R; Harcourt, Robert G; Burton, Harry R; Daniel, Owen; Hindell, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, maternal expenditure on offspring is a complex mix of several factors including the species' mating system, offspring sex and the condition and age of the mother. While theory suggests that in polygynous species mothers should wean larger male offspring than females when resources and maternal conditions allow, the evidence for this remains equivocal. Southern elephant seals are highly dimorphic, polygynous capital breeders existing in an environment with highly variable resources and should therefore provide clear evidence to support the theoretical expectations of differential maternal expenditure in male and female pups. We quantified maternal size (mass and length) and pup size at birth and weaning for 342 elephant seal mothers at Macquarie Island. The study was conducted over 11 years of contrasting sea-ice and Southern Annular Mode values, both indices of maternal prey resources. Overall, large females weaned male pups that weighed 17 kg (15·5%) more than female pups. Maternal condition varied by as much as 59 kg among years, and was positively related to Southern Annular Mode, and negatively to maximum sea-ice extent. Smaller mothers weaned relatively larger male pups under favourable conditions, this effect was less apparent for larger mothers. We developed a simple model linking environmental variation to maternal masses post-partum, followed by maternal masses post-partum to weaning masses and then weaning masses to pup survival and demonstrated that environmental conditions affected predicted survival so that the pups of small mothers had an estimated 7% increase in first year survival in 'good' vs. 'bad' years compared to 1% for female pups of large mothers. Co-occurrence of environmental quality and conservative reproductive tactics suggests that mothers retain substantial plasticity in maternal care, enhancing their lifetime reproductive success by adjusting reproductive expenditure relative to both prevailing environmental conditions

  19. The condition of a finite Markov chain and perturbation bounds for the limiting probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. D., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The inequalities bounding the relative error the norm of w- w squiggly/the norm of w are exhibited by a very simple function of E and A. Let T denote the transition matrix of an ergodic chain, C, and let A = I - T. Let E be a perturbation matrix such that T squiggly = T - E is also the transition matrix of an ergodic chain, C squiggly. Let w and w squiggly denote the limiting probability (row) vectors for C and C squiggly. The inequality is the best one possible. This bound can be significant in the numerical determination of the limiting probabilities for an ergodic chain. In addition to presenting a sharp bound for the norm of w-w squiggly/the norm of w an explicit expression for w squiggly will be derived in which w squiggly is given as a function of E, A, w and some other related terms.

  20. Hydrogen isotope exchange and conditioning in graphite limiters used in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Ulrickson, M.

    1986-02-01

    Isotopic exchange experiments performed in TFTR are used to examine the outgassing and diffusive properties of graphite used as the plasma limiter. Changeover from hydrogen to deuterium for different periods ranges from approx.600 to 60 plasma discharges, which appears to be correlated to the limiter temperature. We present a simple analytical model that predicts a fast transient (approx.10 plasma discharges) changeover where the deuterium fueling dilutes the adsorbed and near-surface hydrogen, and a slowly changing term where bulk hydrogen diffuses to the surface. Using this model we can extract an activation energy for diffusion of 0.15 +- 0.02 eV. We hypothesize that interpore diffusion for this porous (approx.15%) material is consistent with our observations. 19 refs.

  1. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... on genetic information, A has a predisposition towards breast cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast... plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer because, prior to A's enrollment date, A...

  2. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... on genetic information, A has a predisposition towards breast cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast... plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer because, prior to A's enrollment date, A...

  3. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast cancer at any time prior to A's enrollment date in the plan. Nine months after A's enrollment date in the plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast...

  4. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast cancer at any time prior to A's enrollment date in the plan. Nine months after A's enrollment date in the plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast...

  5. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements show in general that the edge electron density n{sub e} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature T{sub e} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C 2 decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the D{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Microbial responses to disturbance following the conversion of CRP land to cropland under water limiting conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The conversion of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands to croplands potentially reduces ecological benefits such as high soil health condition that resist to disturbance (i.e. extreme weather). Soil CO2 flux primarily comes from root and microbes’ respirations and is sensitive to changes in soil...

  7. Limiting Conditions for Effects of ELF on Free Flying Migrant Birds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-15

    Iv SITE ONE SITE TWO SITE98 TS1, P 3FOUR Figure L1 Deviation of mean track direction from nearest control ("off") condition.The figure includes all...migration, three areas were chosen for radar observation: Iron Rill, Del., Franklin, aass., and Mallen and Round Lake, Wisc . Ob- servations were made in the

  8. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... on genetic information, A has a predisposition towards breast cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast... plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer because, prior to A's enrollment date, A was...

  9. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast cancer at any time prior to A's enrollment date in the plan. Nine months after A's enrollment date in the plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer...

  10. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast cancer at any time prior to A's enrollment date in the plan. Nine months after A's enrollment date in the plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer...

  11. Reference conditions for silvicultural field studies in Maine: limitations and opportunities

    Treesearch

    Laura S. Kenefic; Alan S. White; Shawn Fraver

    2004-01-01

    There are many types of controls or reference conditions for silvicultural experiments. The most basic are pretreatment records of composition and structure, but such data provide little information about response to treatment compared to natural developmental and disturbance patterns. Ideally, experiments should have untreated stand replicates in which development can...

  12. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low-density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements shown in general that the edge electron density {ital n}{sub {ital e}} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C II decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the {ital D}{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement.

  13. Limited value of bladder sensation as a trigger for conditional neurostimulation in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Martens, F M J; van Kuppevelt, H J M; Beekman, J A C; Rijkhoff, N J M; Heesakkers, J P F A

    2010-03-01

    Conditional stimulation of dorsal genital nerves suppresses undesired detrusor contractions (UDC) and consequently increases bladder capacity and prevents incontinence. No clinically applicable sensor exists for reliable bladder activity monitoring as a trigger for conditional stimulation. Primary objective of this study was to determine whether bladder sensation concomitant with UDC may be used for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients to trigger neurostimulation in daily life. Nineteen male and 7 female SCI patients suspected of detrusor overactivity (DO) underwent conventional and 6-hr ambulatory urodynamics. Patients were instructed to do normal daily activities and to activate event buttons of the ambulatory recorder to mark events: physical activity, bladder sensation, micturition or intermittent catheterization, and urinary incontinence. Detection rate was defined as the number of recorded bladder sensation divided by the total number of recorded UDC during ambulatory urodynamics. Bladder sensation was reported by 73% of patients in daily life. Only 41% of patients had analyzable bladder sensation concomitant with UDC during ambulatory urodynamics. For ambulatory and conventional urodynamics, mean detection rates were 23% and 72%, respectively, with mean recording delays of 57 and 16 sec after UDC onset, respectively. Bladder sensation only occurs in a small group of SCI patients combined with a rather low detection rate and long reaction time. Therefore, bladder sensation as a trigger for conditional stimulation does not seem to be suitable for SCI patients with DO. Reliable techniques for chronic bladder activity monitoring are a prerequisite for successful clinical application of conditional stimulation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Polyhydroxyalkanoates from Pseudomonas sp. using synthetic and olive mill wastewater under limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Kourmentza, C; Ntaikou, I; Lyberatos, G; Kornaros, M

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the ability of bacteria isolated from an enriched mixed culture to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and examining the effect of nitrogen and dual nitrogen-oxygen limitation on PHAs production, by using both synthetic and olive mill wastewater (OMW). PHAs production was performed through batch experiments using both the enriched culture and the isolated strains (belonging to the genus of Pseudomonas) aiming to compare PHAs accumulation capacity, yields and rates. The use of enriched culture and synthetic wastewater under nitrogen limitation resulted in the highest PHA accumulation, i.e. 64.4%gPHAs/g of cell dry mass (CDM). However, when OMW was used, PHAs accumulation significantly decreased, i.e. 8.8%gPHAs/g CDM. The same trend was followed by the isolated strains, nevertheless, their ability to synthesize PHAs was lower. Although, dual nitrogen-oxygen limitation generally slowed down PHAs biosynthesis, in certain strains PHAs production was positively affected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed.

  16. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  17. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  18. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may hold...

  19. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  20. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for citrus greening. 301.76-6 Section 301.76-6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-6 Additional conditions for issuance of...

  1. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for citrus greening. 301.76-6 Section 301.76-6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-6 Additional conditions for issuance of...

  2. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for citrus greening. 301.76-6 Section 301.76-6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-6 Additional conditions for issuance of...

  3. GCM Simulations of Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" Conditions: Implications for the Environmental Limits on Terrestrial Metazoans and Their Extraterrestrial Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth intervals provide excellent opportunities to examine the environmental limits on terrestrial metazoans. A series of GCM simulations was run in order to quantify climatic conditions during these intervals. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksenko, A. I.; Cruz, J. P.; Lakshtanov, E. L.

    2008-06-01

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus.

  5. 76 FR 10213 - Special Conditions: Embraer Model EMB-135BJ (Legacy 650) Airplanes, Limit Engine Torque Loads for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... appropriate design standards. The latest generation of jet engines is capable of producing, during failure... 650) Airplanes, Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal Aviation... engine size and the potential torque load imposed by sudden engine-stoppage conditions. The applicable...

  6. Limits on conservative behavior of Nd isotopes in seawater assessed from analysis of fish teeth from Pacific core tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E.; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Sagawa, Takuya

    2011-10-01

    Neodymium (Nd) isotopes have become an accepted water mass tracer for paleoceanographic reconstructions; however, high rates of radiogenic Nd input from volcanic islands/arcs in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) and the subarctic North Pacific (SANP) can significantly alter the isotopic composition of ambient seawaters, leading to questions about the conservative nature of Nd isotopes in the Pacific. Here we present the first comprehensive study of Nd isotopes preserved in core-top fossil fish teeth/debris from 31 sites in the Pacific to define the vertical and horizontal distributions of seawater Nd isotopes and to test the reliability of Nd isotopes as a water mass tracer in the Pacific. We found that Nd isotopic values of northward-flowing Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) are significantly modified in the western-central equatorial Pacific and the SANP as a result of local radiogenic inputs from young circum-Pacific island arcs. Consequently, 'modified LCDW' with ~-5 ɛ Nd is created in the central equatorial Pacific, while recirculated North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) acquires a radiogenic Nd isotope value (~-2 ɛ Nd) in the SANP. Nd isotopic ratios of fish teeth/debris in the central North Pacific plotted against salinity (or phosphate concentration) from the overlying bottom water produce a mixing envelope between modified LCDW and NPDW, indicating that these Nd isotopic values represent the southern- and northern-sourced end member values for the central North Pacific and that mixing of these water masses defines vertical profiles of Nd isotopes in this region. In the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) three water masses (modified LCDW, NPDW SANP, and NPDW western Pacific) combine to produce Nd isotopic values that reflect this conservative mixture. Therefore, Nd isotopes behave as a conservative water mass tracer in the central North Pacific and the EEP, but high rates of lithogenic inputs from young circum-Pacific island arcs compromise the conservative

  7. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Osada, Naoki; Araki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  8. Factors limiting endurance of armor, artillery, and infantry units under simulated NBC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, T.M.; Tharion, W.J.; Banderet, L.E.; Lussier, A.R.

    1986-03-13

    The war of the future will require 72-hour operations in environments contaminated with nuclear/biological/chemical (NBC) agents. The 1985 P2NBC2 (Physiological and Psychological Effects of NBC and Extended Operations on Combined Arms Crews) Program assessed soldier endurance and performance under simulated NBC conditions. A total of 175 soldiers were observed during four tests differing in design, site, climatic conditions, and performance demands. In all but one of the iterations where the full chemical-protective ensemble (MOPP 4) was used without cooling, soldier endurance fell far short of the projected requirement. Psychological data were analyzed to determine which factors were associated with the incidence of casualties. The findings showed that perceived intensity of symptoms resembling the hyperventilation syndrome was significantly greater in soldiers classified as Casualties. Five of these symptoms (painful breathing, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, headache, and nausea) showed Casualty-Survivor differences in all tests. Symptom intensity was attributed to two factors. (1) External conditions. Thermal stress exacerbated the five basic symptoms, induced others (tetany and paresthesia), and decreased endurance. Periodic relief from respirator use attenuated these symptoms and enhanced endurance. (2) Individual differences. Significant Casualty-Survivor differences in anxiety, depression, and cognitive strategy scores indicated that perception of hyperventilation symptoms and endurance were related to personality variables. Hyperventilation symptoms could incapacitate the soldier or induce removal of the protective mask under actual chemical attack.

  9. HERFD-XAS and valence-to-core-XES: new tools to push the limits in research with hard X-rays?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias

    2014-07-21

    In this perspective, the HERFD-XANES (high energy resolution fluorescence detected X-ray absorption near edge structure) and Kβ2,5- or V2C-XES (valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy) methods are discussed as new and powerful tools for chemical research with hard X-rays. This includes a brief survey of the underlying physical processes and the introduction of experimental issues. The potential of both methods to overcome limitations of conventional XAS (X-ray absorption spectroscopy) and to push the limits for obtaining new information about the electronic and geometric structures of metal centers, in the solid state structure or heterogeneous catalysts, but also in metal complexes and homogeneous catalysts, is discussed by presenting a survey of representative references and recent own studies, rounded off by a conclusion and outlook.

  10. Phase transitions in the hard-core Bose-Fermi-Hubbard model at non-zero temperatures in the heavy-fermion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, I. V.; Krasnov, V. O.

    2017-04-01

    Phase transitions at non-zero temperatures in ultracold Bose- and Fermi-particles mixture in optical lattices using the Bose-Fermi-Hubbard model in the mean field and hard-core boson approximations are investigated. The case of infinitely small fermion transfer and the repulsive on-site boson-fermion interaction is considered. The possibility of change of order (from the 2nd to the 1st one) of the phase transition to the superfluid phase in the regime of fixed values of the chemical potentials of Bose- and Fermi-particles is established. The relevant phase diagrams determining the conditions at which such a change takes place, are built.

