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Sample records for core metabolic proteins

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein impairs metabolic disorder of liver cell via HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qin; Gu, Xin-Yu; Hu, Jin-Xing; Ping, Yu; Li, Hua; Yan, Jing-Ya; Li, Juan; Sun, Ran; Yu, Zu-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    It has been suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is associated with metabolic disorders of liver cell. However, the precise mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of HCV core protein on hepatocyte metabolism by HepG2 and the possible involvement of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this process. The effect of HCV core protein on lncRNAs expression was examined with quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. The potential downstream Sirt1 signal was examined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. Also it benefits for metabolic homoeostasis of hepatocyte indicated by restoration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and NAD/NADH ratio. By manipulation of HOTAIR, we concluded that HOTAIR negatively regulates Sirt1 expression through affecting its promotor methylation. Moreover, overexpression of Sirt1 reverses pcDNA-HOTAIR-induced glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related gene expression. Our study suggests that HCV core protein causes dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism in liver cells through HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling pathway. PMID:27129296

  2. Protein metabolism and requirements.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptation to critical illness includes insulin resistance, accelerated proteolysis, and increased release of glutamine and the other amino acids. Such amino acid efflux from skeletal muscle provides precursors for protein synthesis and energy fuel to the liver and to the rapidly dividing cells of the intestinal mucosa and the immune system. From these adaptation mechanisms, severe muscle wasting, glutamine depletion, and hyperglycemia, with increased patient morbidity and mortality, may ensue. Protein/amino acid nutrition, through either enteral or parenteral routes, plays a pivotal role in treatment of metabolic abnormalities in critical illness. In contrast to energy requirement, which can be accurately assessed by indirect calorimetry, methods to determine individual protein/amino acid needs are not currently available. In critical illness, a decreased ability of protein/amino acid intake to promote body protein synthesis is defined as anabolic resistance. This abnormality leads to increased protein/amino acid requirement and relative inefficiency of nutritional interventions. In addition to stress mediators, immobility and physical inactivity are key determinants of anabolic resistance. The development of mobility protocols in the intensive care unit should be encouraged to enhance the efficacy of nutrition. In critical illness, protein/amino acid requirement has been defined as the intake level associated with the lowest rate of catabolism. The optimal protein-sparing effects in patients receiving adequate energy are achieved when protein/amino acids are administered at rates between 1.3 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Extra glutamine supplementation is required in conditions of severe systemic inflammatory response. Protein requirement increases during hypocaloric feeding and in patients with acute renal failure on continuous renal replacement therapy. Evidence suggests that receiving adequate protein/amino acid intake may be more important than achieving

  3. Inferring ancient metabolism using ancestral core metabolic models of enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterobacteriaceae diversified from an ancestral lineage ~300-500 million years ago (mya) into a wide variety of free-living and host-associated lifestyles. Nutrient availability varies across niches, and evolution of metabolic networks likely played a key role in adaptation. Results Here we use a paleo systems biology approach to reconstruct and model metabolic networks of ancestral nodes of the enterobacteria phylogeny to investigate metabolism of ancient microorganisms and evolution of the networks. Specifically, we identified orthologous genes across genomes of 72 free-living enterobacteria (16 genera), and constructed core metabolic networks capturing conserved components for ancestral lineages leading to E. coli/Shigella (~10 mya), E. coli/Shigella/Salmonella (~100 mya), and all enterobacteria (~300-500 mya). Using these models we analyzed the capacity for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulfur, and iron utilization in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, identified conserved and differentiating catabolic phenotypes, and validated predictions by comparison to experimental data from extant organisms. Conclusions This is a novel approach using quantitative ancestral models to study metabolic network evolution and may be useful for identification of new targets to control infectious diseases caused by enterobacteria. PMID:23758866

  4. Knockdown of core binding factorβ alters sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Greer, Adam H; Yong, Thomas; Fennell, Katie; Moustafa, Yara W; Fowler, Marcie; Galiano, Floyd; Ng, Shu-Wing; Berkowitz, Ross S; Cardelli, James; Meyers, Shari; Davis, J Nathan

    2013-12-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) is a heterodimeric transcription factor containing one of three DNA-binding proteins of the Runt-related transcription factor family (RUNX1-3) and the non-DNA-binding protein, CBFβ. RUNX1 and CBFβ are the most common targets of chromosomal rearrangements in leukemia. CBF has been implicated in other cancer types; for example RUNX1 and RUNX2 are implicated in cancers of epithelial origin, including prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers. In these tumors, CBF is involved in maintaining the malignant phenotype and, when highly over-expressed, contributes to metastatic growth in bone. Herein, lentiviral delivery of CBFβ-specific shRNAs was used to achieve a 95% reduction of CBFβ in an ovarian cancer cell line. This drastic reduction in CBFβ expression resulted in growth inhibition that was not associated with a cell cycle block or an increase in apoptosis. However, CBFβ silencing resulted in increased autophagy and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since sphingolipid and ceramide metabolism regulates non-apoptotic cell death, autophagy, and ROS production, fumonsin B1 (FB1), an inhibitor of ceramide synthase, was used to alter ceramide production in the CBFβ-silenced cells. FB1 treatment inhibited the CBFβ-dependent increase in autophagy and provided a modest increase in cell survival. To document alterations to sphingolipids in the CBFβ-silenced cells, ceramide, and lactosylceramide levels were directly examined by mass spectrometry. Substantial increases in ceramide species and decreases in lactosylceramides were identified. Altogether, this report provides evidence that CBF transcriptional pathways control cellular survival, at least in part, through sphingolipid metabolism.

  5. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  6. The hydrogen exchange core and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R.; Woodward, C.

    1999-01-01

    A database of hydrogen-deuterium exchange results has been compiled for proteins for which there are published rates of out-exchange in the native state, protection against exchange during folding, and out-exchange in partially folded forms. The question of whether the slow exchange core is the folding core (Woodward C, 1993, Trends Biochem Sci 18:359-360) is reexamined in a detailed comparison of the specific amide protons (NHs) and the elements of secondary structure on which they are located. For each pulsed exchange or competition experiment, probe NHs are shown explicitly; the large number and broad distribution of probe NHs support the validity of comparing out-exchange with pulsed-exchange/competition experiments. There is a strong tendency for the same elements of secondary structure to carry NHs most protected in the native state, NHs first protected during folding, and NHs most protected in partially folded species. There is not a one-to-one correspondence of individual NHs. Proteins for which there are published data for native state out-exchange and theta values are also reviewed. The elements of secondary structure containing the slowest exchanging NHs in native proteins tend to contain side chains with high theta values or be connected to a turn/loop with high theta values. A definition for a protein core is proposed, and the implications for protein folding are discussed. Apparently, during folding and in the native state, nonlocal interactions between core sequences are favored more than other possible nonlocal interactions. Other studies of partially folded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Barbar E, Barany G, Woodward C, 1995, Biochemistry 34:11423-11434; Barber E, Hare M, Daragan V, Barany G, Woodward C, 1998, Biochemistry 37:7822-7833), suggest that developing cores have site-specific energy barriers between microstates, one disordered, and the other(s) more ordered. PMID:10452602

  7. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  8. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  9. Posttranslational Protein Modifications in Plant Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality, and allow for rapid responses, all at relatively low costs for the cell. PTMs play key roles in plants through their impact on signaling, gene expression, protein stability and interactions, and enzyme kinetics. Following a brief discussion of the experimental and bioinformatics challenges of PTM identification, localization, and quantification (occupancy), a concise overview is provided of the major PTMs and their (potential) functional consequences in plants, with emphasis on plant metabolism. Classic examples that illustrate the regulation of plant metabolic enzymes and pathways by PTMs and their cross talk are summarized. Recent large-scale proteomics studies mapped many PTMs to a wide range of metabolic functions. Unraveling of the PTM code, i.e. a predictive understanding of the (combinatorial) consequences of PTMs, is needed to convert this growing wealth of data into an understanding of plant metabolic regulation. PMID:26338952

  10. Reconstruction and Use of Microbial Metabolic Networks: the Core Escherichia coli Metabolic Model as an Educational Guide.

    PubMed

    Orth, Jeffrey D; Fleming, R M T; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-09-01

    Biochemical network reconstructions have become popular tools in systems biology. Metabolicnetwork reconstructions are biochemically, genetically, and genomically (BiGG) structured databases of biochemical reactions and metabolites. They contain information such as exact reaction stoichiometry, reaction reversibility, and the relationships between genes, proteins, and reactions. Network reconstructions have been used extensively to study the phenotypic behavior of wild-type and mutant stains under a variety of conditions, linking genotypes with phenotypes. Such phenotypic simulations have allowed for the prediction of growth after genetic manipulations, prediction of growth phenotypes after adaptive evolution, and prediction of essential genes. Additionally, because network reconstructions are organism specific, they can be used to understand differences between organisms of species in a functional context.There are different types of reconstructions representing various types of biological networks (metabolic, regulatory, transcription/translation). This chapter serves as an introduction to metabolic and regulatory network reconstructions and models and gives a complete description of the core Escherichia coli metabolic model. This model can be analyzed in any computational format (such as MATLAB or Mathematica) based on the information given in this chapter. The core E. coli model is a small-scale model that can be used for educational purposes. It is meant to be used by senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students learning about constraint-based modeling and systems biology. This model has enough reactions and pathways to enable interesting and insightful calculations, but it is also simple enough that the results of such calculations can be understoodeasily.