  11. Teleportation of qubit states through dissipative channels: Conditions for surpassing the no-cloning limit

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Bartkiewicz, Karol; Liu, Yu-xi; Miranowicz, Adam

    2007-10-15

    We investigate quantum teleportation through dissipative channels and calculate teleportation fidelity as a function of damping rates. It is found that the average fidelity of teleportation and the range of states to be teleported depend on the type and rate of the damping in the channel. Using the fully entangled fraction, we derive two bounds on the damping rates of the channels: one is to beat the classical limit and the second is to guarantee the nonexistence of any other copy with better fidelity. The effect of the initially distributed maximally entangled state on the process is presented; the concurrence and the fully entangled fraction of the shared states are discussed. We intend to show that prior information on the dissipative channel and the range of qubit states to be teleported is helpful for the evaluation of the success of teleportation, where success is defined as surpassing the fidelity limit imposed by the fidelity of the 1-to-2 optimal cloning machine for the specific range of qubits.

  12. Synthesis of Extracellular Proteinase by Pseudomonas fluorescens Under Conditions of Limiting Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphate †

    PubMed Central

    McKellar, R. C.; Cholette, H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate concentrations on growth and proteinase production by Pseudomonas fluorescens 32A was examined. In mineral salts medium containing dialyzed skim milk supernatant as an inducer, maximum growth was obtained at 1.0 and 2.5 mM orthophosphate at 20 and 5°C, respectively. At both temperatures, 5 mM orthophosphate was required for maximum proteinase production, whereas significant inhibition was found at 10 mM. Orthophosphate was the only phosphate compound able to support growth. With sodium pyruvate as the carbon source, maximum enzyme synthesis was at 100 mM carbon at both temperatures. At both 20 and 5°C maximum growth and enzyme production was found with 10 mM NH4Cl. A bioassay for available phosphate based on the growth of P. fluorescens 32A in phosphate-limited mineral salts medium showed that skim milk and skim milk supernatant contained 50 and 10 mM orthophosphate, respectively. Proteinase production in skim milk was 2.6- and 12-fold greater than that in optimal mineral salts medium at 20 and 5°C, respectively. These results suggest that proteinase production in milk does not occur as a result of nutrient limitation and may be regulated in part by milk phosphates. PMID:16346559

  13. Highly reducing conditions during core formation on Mercury: Implications for internal structure and the origin of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavergne, Valérie; Toplis, Michael J.; Berthet, Sophie; Jones, John

    2010-03-01

    The high average density and low surface FeO content of the planet Mercury are shown to be consistent with very low oxygen fugacity during core segregation, in the range 3-6 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer. These low oxygen fugacities, and associated high metal content, are characteristic of high-iron enstatite (EH) and Bencubbinite (CB) chondrites, raising the possibility that such materials may have been important building blocks for this planet. With this idea in mind we have explored the internal structure of a Mercury sized planet of EH or CB bulk composition. Phase equilibria in the silicate mantle have been modeled using the thermodynamic calculator p-MELTS, and these simulations suggest that orthopyroxene will be the dominant mantle phase for both EH and CB compositions, with crystalline SiO 2 being an important minor phase at all pressures. Simulations for both compositions predict a plagioclase-bearing "crust" at low pressure, significant clinopyroxene also being calculated for the CB bulk composition. Concerning the core, comparison with recent high pressure and high temperature experiments relevant to the formation of enstatite meteorites, suggest that the core of Mercury may contain several wt.% silicon, in addition to sulfur. In light of the pressure of the core-mantle boundary on Mercury (˜7 GPa) and the pressure at which the immiscibility gap in the system Fe-S-Si closes (˜15 GPa) we suggest that Mercury's core may have a complex shell structure comprising: (i) an outer layer of Fe-S liquid, poor in Si; (ii) a middle layer of Fe-Si liquid, poor in S; and (iii) an inner core of solid metal. The distribution of heat-producing elements between mantle and core, and within a layered core have been quantified. Available data for Th and K suggest that these elements will not enter the core in significant amounts. On the other hand, for the case of U both recently published metal/silicate partitioning data, as well as observations of U

  14. Increased conditioned fear response and altered balance of dopamine in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens during amphetamine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Pezze, M A; Feldon, J; Murphy, C A

    2002-04-01

    It has been suggested that neuroadaptations within the nucleus accumbens (NAC) dopaminergic (DA) projection contribute to the negative affect associated with psychostimulant withdrawal. The present study assessed the effects of amphetamine (AMPH) withdrawal on behavioral and NAC DA responses to conditioned fear stress. Animals injected with escalating-dose AMPH (1-5mg/kg, three injections/day, 6 days) or saline (SAL) acquired a tone-shock association on withdrawal day 3 and were tested for extinction of conditioned freezing to the tone on withdrawal day 4. Extracellular levels of NAC shell and core DA were monitored using in vivo microdialysis on both days. AMPH-withdrawn animals exhibited more conditioned freezing than SAL animals during both acquisition and extinction. During acquisition, DA increased more in the shell than the core of the NAC in both AMPH and SAL groups. During extinction to the tone, shell DA increased in SAL- but not AMPH-treated animals, whereas core DA activity was greater in AMPH than SAL animals. These data demonstrate that AMPH withdrawal alters the balance between shell and core DA transmission while increasing the behavioral expression of conditioned fear. Such drug-induced neuroadaptations in the NAC stress response may be involved in the exacerbation of negative emotions associated with drug withdrawal and stimulant-induced psychosis.

  15. The solubility limited source term for cement-conditioned wastes: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, F.P.

    1999-07-01

    An important function of the cement backfill in a nuclear waste repository is to react with aqueous waste species and reduce their solubility. However, to quantify backfill performance it is first necessary to prove the existence and establish the nature of the chemical solubility controls. This can be done by characterizing the solubility-limiting phases, determining their solubility and thermodynamic functions, and assessing their stability and persistence and solubility during backfill degradation. Much of the necessary data must be acquired experimentally. The title paper describes briefly the progress of experimental work on selected species including nickel, chromium(III,VI), tin(IV), molybdenum(VI), uranium(VI), Ce(III,IV), thorium, actinide simulants (III,IV) and chloride. Data needs are assessed and although much experimental work remains to be done, methodologies have been developed which will expedite progress. The expectation of a more quantitative performance assessment of cement barriers is, therefore, attainable.

  16. Decoupling criterion based on limited energy loss condition for groove measurement using optical scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Mengzhou; Li, Qiang; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    In confocal metrology, the lateral and axial responses are coupled in narrow regions near groove edges. This coupling results in an area with an uncertain profile, particularly for measurements of tight structures or deep grooves. In this paper, to delineate the area with measurement accuracy loss, an analytical model depicting the coupling relationships between the groove depth, the coupled portions and the NA of the objective used is introduced. Based on this model, the limited energy lost (LEL) decoupling criterion is presented that can enable users to choose suitable numerical apertures before performing measurements, predict the extents of the areas with measurement accuracy loss, and identify readout areas that yield accurate height measurements. The theory was verified by using confocal microscopes and is also applicable to far-field optical scanning metrology.

  17. Deformation-aided segregation of Fe-S liquid from olivine under deep Earth conditions: Implications for core formation in the early solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Madeleine T. L.; Bromiley, Geoffrey D.; Butler, Ian B.; Frost, Mungo; Bradley, Robert; Carr, James; Le Godec, Yann; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Zhu, Wenlu; Miller, Kevin; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Mariani, Elisabetta; Tatham, Daniel; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2017-02-01

    The planets and larger rocky bodies of the inner solar system are differentiated, and consist of metallic, iron-rich cores surrounded by thick shells of silicate. Core formation in these bodies, i.e. the segregation of metal from silicate, was a key process in the early solar system, and one which left a lasting geochemical signature. It is commonly assumed that extensive silicate melting and formation of deep magma oceans was required to initiate core formation, due to the inability of iron-rich melts to segregate from a solid silicate matrix. Here we assess the role of deformation in aiding segregation of core-forming melts from solid silicate under conditions of planetary deep interiors. Low-strain rate, high-pressure/temperature deformation experiments and high-resolution 2-D and 3-D textural analysis demonstrate that deformation fundamentally alters iron-rich melt geometry, promoting wetting of silicate grain boundaries and formation of extensive micron to sub-micron width Fe-rich melt bands. Deformation-aided Fe-S melt networks noted here contrast those observed in higher finite strain experiments conducted at lower pressure, and may reveal either an alternative mechanism for melt segregation at higher pressures, or an early stage process of melt segregation. Results suggest, however, that core-mantle chemical equilibration cannot be assumed in models of planetary formation, and that instead, the chemistry of rocky planets may record a complex, multi-stage process of core formation.

  18. Unravelling Carbon Fixation under Nutrient limited Conditions - a Water Column Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Craig, Susanne; Shadwick, Elizabeth H.; Li, William K.; Greenan, Blair J. W.

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplankton plays a critical role in the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) by the ocean, and is comprised of a spectrum of cell sizes that are strongly regulated by oceanographic conditions. Elevated CO2 fixation relative to nutrient availability, also called carbon overconsumption, has been observed in various mid to high latitude systems, such as the Baltic and North Seas, the North Atlantic Ocean, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago or the Scotian Shelf. We shed light on this phenomenon relying on an extensive data set of water column observations of the CO2 system and phytoplankton cell counts from the Scotian Shelf, a temperate shelf sea. We show that in the summertime, the population of numerically abundant small cells, which favour warmer, nutrient poor conditions, accounts for approximately 20% of annual carbon uptake. At the broader scale, the neglection of this "non-Redfieldian" contribution typically leads to an underestimation of net community production by approximately 20% to 50%. These small cells are not well represented by chlorophyll a - the ubiquitously used proxy of phytoplankton biomass - but rather, are strongly correlated with surface water temperature. Given the persistent near-zero nutrient concentrations during the summer, it appears that small cells drive carbon overconsumption, and suggest that their role in carbon fixation will become increasingly important in a warming, increasingly stratified ocean.

  19. Heterogenous oceanic redox conditions through the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary limited the metazoan zonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junpeng; Fan, Tailiang; Zhang, Yuandong; Lash, Gary G; Li, Yifan; Wu, Yue

    2017-08-17

    Recent studies have enhanced our understanding of the linkage of oxygenation and metazoan evolution in Early Cambrian time. However, little of this work has addressed the apparent lag of animal diversification and atmospheric oxygenation during this critical period of Earth history. This study utilizes the geochemical proxy and N isotope record of the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary preserved in intra-shelf basin, slope, and slope basin deposits of the Yangtze Sea to assess the ocean redox state during the Early Cambrian metazoan radiation. Though ferruginous conditions appear to have prevailed through the water column during this time, episodes of local bottom-water anoxia extending into the photic-zone impacted the slope belt of the basin. Heterogenous oceanic redox conditions are expressed by trace element concentrations and Fe speciation, and spatial variation of N isotopes. We propose that the coupling of ocean chemistry and Early Cambrian animal diversification was not a simple cause-and-effect relationship, but rather a complex interaction. Specifically, it is likely that animal diversification expanded not only temporally but also spatially from the shallow shelf to deep-water environments in tandem with progressive oxygenation of the extensive continental margin.

  20. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: FT-IR spectroscopic studies of yeast grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Rozenfelde, Linda; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrobiosis is a unique state of living organisms when metabolism is temporarily and reversibly delayed in response to the extreme desiccation of cells. The production of dry active preparations of yeast grown under anaerobic conditions is not currently possible because preparations are extremely sensitive to the dehydration procedure, though they could be very helpful in different biotechnological processes, including bioethanol production. To characterize mechanisms responsible for such sensitivity to the dehydration procedure, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to study the composition of aerobically grown yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to dehydration and grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation and sensitive to dehydration. Results indicated that significantly lower amounts of lipids in cells, grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation, may be related to the mechanisms of sensitivity. Dehydration of both resistant and sensitive S. cerevisiae cells was accompanied by similar changes in main cellular compounds. Amounts of nucleic acids and proteins decreased slightly, whereas that of lipids and carbohydrates increased. Artificially reduced sensitivity to dehydration in S. cerevisiae cells, grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation, led to the increase in the lipid concentration. The chemical composition of S. cerevisiae membranes is proposed to dictate the resistance to dehydration in resistant and sensitive cells.

  1. [Evaluation of the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, core-needle aspiration and fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohang; Niu, Lijuan

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, ultrasound-guided core-needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid. A retrospective was performed in 92 patients with suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid. Of them, 52 patients underwent US-CNB and US-FNA and 40 patients underwent US-CNA and US-FNA. The diagnoses for the micro-nodules were identified by histopathlogical examination after surgery. Among 52 cases with both US-CNB and US-FNA, 41 got nondiagnostic US-CNB and 11 cases successfully got the correct diagnoses of US-CNB; 6 cases got the incorrect diagnosis of US-FNA and 46 cases got the correct diagnosis of US-FNA. Of 40 cases with US-CNA and US-FNA, unsatisfactory specimen of US-CNA occurred in 14 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-CNA were got in 26 cases; unsatisfactory specimen of US-FNA occurred in 4 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-FNA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US-FNA in 92 cases for the diagnosis of malignancy were 93.4%, 86.7%, 97.3%, 72.2% and 92.3%, respectively. US-FNA is the most valuable method for the diagnosis of suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid before operation.

  2. Modeling the Performance Limitations and Prospects of Perovskite/Si Tandem Solar Cells under Realistic Operating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite/Si tandem solar cells have the potential to considerably out-perform conventional solar cells. Under standard test conditions, perovskite/Si tandem solar cells already outperform the Si single junction. Under realistic conditions, however, as we show, tandem solar cells made from current record cells are hardly more efficient than the Si cell alone. We model the performance of realistic perovskite/Si tandem solar cells under real-world climate conditions, by incorporating parasitic cell resistances, nonradiative recombination, and optical losses into the detailed-balance limit. We show quantitatively that when optimizing these parameters in the perovskite top cell, perovskite/Si tandem solar cells could reach efficiencies above 38% under realistic conditions, even while leaving the Si cell untouched. Despite the rapid efficiency increase of perovskite solar cells, our results emphasize the need for further material development, careful device design, and light management strategies, all necessary for highly efficient perovskite/Si tandem solar cells. PMID:28920081

  3. Modeling the Performance Limitations and Prospects of Perovskite/Si Tandem Solar Cells under Realistic Operating Conditions.

    PubMed

    Futscher, Moritz H; Ehrler, Bruno

    2017-09-08

    Perovskite/Si tandem solar cells have the potential to considerably out-perform conventional solar cells. Under standard test conditions, perovskite/Si tandem solar cells already outperform the Si single junction. Under realistic conditions, however, as we show, tandem solar cells made from current record cells are hardly more efficient than the Si cell alone. We model the performance of realistic perovskite/Si tandem solar cells under real-world climate conditions, by incorporating parasitic cell resistances, nonradiative recombination, and optical losses into the detailed-balance limit. We show quantitatively that when optimizing these parameters in the perovskite top cell, perovskite/Si tandem solar cells could reach efficiencies above 38% under realistic conditions, even while leaving the Si cell untouched. Despite the rapid efficiency increase of perovskite solar cells, our results emphasize the need for further material development, careful device design, and light management strategies, all necessary for highly efficient perovskite/Si tandem solar cells.

  4. Conditioned media from adipose stromal cells limit lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury, endothelial hyperpermeability and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyan; Poirier, Christophe; Cook, Todd; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; Lease, Benjamin; Petrache, Irina; March, Keith L; Bogatcheva, Natalia V

    2015-02-21

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a condition that contributes to morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. We investigated whether factors secreted by adipose stromal cells (ASC) into conditioned media (ASC-CM) will effectively decrease lung injury in the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. To assess the effect of ASC-CM on ARDS indices, intravenous delivery of ASC and ASC-CM to C57Bl/6 mice was carried out 4 h after LPS oropharyngeal aspiration; Evans Blue Dye (EBD) was injected intravenously 1 h prior to animal sacrifice (48 h post-LPS). Lungs were either fixed for histopathology, or used to extract bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) or EBD. To assess the effect of ASC-CM on endothelial barrier function and apoptosis, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells were treated with ASC-CM for 48-72 h. ASC-CM markedly reduced LPS-induced histopathologic changes of lung, protein extravasation into BALF, and suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL6. White Blood Cells (WBC) from BALF of LPS-challenged mice receiving ASC-CM had decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation compared to WBC from LPS-challenged mice receiving control media injection. Treatment of pulmonary endothelial monolayers with ASC-CM significantly suppressed H2O2-induced leakage of FITC dextran and changes in transendothelial resistance, as well as gap formation in endothelial monolayer. ASC-CM exposure reduced the percentage of endothelial cells expressing ICAM-1, and suppressed TNFα-induced expression of E-selectin and cleavage of caspase-3. ASC-CM reduced the endothelial level of pro-apoptotic protein Bim, but did not affect the level of Bcl-2, Bad, or Bad phosphorylation. Factors secreted by ASC efficiently reduce ARDS indices, endothelial barrier hyperpermeability, and activation of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic pathways in endothelium.

  5. Ammonia-limited conditions cause of Thaumarchaeal dominance in volcanic grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul L E; Hefting, Mariet M; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-03-01

    The first step of nitrification is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). It is largely unknown, by which mechanisms these microbes are capable of coexistence and how their respective contribution to ammonia oxidation may differ with varying soil characteristics. To determine how different levels of ammonium availability influence the extent of archaeal and bacterial contributions to ammonia oxidation, microcosm incubations with controlled ammonium levels were conducted. Net nitrification was monitored and ammonia-oxidizer communities were quantified. Additionally, the nitrification inhibitor allylthiourea (ATU) was applied to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial contributions to soil ammonia oxidation. Thaumarchaeota, which were the only ammonia oxidizers detectable at the start of the incubation, grew in all microcosms, but AOB later became detectable in ammonium amended microcosms. Low and high additions of ammonium increasingly stimulated AOB growth, while AOA were only stimulated by the low addition. Treatment with ATU had no effect on net nitrification and sizes of ammonia-oxidizing communities suggesting that the effective concentration of ATU to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation is not the same in different soils. Our results support the niche-differentiating potential of ammonium concentration for AOA and AOB, and we conclude that ammonium limitation can be a major reason for absence of detectable AOB in soil.

  6. Conditions and limitations on learning in the adaptive management of mallard harvests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, F.A.; Kendall, W.L.; Dubovsky, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service adopted a protocol for the adaptive management of waterfowl hunting regulations (AHM) to help reduce uncertainty about the magnitude of sustainable harvests. To date, the AHM process has focused principally on the midcontinent population of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), whose dynamics are described by 4 alternative models. Collectively, these models express uncertainty (or disagreement) about whether harvest is an additive or a compensatory form of mortality and whether the reproductive process is weakly or strongly density-dependent. Each model is associated with a probability or 'weight,' which describes its relative ability to predict changes in population size. These Bayesian probabilities are updated annually using a comparison of population size predicted under each model with that observed by a monitoring program. The current AHM process is passively adaptive, in the sense that there is no a priori consideration of how harvest decisions might affect discrimination among models. We contrast this approach with an actively adaptive approach, in which harvest decisions are used in part to produce the learning needed to increase long-term management performance. Our investigation suggests that the passive approach is expected to perform nearly as well as an optimal actively adaptive approach, particularly considering the nature of the model set, management objectives and constraints, and current regulatory alternatives. We offer some comments about the nature of the biological hypotheses being tested and describe some of the inherent limitations on learning in the AHM process.

  7. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming’s Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jeffrey L.; Kirol, Christopher P.; Pratt, Aaron C.; Conover, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming’s Core Area Policy. Wyoming’s Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008–2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m), while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4–45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming’s Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between

  8. Water-Limiting Conditions Alter the Structure and Biofilm-Forming Ability of Bacterial Multispecies Communities in the Alfalfa Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Bogino, Pablo; Abod, Ayelén; Nievas, Fiorela; Giordano, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria) is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect). The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA) for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices. PMID:24223979

  9. Measuring the Internal Structure and Physical Conditions in Star and Planet Forming Clouds Core: Toward a Quantitative Description of Cloud Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular cloud cores and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of this program are to acquire, reduce and analyze deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds in order to internal structure of starless cloud cores and to quantitatively investigate the evolution of such structure through the star and planet formation process. During the second year of this grant, progress toward these goals is discussed.

  10. Determination of Bacterial Weathering Ability in Nutrient Limited Conditions on Biotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. R.; Harsh, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities facilitate the weathering of minerals in oligotrophic soils. The bacterial communities reside in biofilms, consisting of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nuclei acids. Biotite, a 2:1 aluminosilicate mica, is a common primary mineral found in these low nutrient soils and is a source of potassium, magnesium and iron for both microorganisms and plants. Studies show that bacteria, when incubated with biotite flakes, can remove iron, potassium, and magnesium at higher quantities and increased rates compared to abiotic controls (Balogh-Brunstad et al., 2008; Calvaruso et al., 2006; Hopf et al. 2008; Uroz et al., 2007 and 2009). How this happens mechanistically is still unclear and this study seeks to shed light on this issue. We hypothesize that weathering by bacteria is selective; i.e., that the mechanism will depend on the limiting nutrient. Using a drip flow biofilm reactor, biofilms are grown on biotite coupons under non-turbulent, low sheer flow, with four different nutrient treatments. The nutrient treatments include a complete nutrient solution and the same solution without K, Mg, or Fe. In each treatment, we determine the concentration and cumulative release of each cation in the effluent. Congruent dissolution of biotite indicates that weathering is nonselective whereas incongruent dissolution suggests that the bacteria alter the weathering mechanism for a specific nutrient. The bacteria are selected from a bacterial inoculum collected from the roots of young White Pine (Pinus strobus) trees in the Saint Joseph National Forest, Idaho. The bacteria are isolated on plates and the best weathering species are selected using a microplate bioassay technique to determine the concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, and protons colorimetrically.

  11. Profiling of spatial metabolite distributions in wheat leaves under normal and nitrate limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, J. William; Chandra, Surya; Xu, Yun; Dunn, Warwick B.; Correa, Elon; Hopkins, Laura; Goodacre, Royston; Tobin, Alyson K.; Bowsher, Caroline G.

    2015-01-01

    The control and interaction between nitrogen and carbon assimilatory pathways is essential in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissue in order to support metabolic processes without compromising growth. Physiological differences between the basal and mature region of wheat (Triticum aestivum) primary leaves confirmed that there was a change from heterotrophic to autotrophic metabolism. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the suitability and phenotypic reproducibility of the leaf growth conditions. Principal Component–Discriminant Function Analysis (PC–DFA) revealed distinct clustering between base, and tip sections of the developing wheat leaf, and from plants grown in the presence or absence of nitrate. Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight/Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) combined with multivariate and univariate analyses, and Bayesian network (BN) analysis, distinguished different tissues and confirmed the physiological switch from high rates of respiration to photosynthesis along the leaf. The operation of nitrogen metabolism impacted on the levels and distribution of amino acids, organic acids and carbohydrates within the wheat leaf. In plants grown in the presence of nitrate there was reduced levels of a number of sugar metabolites in the leaf base and an increase in maltose levels, possibly reflecting an increase in starch turnover. The value of using this combined metabolomics analysis for further functional investigations in the future are discussed. PMID:25680480

  12. Comparative studies of S-layer proteins from Bacillus stearothermophilus strains expressed during growth in continuous culture under oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    The specific properties of S-layer proteins from three different Bacillus stearothermophilus strains revealing oblique, square, or hexagonal lattice symmetry were preserved during growth in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions in which glucose was used as the sole carbon source. When oxygen limitation was relieved, amino acids became metabolized, cell density increased, and different S-layer proteins from wild-type strains became rapidly replaced by a new common type of S-layer protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 97,000 which assembled into an identical oblique (p2) lattice type. During switching from wild-type strains to variants, patches of the S-layer lattices characteristics for wild-type strains, granular regions, and areas with oblique lattice symmetry could be observed on the surface of individual cells from all organisms. The granular regions apparently consisted of mixtures of the S-layer proteins from the wild-type strains and the newly synthesized p2 S-layer proteins from the variants. S-layer proteins from wild-type strains possessed identical N-terminal regions but led to quite different cleavage products upon peptide mapping, indicating that they are encoded by different genes. Chemical analysis including N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping showed that the oblique S-layer lattices synthesized under increased oxygen supply were composed of identical protein species. Images PMID:7961489

  13. Limited physical contact through a mesh barrier is sufficient for social reward-conditioned place preference in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Peartree, Natalie A; Hood, Lauren E; Thiel, Kenneth J; Sanabria, Federico; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Chandler, Kayla N; Neisewander, Janet L

    2012-02-01

    Adolescence is a period of enhanced sensitivity to social influences and vulnerability to drug abuse. Social reward in adolescent rats has been demonstrated with the conditioned place preference (CPP) model, but it is not clear whether limited contact with another rat without play is sufficient to produce reward. We investigated this issue using an apparatus containing two main compartment, each with a wire mesh barrier that allowed rats placed on either side of the barrier to have limited physical contact. Adolescent male rats were given two conditioning sessions/day for 2 or 8 days following baseline preference tests. Rats were placed into their preferred side alone for one daily 10-min session and into their initially non-preferred side (i.e., CS) for the other session during which they either had restricted or unrestricted physical access to another rat (Rat/Mesh or Rat/Phys, respectively) or to a tennis ball (Ball/Mesh or Ball/Phys, respectively) unconditioned stimulus (US). Only the Rat/Phys group exhibited CPP after 2 CS-US pairings; however, after 8 CS-US pairings, the Rat/Mesh and Ball/Phys groups also exhibited CPP. During conditioning, the rat US elicited more robust approach and contact behavior compared to the ball, regardless of physical or restricted access. The incidence of contact and/or approach increased as the number of exposures increased. The results suggest that the rank order of US reward efficacy was physical contact with a rat>limited contact with a rat>physical contact with a ball, and that rough-and-tumble play is not necessary to establish social reward-CPP. The findings have important implications for emerging drug self-administration models in which two rats self-administering drug intravenously have limited physical contact via a mesh barrier shared between their respective operant conditioning chambers.

  14. Burkholderia spp. are the most competitive symbionts of Mimosa, particularly under N-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Geoffrey N; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Ming; Bloemberg, Guido V; Bontemps, Cyril; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Velázquez, Encarna; Young, J Peter W; Sprent, Janet I; James, Euan K

    2009-04-01

    Bacteria isolated from Mimosa nodules in Taiwan, Papua New Guinea, Mexico and Puerto Rico were identified as belonging to either the alpha- or beta-proteobacteria. The beta-proteobacterial Burkholderia and Cupriavidus strains formed effective symbioses with the common invasive species Mimosa diplotricha, M. pigra and M. pudica, but the alpha-proteobacterial Rhizobium etli and R. tropici strains produced a range of symbiotic phenotypes from no nodulation through ineffective to effective nodulation, depending on Mimosa species. Competition studies were performed between three of the alpha-proteobacteria (R. etli TJ167, R. tropici NGR181 and UPRM8021) and two of the beta-rhizobial symbionts (Burkholderia mimosarum PAS44 and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424) for nodulation of these invasive Mimosa species. Under flooded conditions, B. mimosarum PAS44 out-competed LMG19424 and all three alpha-proteobacteria to the point of exclusion. This advantage was not explained by initial inoculum levels, rates of bacterial growth, rhizobia-rhizobia growth inhibition or individual nodulation rate. However, the competitive domination of PAS44 over LMG19424 was reduced in the presence of nitrate for all three plant hosts. The largest significant effect was for M. pudica, in which LMG19424 formed 57% of the nodules in the presence of 0.5 mM potassium nitrate. In this host, ammonium also had a similar, but lesser, effect. Comparable results were also found using an N-containing soil mixture, and environmental N levels are therefore suggested as a factor in the competitive success of the bacterial symbiont in vivo.