  11. Hepatitis C virus core+1/ARF protein decreases hepcidin transcription through an AP1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Vassilaki, Niki; Pissas, George; Kakkanas, Athanassios; Bakiri, Latifa; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Mavromara, Penelope

    2013-07-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis C is characterized by iron accumulation in the liver, and hepcidin regulates iron absorption. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core+1/ARFP is a novel protein produced by a second functional ORF within the core gene. Here, using reporter assays and HCV bicistronic replicons, we show that, similarly to core, core+1/ARFP decreases hepcidin expression in hepatoma cells. The activator protein 1 (AP1) binding site of the human hepcidin promoter, shown here to be relevant to basal promoter activity and to the repression by core, is essential for the downregulation by core+1/ARFP while the previously described C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) sites are not. Consistently, expression of the AP1 components c-jun and c-fos obliterated the repressive effect of core and core+1/ARFP. In conclusion, we provide evidence that core+1/ARFP downregulates AP1-mediated transcription, providing new insights into the biological role of core+1/ARFP, as well as the transcriptional modulation of hepcidin, the main regulator of iron metabolism. PMID:23580428

  12. Effects of metabolic rate on protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; McCoy, Michael W; Allen, Andrew P

    2007-12-22

    Since the modern evolutionary synthesis was first proposed early in the twentieth century, attention has focused on assessing the relative contribution of mutation versus natural selection on protein evolution. Here we test a model that yields general quantitative predictions on rates of protein evolution by combining principles of individual energetics with Kimura's neutral theory. The model successfully predicts much of the heterogeneity in rates of protein evolution for diverse eukaryotes (i.e. fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals) from different thermal environments. Data also show that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution is independent of body size, and thus presumably of effective population size. These findings indicate that rates of protein evolution are largely controlled by mutation rates, which in turn are strongly influenced by individual metabolic rate.

  13. Proteomic profiling of cellular proteins interacting with the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Shin, Min-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The core protein of HCV packages the viral RNA genome to form a nucleocapsid. In addition to its function as a structural protein, core protein is involved in regulation of cellular transcription, virus-induced transformation, and pathogenesis. To gain insights into cellular functions of the core protein by identification of cellular proteins interacting with the core protein, we employed a proteomic approach. Hepatocytes soluble cytoplasmic proteins were applied to the core proteins immobilized on Ni-nitrilotriacetic resin and total bound cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE. Analyses of interacting proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry allowed identification of 14 cellular proteins binding to the core protein. These proteins include DEAD-box polypeptide 5, similar in function to a known protein identified previously by yeast two-hybrid screening and 13 newly identified cellular proteins. Interestingly, nine protein spots were identified as intermediate microfilament proteins, including cytokeratins (five spots for cytokeratin 8, two for cytokeratin 19, and one for cytokeratin 18) and vimentin. Cytokeratin 8 and vimentin, which were previously shown to be involved in the infection processes of other viruses, were further analyzed to confirm their in vivo interactions with the core protein by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. We discuss the functional implications of the interactions of the core protein with newly identified cellular proteins in HCV infection and pathogenesis.

  14. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Busiello, Rosa A.; Savarese, Sabrina; Lombardi, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the metabolic factors that contribute to energy metabolism (EM) is critical for the development of new treatments for obesity and related diseases. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is not perfectly coupled to ATP synthesis, and the process of proton-leak plays a crucial role. Proton-leak accounts for a significant part of the resting metabolic rate (RMR) and therefore enhancement of this process represents a potential target for obesity treatment. Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have stimulated great interest due to their involvement in mitochondrial-inducible proton-leak. Despite the widely accepted uncoupling/thermogenic effect of uncoupling protein one (UCP1), which was the first in this family to be discovered, the reactions catalyzed by its homolog UCP3 and the physiological role remain under debate. This review provides an overview of the role played by UCP1 and UCP3 in mitochondrial uncoupling/functionality as well as EM and suggests that they are a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and its related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:25713540

  15. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis.

  16. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  17. Effect of puromycin aminonucleoside on HSPG core protein content of glomerular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinath, B.S.; Singh, A.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.; Lewis, E.J. )

    1988-10-01

    It has been suggested that the glomerular basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) is an important determinant of the glomerular permselectivity barrier. Derangements in the content of basement membrane heparan sulfate have been implicated in alterations in glomerular permselectivity seen in many glomerular diseases such as aminonucleoside nephrosis. The cellular origin and metabolism of the glomerular basement membrane HSPG have not been studied in detail. The authors have detected the expression of the proteoglycan by cloned glomerular visceral epithelial cells of the rat by employing a specific antibody against the core protein of HSPG isolated from the rat glomerular basement membrane. These findings suggest that in the rat in vivo glomerular visceral epithelial cells are one source of heparan sulfate present in the glomerular basement membrane. The effect of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) on the HSPG core protein content of the cloned glomerular epithelial cells was studied. By a quantitative immunoperoxidase method, the aminonucleoside caused a 28% reduction in the core protein content of the epithelial cells following 72 h of incubation. However, the content of Heymann nephritis-related antigen, Fx1A was unchanged. Studies employing ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation showed that PAN was a weak inhibitor of de novo protein synthesis at 24 h of incubation, with complete recovery at 48 and 72 h. These data suggest that PAN effect on heparan sulfate core protein cannot be attributed to generalized inhibition of protein synthesis. The precise mechanism underlying the aminonucleoside effect on heparan sulfate core protein remains to be elucidated.

  18. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  19. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  20. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd; John, Swen; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Lindeberg, Staffan; Cordain, Loren

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual's pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  1. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  2. Relationship between asparagine metabolism and protein concentration in soybean seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between asparagine metabolism and protein concentration was investigated in soybean seed. Phenotyping of a population of recombinant inbred lines adapted to Illinois confirmed a positive correlation between free asparagine levels in developing seeds and protein concentration at matu...

  3. Steric interactions determine side-chain conformations in protein cores.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Virrueta, A; O'Hern, C S; Regan, L

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of steric interactions in defining side-chain conformations in protein cores. Previously, we explored the strengths and limitations of hard-sphere dipeptide models in defining sterically allowed side-chain conformations and recapitulating key features of the side-chain dihedral angle distributions observed in high-resolution protein structures. Here, we show that modeling residues in the context of a particular protein environment, with both intra- and inter-residue steric interactions, is sufficient to specify which of the allowed side-chain conformations is adopted. This model predicts 97% of the side-chain conformations of Leu, Ile, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Thr core residues to within 20°. Although the hard-sphere dipeptide model predicts the observed side-chain dihedral angle distributions for both Thr and Ser, the model including the protein environment predicts side-chain conformations to within 20° for only 60% of core Ser residues. Thus, this approach can identify the amino acids for which hard-sphere interactions alone are sufficient and those for which additional interactions are necessary to accurately predict side-chain conformations in protein cores. We also show that our approach can predict alternate side-chain conformations of core residues, which are supported by the observed electron density.

  4. Chemical Reporter for Visualizing Metabolic Cross-Talk between Carbohydrate Metabolism and Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells. PMID:25062036

  5. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  6. Protein Quality Control and Metabolism: Bidirectional Control in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of heart disease, especially heart failure, continues to increase, and cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. As cardiomyocytes are essentially irreplaceable, protein quality control is pivotal to cellular homeostasis and, ultimately, cardiac performance. Three evolutionarily conserved mechanisms – autophagy, the unfolded protein response, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system– act in concert to degrade misfolded proteins and eliminate defective organelles. Recent advances have revealed that these mechanisms are intimately associated with cellular metabolism. Going forward, comprehensive understanding of the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cardiac pathology will require integration of metabolic pathways and metabolic control. PMID:25651176

  7. Protein Phosphorylation: A Major Switch Mechanism for Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Sean J; James, David E; Mann, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Metabolism research is undergoing a renaissance because many diseases are increasingly recognized as being characterized by perturbations in intracellular metabolic regulation. Metabolic changes can be conferred through changes to the expression of metabolic enzymes, the concentrations of substrates or products that govern reaction kinetics, or post-translational modification (PTM) of the proteins that facilitate these reactions. On the 60th anniversary since its discovery, reversible protein phosphorylation is widely appreciated as an essential PTM regulating metabolism. With the ability to quantitatively measure dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation on a global scale - hereafter referred to as phosphoproteomics - we are now entering a new era in metabolism research, with mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics at the helm. PMID:26498855

  8. Protein design in systems metabolic engineering for industrial strain development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Accelerating the process of industrial bacterial host strain development, aimed at increasing productivity, generating new bio-products or utilizing alternative feedstocks, requires the integration of complementary approaches to manipulate cellular metabolism and regulatory networks. Systems metabolic engineering extends the concept of classical metabolic engineering to the systems level by incorporating the techniques used in systems biology and synthetic biology, and offers a framework for the development of the next generation of industrial strains. As one of the most useful tools of systems metabolic engineering, protein design allows us to design and optimize cellular metabolism at a molecular level. Here, we review the current strategies of protein design for engineering cellular synthetic pathways, metabolic control systems and signaling pathways, and highlight the challenges of this subfield within the context of systems metabolic engineering.

  9. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  10. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  11. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  12. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  13. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  14. MANET: tracing evolution of protein architecture in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Shin; Mittenthal, Jay E; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cellular metabolism can be characterized by networks of enzymatic reactions and transport processes capable of supporting cellular life. Our aim is to find evolutionary patterns and processes embedded in the architecture and function of modern metabolism, using information derived from structural genomics. Description The Molecular Ancestry Network (MANET) project traces evolution of protein architecture in biomolecular networks. We describe metabolic MANET, a database that links information in the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP), the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and phylogenetic reconstructions depicting the evolution of protein fold architecture. Metabolic MANET literally 'paints' the ancestries of enzymes derived from rooted phylogenomic trees directly onto over one hundred metabolic subnetworks, enabling the study of evolutionary patterns at global and local levels. An initial analysis of painted subnetworks reveals widespread enzymatic recruitment and an early origin of amino acid metabolism. Conclusion MANET maps evolutionary relationships directly and globally onto biological networks, and can generate and test hypotheses related to evolution of metabolism. We anticipate its use in the study of other networks, such as signaling and other protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:16854231

  15. Estimating resting metabolic rate by biologging core and subcutaneous temperature in a mammal.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G; Hetem, Robyn S; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan; Rouanet, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-01

    Tri-axial accelerometry has been used to continuously and remotely assess field metabolic rates in free-living endotherms. However, in cold environments, the use of accelerometry may underestimate resting metabolic rate because cold-induced stimulation of metabolic rate causes no measurable acceleration. To overcome this problem, we investigated if logging the difference between core and subcutaneous temperatures (ΔTc-s) could reveal the metabolic costs associated with cold exposure. Using implanted temperature data loggers, we recorded core and subcutaneous temperatures continuously in eight captive rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and concurrently measured their resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, at ambient temperatures ranging from -7 to +25°C. ΔTc-s showed no circadian fluctuations in warm (+23°C) or cold (+5°C) environments implying that the ΔTc-s was not affected by an endogenous circadian rhythm in our laboratory conditions. ΔTc-s correlated well with resting metabolic rate (R(2)=0.77) across all ambient temperatures except above the upper limit of the thermoneutral zone (+25°C). Determining ΔTc-s could therefore provide a complementary approach for better estimating resting metabolic rate of animals within and below their thermoneutral zone. Combining data from accelerometers with such measures of body temperature could improve estimates of the overall field metabolic rate of free-living endotherms.