  15. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klinger, R.; Rejmanek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromysdesmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus. ?? The Author(s) 2010.

  16. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Rob; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2010-04-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromys desmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus.

  17. Arsenic-induced phosphate limitation under experimental Early Proterozoic oceanic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Hemmingsson, Christoffer; Holm, Mikaela; Chiu, Beverly; Iñiguez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of phosphorus concentrations associated with modern hydrothermal Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides and ancient Fe(III) oxide-rich iron formations, is used to estimate bioavailable Precambrian marine phosphorus (P) concentrations. This led to the proposition of a low dissolved P budget of ∼10-25% of present-day levels, before ∼1.9 billion years ago. Estimates incorporating ancient marine Si levels ≥ 0.67 mM instead suggested global dissolved P levels greater than today. Here we unite current experimental models that have considered NaCl solutions containing elevated dissolved Fe(II), Si, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions in the incorporation of P in Precambrian marine Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides, in addition to arsenic as a hydrothermal proxy. We show that the coprecipitation of dissolved P and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides from arsenic-rich marine waters produces an average P distribution coefficient of ∼0.072 (± 0.01) μM-1. This is comparable to the ∼ 0.07 μM-1 predicted for Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides in modern arsenic-rich, submarine hydrothermal settings, from which the lower Early Proterozoic dissolved marine P concentrations were predicted. As/P molar ratios below modern seawater ratios removed the negative feedback effect high Si impose on P scavenging by Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides. The binding of As(III) to Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides exhibits a lower competitive influence on P fixation. As(V) that likely became prominent in the surficially oxidized Early Proterozoic oceans induced dissolved P limitation because of preferential P sequestration at the expense of dissolved As(V) enrichment. The control of As on P scavenging by the precipitating Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides is strong regardless of common seawater cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+). The data suggest that the application of Si and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides as an ancient seawater P proxy should consider chemical variability between depositional basins, taking into account the rather strong role hydrothermal arsenic has on the distribution of P

  18. VLBI FOR GRAVITY PROBE B. III. A LIMIT ON THE PROPER MOTION OF THE 'CORE' OF THE QUASAR 3C 454.3

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Ransom, R. R.; Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.; Lederman, J. I.; Petrov, L.

    2012-07-01

    We made very long baseline interferometry observations at 8.4 GHz between 1997 and 2005 to estimate the coordinates of the 'core' component of the superluminal quasar, 3C 454.3, the ultimate reference point in the distant universe for the NASA/Stanford Gyroscope Relativity Mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B). These coordinates are determined relative to those of the brightness peaks of two other compact extragalactic sources, B2250+194 and B2252+172, nearby on the sky, and within a celestial reference frame (CRF), defined by a large suite of compact extragalactic radio sources, and nearly identical to the International Celestial Reference Frame 2 (ICRF2). We find that B2250+194 and B2252+172 are stationary relative to each other, and also in the CRF, to within 1{sigma} upper limits of 15 and 30 {mu}as yr{sup -1} in {alpha} and {delta}, respectively. The core of 3C 454.3 appears to jitter in its position along the jet direction over {approx}0.2 mas, likely due to activity close to the putative supermassive black hole nearby, but on average is stationary in the CRF within 1{sigma} upper limits on its proper motion of 39 {mu}as yr{sup -1} (1.0c) and 30 {mu}as yr{sup -1} (0.8c) in {alpha} and {delta}, respectively, for the period 2002-2005. Our corresponding limit over the longer interval, 1998-2005, of more importance to GP-B, is 46 and 56 {mu}as yr{sup -1} in {alpha} and {delta}, respectively. Some of 3C 454.3's jet components show significantly superluminal motion with speeds of up to {approx}200 {mu}as yr{sup -1} or 5c in the CRF. The core of 3C 454.3 thus provides for GP-B a sufficiently stable reference in the distant universe.

  19. The capacity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to multiply under iron-limiting conditions correlates with its pathogenicity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Goulet, V; Mayrand, D

    2001-07-01

    Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis have various abilities to induce infections in an animal model. The hypothesis of this study was that pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis could multiply under iron-limiting conditions, while non-pathogenic strains could not. Three pathogenic strains (W50, W83, and ATCC 49417) grew to a final optical density (660 nm) > 2 in horse serum, while the growth of the 3 non-pathogenic strains (ATCC 33277, LB13D-2, and HW24D-1) was negligible. When an excess of hemin or ferric chloride was added to the serum, significant growth of the non-pathogenic strains occurred. Under iron-limiting conditions, the pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis had a much lower requirement for human iron-loaded transferrin and hemin than the non-pathogenic strains. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin, which may be associated with the release of iron, was not markedly different for pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. In addition, no relationship could be established between the level of 55Fe uptake from 55Fe-transferrin and the pathogenicity of strains. Our study provided evidence that the ability of P. gingivalis to multiply in vitro under iron-limiting conditions may be correlated with its ability to induce infections in an animal model. Isolates of P. gingivalis possessing a low requirement for iron are likely to have a higher potential for initiating periodontal infections.

  20. Decision-making and future planning for children with life-limiting conditions: a qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Popejoy, E; Pollock, K; Almack, K; Manning, J C; Johnston, B

    2017-09-01

    In the last decade, the number of children with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions in England has almost doubled, and it is estimated that worldwide, there are 1.2 million children with palliative care needs. Families and professionals caring for children with life-limiting conditions are likely to face a number of difficult treatment decisions and develop plans for future care over the course of the child's life, but little is known about the process by which these decisions and plans are made. The purpose of this review is to synthesize findings from qualitative research that has investigated decision-making and future planning for children with life-limiting conditions. A systematic search of six online databases was conducted and identified 887 papers for review; five papers were selected for inclusion, using predefined criteria. Reference list searching and contacting authors identified a further four papers for inclusion. Results sections of the papers were coded and synthesized into themes. Nineteen descriptive themes were identified, and these were further synthesized into four analytical themes. Analytical themes were 'decision factors', 'family factors', 'relational factors' and 'system factors'. Review findings indicate that decision-making and future planning is difficult and needs to be individualized for each family. However, deficits in understanding the dynamic, relational and contextual aspects of decision-making remain and require further research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Carotenoids in nestling Montagu's harriers: variations according to age, sex, body condition and evidence for diet-related limitations.

    PubMed

    Sternalski, Audrey; Mougeot, François; Eraud, Cyril; Gangloff, Benoît; Villers, Alexandre; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are colored pigments forming the basis of many avian social traits. Before their utilization carotenoids must be acquired through diet and mobilized for specific uses. The relationships between carotenoid-based coloration, circulating carotenoids and body condition have been well studied in adult birds, but little is known in nestlings. Here, we investigated variations in carotenoid-based coloration in a raptor nestling, the Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus), both in captivity and in natural conditions, and within a vole (poor-carotenoid source and cyclic prey) specialist population. We studied these variations according to nestling age and sex, and possible limitations in carotenoid availability by comparing years of contrasted prey abundance and using carotenoid supplementation experiments. Captive nestlings, fed only with mice, were strongly carotenoid limited. Wild nestlings were also carotenoid limited, especially in a year of high vole abundance. Nestlings were in better condition but less colored during a peak vole abundance year than during a low vole abundance year, when harriers targeted more alternative preys (birds, insects). Thus, variation in vole abundance resulted in a de-coupling of body condition and carotenoid-based coloration in this population. This suggested that the positive relation between the body condition and carotenoid-based traits, typically found in adult birds, could be restricted to adults or nestlings of species that feed on carotenoid-rich food. Our results should stimulate more work on the functions and mechanisms of carotenoid-based traits in nestlings, which deserve more attention and most likely differ from those of adult birds.

  2. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  3. Ultraviolet radiation-induced limitation to epilithic microbial growth in arid deserts--dosimetric experiments in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; McKay, Christopher P; Warren-Rhodes, Kim; Horneck, Gerda

    2008-02-27

    Experiments were conducted during November 2003 in the dry core of the Atacama Desert, Yungay, Chile to test the hypothesis that UV radiation, in environments where liquid water is not available, and thus enzymatic repair of UV-induced damage is inhibited, can prevent epilithic colonization. Novel dosimeters made from the cryptoendolithic, desiccation and radiation-resistant cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. isolated from the dry Negev desert, Israel, showed that monolayers of this organism were killed within one day. The diurnal profile of microbial loss of viability was investigated with dosimeters of Bacillus subtilis, which similarly showed cell death within one day. Soil grains obtained from south of Yungay where liquid water is more abundant and transported to the hyperarid core showed killing of indigenous vegetative organisms within one day. Gypsum and mineral grain coverings of 1mm were sufficient to prevent measurable UV-induced damage of Chroococcidiopsis and B. subtilis after 8d exposure. These results show that under extreme desiccation and an ambient UV flux the surface of rocks can potentially be rendered sterile, but that millimetre thick mineral coverings can protect organisms from UV-induced killing, consistent with the observed patterns of lithophytic colonization in the Atacama Desert. These data further show that UV radiation can be an important limiting factor in surface biological rock weathering in arid regions.

  4. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUD CORE DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) IN CORONA AUSTRALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.; Sipilae, O.; Hotzel, S.

    2013-01-20

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1, 1-0) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct comparison to the dust component of the cloud core and provide evidence for gas phase depletion of CO at the highest extinctions. The dust color temperature in the core calculated from Herschel maps ranges from roughly 10.7 to 14.0 K. This range agrees with the previous determinations from Infrared Space Observatory and Planck observations. The column density profile of the core can be fitted with a Plummer-like density distribution approaching n(r) {approx} r {sup -2} at large distances. The core structure deviates clearly from a critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Instead, the core appears to be gravitationally bound and to lack thermal and turbulent support against the pressure of the surrounding low-density material: it may therefore be in the process of slow contraction. We test two chemical models and find that a steady-state depletion model agrees with the observed C{sup 18}O column density profile and the observed N(C{sup 18}O) versus A{sub V} relationship.

  5. Exploring the Limits of Cell Adhesion under Shear Stress within Physiological Conditions and beyond on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Stamp, Melanie E. M.; Jötten, Anna M.; Kudella, Patrick W.; Breyer, Dominik; Strobl, Florian G.; Geislinger, Thomas M.; Wixforth, Achim; Westerhausen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion processes are of ubiquitous importance for biomedical applications such as optimization of implant materials. Here, not only physiological conditions such as temperature or pH, but also topographical structures play crucial roles, as inflammatory reactions after surgery can diminish osseointegration. In this study, we systematically investigate cell adhesion under static, dynamic and physiologically relevant conditions employing a lab-on-a-chip system. We screen adhesion of the bone osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 on a titanium implant material for pH and temperature values in the physiological range and beyond, to explore the limits of cell adhesion, e.g., for feverish and acidic conditions. A detailed study of different surface roughness Rq gives insight into the correlation between the cells’ abilities to adhere and withstand shear flow and the topography of the substrates, finding a local optimum at Rq = 22 nm. We use shear stress induced by acoustic streaming to determine a measure for the ability of cell adhesion under an external force for various conditions. We find an optimum of cell adhesion for T = 37 °C and pH = 7.4 with decreasing cell adhesion outside the physiological range, especially for high T and low pH. We find constant detachment rates in the physiological regime, but this behavior tends to collapse at the limits of 41 °C and pH 4. PMID:27775638

  6. Exploring the Limits of Cell Adhesion under Shear Stress within Physiological Conditions and beyond on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Melanie E M; Jötten, Anna M; Kudella, Patrick W; Breyer, Dominik; Strobl, Florian G; Geislinger, Thomas M; Wixforth, Achim; Westerhausen, Christoph

    2016-10-21

    Cell adhesion processes are of ubiquitous importance for biomedical applications such as optimization of implant materials. Here, not only physiological conditions such as temperature or pH, but also topographical structures play crucial roles, as inflammatory reactions after surgery can diminish osseointegration. In this study, we systematically investigate cell adhesion under static, dynamic and physiologically relevant conditions employing a lab-on-a-chip system. We screen adhesion of the bone osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 on a titanium implant material for pH and temperature values in the physiological range and beyond, to explore the limits of cell adhesion, e.g., for feverish and acidic conditions. A detailed study of different surface roughness Rq gives insight into the correlation between the cells' abilities to adhere and withstand shear flow and the topography of the substrates, finding a local optimum at Rq = 22 nm. We use shear stress induced by acoustic streaming to determine a measure for the ability of cell adhesion under an external force for various conditions. We find an optimum of cell adhesion for T = 37 °C and pH = 7.4 with decreasing cell adhesion outside the physiological range, especially for high T and low pH. We find constant detachment rates in the physiological regime, but this behavior tends to collapse at the limits of 41 °C and pH 4.