  16. Core Proteomic Analysis of Unique Metabolic Pathways of Salmonella enterica for the Identification of Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Salmonella enterica, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are major threats to the health of humans and animals. The recent availability of complete genome data of pathogenic strains of the S. enterica gives new avenues for the identification of drug targets and drug candidates. We have used the genomic and metabolic pathway data to identify pathways and proteins essential to the pathogen and absent from the host. Methods We took the whole proteome sequence data of 42 strains of S. enterica and Homo sapiens along with KEGG-annotated metabolic pathway data, clustered proteins sequences using CD-HIT, identified essential genes using DEG database and discarded S. enterica homologs of human proteins in unique metabolic pathways (UMPs) and characterized hypothetical proteins with SVM-prot and InterProScan. Through this core proteomic analysis we have identified enzymes essential to the pathogen. Results The identification of 73 enzymes common in 42 strains of S. enterica is the real strength of the current study. We proposed all 73 unexplored enzymes as potential drug targets against the infections caused by the S. enterica. The study is comprehensive around S. enterica and simultaneously considered every possible pathogenic strain of S. enterica. This comprehensiveness turned the current study significant since, to the best of our knowledge it is the first subtractive core proteomic analysis of the unique metabolic pathways applied to any pathogen for the identification of drug targets. We applied extensive computational methods to shortlist few potential drug targets considering the druggability criteria e.g. Non-homologous to the human host, essential to the pathogen and playing significant role in essential metabolic pathways of the pathogen (i.e. S. enterica). In the current study, the subtractive proteomics through a novel approach was applied i.e. by considering only proteins

  17. Evolution of biomolecular networks: lessons from metabolic and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer

    2009-11-01

    Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein-protein interactions or enzyme-enzyme interactions through shared metabolites in the case of metabolic networks. Evolutionary analysis has revealed that changes in the nodes and links in protein-protein interaction and metabolic networks are subject to different selection pressures owing to distinct topological features. However, many evolutionary constraints can be uncovered only if temporal and spatial aspects are included in the network analysis.

  18. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  19. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  20. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  1. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  2. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  3. Comparative genomics and evolution of proteins involved in RNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V.; Aravind, L.

    2002-01-01

    RNA metabolism, broadly defined as the compendium of all processes that involve RNA, including transcription, processing and modification of transcripts, translation, RNA degradation and its regulation, is the central and most evolutionarily conserved part of cell physiology. A comprehensive, genome-wide census of all enzymatic and non-enzymatic protein domains involved in RNA metabolism was conducted by using sequence profile analysis and structural comparisons. Proteins related to RNA metabolism comprise from 3 to 11% of the complete protein repertoire in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, with the greatest fraction seen in parasitic bacteria with small genomes. Approximately one-half of protein domains involved in RNA metabolism are present in most, if not all, species from all three primary kingdoms and are traceable to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). The principal features of LUCA’s RNA metabolism system were reconstructed by parsimony-based evolutionary analysis of all relevant groups of orthologous proteins. This reconstruction shows that LUCA possessed not only the basal translation system, but also the principal forms of RNA modification, such as methylation, pseudouridylation and thiouridylation, as well as simple mechanisms for polyadenylation and RNA degradation. Some of these ancient domains form paralogous groups whose evolution can be traced back in time beyond LUCA, towards low-specificity proteins, which probably functioned as cofactors for ribozymes within the RNA world framework. The main lineage-specific innovations of RNA metabolism systems were identified. The most notable phase of innovation in RNA metabolism coincides with the advent of eukaryotes and was brought about by the merge of the archaeal and bacterial systems via mitochondrial endosymbiosis, but also involved emergence of several new, eukaryote-specific RNA-binding domains. Subsequent, vast expansions of these domains mark the origin of alternative splicing in animals

  4. Leucine and protein metabolism in obese zucker rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are circulating nutrient signals for protein accretion, however they increase in obesity and appear to prognosticate diabetes onset. To understand the mechanisms whereby obesity affects BCAAs and protein metabolism, we employed metabolomics and measured rates of [1...

  5. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, Satish C; Bier, Dennis M

    2008-01-01

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, thermogenesis, and a significant change in the mobilization and use of oxidative substrates. The development of safe, stable isotopic tracer methods has allowed the study of protein and amino acid metabolism not only in the healthy newborn but also in those born prematurely and of low birth weight. These studies have identified the unique and quantitative aspects of amino acid/protein metabolism in the neonate, thus contributing to rational nutritional care of these babies. The present review summarizes the contemporary data on some of the significant developments in essential and dispensable amino acids and their relationship to overall protein metabolism. Specifically, the recent data of kinetics of leucine, phenylalanine, glutamine, sulfur amino acid, and threonine and their relation to whole-body protein turnover are presented. Finally, the physiological rationale and the impact of nutrient (amino acids) interventions on the dynamics of protein metabolism are discussed.

  6. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  7. Assembly and solution structure of the core retromer protein complex.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Suzanne J; Shaw, Daniel J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Owen, David J; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Retromer is a peripheral membrane protein complex that has pleiotropic roles in endosomal membrane trafficking. The core of retromer possesses three subunits, VPS35, VPS29 and VPS26, that play different roles in binding to cargo, regulatory proteins and complex stabilization. We have performed an investigation of the thermodynamics of core retromer assembly using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrating that VPS35 acts as the central subunit to which VPS29 and VPS26 bind independently. Furthermore, we confirm that the conserved PRLYL motif of the large VPS35 subunit is critical for direct VPS26 interaction. Heat capacity measurements of VPS29 and VPS26 binding to VPS35 indicate extensive binding interfaces and suggest conformational alterations in VPS29 or VPS35 upon complex formation. Solution studies of the retromer core using small-angle X-ray scattering allow us to propose a model whereby VPS35 forms an extended platform with VPS29 and VPS26 bound at distal ends, with the potential for forming dimeric assemblies. PMID:20875039

  8. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions.

  9. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions. PMID:27023370

  10. Adjustments of Protein Metabolism in Fasting Arctic Charr, Salvelinus alpinus

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Alicia A.; Saulnier, Roxanne J.; Lamarre, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Protein metabolism, including the interrelated processes of synthesis and degradation, mediates the growth of an animal. In ectothermic animals, protein metabolism is responsive to changes in both biotic and abiotic conditions. This study aimed to characterise responses of protein metabolism to food deprivation that occur in the coldwater salmonid, Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus. We compared two groups of Arctic charr: one fed continuously and the other deprived of food for 36 days. We measured the fractional rate of protein synthesis (KS) in individuals from the fed and fasted groups using a flooding dose technique modified for the use of deuterium-labelled phenylalanine. The enzyme activities of the three major protein degradation pathways (ubiquitin proteasome, lysosomal cathepsins and the calpain systems) were measured in the same fish. This study is the first to measure both KS and the enzymatic activity of protein degradation in the same fish, allowing us to examine the apparent contribution of different protein degradation pathways to protein turnover in various tissues (red and white muscle, liver, heart and gills). KS was lower in the white muscle and in liver of the fasted fish compared to the fed fish. There were no observable effects of food deprivation on the protease activities in any of the tissues with the exception of liver, where the ubiquitin proteasome pathway seemed to be activated during fasting conditions. Lysosomal proteolysis appears to be the primary degradation pathway for muscle protein, while the ubiquitin proteasome pathway seems to predominate in the liver. We speculate that Arctic charr regulate protein metabolism during food deprivation to conserve proteins. PMID:27096948

  11. Co-evolution of metabolism and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Moritz; Klitgord, Niels; Segrè, Daniel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The set of chemicals producible and usable by metabolic pathways must have evolved in parallel with the enzymes that catalyze them. One implication of this common historical path should be a correspondence between the innovation steps that gradually added new metabolic reactions to the biosphere-level biochemical toolkit, and the gradual sequence changes that must have slowly shaped the corresponding enzyme structures. However, global signatures of a long-term co-evolution have not been identified. Here we search for such signatures by computing correlations between inter-reaction distances on a metabolic network, and sequence distances of the corresponding enzyme proteins. We perform our calculations using the set of all known metabolic reactions, available from the KEGG database. Reaction-reaction distance on the metabolic network is computed as the length of the shortest path on a projection of the metabolic network, in which nodes are reactions and edges indicate whether two reactions share a common metabolite, after removal of cofactors. Estimating the distance between enzyme sequences in a meaningful way requires some special care: for each enzyme commission (EC) number, we select from KEGG a consensus set of protein sequences using the cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG) database. We define the evolutionary distance between protein sequences as an asymmetric transition probability between two enzymes, derived from the corresponding pair-wise BLAST scores. By comparing the distances between sequences to the minimal distances on the metabolic reaction graph, we find a small but statistically significant correlation between the two measures. This suggests that the evolutionary walk in enzyme sequence space has locally mirrored, to some extent, the gradual expansion of metabolism. PMID:20238426

  12. MicroRNA-185-5p mediates regulation of SREBP2 expression by hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wang, Qi; Liu, Shun-Ai; Zhang, Jin-Qian; Ju, Wei; Quan, Min; Feng, Sheng-Hu; Dong, Jin-Ling; Gao, Ping; Cheng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanism for regulation of cholesterol metabolism by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein in HepG2 cells. METHODS: HCV genotype 1b core protein was cloned and expressed in HepG2 cells. The cholesterol content was determined after transfection. The expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis (HMGCR) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting after transfection. The effects of core protein on the SREBP2 promoter and 3’-untranslated region were analyzed by luciferase assay. We used different target predictive algorithms, microRNA (miRNA) mimics/inhibitors, and site-directed mutation to identify a putative target of a particular miRNA. RESULTS: HCV core protein expression in HepG2 cells increased the total intracellular cholesterol level (4.05 ± 0.17 vs 6.47 ± 0.68, P = 0.001), and this increase corresponded to an increase in SREBP2 and HMGCR mRNA levels (P = 0.009 and 0.037, respectively) and protein expression. The molecular mechanism study revealed that the HCV core protein increased the expression of SREBP2 by enhancing its promoter activity (P = 0.004). In addition, miR-185-5p expression was tightly regulated by the HCV core protein (P = 0.041). Moreover, overexpression of miR-185-5p repressed the SREBP2 mRNA level (P = 0.022) and protein expression. In contrast, inhibition of miR-185-5p caused upregulation of SREBP2 protein expression. miR-185-5p was involved in the regulation of SREBP2 expression by HCV core protein. CONCLUSION: HCV core protein disturbs the cholesterol homeostasis in HepG2 cells via the SREBP2 pathway; miR-185-5p is involved in the regulation of SREBP2 by the core protein. PMID:25914460

  13. ProCoCoA: A quantitative approach for analyzing protein core composition.

    PubMed

    Bottini, Silvia; Bernini, Andrea; De Chiara, Matteo; Garlaschelli, Diego; Spiga, Ottavia; Dioguardi, Marco; Vannuccini, Elisa; Tramontano, Anna; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-04-01

    Defining the amino acid composition of protein cores is fundamental for understanding protein folding, as different architectures might achieve structural stability only in the presence of specific amino acid networks. Quantitative characterization of protein cores in relation to the corresponding structures and dynamics is needed to increase the reliability of protein engineering procedures. Unambiguous criteria based on atom depth considerations were established to assign amino acid residues to protein cores and, hence, for classifying inner and outer molecular moieties. These criteria were summarized in a new tool named ProCoCoA, Protein Core Composition Analyzer. An user-friendly web interface was developed, available at the URL: http://www.sbl.unisi.it/prococoa. An accurate estimate of protein core composition for six protein architectures selected from the CATH database of solved structures has been carried out, and the obtained results indicate the presence of specific patterns of amino acid core composition in different protein folds.

  14. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein).

  15. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein). PMID:22328905

  16. Cancerogenic effect of different fragments of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Heqiu; Liu, Hezhong; Song, Xiaoguo; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Ling, Shigan

    2007-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus core protein plays an extremely important role in the hepatocarcinogenesis of hepatitis C virus. Little, however, is known about the oncogenic potency of fragments. Thus, the purpose of the present study is to investigate the cancerogenic effects of the different core protein fragments. Two series of recombinant plasmids containing hepatitis C virus core gene fragments encoding the different-length core protein were constructed using plasmid enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP)-C1 and pcDNA3.1(+), respectively. Human hepatocyte L02 cells transiently transfected with pEGFP-C1-based plasmids were subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis to determine the localization of the different core protein fragments. The stably transfected L02 cells with the pcDNA3.1(+)-based core protein plasmids were used to investigate the ultrastructural effects of the core protein and the tumorigenicity of L02 cells expressing core protein fragments in athymic nude mice. The full-length core protein and Core130-191 were completely localized in the cytoplasm, while Core1-59 existed exclusively in the nucleus. On the other hand, Core50-140 and Core1-140 were observed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Ultrastructural changes of L02 cells expressing the full-length core protein were comprehensive and included, for example, irregular nuclear, increased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and mitochondria swelling. The slight changes were observed in the cells expressing Core50-140 and Core130-191, whereas the ultrastructure of the cells expressing Core1-59 remained normal. All the L02 cells stably expressing different fragments of the core protein, with the exception of the C-terminal truncated fragment Core1-59, could induce the occurrence of tumor in the nude mice. The N-terminal fragment of the core protein, Core1-59, was not oncogenic, while the intermediate and posterior segments of the hepatitis C virus core protein had the cancerogenic potency. In

  17. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  18. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  19. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by spatial cotranscription of core starch metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huang-Lung; Lue, Wei-Ling; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Shue-Mei; Chen, Jychian

    2009-11-01

    Starch synthesis and degradation require the participation of many enzymes, occur in both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues, and are subject to environmental and developmental regulation. We examine the distribution of starch in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the expression of genes encoding core enzymes for starch synthesis. Starch is accumulated in plastids of epidermal, mesophyll, vascular, and root cap cells but not in root proper cells. We also identify cells that can synthesize starch heterotrophically in albino mutants. Starch synthesis in leaves is regulated by developmental stage and light. Expression of gene promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusion constructs in transgenic seedlings shows that starch synthesis genes are transcriptionally active in cells with starch synthesis and are inactive in root proper cells except the plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase. In addition, ADG2 (for ADPG PYROPHOSPHORYLASE2) is not required for starch synthesis in root cap cells. Expression profile analysis reveals that starch metabolism genes can be clustered into two sets based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Starch distribution and expression pattern of core starch synthesis genes are common in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting that the regulatory mechanism for starch metabolism genes may be conserved evolutionarily. We conclude that starch synthesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by spatial coexpression of core starch metabolism genes regulated by their promoter activities and is fine-tuned by cell-specific endogenous and environmental controls.

  20. Core protein: a pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals -- while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story.” PMID:26129969

  1. Core protein: A pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates almost every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals - while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story." PMID:26129969

  2. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  3. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to improve recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Feng, Xinjun; Ding, Yamei; Zhao, Guang; Liu, Huizhou; Xian, Mo

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used strains for recombinant protein production. However, obstacles also exist in both academic researches and industrial applications, such as the metabolic burden, the carbon source waste, and the cells' physiological deterioration. This article reviews recent approaches for improving recombinant protein production in metabolic engineering, including workhorse selection, stress factor application, and carbon flux regulation. Selecting a suitable host is the first key point for recombinant protein production. In general, it all depends on characteristics of the strains and the target proteins. It will be triggered cells physiological deterioration when the medium is significantly different from the cell's natural environment. Coexpression of stress factors can help proteins to fold into their native conformation. Carbon flux regulation is a direct approach for redirecting more carbon flux toward the desirable pathways and products. However, some undesirable consequences are usually found in metabolic engineering, such as glucose transport inhibition, cell growth retardation, and useless metabolite accumulation. More efficient regulators and platform cell factories should be explored to meet a variety of production demands.

  4. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wen-Ta; Li, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through β-catenin signaling pathway.

  5. Trafficking of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein during Virus Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Lindenbach, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD), a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly. PMID:22028650

  6. The Expanded FindCore Method for Identification of a Core Atom Set for Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, David A.; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (D.A. Snyder and G.T. Montelione PROTEINS 2005;59:673–686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set, and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an “Expanded FindCore” atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines “expanded core atom sets” that match an expert’s intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well-defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores. PMID:24327305

  7. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3′ end by 3′-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3′-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3′ end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation. PMID:27366906

  9. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  10. Protein and leucine metabolism in maple syrup urine disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Bresson, J.L.; Pacy, P.J.; Bonnefont, J.P.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Saudubray, J.M.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-04-01

    Constant infusions of (13C)leucine and (2H5)phenylalanine were used to trace leucine and protein kinetics, respectively, in seven children with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and eleven controls matched for age and dietary protein intake. Despite significant elevations of plasma leucine (mean 351 mumol/l, range 224-477) in MSUD subjects, mean whole body protein synthesis (3.78 +/- 0.42 (SD) g.kg-1. 24 h-1) and catabolism (4.07 +/- 0.46) were similar to control values (3.69 +/- 0.50 and 4.09 +/- 0.50, respectively). The relationship between phenylalanine and leucine fluxes was also similar in MSUD subjects (mean phenylalanine-leucine flux ratio 0.35 +/- 0.07) and previously reported adult controls (0.33 +/- 0.02). Leucine oxidation was undetectable in four of the MSUD subjects and very low in the other three (less than 4 mumol.kg-1.h-1; controls 13-20). These results show that persistent elevation in leucine concentration has no effect on protein synthesis. The marked disturbance in leucine metabolism in MSUD did not alter the relationship between rates of catabolism of protein to phenylalanine and leucine, which provides further support for the validity of the use of a single amino acid to trace whole body protein metabolism. The minimal leucine oxidation in MSUD differs from findings in other inborn metabolic errors and indicates that in patients with classical MSUD there is no significant route of leucine disposal other than through protein synthesis.

  11. Alterations in protein metabolism during space flight and inactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, Arny A.; Paddon-Jones, Doug; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight and the accompanying diminished muscular activity lead to a loss of body nitrogen and muscle function. These losses may affect crew capabilities and health in long-duration missions. Space flight alters protein metabolism such that the body is unable to maintain protein synthetic rates. A concomitant hypocaloric intake and altered anabolic/catabolic hormonal profiles may contribute to or exacerbate this problem. The inactivity associated with bedrest also reduces muscle and whole-body protein synthesis. For this reason, bedrest provides a good model for the investigation of potential exercise and nutritional countermeasures to restore muscle protein synthesis. We have demonstrated that minimal resistance exercise preserves muscle protein synthesis throughout bedrest. In addition, ongoing work indicates that an essential amino acid and carbohydrate supplement may ameliorate the loss of lean body mass and muscle strength associated with 28 d of bedrest. The investigation of inactivity-induced alterations in protein metabolism, during space flight or prolonged bedrest, is applicable to clinical populations and, in a more general sense, to the problems associated with the decreased activity that occur with aging.

  12. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  13. The Involvement of Transport Proteins in Transcriptional and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Västermark, Åke; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Transport proteins have sometimes gained secondary regulatory functions that influence gene expression and metabolism. These functions allow communication with the external world via mechanistically distinctive signal transduction pathways. In this brief review we focus on three transport systems in Escherichia coli that control and coordinate carbon, exogenous hexose-phosphate and phosphorous metabolism. The transport proteins that play central roles in these processes are (1) the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphotransferase system, PTS, (2) the glucose-6-phosphate receptor, UhpC, and (3) the phosphate-specific transporter, PstSABC, respectively. While the PTS participates in multiple complex regulatory processes, three of which are discussed here, UhpC and the Pst transporters exemplify differing strategies. PMID:24513656

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  15. Hepatitis C virus core protein interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of lymphotoxin-beta receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, M; Hsieh, T Y; Zhu, N; VanArsdale, T; Hwang, S B; Jeng, K S; Gorbalenya, A E; Lo, S Y; Ou, J H; Ware, C F; Lai, M M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is a multifunctional protein. We examined whether it can interact with cellular proteins, thus contributing to viral pathogenesis. Using the HCV core protein as a bait to screen a human liver cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid screening system, we have isolated several positive clones encoding cellular proteins that interact with the HCV core protein. Interestingly, more than half of these clones encode the cytoplasmic domain of lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LT betaR), which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. Their binding was confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase fusion protein binding assay and protein-protein blotting assay to be direct and specific. The binding sites were mapped within a 58-amino-acid region of the cytoplasmic tail of LT betaR. The binding site in the HCV core protein was localized within amino acid residues 36 to 91 from the N terminus, corresponding to the hydrophilic region of the protein. In mammalian cells, the core protein was found to be associated with the membrane-bound LT betaR. Since the LT betaR is involved in germinal center formation and developmental regulation of peripheral lymphoid organs, lymph node development, and apoptotic signaling, the binding of HCV core protein to LT betaR suggests the possibility that this viral protein has an immunomodulating function and may explain the mechanism of viral persistence and pathogenesis of HCV. PMID:8995654

  16. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  17. Metabolic impact assessment for heterologous protein production in Streptomyces lividans based on genome-scale metabolic network modeling.