  7. On the effect of accident conditions on the molten core debris relocation into lower head of a PWR vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xuegao

    From 1975 to present, it has been found that the primary risk to the public health and safety from nuclear power reactors lies in ``beyond design basis'' accidents. During such severe accidents, melting of the reactor core may lead to a loss of primary system integrity, or even containment failure, which will allow escape of significant amounts of radioactive material to the environment. It is very important to understand the mechanism of reactor core degradation during a severe accident. In this study, the damage progression of the reactor core and the slumping mechanism of molten material to the lower head of the reactor vessel were examined through simulation of severe accident scenarios that lead to large-scale core damage. The calculations were carried out using the computer code SCDAP/RELAP5. Different modeling parameters or models were used in calculations by version MOD3.2. The cladding oxidation shell ``durability'' parameter, which can control the timing of fuel clad failure, was varied. The heat flux model of steady-state natural convection of the molten pool was changed. The ultimate strength of the crust supporting the molten pool was doubled. These changes were made to examine the effects on the calculated core damage, and the molten pool expansion and its slumping. Different accident scenarios were simulated. The HPI/makeup flow rates were changed. The timing of opening and closing the PORV was considered. Reflood by restart of coolant pump 2B was also studied. Finally, the size of the PORV opening was also changed. The effects of these accident scenarios on accident progression and core damage process were studied. From the calculated results, it was concluded that the accurate modeling of core damage phenomena was very important to the prediction of the later stage of an accident. According to code MOD3.2, the molten material in a pool slumped to the lower head of the reactor vessel when the juncture of the top and side crusts failed after the

  8. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is normally described by an expression, here termed the conventional (CONV) description, that is restricted to the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption condition (CCLWA), i.e. when the single pass absorbance is significantly smaller than the empty cavity losses, i.e. when α0 L < < π / F. To describe NICE-OHMS signals beyond this limit two simplified extended descriptions (termed the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT), which are assumed to be valid under the relaxed cavity-limited weak absorption condition (RCLWA), i.e. when α0 L < π / F, and a full description (denoted FULL), presumed to be valid also when the α0 L < π / F condition does not hold, have recently been derived in an accompanying work (Ma W, et al. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical Description. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2015.09.007). The present work constitutes an experimental verification and assessment of the validity of these, performed in the Doppler limit for a set of Fα0 L / π values (up to 3.5); it is shown under which conditions the various descriptions are valid. It is concluded that for samples with Fα0 L / π up to 0.01, all descriptions replicate the data well. It is shown that the CONV description is adequate and provides accurate assessments of the signal strength (and thereby the analyte concentration) up to Fα0 L / π of around 0.1, while the ELET is accurate for Fα0 L / π up to around 0.3. The ELFT description mimics the Db NICE-OHMS signal well for Fα0 L / π up to around unity, while the FULL description is adequate for all Fα0 L / π values investigated. Access to these descriptions both increases considerably the dynamic range of the technique and

  9. Hypoxic areas, density-dependence and food limitation drive the body condition of a heavily exploited marine fish predator

    PubMed Central

    Käll, Filip; Hansson, Martin; Baranova, Tatjana; Karlsson, Olle; Lundström, Karl; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Hjelm, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the factors regulating fish condition is crucial in ecology and the management of exploited fish populations. The body condition of cod (Gadus morhua) in the Baltic Sea has dramatically decreased during the past two decades, with large implications for the fishery relying on this resource. Here, we statistically investigated the potential drivers of the Baltic cod condition during the past 40 years using newly compiled fishery-independent biological data and hydrological observations. We evidenced a combination of different factors operating before and after the ecological regime shift that occurred in the Baltic Sea in the early 1990s. The changes in cod condition related to feeding opportunities, driven either by density-dependence or food limitation, along the whole period investigated and to the fivefold increase in the extent of hypoxic areas in the most recent 20 years. Hypoxic areas can act on cod condition through different mechanisms related directly to species physiology, or indirectly to behaviour and trophic interactions. Our analyses found statistical evidence for an effect of the hypoxia-induced habitat compression on cod condition possibly operating via crowding and density-dependent processes. These results furnish novel insights into the population dynamics of Baltic Sea cod that can aid the management of this currently threatened population. PMID:27853557

  10. Near diffraction-limited performance of an OPA pumped acetylene-filled hollow-core fiber laser in the mid-IR.

    PubMed

    Dadashzadeh, Neda; Thirugnanasambandam, Manasadevi P; Weerasinghe, H W Kushan; Debord, Benoit; Chafer, Matthieu; Gerome, Frederic; Benabid, Fetah; Washburn, Brian R; Corwin, Kristan L

    2017-06-12

    We investigate the mid-IR laser beam characteristics from an acetylene-filled hollow-core optical fiber gas laser (HOFGLAS) system. The laser exhibits near-diffraction limited beam quality in the 3 μm region with M(2) = 1.15 ± 0.02 measured at high pulse energy, and the highest mid-IR pulse energy from a HOFGLAS system of 1.4 μJ is reported. Furthermore, the effects of output saturation with pump pulse energy are reduced through the use of longer fibers with low loss. Finally, the slope efficiency is shown to be nearly independent of gas pressure over a wide range, which is encouraging for further output power increase.

  11. Pushing the performance limits of reversed-phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography with 1.3μm core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, A Carl; Friedlander, Gareth; Fekete, Szabolcs; Anspach, Jason; Guillarme, Dvy; Chitty, Mike; Farkas, Tivadar

    2013-10-11

    Innovative columns made with very small core-shell particles (1.0-1.4μm) were investigated over a wide experimental space using state-of-the-art ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) instruments. Among the columns tested is one that is now commercially available and is made with 1.3μm core-shell particles consisting of non-porous cores about 0.9μm in size and porous shells <0.2μm thick. This work demonstrated that exceptionally low observed minimum plate heights of 2.2μm could be obtained using columns packed with 1.3μm particles, corresponding to a plate count of over 450,000 plates/m. It was shown that only low volume columns allow operation under optimal conditions with current top-of-the-line UHPLC instruments. It was also demonstrated that the loss in performance caused by frictional heating effects remains negligible. Finally, the practical utility of these columns was confirmed with several real-world applications requiring extreme resolving power (i.e. peptide mapping, sample typical of metabolomic studies and crude human insulin). The performance achieved was compared to that of a reference UHPLC column packed with 1.7μm fully porous particles. The column packed with 1.3μm particles gave peak capacity values that were 20-40% higher than the reference column for the same analysis time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying the Genes Responsible for Iron-Limited Condition in Riemerella anatipestifer CH-1 through RNA-Seq-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mi; Zhu, DeKang; Wang, MingShu; Jia, RenYong; Chen, Shun; Sun, KunFeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Biville, Francis

    2017-01-01

    One of the important elements for most bacterial growth is iron, the bioavailability of which is limited in hosts. Riemerella anatipestifer (R. anatipestifer, RA), an important duck pathogen, requires iron to live. However, the genes involved in iron metabolism and the mechanisms of iron transport are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the transcriptomic effects of iron limitation condition on R. anatipestifer CH-1 using the RNA-Seq and RNA-Seq-based analysis. Data analysis revealed genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, including a number of putative TonB-dependent receptor systems, a HmuY-like protein-dependent hemin (an iron-containing porphyrin) uptake system, a Feo system, a gene cluster related to starch utilization, and genes encoding hypothetical proteins that were significantly upregulated in response to iron limitation. Compared to the number of upregulated genes, more genes were significantly downregulated in response to iron limitation. The downregulated genes mainly encoded a number of outer membrane receptors, DNA-binding proteins, phage-related proteins, and many hypothetical proteins. This information suggested that RNA-Seq-based analysis in iron-limited medium is an effective and fast method for identifying genes involved in iron uptake in R. anatipestifer CH-1. PMID:28540303

  13. NMDA antagonist MK 801 in nucleus accumbens core but not shell disrupts the restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    De Giovanni, Laura N; Guzman, Andrea S; Virgolini, Miriam B; Cancela, Liliana M

    2016-12-15

    Relapse is a common feature of cocaine addiction. In rodents, it can be elicited by cues, stress or the drug. Restraint stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP) is a useful model to study the mechanisms involved in stress-induced relapse of drug-seeking behavior. There is evidence that the glutamate NMDA receptors are critically involved in drug- and cue-induced reinstatement of seeking behavior and drug-CPP responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of NMDA receptors within core vs. shell nucleus accumbens (NAc) subregions to restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-CPP. After extinction of cocaine-conditioned preference, animals were administered MK 801 systemically or directly into intra-core or intra-shell, and restrained for 30min or left undisturbed in their home-cages. First, we demonstrated that restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-CPP depends on the duration of restraint as well as on the context in which it is applied. Second, this effect was blocked by systemic MK 801 administration either before or after restraint. Third, intra-core but not intra-shell administration abrogated the restraint stress-induced reinstatement. These findings show that NMDA receptors within NAc core, but not shell, play a critical role in restraint stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-CPP.

  14. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is Required to Maintain Visual Conditioning-Induced Behavioral Plasticity by Limiting Local Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-Hsuan; Cline, Hollis T

    2016-07-06

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to regulate neuronal plasticity by limiting dendritic protein synthesis, but direct demonstration of a requirement for FMRP control of local protein synthesis during behavioral plasticity is lacking. Here we tested whether FMRP knockdown in Xenopus optic tectum affects local protein synthesis in vivo and whether FMRP knockdown affects protein synthesis-dependent visual avoidance behavioral plasticity. We tagged newly synthesized proteins by incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid azidohomoalanine and visualized them with fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT). Visual conditioning and FMRP knockdown produce similar increases in FUNCAT in tectal neuropil. Induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally in FMRP knockdown animals, but plasticity degrades over 24 h. These results indicate that FMRP affects visual conditioning-induced local protein synthesis and is required to maintain the visual conditioning-induced behavioral plasticity. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Exaggerated dendritic protein synthesis resulting from loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to underlie cognitive deficits in FXS, but no direct evidence has demonstrated that FMRP-regulated dendritic protein synthesis affects behavioral plasticity in intact animals. Xenopus tadpoles exhibit a visual avoidance behavior that improves with visual conditioning in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. We showed that FMRP knockdown and visual conditioning dramatically increase protein synthesis in neuronal processes. Furthermore, induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally after FMRP knockdown, but performance rapidly deteriorated in the absence of FMRP. These studies show that FMRP negatively regulates local protein synthesis and is required to maintain visual conditioning

  15. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is Required to Maintain Visual Conditioning-Induced Behavioral Plasticity by Limiting Local Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to regulate neuronal plasticity by limiting dendritic protein synthesis, but direct demonstration of a requirement for FMRP control of local protein synthesis during behavioral plasticity is lacking. Here we tested whether FMRP knockdown in Xenopus optic tectum affects local protein synthesis in vivo and whether FMRP knockdown affects protein synthesis-dependent visual avoidance behavioral plasticity. We tagged newly synthesized proteins by incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid azidohomoalanine and visualized them with fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT). Visual conditioning and FMRP knockdown produce similar increases in FUNCAT in tectal neuropil. Induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally in FMRP knockdown animals, but plasticity degrades over 24 h. These results indicate that FMRP affects visual conditioning-induced local protein synthesis and is required to maintain the visual conditioning-induced behavioral plasticity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Exaggerated dendritic protein synthesis resulting from loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to underlie cognitive deficits in FXS, but no direct evidence has demonstrated that FMRP-regulated dendritic protein synthesis affects behavioral plasticity in intact animals. Xenopus tadpoles exhibit a visual avoidance behavior that improves with visual conditioning in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. We showed that FMRP knockdown and visual conditioning dramatically increase protein synthesis in neuronal processes. Furthermore, induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally after FMRP knockdown, but performance rapidly deteriorated in the absence of FMRP. These studies show that FMRP negatively regulates local protein synthesis and is required to maintain visual

  16. Ethics at the end of life: who should make decisions about treatment limitation for young children with life-threatening or life-limiting conditions?

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn; Sullivan, Jane

    2011-09-01

    It is now ethical orthodoxy that parents should be involved in the decision-making about their children's health care. This extends to decisions about whether to continue or to limit life-sustaining medical treatment for a child with a life-limiting or life-threatening condition. What remains contested and uncertain is the extent and nature of parental involvement, especially in this emotionally charged situation. In particular, should it be the parents, who are the ultimate decision-makers, taking final responsibility, should it be a shared decision, or should it be a medical decision that parents are simply asked to consent to? One approach to this issue is to consider the in-principle ethical arguments and weigh their merits. The two key principles here are parental rights and authority, and the best interests of child, and the contested issue is what to do if these appear to clash. Another approach is to consider the principles in the practical clinical context. What would be the implications and consequences of adopting the model of parents as final decision-makers? Are parents able to carry out this role, and do they really want it? What is the effect on parents of taking this role? Answers to these questions could modify the in-principle ethical position. In this paper, we review the empirical evidence currently available on these questions, in relation to parents of infants and young children. Overall, the literature suggests that parents do want to be involved and do not suffer adverse psychological consequences from their involvement. However, the crucial ethical implication of the evidence is that the level and nature of parental involvement in decision-making should be negotiated with the parents in each case, because parents have a range of different views about taking final responsibility for decisions. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-02

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells

  18. Naphthalene biodegradation under oxygen-limiting conditions: community dynamics and the relevance of biofilm-forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Martirani-Von Abercron, Sophie-Marie; Marín, Patricia; Solsona-Ferraz, Marta; Castañeda-Cataña, Mayra-Alejandra; Marqués, Silvia

    2017-08-25

    Toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are frequently released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. PAH remediation strategies focus on biological processes mediated by bacteria. The availability of oxygen in polluted environments is often limited or absent, and only bacteria able to thrive in these conditions can be considered for bioremediation strategies. To identify bacterial strains able to degrade PAHs under oxygen-limiting conditions, we set up enrichment cultures from samples of an oil-polluted aquifer, using either anoxic or microaerophilic condition and with PAHs as the sole carbon source. Despite the presence of a significant community of nitrate-reducing bacteria, the initial community, which was dominated by Betaproteobacteria, was incapable of PAH degradation under strict anoxic conditions, although a clear shift in the structure of the community towards an increase in the Alphaproteobacteria (Sphingomonadaceae), Actinobacteria and an uncultured group of Acidobacteria was observed in the enrichments. In contrast, growth under microaerophilic conditions with naphthalene as the carbon source evidenced the development of a biofilm structure around the naphthalene crystal. The enrichment process selected two co-dominant groups which finally reached 97% of the bacterial communities: Variovorax spp. (54%, Betaproteobacteria) and Starkeya spp. (43%, Xanthobacteraceae). The two dominant populations were able to grow with naphthalene, although only Starkeya was able to reproduce the biofilm structure around the naphthalene crystal. The pathway for naphthalene degradation was identified, which included as essential steps dioxygenases with high affinity for oxygen, showing 99% identity with Xanthobacter polyaromaticivorans dbd cluster for PAH degradation. Our results suggest that the biofilm formation capacity of Starkeya provided a structure to allocate its cells at an appropriate distance from the toxic carbon source. © 2017 The Authors

  19. The behavior of fuel-lean premixed flames in a standard flammability limit tube under controlled gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wherley, B. L.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel-lean flames in methane-air mixtures from 4.90 to 6.20 volume percent fuel and propane-air mixtures from 1.90 to 3.00 volume percent fuel were studied in the vicinity of the limit for a variety of gravity conditions. The limits were determined and the behavior of the flames studied for one g upward, one g downward, and zero g propagation. Photographic records of all flammability tube firings were obtained. The structure and behavior of these flames were detailed including the variations of the curvature of the flame front, the skirt length, and the occurrence of cellular instabilities with varying gravity conditions. The effect of ignition was also discussed. A survey of flame speeds as a function of mixture strength was made over a range of lean mixture compositions for each of the fuels studied. The results were presented graphically with those obtained by other researchers. The flame speed for constant fractional gravity loadings were plotted as a function of gravity loadings from 0.0 up to 2.0 g's against flame speeds extracted from the transient gravity flame histories for corresponding gravity loadings. The effects of varying gravity conditions on the extinguishment process for upward and downward propagating flames were investigated.