    PubMed

    Lule, Ivan; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef; Bernaerts, Kristel; Van Impe, Jan

    2013-11-01

    The metabolic impact exerted on a microorganism due to heterologous protein production is still poorly understood in Streptomyces lividans. In this present paper, based on exometabolomic data, a proposed genome-scale metabolic network model is used to assess this metabolic impact in S. lividans. Constraint-based modeling results obtained in this work revealed that the metabolic impact due to heterologous protein production is widely distributed in the genome of S. lividans, causing both slow substrate assimilation and a shift in active pathways. Exchange fluxes that are critical for model performance have been identified for metabolites of mouse tumor necrosis factor, histidine, valine and lysine, as well as biomass. Our results unravel the interaction of heterologous protein production with intracellular metabolism of S. lividans, thus, a possible basis for further studies in relieving the metabolic burden via metabolic or bioprocess engineering.

  18. Ethanol impairs post-prandial hepatic protein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, P; Volpi, E; Lucidi, P; Cruciani, G; Monacchia, F; Reboldi, G; Santeusanio, F; Bolli, G B; Brunetti, P

    1995-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol ingestion on whole body and hepatic protein metabolism in humans are not known. To simulate social drinking, we compared the effects of the association of a mixed meal (632 kcal, 17% amino acids, 50% glucose, 33% lipids) with a bottle of either table wine (ethanol content 71 g) or water on the estimates ([1-14C]-leucine infusion) of whole body protein breakdown, oxidation, and synthesis, and on the intravascular fractional secretory rates (FSR) of hepatically (albumin, fibrinogen) and extrahepatically (IgG) synthesized plasma proteins in two randomized groups (ethanol n = 7, water n = 7) of healthy nonalcoholic volunteers. Each study was carried out for 8 h. Protein kinetics were measured in the overnight post-absorptive state, over the first 4 h, and during a meal infusion (via a nasogastric feeding tube at constant rate) combined with the oral ingestion of wine or water, over the last 4 h. When compared with water, wine ingestion during the meal reduced (P < 0.03) by 24% the rate of leucine oxidation, did not modify the estimates of whole body protein breakdown and synthesis, reduced (P < 0.01) by approximately 30% the FSR of albumin and fibrinogen, but did not affect IgG FSR. In conclusion, 70 g of ethanol, an amount usual among social drinkers, impairs hepatic protein metabolism. The habitual consumption of such amounts by reducing the synthesis and/or secretion of hepatic proteins might lead to the progressive development of liver injury and to hypoalbuminemia also in the absence of protein malnutrition. PMID:7706451

  19. Dysregulation of skeletal muscle protein metabolism by alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse, either by acute intoxication or prolonged excessive consumption, leads to pathological changes in many organs and tissues including skeletal muscle. As muscle protein serves not only a contractile function but also as a metabolic reserve for amino acids, which are used to support the energy needs of other tissues, its content is tightly regulated and dynamic. This review focuses on the etiology by which alcohol perturbs skeletal muscle protein balance and thereby over time produces muscle wasting and weakness. The preponderance of data suggest that alcohol primarily impairs global protein synthesis, under basal conditions as well as in response to several anabolic stimuli including growth factors, nutrients, and muscle contraction. This inhibitory effect of alcohol is mediated, at least in part, by a reduction in mTOR kinase activity via a mechanism that remains poorly defined but likely involves altered protein-protein interactions within mTOR complex 1. Furthermore, alcohol can exacerbate the decrement in mTOR and/or muscle protein synthesis present in other catabolic states. In contrast, alcohol-induced changes in muscle protein degradation, either global or via specific modulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome or autophagy pathways, are relatively inconsistent and may be model dependent. Herein, changes produced by acute intoxication versus chronic ingestion are contrasted in relation to skeletal muscle metabolism, and limitations as well as opportunities for future research are discussed. As the proportion of more economically developed countries ages and chronic illness becomes more prevalent, a better understanding of the etiology of biomedical consequences of alcohol use disorders is warranted. PMID:25759394

  20. Protein S-glutathionlyation links energy metabolism to redox signaling in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Treberg, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    At its core mitochondrial function relies on redox reactions. Electrons stripped from nutrients are used to form NADH and NADPH, electron carriers that are similar in structure but support different functions. NADH supports ATP production but also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide (O2·-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). NADH-driven ROS production is counterbalanced by NADPH which maintains antioxidants in an active state. Mitochondria rely on a redox buffering network composed of reduced glutathione (GSH) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) to quench ROS generated by nutrient metabolism. As H2O2 is quenched, NADPH is expended to reactivate antioxidant networks and reset the redox environment. Thus, the mitochondrial redox environment is in a constant state of flux reflecting changes in nutrient and ROS metabolism. Changes in redox environment can modulate protein function through oxidation of protein cysteine thiols. Typically cysteine oxidation is considered to be mediated by H2O2 which oxidizes protein thiols (SH) forming sulfenic acid (SOH). However, problems begin to emerge when one critically evaluates the regulatory function of SOH. Indeed SOH formation is slow, non-specific, and once formed SOH reacts rapidly with a variety of molecules. By contrast, protein S-glutathionylation (PGlu) reactions involve the conjugation and removal of glutathione moieties from modifiable cysteine residues. PGlu reactions are driven by fluctuations in the availability of GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thus should be exquisitely sensitive to changes ROS flux due to shifts in the glutathione pool in response to varying H2O2 availability. Here, we propose that energy metabolism-linked redox signals originating from mitochondria are mediated indirectly by H2O2 through the GSH redox buffering network in and outside mitochondria. This proposal is based on several observations that have shown that unlike other redox modifications PGlu reactions fulfill the requisite

  1. Protein S-glutathionlyation links energy metabolism to redox signaling in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-08-01

    At its core mitochondrial function relies on redox reactions. Electrons stripped from nutrients are used to form NADH and NADPH, electron carriers that are similar in structure but support different functions. NADH supports ATP production but also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide (O2(·-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). NADH-driven ROS production is counterbalanced by NADPH which maintains antioxidants in an active state. Mitochondria rely on a redox buffering network composed of reduced glutathione (GSH) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) to quench ROS generated by nutrient metabolism. As H2O2 is quenched, NADPH is expended to reactivate antioxidant networks and reset the redox environment. Thus, the mitochondrial redox environment is in a constant state of flux reflecting changes in nutrient and ROS metabolism. Changes in redox environment can modulate protein function through oxidation of protein cysteine thiols. Typically cysteine oxidation is considered to be mediated by H2O2 which oxidizes protein thiols (SH) forming sulfenic acid (SOH). However, problems begin to emerge when one critically evaluates the regulatory function of SOH. Indeed SOH formation is slow, non-specific, and once formed SOH reacts rapidly with a variety of molecules. By contrast, protein S-glutathionylation (PGlu) reactions involve the conjugation and removal of glutathione moieties from modifiable cysteine residues. PGlu reactions are driven by fluctuations in the availability of GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thus should be exquisitely sensitive to changes ROS flux due to shifts in the glutathione pool in response to varying H2O2 availability. Here, we propose that energy metabolism-linked redox signals originating from mitochondria are mediated indirectly by H2O2 through the GSH redox buffering network in and outside mitochondria. This proposal is based on several observations that have shown that unlike other redox modifications PGlu reactions fulfill the requisite

  2. The Healthy Core Metabolism: A New Paradigm for Primary Preventive Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fardet, A; Rock, E

    2016-03-01

    Research in preventive nutrition aims at elucidating mechanism by which our diet helps us to remain in good health through optimal physiological functions. However, despite decades of accumulated data in human nutrition and regular subsequent nutritional recommendations, obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemics continue to progress worldwide each year leading to a regular decrease of the Healthy Life Years, notably in Western countries. Such a paradox may be explained by the Nutrition Transition, the extreme application of the reductionist paradigm in nutrition research, the lack of nutritional education and a too strong focus on curative nutrition in at risk/ill subjects. In this position paper, we hypothesized that researchers should focus more on healthy subjects, from birth until maturity. Rather than exploring what differentiates healthy and at risk/ill subjects, we propose to thoroughly study what characterizes a healthy state and its underlying metabolism. We define it as the Healthy Core Metabolism which remains stable whatever energy inputs (diets) and outputs (exercise), genetic background and external/internal stress, e.g., temporary illnesses. As a basis for Healthy Core Metabolism investigation, we observed that main physiological and ubiquitous functions of human organism, i.e., the neuro-vasculo-sarco-osteoporotic system, tend to follow a concave curve with common phases of growth, optimum, and decline. Finally, we hypothesized that true primary preventive nutrition should focus on the growth phase to reach the maximum capital of a given physiological function so that - whatever the further decline -, Healthy Life Years may approach or coincide with theoretical Life Expectancy.