  20. Impact of Australian Dekkera bruxellensis strains grown under oxygen-limited conditions on model wine composition and aroma.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Chris D; Langhans, Geoffrey; Henschke, Paul A; Grbin, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    Spoilage of red wine by the yeast species Dekkera bruxellensis is a common problem for the global wine industry. When conditions are conducive for growth of these yeasts in wine, they efficiently convert non-volatile hydroxycinnamic acids into aroma-active ethylphenols, thereby reducing the quality of the wine. It has been demonstrated previously that dissolved oxygen is a key factor which stimulates D. bruxellensis growth in wine. We demonstrate that whereas the presence of oxygen accelerates the growth of this species, oxygen-limited conditions favour 4-ethylphenol production. Consequently, we evaluated wine spoilage potential of three D. bruxellensis strains (AWRI1499, AWRI1608 and AWRI1613) under oxygen-limited conditions. Each strain was cultured in a chemically-defined wine medium and the fermentation products were analysed using HPLC and HS-SPME-GC/MS. The strains displayed different growth characteristics but were equally capable of producing ethylphenols. On the other hand, significant differences were observed for 18 of the remaining 33 metabolites analysed and duo-trio sensory analysis indicated significant aroma differences between wines inoculated with AWRI1499 and AWRI1613. When these wines were spiked with low concentrations of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, no sensorial differences could be perceived. Together these data suggest that the three predominant D. bruxellensis strains previously isolated during a large survey of Australian wineries do not differ substantively in their capacity to grow in, and spoil, a model wine medium.

  1. Oil viscosity limitation on dispersibility of crude oil under simulated at-sea conditions in a large wave tank.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Ken; Belore, Randy C; Mullin, Joseph V; Guarino, Alan

    2010-09-01

    This study determined the limiting oil viscosity for chemical dispersion of oil spills under simulated sea conditions in the large outdoor wave tank at the US National Oil Spill Response Test Facility in New Jersey. Dispersant effectiveness tests were completed using crude oils with viscosities ranging from 67 to 40,100 cP at test temperature. Tests produced an effectiveness-viscosity curve with three phases when oil was treated with Corexit 9500 at a dispersant-to-oil ratio of 1:20. The oil viscosity that limited chemical dispersion under simulated at-sea conditions was in the range of 18,690 cP to 33,400 cP. Visual observations and measurements of oil concentrations and droplet size distributions in the water under treated and control slicks correlated well with direct measurements of effectiveness. The dispersant effectiveness versus oil viscosity relationship under simulated at sea conditions at Ohmsett was most similar to those from similar tests made using the Institut Francais du Pétrole and Exxon Dispersant Effectiveness (EXDET) test methods.

  2. Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens under excess and limitation of electron donors. Part II. Mimicking environmental conditions during cultivation in retentostats.

    PubMed

    Marozava, Sviatlana; Röling, Wilfred F M; Seifert, Jana; Küffner, Robert; von Bergen, Martin; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    The strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens was cultivated in retentostats under acetate and acetate plus benzoate limitation in the presence of Fe(III) citrate in order to investigate its physiology under close to natural conditions. Growth rates below 0.003h(-1) were achieved in the course of cultivation. A nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach (nano-LC-MS/MS) with subsequent label-free quantification was performed on proteins extracted from cells sampled at different time points during retentostat cultivation. Proteins detected at low (0.002h(-1)) and high (0.06h(-1)) growth rates were compared between corresponding growth conditions (acetate or acetate plus benzoate). Carbon limitation significantly increased the abundances of several catabolic proteins involved in the degradation of substrates not present in the medium (ethanol, butyrate, fatty acids, and aromatic compounds). Growth rate-specific physiology was reflected in the changed abundances of energy-, chemotaxis-, oxidative stress-, and transport-related proteins. Mimicking natural conditions by extremely slow bacterial growth allowed to show how G. metallireducens optimized its physiology in order to survive in its natural habitats, since it was prepared to consume several carbon sources simultaneously and to withstand various environmental stresses.

  3. Impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions associated with the acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    López-Rojas, Rafael; García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with reduced bacterial fitness and virulence, although the mechanisms underlying this fitness loss have not been well characterised. In this study, the role played by environmental iron levels on the growth and survival of colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii was assessed. Growth assays with the colistin-susceptible ATCC 19606 strain and its colistin-resistant derivative RC64 [colistin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64 mg/L] demonstrated that the strains grew similarly in rich laboratory medium (Mueller-Hinton broth), whereas RC64 demonstrated impaired growth compared with ATCC 19606 in human serum (>100-fold at 24 h). Compared with RC64, ATCC 19606 grew in the presence of higher concentrations of the iron-specific chelator 2,2'-bipyridine and grew more readily under iron-limiting conditions in solid and liquid media. In addition, iron supplementation of human serum increased the growth of RC64 compared with unsupplemented human serum to a greater extent than ATCC 19606. The ability of 11 colistin-resistant clinical isolates with mutations in the pmrB gene to grow in iron-replete and iron-limiting conditions was assessed, demonstrating that eight of the strains showed reduced growth under iron limitation. Individual mutations in the pmrB gene did not directly correlate with a decreased capacity for growth under iron limitation, suggesting that mutations in pmrB may not directly produce this phenotype. Together these results indicate that acquisition of colistin resistance in A. baumannii can be associated with a decreased ability to grow in low-iron environments.

  4. Fe and P solubilization under limiting conditions by bacteria isolated from Carex kobomugi roots at the Hasaki coast.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Masaru; Kobayashi, Katsuichiro; Yamaji, Keiko

    2013-03-01

    Our objective was simply to report a sedge species, Carex kobomugi Ohwi that has beneficial bacterial associations under low Fe and P conditions of the Hasaki coast, Japan. C. kobomugi is the dominant species in our study area and grows closest to the sea. C. kobomugi showed higher Fe and P content, while these nutrients were less available under alkaline root-zone soil. Within the roots, mycorrhizal fungal colonization was absent, and endophytic fungal colonization was low. On the contrary, endophytic bacteria (e.g. Bacillus sp., Streptomyces luteogriseus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were isolated, which exhibited both siderophore production and inorganic phosphate solubilization under Fe or P limited conditions. Our results suggest that colonization of root tissue by these bacteria contribute to the Fe and P uptakes by C. kobomugi by increasing availability in the soil.

  5. Evaluation of shrinking core model in leaching process of Pomalaa nickel laterite using citric acid as leachant at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanta, K. C.; Perdana, I.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2016-11-01

    Most of kinetics studies related to leaching process used shrinking core model to describe physical phenomena of the process. Generally, the model was developed in connection with transport and/or reaction of reactant components. In this study, commonly used internal diffusion controlled shrinking core model was evaluated for leaching process of Pomalaa nickel laterite using citric acid as leachant. Particle size was varied at 60-70, 100-120, -200 meshes, while the operating temperature was kept constant at 358 K, citric acid concentration at 0.1 M, pulp density at 20% w/v and the leaching time was for 120 minutes. Simulation results showed that the shrinking core model was inadequate to closely approach the experimental data. Meanwhile, the experimental data indicated that the leaching process was determined by the mobility of product molecules in the ash layer pores. In case of leaching resulting large product molecules, a mathematical model involving steps of reaction and product diffusion might be appropriate to develop.

  6. Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts for ethanol production from renewable sources under oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Galafassi, Silvia; Merico, Annamaria; Pizza, Francesca; Hellborg, Linda; Molinari, Francesco; Piškur, Jure; Compagno, Concetta

    2011-08-01

    Industrial fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol requires microorganisms able to utilise a broad range of carbon sources and generate ethanol at high yield and productivity. D. bruxellensis has recently been reported to contaminate commercial ethanol processes, where it competes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae [4, 26]. In this work Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts were studied to explore their potential to produce ethanol from renewable sources under conditions suitable for industrial processes, such as oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions. Over 50 strains were analysed for their ability to utilise a variety of carbon sources, and some strains grew on cellobiose and pentoses. Two strains of D. bruxellensis were able to produce ethanol at high yield (0.44 g g(-1) glucose), comparable to those reported for S. cerevisiae. B. naardenensis was shown to be able to produce ethanol from xylose. To obtain ethanol from synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates we developed a two-step fermentation strategy: the first step under aerobic conditions for fast production of biomass from mixtures of hexoses and pentoses, followed by a second step under oxygen limitation to promote ethanol production. Under these conditions we obtained biomass and ethanol production on synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates, with ethanol yields ranging from 0.2 to 0.3 g g(-1) sugar. Hexoses, xylose and arabinose were consumed at the end of the process, resulting in 13 g l(-1) of ethanol, even in the presence of furfural. Our studies showed that Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts have clear potential for further development for industrial processes aimed at production of ethanol from renewable sources.

  7. Extreme metamorphism in a firn core from the Allan Hills, Antarctica, as an analogue for glacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, Ruzica; Schneebeli, Martin; Bertler, Nancy; Schwikowski, Margit; Matzl, Margret

    2015-04-01

    Understanding processes in near-zero accumulation areas can help to better understand the ranges of isotopic composition in ice cores, particularly during ice ages, when accumulation rates were lower than today. Snow metamorphism is a primary driver of the transition from snow to ice and can be accompanied by altered isotopic compositions and chemical species concentration. High degree snow metamorphism, which results in major structural changes, is little-studied but has been identified in certain places in Antarctica. Here we report on a 5-m firn core collected adjacent to a blue-ice field in the Allan Hills, Antarctica. We determined the physical properties of the snow using computer tomography (microCT) and measured the isotopic composition of δD and δ18O, as well as 210Pb activity. The core shows a high degree of snow metamorphism and an exponential decrease in specific surface area (SSA), but no clear densification, with depth. The micro-CT measurements show a homogenous and stable structure throughout the entire core, with obvious erosion features in the near-surface, where high-resolution data is available. The observed firn structure is likely caused by a combination of unique depositional and post-depositional processes. The defining depositional process is the impact deposition under high winds and with a high initial density. The defining post-depositional processes are a) increased moisture transport due to forced ventilation and high winds and b) decades of temperature-gradient driven metamorphic growth in the near surface due to prolonged exposure to seasonal temperature cycling. Both post-processes are enhanced in low accumulation regions where snow stays close to surface for a long time. We observe an irregular signal in δD and δ18O that does not follow the stratigraphic sequence. The isotopic signal is likely caused by the same post-depositional processes that are responsible for the firn structure, and that are driven by local climate

  8. Fuel and Core Design Options to Overcome the Heavy Metal Loading Limit and Improve Performance and Safety of Liquid Salt Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Bojan; Maldonado, Ivan

    2016-04-14

    The research performed in this project addressed the issue of low heavy metal loading and the resulting reduced cycle length with increased refueling frequency, inherent to all FHR designs with solid, non-movable fuel based on TRISO particles. Studies performed here focused on AHTR type of reactor design with plate (“plank”) fuel. Proposal to FY12 NEUP entitled “Fuel and Core Design Options to Overcome the Heavy Metal Loading Limit and Improve Performance and Safety of Liquid Salt Cooled Reactors” was selected for award, and the 3-year project started in August 2012. A 4-month NCE was granted and the project completed on December 31, 2015. The project was performed by Georgia Tech (Prof. Bojan Petrovic, PI) and University of Tennessee (Prof. Ivan Maldonado, Co-PI), with a total funding of $758,000 over 3 years. In addition to two Co-PIs, the project directly engaged 6 graduate students (at doctoral or MS level) and 2 postdoctoral researchers. Additionally, through senior design projects and graduate advanced design projects, another 23 undergraduate and 12 graduate students were exposed to and trained in the salt reactor technology. We see this as one of the important indicators of the project’s success and effectiveness. In the process, 1 journal article was published (with 3 journal articles in preparation), together with 8 peer-reviewed full conference papers, 8 peer-reviewed extended abstracts, as well as 1 doctoral dissertation and 2 master theses. The work included both development of models and methodologies needed to adequately analyze this type of reactor, fuel, and its fuel cycle, as well as extensive analyses and optimization of the fuel and core design.

  9. A New Methodology for Open Pit Slope Design in Karst-Prone Ground Conditions Based on Integrated Stochastic-Limit Equilibrium Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Ma, Guowei; Fan, Wenchen; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui

    2016-07-01

    Using the Chengmenshan Copper Mine as a case study, a new methodology for open pit slope design in karst-prone ground conditions is presented based on integrated stochastic-limit equilibrium analysis. The numerical modeling and optimization design procedure contain a collection of drill core data, karst cave stochastic model generation, SLIDE simulation and bisection method optimization. Borehole investigations are performed, and the statistical result shows that the length of the karst cave fits a negative exponential distribution model, but the length of carbonatite does not exactly follow any standard distribution. The inverse transform method and acceptance-rejection method are used to reproduce the length of the karst cave and carbonatite, respectively. A code for karst cave stochastic model generation, named KCSMG, is developed. The stability of the rock slope with the karst cave stochastic model is analyzed by combining the KCSMG code and the SLIDE program. This approach is then applied to study the effect of the karst cave on the stability of the open pit slope, and a procedure to optimize the open pit slope angle is presented.

  10. Simulating Biodegradation Under Mixing-limited Conditions Using Michaelis-Menten (Monod) Kinetic Expressions in a Particle Tracking Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the typical method of adding mass-action reaction terms to the advection-dispersion equation overestimates the field-scale reaction rates. The mismatch is usually attributed to poor mixing. A recent method, based on a purely Langragian particle tracking (PT) theoretical development, successfully reproduces the results of mixing-limited bimolecular reaction (A+B → C) from two benchmark experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles. The reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities that govern whether: 1) reactant particles are collocated during a short time interval, and 2) two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. We extend the application of the PT method to biodegradation, which is commonly characterized by more complex Michaelis-Menten (Monod) chemical kinetics. The advantage of the PT method is that it explains the variation of reaction rate based on mixing-controlled particle collisions instead of using empirical parameters. The PT method is not only able to match the Michaelis-Menten (Monod) equation under ideal conditions, but also is able to capture the characteristics of non-ideal conditions such as imperfect mixing, disequilibrium, and limited availability of the active sites. Furthermore, for the ultimate goal of applying the Langragian PT method directly to the field scale problems, this method is implemented to the simulation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) biodegradation at the Schoolcraft, Michigan, site, where the hydraulic properties and reaction kinetics are well understood.

  11. Oxygen Response of the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 Grown under Carbon-Sufficient, Nitrogen-Limited Enological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aceituno, Felipe F.; Orellana, Marcelo; Torres, Jorge; Mendoza, Sebastián; Slater, Alex W.; Melo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Discrete additions of oxygen play a critical role in alcoholic fermentation. However, few studies have quantitated the fate of dissolved oxygen and its impact on wine yeast cell physiology under enological conditions. We simulated the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations that occur after a pump-over during the winemaking process by sparging nitrogen-limited continuous cultures with oxygen-nitrogen gaseous mixtures. When the dissolved oxygen concentration increased from 1.2 to 2.7 μM, yeast cells changed from a fully fermentative to a mixed respirofermentative metabolism. This transition is characterized by a switch in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and an activation of NADH shuttling from the cytosol to mitochondria. Nevertheless, fermentative ethanol production remained the major cytosolic NADH sink under all oxygen conditions, suggesting that the limitation of mitochondrial NADH reoxidation is the major cause of the Crabtree effect. This is reinforced by the induction of several key respiratory genes by oxygen, despite the high sugar concentration, indicating that oxygen overrides glucose repression. Genes associated with other processes, such as proline uptake, cell wall remodeling, and oxidative stress, were also significantly affected by oxygen. The results of this study indicate that respiration is responsible for a substantial part of the oxygen response in yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. This information will facilitate the development of temporal oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. PMID:23001663

  12. Conditional solvation thermodynamics of isoleucine in model peptides and the limitations of the group-transfer model.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2014-04-17

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute-solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance.

  13. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with β≈1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  14. The Effect of Nickel on the Seismic Wave Belocities of Iron at the Pressure Conditions of the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell Masip, B.; Vocadlo, L.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the Earth's core is a key step in the study of the evolution and dynamics of our planet. For much of the last century, based on studies of meteorites [1], it was believed that Earth's core was predominantly a mixture of iron and nickel. More specifically, the Earth's inner core is a solid Fe-Ni alloy at high temperature (T, 6000 K) and high pressure (P, 360 GPa). Furthermore, to account for the lower than expected density in the Earth's core, it has been suggested that light elements must also be present [2]. While the effect of light elements on the properties of iron have been the subject of an extensive literature [3-6], the effect of nickel on the properties of iron has often been overlooked; this is due to the expectation, based on their proximity in the periodic table, that the properties of Ni are sufficiently similar to those of iron that the presence of nickel can be neglected. Although recent research using high P-T experiments and theoretical studies of Fe-Ni alloys has been performed in order to establish whether nickel affects the physical properties of iron, the results have been inconclusive and sometimes contradictory [7-11]. Here we present a DFT study of the athermal elastic properties of solid Fe-Ni alloys at core pressures using the GGA. We have calculated the equation of state (EoS) for Fe-Ni alloys at several compositions for bcc, fcc and hcp structures, and fitted the results to Birch-Murnaghan 3rd order equations of state. We have also calculated the elastic constants for each structure at 360 GPa and evaluated the seismic wave velocities. Our results show that the effect of small amounts of Ni is significant (-1.9% in vp and -4.0% in vs for hcp structure of Fe93.25-Ni6.75 alloy), and therefore nickel must be taken into account if a detailed model of the Earth's inner core is to be constructed. Other aspects of the influence of nickel, such as its effect on the high P-T phase diagram and melting curve

  15. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  16. Testing phenotypic trade-offs in the chemical defence strategy of Scots pine under growth-limiting field conditions.

    PubMed

    Villari, Caterina; Faccoli, Massimo; Battisti, Andrea; Bonello, Pierluigi; Marini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens and herbivores through fine-tuned resource allocation, including trade-offs among resource investments to support constitutive and inducible defences. However, empirical research, especially concerning conifers growing under natural conditions, is still scarce. We investigated the complexity of constitutive and induced defences in a natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand under growth-limiting conditions typical of alpine environments. Phenotypic trade-offs at three hierarchical levels were tested by investigating the behaviour of phenolic compounds and terpenoids of outer bark and phloem. We tested resource-derived phenotypic correlations between (i) constitutive and inducible defences vs tree ring growth, (ii) different constitutive defence metabolites and (iii) constitutive concentration and inducible variation of individual metabolites. Tree ring growth was positively correlated only with constitutive concentration of total terpenoids, and no overall phenotypic trade-offs between different constitutive defensive metabolites were found. At the lowest hierarchical level tested, i.e., at the level of relationship between constitutive and inducible variation of individual metabolites, we found that different compounds displayed different behaviours; we identified five different defensive metabolite response types, based on direction and strength of the response, regardless of tree age and growth rate. Therefore, under growth-limiting field conditions, Scots pine appears to utilize varied and complex outer bark and phloem defence chemistry, in which only part of the constitutive specialized metabolism is influenced by tree growth, and individual components do not appear to be expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in either constitutive or inducible metabolism. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Modeling ground thermal conditions and the limit of permafrost within the nearshore zone of the Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Christopher W.; Moorman, Brian J.; Solomon, Steve M.

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the interrelated effects of snow and ice on ground thermal conditions beneath regions of shallow water within the nearshore zone of the Mackenzie Delta. Field- and model-based data were used to determine the thermal boundary conditions at the sediment bed surface and to define the contemporary limit of permafrost. Over two consecutive winters, mean sediment bed temperatures deviated up to 9.8°C beneath bottom-fast ice that ranged from 10 cm to 100 cm thick, with intrasite variability as much as 4.7°C. Measured and modeled temperatures were found to exponentially relate to the duration of time ice is bottom-fast with the sediment bed. Mean winter ground temperatures at this boundary were predicted within ±0.25°C of the observed measurements using numerical thermal modeling. As on-ice snow depth decreased, the limit of equilibrium permafrost shifted toward progressively deeper water because of longer durations of ice contact and greater heat loss from the ground. The critical water depth for permafrost under equilibrium conditions was 84 cm (calculated from an ice thickness of 93 cm), which is equivalent to an ice contact time of 142 days. Equilibrium permafrost was mapped beneath 393.8 km2 of bottom-fast ice. An additional 387.9 km2 exhibited seasonal ground freezing in the winter of 2006-2007. Areas affected by bottom-fast ice represent locations that are actively receiving sediment from distributary channels. These results provide the first estimates of contemporary permafrost distribution for shallow water regions of the outer Mackenzie Delta.

  18. Preferential depletion of zinc within Costa Rica upwelling dome creates conditions for zinc co-limitation of primary production

    PubMed Central

    Dreux Chappell, P.; Vedmati, Jagruti; Selph, Karen E.; Cyr, Heather A.; Jenkins, Bethany D.; Landry, Michael R.; Moffett, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The Costa Rica Dome (CRD) is a wind-driven feature characterized by high primary production and an unusual cyanobacterial bloom in surface waters. It is not clear whether this bloom arises from top-down or bottom-up processes. Several studies have argued that trace metal geochemistry within the CRD contributes to the composition of the phytoplankton assemblages, since cyanobacteria and eukaryotic phytoplankton have different transition metal requirements. Here, we report that total dissolved zinc (Zn) is significantly depleted relative to phosphate (P) and silicate (Si) within the upper water column of the CRD compared with other oceanic systems, and this may create conditions favorable for cyanobacteria, which have lower Zn requirements than their eukaryotic competitors. Shipboard grow-out experiments revealed that while Si was a limiting factor under our experimental conditions, additions of Si and either iron (Fe) or Zn led to higher biomass than Si additions alone. The addition of Fe and Zn alone did not lead to significant enhancements. Our results suggest that the depletion of Zn relative to P in upwelled waters may create conditions in the near-surface waters that favor phytoplankton with low Zn requirements, including cyanobacteria. PMID:27275028

  19. Enhanced interaction of Vibrio cholerae virulence regulators TcpP and ToxR under oxygen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fenxia; Liu, Zhi; Jabeen, Nusrat; Birdwell, L Dillon; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. The ability of V. cholerae to colonize and cause disease requires the intricately regulated expression of a number of virulence factors during infection. One of the signals sensed by V. cholerae is the presence of oxygen-limiting conditions in the gut. It has been shown that the virulence activator AphB plays a key role in sensing low oxygen concentrations and inducing the transcription of another key virulence activator, TcpP. In this study, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system to further examine the effect of oxygen on different virulence regulators. We found that anoxic conditions enhanced the interaction between TcpP and ToxR, identified as the first positive regulator of V. cholerae virulence genes. We further demonstrated that the TcpP-ToxR interaction was dependent on the primary periplasmic protein disulfide formation enzyme DsbA and cysteine residues in the periplasmic domains of both ToxR and TcpP. Furthermore, we showed that in V. cholerae, an interaction between TcpP and ToxR is important for virulence gene induction. Under anaerobic growth conditions, we detected ToxR-TcpP heterodimers, which were abolished in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Our results suggest that V. cholerae may sense intestinal anoxic signals by multiple components to activate virulence.

  20. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. Monthly report No. 5, November 1, 1983-November 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    During November work has been focused on two items. These are (a) Analysis of the formation kinetics of synthetic hydrate cores. (b) Analysis of the effect of sediment and heat transfer resistance on the dissociation rate of gas hydrates. The conclusion to be drawn is that dissociation of gas hydrates is severly heat transfer limited after only the shortest periods of time. Even if the conductivities used in this example are not correct, it is clear that the presence of a medium between an injected hot fluid and the hydrate zone must be taken into account in calculating rates at which hydrates will dissociate. 22 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Ab-initio study of the physics and chemistry of metals in planetary core materials and nanomaterials at relevant thermodynamics conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian

    Material science investigates the relationship between the structure of materials at the atomic or molecular scales and their macroscopic properties. Ab-initio DFT, atomistic force-field, and molecular dynamic simulations have been used to investigate the electronic, optical, structural, magnetic properties of group II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles, metal organic frameworks, amide-water complexes, and planetary core materials at the atomic and/or molecular level. Structure, density of electronic states, magnetic dipole moments, and HOMO-LUMO gaps of surface-passivated ZnnSem, Cd nTem, CdTe-core/ZnTe-shell, and ZnSe-core/CdSe-shell nanocrystals are calculated using a first principles. The intrinsic magnetic dipole moments are found to be strongly size dependent. The detailed analysis of the dipole moment as a function of particle size shows the appearance of zincblende-wurtzite polymorphism in these nano-particles. Energy-efficient adsorption processes are considered promising alternatives to traditional separation techniques. Mg-MOF-74, a magnesium-based metal organic framework, has been used as an efficient adsorbent structure for several gas separation purposes. Adsorption equilibria and kinetics of ethane, ethylene, propane, and propylene on Mg-MOF-74 were determined at temperatures of 278, 298, and 318 K and pressures up to 100 kPa. A grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to calculate the adsorption isotherms and to explore adsorption mechanisms. I found that propylene and propane have a stronger affinity to the Mg-MOF-74 adsorbent than ethane and ethylene because of their significant dipole moments. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the role of equilibrium volume and magnetism in Fe and FeX alloys (X=Ni, O) and their stability at earth core conditions. This study provides new insights into the pressure dependence of magnetism by tracking the hybridization between crystal orbitals for pressures up to 600 GPa in