  3. RNA chaperoning and intrinsic disorder in the core proteins of Flaviviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Gabus, Caroline; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    RNA chaperone proteins are essential partners of RNA in living organisms and viruses. They are thought to assist in the correct folding and structural rearrangements of RNA molecules by resolving misfolded RNA species in an ATP-independent manner. RNA chaperoning is probably an entropy-driven process, mediated by the coupled binding and folding of intrinsically disordered protein regions and the kinetically trapped RNA. Previously, we have shown that the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent RNA chaperone that can drive profound structural modifications of HCV RNA in vitro. We now examined the RNA chaperone activity and the disordered nature of core proteins from different Flaviviridae genera, namely that of HCV, GBV-B (GB virus B), WNV (West Nile virus) and BVDV (bovine viral diarrhoea virus). Despite low-sequence similarities, all four proteins demonstrated general nucleic acid annealing and RNA chaperone activities. Furthermore, heat resistance of core proteins, as well as far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that a well-defined 3D protein structure is not necessary for core-induced RNA structural rearrangements. These data provide evidence that RNA chaperoning—possibly mediated by intrinsically disordered protein segments—is conserved in Flaviviridae core proteins. Thus, besides nucleocapsid formation, core proteins may function in RNA structural rearrangements taking place during virus replication. PMID:18033802

  4. Leucine and Protein Metabolism in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    She, Pengxiang; Olson, Kristine C.; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Inukai, Ayami; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Hoppel, Charles L.; Adams, Sean H.; Kawamata, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Hideki; Sakai, Ryosei; Lang, Charles H.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are circulating nutrient signals for protein accretion, however, they increase in obesity and elevations appear to be prognostic of diabetes. To understand the mechanisms whereby obesity affects BCAAs and protein metabolism, we employed metabolomics and measured rates of [1-14C]-leucine metabolism, tissue-specific protein synthesis and branched-chain keto-acid (BCKA) dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) activities. Male obese Zucker rats (11-weeks old) had increased body weight (BW, 53%), liver (107%) and fat (∼300%), but lower plantaris and gastrocnemius masses (−21–24%). Plasma BCAAs and BCKAs were elevated 45–69% and ∼100%, respectively, in obese rats. Processes facilitating these rises appeared to include increased dietary intake (23%), leucine (Leu) turnover and proteolysis [35% per g fat free mass (FFM), urinary markers of proteolysis: 3-methylhistidine (183%) and 4-hydroxyproline (766%)] and decreased BCKDC per g kidney, heart, gastrocnemius and liver (−47–66%). A process disposing of circulating BCAAs, protein synthesis, was increased 23–29% by obesity in whole-body (FFM corrected), gastrocnemius and liver. Despite the observed decreases in BCKDC activities per gm tissue, rates of whole-body Leu oxidation in obese rats were 22% and 59% higher normalized to BW and FFM, respectively. Consistently, urinary concentrations of eight BCAA catabolism-derived acylcarnitines were also elevated. The unexpected increase in BCAA oxidation may be due to a substrate effect in liver. Supporting this idea, BCKAs were elevated more in liver (193–418%) than plasma or muscle, and per g losses of hepatic BCKDC activities were completely offset by increased liver mass, in contrast to other tissues. In summary, our results indicate that plasma BCKAs may represent a more sensitive metabolic signature for obesity than BCAAs. Processes supporting elevated BCAA]BCKAs in the obese Zucker rat include increased dietary intake, Leu and

  5. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  6. Apolipoprotein A-IV: a protein intimately involved in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Kohan, Alison B.; Lo, Chun-Min; Liu, Min; Howles, Philip; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the physiological roles of apoA-IV in metabolism, and to underscore the potential for apoA-IV to be a focus for new therapies aimed at the treatment of diabetes and obesity-related disorders. ApoA-IV is primarily synthesized by the small intestine, attached to chylomicrons by enterocytes, and secreted into intestinal lymph during fat absorption. In circulation, apoA-IV is associated with HDL and chylomicron remnants, but a large portion is lipoprotein free. Due to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and because it can mediate reverse-cholesterol transport, proposed functions of circulating apoA-IV have been related to protection from cardiovascular disease. This review, however, focuses primarily on several properties of apoA-IV that impact other metabolic functions related to food intake, obesity, and diabetes. In addition to participating in triglyceride absorption, apoA-IV can act as an acute satiation factor through both peripheral and central routes of action. It also modulates glucose homeostasis through incretin-like effects on insulin secretion, and by moderating hepatic glucose production. While apoA-IV receptors remain to be conclusively identified, the latter modes of action suggest that this protein holds therapeutic promise for treating metabolic disease. PMID:25640749

  7. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  8. Changes in contralateral protein metabolism following unilateral sciatic nerve section

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.A.; Cubas, S.C.

    1990-03-01

    Changes in nerve biochemistry, anatomy, and function following injuries to the contralateral nerve have been repeatedly reported, though their significance is unknown. The most likely mechanisms for their development are either substances carried by axoplasmic flow or electrically transmitted signals. This study analyzes which mechanism underlies the development of a contralateral change in protein metabolism. The incorporation of labelled amino acids (AA) into proteins of both sciatic nerves was assessed by liquid scintillation after an unilateral section. AA were offered locally for 30 min to the distal stump of the sectioned nerves and at homologous levels of the intact contralateral nerves. At various times, from 1 to 24 h, both sciatic nerves were removed and the proteins extracted with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). An increase in incorporation was found in both nerves 14-24 h after section. No difference existed between sectioned and intact nerves, which is consistent with the contralateral effect. Lidocaine, but not colchicine, when applied previously to the nerves midway between the sectioning site and the spinal cord, inhibited the contralateral increase in AA incorporation. It is concluded that electrical signals, crossing through the spinal cord, are responsible for the development of the contralateral effect. Both the nature of the proteins and the significance of the contralateral effect are matters for speculation.

  9. Acute responses of muscle protein metabolism to reduced blood flow reflect metabolic priorities for homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Irtun, Oivind; Chinkes, David L; Wolfe, Robert R

    2008-03-01

    The present experiment was designed to measure the synthetic and breakdown rates of muscle protein in the hindlimb of rabbits with or without clamping the femoral artery. l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was infused as a tracer for measurement of muscle protein kinetics by means of an arteriovenous model, tracer incorporation, and tracee release methods. The ultrasonic flowmeter, dye dilution, and microsphere methods were used to determine the flow rates in the femoral artery, in the leg, and in muscle capillary, respectively. The femoral artery flow accounted for 65% of leg flow. A 50% reduction in the femoral artery flow reduced leg flow by 28% and nutritive flow by 26%, which did not change protein synthetic or breakdown rate in leg muscle. Full clamp of the femoral artery reduced leg flow by 42% and nutritive flow by 59%, which decreased (P < 0.05) both the fractional synthetic rate from 0.19 +/- 0.05 to 0.14 +/- 0.03%/day and fractional breakdown rate from 0.28 +/- 0.07 to 0.23 +/- 0.09%/day of muscle protein. Neither the partial nor full clamp reduced (P = 0.27-0.39) the intracellular phenylalanine concentration or net protein balance in leg muscle. We conclude that the flow threshold to cause a fall of protein turnover rate in leg muscle was a reduction of 30-40% of the leg flow. The acute responses of muscle protein kinetics to the reductions in blood flow reflected the metabolic priorities to maintain muscle homeostasis. These findings cannot be extrapolated to more chronic conditions without experimental validation. PMID:18089763

  10. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  11. Non-Genomic Origins of Proteins and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    It is proposed that evolution of inanimate matter to cells endowed with a nucleic acid- based coding of genetic information was preceded by an evolutionary phase, in which peptides not coded by nucleic acids were able to self-organize into networks capable of evolution towards increasing metabolic complexity. Recent findings that truly different, simple peptides (Keefe and Szostak, 2001) can perform the same function (such as ATP binding) provide experimental support for this mechanism of early protobiological evolution. The central concept underlying this mechanism is that the reproduction of cellular functions alone was sufficient for self-maintenance of protocells, and that self- replication of macromolecules was not required at this stage of evolution. The precise transfer of information between successive generations of the earliest protocells was unnecessary and, possibly, undesirable. The key requirement in the initial stage of protocellular evolution was an ability to rapidly explore a large number of protein sequences in order to discover a set of molecules capable of supporting self- maintenance and growth of protocells. Undoubtedly, the essential protocellular functions were carried out by molecules not nearly as efficient or as specific as contemporary proteins. Many, potentially unrelated sequences could have performed each of these functions at an evolutionarily acceptable level. As evolution progressed, however proteins must have performed their functions with increasing efficiency and specificity. This, in turn, put additional constraints on protein sequences and the fraction of proteins capable of performing their functions at the required level decreased. At some point, the likelihood of generating a sufficiently efficient set of proteins through a non-coded synthesis was so small that further evolution was not possible without storing information about the sequences of these proteins. Beyond this point, further evolution required coupling between

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  13. Brain metabolic dysfunction at the core of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Tong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the concept that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is fundamentally a metabolic disease with molecular and biochemical features that correspond with diabetes mellitus and other peripheral insulin resistance disorders. Brain insulin/IGF resistance and its consequences can readily account for most of the structural and functional abnormalities in AD. However, disease pathogenesis is complicated by the fact that AD can occur as a separate disease process, or arise in association with systemic insulin resistance diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Whether primary or secondary in origin, brain insulin/IGF resistance initiates a cascade of neurodegeneration that is propagated by metabolic dysfunction, increased oxidative and ER stress, neuro-inflammation, impaired cell survival, and dysregulated lipid metabolism. These injurious processes compromise neuronal and glial functions, reduce neurotransmitter homeostasis, and cause toxic oligomeric pTau and (amyloid beta peptide of amyloid beta precursor protein) AβPP-Aβ fibrils and insoluble aggregates (neurofibrillary tangles and plaques) to accumulate in brain. AD progresses due to: (1) activation of a harmful positive feedback loop that progressively worsens the effects of insulin resistance; and (2) the formation of ROS- and RNS-related lipid, protein, and DNA adducts that permanently damage basic cellular and molecular functions. Epidemiologic data suggest that insulin resistance diseases, including AD, are exposure-related in etiology. Furthermore, experimental and lifestyle trend data suggest chronic low-level nitrosamine exposures are responsible. These concepts offer opportunities to discover and implement new treatments and devise preventive measures to conquer the AD and other insulin resistance disease epidemics. PMID:24380887

  14. Sequential processing of hepatitis C virus core protein by host cell signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Pène, V; Hernandez, C; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Garaud-Aunis, J; Rosenberg, A R