  2. A relational understanding of sibling experiences of children with rare life-limiting conditions: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Cari; Gibson, Faith; Adams, Sally; Anderson, Gillian; Forbat, Liz

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) and Batten disease are rare life-limiting conditions (LLCs) characterised by progressive and permanent physical and cognitive decline. The impact of such conditions on families, and notably on siblings, has not yet been described or documented. This paper presents data from a UK-wide study that sought to understand the family experience of supporting a child with the rare degenerative LLCs of MPS and Batten disease. The aim of this paper is to report sibling experiences related to these rare degenerative and progressive conditions, in order to inform the future development of supportive interventions. Eight siblings of children with MPS (n = 7) and Batten Disease (n = 1) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. A card sort technique was utilised to support and engage the children. Siblings are clearly impacted emotionally, pragmatically and relationally by the ill health of another child in the family. The data indicate four key themes which demonstrate impacts on siblings: perceptions of the condition and its symptoms, impact on daily life, emotional consequences and ways of coping. Siblings often had considerable knowledge of the condition and took on important roles in symptom management. However, these experiences were in the context of managing relationships within the family (often protecting parents from an awareness of how much they knew) and relationships at school (including distraction from learning and being bullied by peers). The data highlight how sibling experiences are generated through a combination of negative disability discourses and support through peers and family members. The data indicate how these features shift as a consequence of witnessing the advancement of their brother's or sister's condition and the emotional sequelae of disease progression. Exploration of siblings' experiences of living with such rare progressive and degenerative LLCs suggest the focus of interventions to support this

  3. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiguang; Silander, Isak; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is conventionally described by an expression (here referred to as the CONV expression) that is restricted to the case when the single-pass absorbance, α0L, is much smaller than the empty cavity losses, π/F [here termed the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption (CCLWA) condition]. This limits the applicability of the technique, primarily its dynamic range and calibration capability. To remedy this, this work derives extended descriptions of Db NICE-OHMS that are not restricted to the CCLWA condition. First, the general principles of Db NICE-OHMS are scrutinized in some detail. Based solely upon a set of general assumptions, predominantly that it is appropriate to linearize the Beer-Lambert law, that the light is modulated to a triplet, and that the Pound-Drever-Hall sidebands are fully reflected, a general description of Db NICE-OHMS that is not limited to any specific restriction on α0L vs. π/F, here referred to as the FULL description, is derived. However, this description constitutes a set of equations to which no closed form solution has been found. Hence, it needs to be solved numerically (by iterations), which is inconvenient. To circumvent this, for the cases when α0L<π/F but without the requirement that the stronger CCLWA condition needs to be fulfilled, a couple of simplified extended expressions that are expressible in closed analytical form, referred to as the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT, have been derived. An analysis based on simulations validates the various descriptions and assesses to which extent they agree. It is shown that in the CCLWA limit, all extended descriptions revert to the CONV expression. The latter one deviates though from the extended ones for α0L around and above 0.1π/F. The two simplified extended descriptions agree

  4. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Laplacian growth phenomena with the third boundary condition: Crossover from dense structure to diffusion-limited aggregation fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1989-12-01

    A Laplacian growth model with the third boundary condition, (1-P)∂Φ/∂n-PΦ=0, is considered in order to study the effect of the sticking probability of the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA), where Φ is the harmonic function satisfying the Laplace equation and ∂Φ/∂n the derivative normal to the interface. The crossover from the dense structure to the DLA fractal is investigated by using a two-parameter position-space renormalization-group method. A global flow diagram in two-parameter space is obtained. It is found that there are two nontrivial fixed points, the Eden point and the DLA point. The DLA point corresponding to the DLA fractal is stable in all directions, while the Eden point is a saddle point. When the sticking probability P is not 1, the aggregate must eventually cross over to the DLA fractal. The crossover exponent φ and crossover radius r× are calculated.

  6. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  7. Simulating biodegradation under mixing-limited conditions using Michaelis-Menten (Monod) kinetic expressions in a particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that effective field-scale bioremediation reactions rates are significantly lower than batch- or lab-scale rates, when the same law of mass action is used to represent the reaction at both scales. The mismatch is usually attributed to poor mixing of reactants brought about by heterogeneity. A recent method, based on a purely Lagrangian particle tracking (PT) theoretical development, successfully reproduces the effects of mixing-limited bimolecular reaction (A + B → C) from two benchmark experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles, and the small-scale physics are directly translated into a combination of two probabilities that govern whether: (1) reactant particles are collocated during a short time interval, and (2) two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The latter is due to thermodynamics and is independent of scale of mixing. The former directly accounts for the degree of mixing in any system. We extend the application of the PT method to biodegradation, which is commonly characterized by more complex Michaelis-Menten (Monod) chemical kinetics. The advantage of the PT method is that it explains the variation of reaction rate based on mixing-controlled particle collisions instead of using empirical parameters. The PT method not only matches the Michaelis-Menten (Monod) equation under ideal conditions, but also captures the characteristics of non-ideal conditions such as imperfect mixing, disequilibrium, and limited availability of the active sites. We show these using hypothetical systems and also successfully apply the method to a column study of carbon tetrachloride biodegradation.

  8. Non-limiting food conditions for growth and production of the copepod community in a highly productive upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, Rubén; Bustos-Ríos, Evelyn; Hidalgo, Pamela; Morales, Carmen E.

    2016-09-01

    Zooplankton production is critical for understanding marine ecosystem dynamics. This work estimates copepod growth and production in the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones off central-southern Chile (~35 to 37°S) during a 3-year time series (2004, 2005, and 2006) at a fixed shelf station, and from spring-summer spatial surveys during the same period. To estimate copepod production (CP), we used species-biomasses and associated C-specific growth rates from temperature dependent equations (food-saturated) for the dominant species, which we assumed were maximal growth rates (gmax). Using chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for food conditions, we determined a size-dependent half-saturation constant with the Michaelis-Menten equation to derive growth rates (g) under the effect of food limitation. These food-dependent C-specific growth rates were much lower (<0.1 d-1) than those observed in the field for the dominant species, while gmax for same species, in the range of 0.19-0.23 d-1 better represented the necessary growth to attain observed adult sizes of at least two copepods, Paracalanus cf. indicus and Calanus chilensis. Copepod biomass (CB) and rates of maximal copepod production (CPmax) obtained with gmax were higher in the coastal upwelling zone (<50 km from shore), and correlated significantly to oceanographic variables associated with upwelling conditions. Both CPmax and gmax exhibited negative trends at the fixed station from 2004 to 2006 in association with increased duration of upwelling in the latter year. Annual CPmax ranged between 24 and 52 g C m-2 y-1 with a mean annual P/B ratio of 7.3. We concluded that interannual variation in copepod production resulted from factors and processes regulating copepod abundance and biomass in the absence of bottom-up control, allowing copepods to grow without limitation due to food resources.

  9. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  10. Conditional Solvation Thermodynamics of Isoleucine in Model Peptides and the Limitations of the Group-Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute–solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance. PMID:24650057

  11. Transition from children's to adult services for young adults with life-limiting conditions: A realist review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Helen; Price, Jayne; Nicholl, Honor; O'Halloran, Peter

    2017-06-23

    Improvements in care and treatment have led to more young adults with life-limiting conditions living beyond childhood, which means they must make the transition from children's to adult services. This has proved a challenging process for both young adults and service providers, with complex transition interventions interacting in unpredictable ways with local contexts. To explain how intervention processes interact with contextual factors to help transition from children's to adult services for young adults with life-limiting conditions. Systematic realist review of the literature. Literature was sourced from four electronic databases: Embase, MEDLINE, Science Direct and Cochrane Library from January 1995 to April 2016. This was supplemented with a search in Google Scholar and articles sourced from reference lists of included papers. Data were extracted using an adapted standardised data extraction tool which included identifying information related to interventions, mechanisms, contextual influences and outcomes. Two reviewers assessed the relevance of papers based on the inclusion criteria. Methodological rigor was assessed using the relevant Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tools. 78 articles were included in the review. Six interventions were identified related to an effective transition to adult services. Contextual factors include the need for children's service providers to collaborate with adult service providers to prepare an environment with knowledgeable staff and adequate resources. Mechanisms triggered by the interventions include a sense of empowerment and agency amongst all stakeholders. Early planning, collaboration between children's and adult service providers, and a focus on increasing the young adults' confidence in decision-making and engaging with adult services, are vital to a successful transition. Interventions should be tailored to their context and focused not only on organisational procedures but on equipping young adults, parents

  12. Use of the Priestley-Taylor evaporation equation for soil water limited conditions in a small forest clearcut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Childs, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Priestley-Taylor equation, a simplification of the Penman equation, was used to allow calculations of evapotranspiration under conditions where soil water supply limits evapotranspiration. The Priestley-Taylor coefficient, ??, was calculated to incorporate an exponential decrease in evapotranspiration as soil water content decreases. The method is appropriate for use when detailed meteorological measurements are not available. The data required to determine the parameter for the ?? coefficient are net radiation, soil heat flux, average air temperature, and soil water content. These values can be obtained from measurements or models. The dataset used in this report pertains to a partially vegetated clearcut forest site in southwest Oregon with soil depths ranging from 0.48 to 0.70 m and weathered bedrock below that. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the Bowen ratio method, and the calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient was fitted to these estimates by nonlinear regression. The calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?????) was found to be approximately 0.9 when the soil was near field capacity (0.225 cm3 cm-3). It was not until soil water content was less than 0.14 cm3 cm-3 that soil water supply limited evapotranspiration. The soil reached a final residual water content near 0.05 cm3 cm-3 at the end of the growing season. ?? 1991.

  13. Self-care of long-term conditions: patients' perspectives and their (limited) use of community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Ogunbayo, Oladapo J; Schafheutle, Ellen I; Cutts, Christopher; Noyce, Peter R

    2017-04-01

    Background Self-care support is an 'inseparable' component of quality healthcare for long-term conditions (LTCs). Evidence of how patients view and use community pharmacy (CP) to engage in self-care of LTCs is limited. Objective To explore patients' perspectives of engaging in self-care and use of CP for self-care support. Setting England and Scotland. Method Qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews. LTCs patients were recruited via general practitioners (GPs) and CPs. Interviews were conducted between May 2013 and June 2014; they were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results Twenty-four participants were interviewed. Three main themes emerged: engaging in self-care, resources for self-care support and (limited) use of community pharmacy. Participants' LTC 'lived experience' showed that self-care was integral to daily living from being diagnosed to long-term maintenance of health/wellbeing; self-care engagement was very personal and diverse and was based on beliefs and experiences. Healthcare professionals were viewed as providing information which was considered passive and insufficient in helping behavioural change. Non-healthcare sources (family, carers, friends, internet) were important in filling active support gaps, particularly lifestyle management. Participants' use of, and identified need for, community pharmacy as a resource for self-care support of LTCs was limited and primarily focussed on medicines supply. There was low awareness and visibility of CPs' potential roles and capability. Conclusion CP needs to reflect on patients' low awareness of its expertise and services to contribute to self-care support of LTCs. Rethinking how interventions are designed and 'marketed'; incorporation of patients' perspectives and collaboration with others, particularly GPs, could prove beneficial.

  14. Investigations of Internal Flow Fields of Constant-Area Mixing-Tubes under Starting-Limit Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Eijiro; Tomioka, Sadatake; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Watanabe, Syuichi; Masuya, Goro

    Flow fields in the constant-area mixing tubes of ejector jets were investigated under the starting-limit conditions of an aerodynamic choking mode by performing numerical simulations and cold flow experiments. Pressure recovery was almost completed in the shock-train region. The length of the shock-train region (Lst) was measured under various conditions. Lst was proportional to the mass flow rate ratio of the secondary flow to the primary flow when this ratio was less than 0.15. On the other hand, Lst became almost constant when the mass flow rate ratio exceeded 0.15. Numerical studies showed that this change was caused by the difference in the mechanism of the flow fields. In the cases with low air mass flow rates, the primary and secondary flows almost mixed in a region between the inlets of the mixing tubes and the choking points. The pressure was recovered by a pseudo-shock-wave generated downstream of the choking point. On the other hand, when the mass flow rate ratio was higher than 0.15, the primary and secondary flows were clearly separated at the choking point. The pressure recovery was achieved by the mixing between the primary and secondary flows downstream of the choking point.

  15. The activity of nodules of the supernodulating mutant Mtsunn is not limited by photosynthesis under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-04-10

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants.

  16. Application of thresholds of potential concern and limits of acceptable change in the condition assessment of a significant wetland.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Colloff, Matthew J; Wen, Li

    2013-10-01

    We propose a framework in which thresholds of potential concern (TPCs) and limits of acceptable change (LACs) are used in concert in the assessment of wetland condition and vulnerability and apply the framework in a case study. The lower Murrumbidgee River floodplain (the 'Lowbidgee') is one of the most ecologically important wetlands in Australia and the focus of intense management intervention by State and Federal government agencies. We used a targeted management stakeholder workshop to identify key values that contribute to the ecological significance of the Lowbidgee floodplain, and identified LACs that, if crossed, would signify the loss of significance. We then used conceptual models linking the condition of these values (wetland vegetation communities, waterbirds, fish species and the endangered southern bell frog) to measurable threat indicators, for which we defined a management goal and a TPC. We applied this framework to data collected across 70 wetland storages', or eco-hydrological units, at the peak of a prolonged drought (2008) and following extensive re-flooding (2010). At the suggestion of water and wetland mangers, we neither aggregated nor integrated indices but reported separately in a series of chloropleth maps. The resulting assessment clearly identified the effect of rewetting in restoring indicators within TPC in most cases, for most storages. The scale of assessment was useful in informing the targeted and timely management intervention and provided a context for retaining and utilising monitoring information in an adaptive management context.