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is believed to play critical roles in the virus morphogenesis and pathogenesis. In HCV polyprotein, core protein terminates with a signal peptide followed by E1 envelope protein. It has remained unclear whether cleavage by host cell signal peptidase (SP) at the core-E1 junction to generate the complete form of core protein, which is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is absolutely required for cleavage within the signal peptide by host cell signal peptide peptidase (SPP) to liberate the mature form of core protein, which is then free for trafficking to lipid droplets. In this study, the possible sources of disagreement in published reports have been examined, and we conclude that a product generated upon inhibition of SP-catalysed cleavage at the core-E1 junction in heterologous expression systems was incorrectly identified as mature core protein. Moreover, inhibition of this cleavage in the most relevant model of human hepatoma cells replicating a full-length HCV genome was shown to abolish interaction of core protein with lipid droplets and production of infectious progeny virus. These results firmly establish that SPP-catalysed liberation of mature core protein is absolutely dependent on prior cleavage by SP at the correct core-E1 site to generate the complete form of core protein, consistent with this obligatory order of processing playing a role in HCV infectious cycle. PMID:19281487

  15. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  16. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  17. Advantages to the use of rodent hepadnavirus core proteins as vaccine platforms.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Jean-Noel; Peterson, Darrell; Lee, Byung O; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Chen, Antony; Sallberg, Matti; Garduño, Fermin; Goldstein, Phillip; Hughes, Janice; Jones, Joyce; Milich, David

    2007-02-19

    The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) has been proposed as a useful particulate carrier platform for poorly immunogenic peptidic and carbohydrate B cell epitopes. However, biochemical and immunologic impediments have plagued this technology. Specifically, the "assembly" problem characterized by the low yield of unstable hybrid particles resulting from the insertion of foreign sequences and the "pre-existing immunity" problem due to the fact that the HBcAg is derived from a human pathogen have limited the development of this carrier technology. As a means of addressing the "pre-existing immunity" problem we have used the core proteins from the rodent hepdnaviruses. A number of advantages to the use of the rodent hepadnaviral core proteins as opposed to the HBcAg for vaccine design were defined including: equal or superior immunogenicity at the T and B cell levels; the use of the rodent core proteins does not compromise the anti-HBc diagnostic assay; the efficacy of the rodent core proteins as vaccine carriers will not be limited by pre-existing anti-HBc antibodies that are present in previously and currently HBV-infected persons; and the HBcAg-specific tolerance present in HBV chronic carriers can be circumvented by the use of the rodent core proteins. PMID:17178179

  18. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  19. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  20. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAA) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to post-prandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  1. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3.

  2. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. PMID:26392314

  3. Purified thick filaments from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: evidence for multiple proteins associated with core structures

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The thick filaments of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, arising predominantly from the body-wall muscles, contain two myosin isoforms and paramyosin as their major proteins. The two myosins are located in distinct regions of the surfaces, while paramyosin is located within the backbones of the filaments. Tubular structures constitute the cores of the polar regions, and electron-dense material is present in the cores of the central regions (Epstein, H.F., D.M. Miller, I. Ortiz, and G.C. Berliner. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100:904-915). Biochemical, genetic, and immunological experiments indicate that the two myosins and paramyosin are not necessary core components (Epstein, H.F., I. Ortiz, and L.A. Traeger Mackinnon. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:985-993). The existence of the core structures suggests, therefore, that additional proteins may be associated with thick filaments in C. elegans. To biochemically detect minor associated proteins, a new procedure for the isolation of thick filaments of high purity and structural preservation has been developed. The final step, glycerol gradient centrifugation, yielded fractions that are contaminated by, at most, 1-2% with actin, tropomyosin, or ribosome-associated proteins on the basis of Coomassie Blue staining and electron microscopy. Silver staining and radioautography of gel electrophoretograms of unlabeled and 35S-labeled proteins, respectively, revealed at least 10 additional bands that cosedimented with thick filaments in glycerol gradients. Core structures prepared from wild-type thick filaments contained at least six of these thick filament-associated protein bands. The six proteins also cosedimented with thick filaments purified by gradient centrifugation from CB190 mutants lacking myosin heavy chain B and from CB1214 mutants lacking paramyosin. For these reasons, we propose that the six associated proteins are potential candidates for putative components of core structures in the thick filaments of body-wall muscles of

  4. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  5. HCV core protein uses multiple mechanisms to induce oxidative stress in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander V; Smirnova, Olga A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Ivanova, Olga N; Karpenko, Inna L; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2015-05-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGF\\(\\upbeta\\)1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37-191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1\\(\\upalpha\\). The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein.

  6. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  7. Structural proteins of ribonucleic acid tumor viruses. Purification of envelope, core, and internal components.

    PubMed

    Strand, M; August, J T

    1976-01-25

    Murine type C virus structural proteins, the envelope glycopeptides, 30,000 dalton major core protein, and 15,000 dalton internal protein have each been purified to near homogeneity and in high yield from the smae batch of virus by use of phosphocellulose column chromatography and gel filtration procedures. Evidence that these proteins are specified by the viral genome was obtained by competition radioimmunoassay analysis, comparing these polypeptides from Rauscher virus cultivated in a variety of mammalian cell lines; all of the reactive antigenic determinants of these proteins appeared to be virus-specific.

  8. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19 mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2 h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50 μU/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (−40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035 mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01 mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  9. Patterns of indirect protein interactions suggest a spatial organization to metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bercoff, Åsa; McLysaght, Aoife; Conant, Gavin C

    2011-11-01

    It has long been believed that cells organize their cytoplasm so as to efficiently channel metabolites between sequential enzymes. This metabolic channeling has the potential to yield higher metabolic fluxes as well as better regulatory control over metabolism. One mechanism for achieving such channeling is to ensure that sequential enzymes in a pathway are physically close to each other in the cell. We present evidence that indirect protein interactions between related enzymes represent a global mechanism for achieving metabolic channeling; the intuition being that protein interactions between enzymes and non-enzymatic mediator proteins are a powerful means of physically associating enzymes in a modular fashion. By analyzing the metabolic and protein-protein interactions networks of Escherichia coli, yeast and humans, we are able to show that all three species have many more indirect protein interactions linking enzymes that share metabolites than would be expected by chance. Moreover, these interactions are distributed non-randomly in the metabolic network. Our analyses in yeast and E. coli show that reactions possessing such interactions also show higher flux than do those lacking them. On the basis of these observations, we suggest that an important role of protein interactions with mediator proteins is to contribute to the spatial organization of the cell. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that these mediator proteins are also enriched with annotations related to signal transduction, a system where scaffolding proteins are known to limit cross-talk by controlling spatial localization.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees

    PubMed Central

    Cattafesta, Monica; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani

    2016-01-01

    Background The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP) is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program’s – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). Results A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68) of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11–0.34). Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001) and stratified by sex (P=0.004) than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001), triglycerides (P=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007), and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. Conclusion us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care. PMID:27274294

  11. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  12. Assessing the Metabolic Diversity of Streptococcus from a Protein Domain Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Schaap, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the diversity and robustness of the metabolism of bacteria is fundamental for understanding how bacteria evolve and adapt to different environments. In this study, we characterised 121 Streptococcus strains and studied metabolic diversity from a protein domain perspective. Metabolic pathways were described in terms of the promiscuity of domains participating in metabolic pathways that were inferred to be functional. Promiscuity was defined by adapting existing measures based on domain abundance and versatility. The approach proved to be successful in capturing bacterial metabolic flexibility and species diversity, indicating that it can be described in terms of reuse and sharing functional domains in different proteins involved in metabolic activity. Additionally, we showed striking differences among metabolic organisation of the pathogenic serotype 2 Streptococcus suis and other strains. PMID:26366735

  13. Redesigning the hydrophobic core of a four-helix-bundle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1994-01-01

    Rationally redesigned variants of the 4-helix-bundle protein Rop are described. The novel proteins have simplified, repacked, hydrophobic cores and yet reproduce the structure and native-like physical properties of the wild-type protein. The repacked proteins have been characterized thermodynamically and their equilibrium and kinetic thermal and chemical unfolding properties are compared with those of wild-type Rop. The equilibrium stability of the repacked proteins to thermal denaturation is enhanced relative to that of the wild-type protein. The rate of chemically induced folding and unfolding of wild-type Rop is extremely slow when compared with other small proteins. Interestingly, although the repacked proteins are more thermally stable than the wild type, their rates of chemically induced folding and unfolding are greatly increased in comparison to wild type. Perhaps as a consequence of this, their equilibrium stabilities to chemical denaturants are slightly reduced in comparison to the wild type. PMID:7535612

  14. Systems biology definition of the core proteome of metabolism and expression is consistent with high-throughput data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Laurence; Tan, Justin; O'Brien, Edward J; Monk, Jonathan M; Kim, Donghyuk; Li, Howard J; Charusanti, Pep; Ebrahim, Ali; Lloyd, Colton J; Yurkovich, James T; Du, Bin; Dräger, Andreas; Thomas, Alex; Sun, Yuekai; Saunders, Michael A; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-08-25

    Finding the minimal set of gene functions needed to sustain life is of both fundamental and practical importance. Minimal gene lists have been proposed by using comparative genomics-based core proteome definitions. A definition of a core proteome that is supported by empirical data, is understood at the systems-level, and provides a basis for computing essential cell functions is lacking. Here, we use a systems biology-based genome-scale model of metabolism and expression to define a functional core proteome consisting of 356 gene products, accounting for 44% of the Escherichia coli proteome by mass based on proteomics data. This systems biology core proteome includes 212 genes not found in previous comparative genomics-based core proteome definitions, accounts for 65% of known essential genes in E. coli, and has 78% gene function overlap with minimal genomes (Buchnera aphidicola and Mycoplasma genitalium). Based on transcriptomics data across environmental and genetic backgrounds, the systems biology core proteome is significantly enriched in nondifferentially expressed genes and depleted in differentially expressed genes. Compared with the noncore, core gene expression levels are also similar across genetic backgrounds (two times higher Spearman rank correlation) and exhibit significantly more complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory features (40% more transcription start sites per gene, 22% longer 5'UTR). Thus, genome-scale systems biology approaches rigorously identify a functional core proteome needed to support growth. This framework, validated by using high-throughput datasets, facilitates a mechanistic understanding of systems-level core proteome function through in silico models; it de facto defines a paleome.

  15. Systems biology definition of the core proteome of metabolism and expression is consistent with high-throughput data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Laurence; Tan, Justin; O'Brien, Edward J; Monk, Jonathan M; Kim, Donghyuk; Li, Howard J; Charusanti, Pep; Ebrahim, Ali; Lloyd, Colton J; Yurkovich, James T; Du, Bin; Dräger, Andreas; Thomas, Alex; Sun, Yuekai; Saunders, Michael A; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-08-25

    Finding the minimal set of gene functions needed to sustain life is of both fundamental and practical importance. Minimal gene lists have been proposed by using comparative genomics-based core proteome definitions. A definition of a core proteome that is supported by empirical data, is understood at the systems-level, and provides a basis for computing essential cell functions is lacking. Here, we use a systems biology-based genome-scale model of metabolism and expression to define a functional core proteome consisting of 356 gene products, accounting for 44% of the Escherichia coli proteome by mass based on proteomics data. This systems biology core proteome includes 212 genes not found in previous comparative genomics-based core proteome definitions, accounts for 65% of known essential genes in E. coli, and has 78% gene function overlap with minimal genomes (Buchnera aphidicola and Mycoplasma genitalium). Based on transcriptomics data across environmental and genetic backgrounds, the systems biology core proteome is significantly enriched in nondifferentially expressed genes and depleted in differentially expressed genes. Compared with the noncore, core gene expression levels are also similar across genetic backgrounds (two times higher Spearman rank correlation) and exhibit significantly more complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory features (40% more transcription start sites per gene, 22% longer 5'UTR). Thus, genome-scale systems biology approaches rigorously identify a functional core proteome needed to support growth. This framework, validated by using high-throughput datasets, facilitates a mechanistic understanding of systems-level core proteome function through in silico models; it de facto defines a paleome. PMID:26261351

  16. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve 'metabolic remodeling' with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation ('moonlighting') and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme-RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future.

  17. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve ‘metabolic remodeling’ with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation (‘moonlighting’) and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme–RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future. PMID:26520658

  18. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein-Protein Interfaces to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2015-08-28

    Missense mutations at protein-protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, "core" and "rim", which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues ("hot spots") is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein-protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p<0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p=0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein-protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  19. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  20. Core-Cone Structured Monodispersed Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Ultra-large Cavity for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Yu, Meihua; Noonan, Owen; Zhang, Jun; Song, Hao; Zhang, Hongwei; Lei, Chang; Niu, Yuting; Huang, Xiaodan; Yang, Yannan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2015-11-25

    A new type of monodispersed mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a core-cone structure (MSN-CC) has been synthesized. The large cone-shaped pores are formed by silica lamellae closely packed encircling a spherical core, showing a structure similar to the flower dahlia. MSN-CC has a large pore size of 45 nm and a high pore volume of 2.59 cm(3) g(-1). MSN-CC demonstrates a high loading capacity of large proteins and successfully delivers active β-galactosidase into cells, showing their potential as efficient nanocarriers for the cellular delivery of proteins with large molecular weights. PMID:26426420

  1. Metabolic Turnover of Synaptic Proteins: Kinetics, Interdependencies and Implications for Synaptic Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Zuchman, Rina; Sorokina, Oksana; Müller, Anke; Dieterich, Daniela C.; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Ziv, Tamar; Ziv, Noam E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain multitudes of proteins, which in common with all proteins, have finite lifetimes and therefore need to be continuously replaced. Given the huge numbers of synaptic connections typical neurons form, the demand to maintain the protein contents of these connections might be expected to place considerable metabolic demands on each neuron. Moreover, synaptic proteostasis might differ according to distance from global protein synthesis sites, the availability of distributed protein synthesis facilities, trafficking rates and synaptic protein dynamics. To date, the turnover kinetics of synaptic proteins have not been studied or analyzed systematically, and thus metabolic demands or the aforementioned relationships remain largely unknown. In the current study we used dynamic Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC), mass spectrometry (MS), Fluorescent Non–Canonical Amino acid Tagging (FUNCAT), quantitative immunohistochemistry and bioinformatics to systematically measure the metabolic half-lives of hundreds of synaptic proteins, examine how these depend on their pre/postsynaptic affiliation or their association with particular molecular complexes, and assess the metabolic load of synaptic proteostasis. We found that nearly all synaptic proteins identified here exhibited half-lifetimes in the range of 2–5 days. Unexpectedly, metabolic turnover rates were not significantly different for presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins, or for proteins for which mRNAs are consistently found in dendrites. Some functionally or structurally related proteins exhibited very similar turnover rates, indicating that their biogenesis and degradation might be coupled, a possibility further supported by bioinformatics-based analyses. The relatively low turnover rates measured here (∼0.7% of synaptic protein content per hour) are in good agreement with imaging-based studies of synaptic protein trafficking, yet indicate that the metabolic load

  2. Protein engineering for metabolic engineering: Current and next-generation tools

    SciTech Connect

    Marcheschi, RJ; Gronenberg, LS; Liao, JC

    2013-04-16

    Protein engineering in the context of metabolic engineering is increasingly important to the field of industrial biotechnology. As the demand for biologically produced food, fuels, chemicals, food additives, and pharmaceuticals continues to grow, the ability to design and modify proteins to accomplish new functions will be required to meet the high productivity demands for the metabolism of engineered organisms. We review advances in selecting, modeling, and engineering proteins to improve or alter their activity. Some of the methods have only recently been developed for general use and are just beginning to find greater application in the metabolic engineering community. We also discuss methods of generating random and targeted diversity in proteins to generate mutant libraries for analysis. Recent uses of these techniques to alter cofactor use; produce non-natural amino acids, alcohols, and carboxylic acids; and alter organism phenotypes are presented and discussed as examples of the successful engineering of proteins for metabolic engineering purposes.

  3. Protein engineering for metabolic engineering: current and next-generation tools

    PubMed Central

    Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Gronenberg, Luisa S.; Liao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering in the context of metabolic engineering is increasingly important to the field of industrial biotechnology. As the demand for biologically-produced food, fuels, chemicals, food additives, and pharmaceuticals continues to grow, the ability to design and modify proteins to accomplish new functions will be required to meet the high productivity demands for the metabolism of engineered organisms. This article reviews advances of selecting, modeling, and engineering proteins to improve or alter their activity. Some of the methods have only recently been developed for general use and are just beginning to find greater application in the metabolic engineering community. We also discuss methods of generating random and targeted diversity in proteins to generate mutant libraries for analysis. Recent uses of these techniques to alter cofactor use, produce non-natural amino acids, alcohols, and carboxylic acids, and alter organism phenotypes are presented and discussed as examples of the successful engineering of proteins for metabolic engineering purposes. PMID:23589443

  4. Role of solvation in the energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Merz, Kenneth M

    2006-08-17

    There are many forces that contribute to the stability of a protein; among these are dispersion interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation effects. In a recent work, Vondrasek et al. estimated the in vacuo stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin using high level ab initio methods (Vondrasek, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2615). In this work, we evaluate the effects of solvation on the stability of the hydrophobic core of this protein. Solvation calculations are made using the polarizable continuum method at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. It is found that, in a protein-like environment (mimicked by a continuum solvent with a dielectric constant of approximately 4), the stability of rubredoxin's hydrophobic core is decreased by 40-50%. We also observed that the stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core is only slightly lower in a protein-like medium than in an aqueous one (DeltaGether-DeltaGwater approximately 1.0-3.5 kcal/mol).

  5. Distribution of DNA-condensing protein complexes in the adenovirus core

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marion, Sanjin; Chichón, F. Javier; Fernández, José J.; Winkler, Dennis C.; Carrascosa, José L.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Šiber, Antonio; San Martín, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Genome packing in adenovirus has long evaded precise description, since the viral dsDNA molecule condensed by proteins (core) lacks icosahedral order characteristic of the virus protein coating (capsid). We show that useful insights regarding the organization of the core can be inferred from the analysis of spatial distributions of the DNA and condensing protein units (adenosomes). These were obtained from the inspection of cryo-electron tomography reconstructions of individual human adenovirus particles. Our analysis shows that the core lacks symmetry and strict order, yet the adenosome distribution is not entirely random. The features of the distribution can be explained by modeling the condensing proteins and the part of the genome in each adenosome as very soft spheres, interacting repulsively with each other and with the capsid, producing a minimum outward pressure of ∼0.06 atm. Although the condensing proteins are connected by DNA in disrupted virion cores, in our models a backbone of DNA linking the adenosomes is not required to explain the experimental results in the confined state. In conclusion, the interior of an adenovirus infectious particle is a strongly confined and dense phase of soft particles (adenosomes) without a strictly defined DNA backbone. PMID:25820430

  6. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-01

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell-cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459-567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell-cell fusion). PMID:25804638

  7. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.

  8. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  9. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  10. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  11. Protease-like sequence in hepatitis B virus core antigen is not involved in the cleavage processes of core protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hwang, L H; Lin, Y J; Lai, W C; Lo, M S

    1991-02-01

    A DNA fragment, coding for hepatitis core antigen (HBcAg), was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and inserted into a lambda PL promoter-derived expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli and proteins produced after heat induction were analyzed. In addition to the 21 kDa HBcAg protein, several smaller related polypeptides, particularly one of 17 kDa in size, were also detected with rabbit anti-HBcAg antiserum. Whether the protease-like sequence of core protein involved in the self-cleavage process to form the 17 kDa polypeptide was investigated by a deletion experiment. Our results with a mutant in which 7 amino acids of the conserved protease-like region in the core protein have been deleted suggest that the cleavage does not depend on the presence of these protease-like sequence. In addition, the core protein synthesized from in vitro translation reaction was not cleaved. Core particles from E. coli lysate were purified by sucrose and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugations and subsequently treated with 0.2% of SDS and 0.2% of beta-mecaptoethanol. Immunoblotting analysis, however, did not reveal any conversion of the 21 kDa protein to smaller ones. In conclusion, our results suggest that the protease-like domain at the N-terminus of the core protein does not contain intrinsic autocleavage activity, nor could the HBcAg be converted to smaller antigens by detergent treatment. PMID:1935370

  12. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV. PMID:26738299

  13. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  14. The origin of modern metabolic networks inferred from phylogenomic analysis of protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Hee Shin; Mittenthal, Jay E

    2007-05-29

    Metabolism represents a complex collection of enzymatic reactions and transport processes that convert metabolites into molecules capable of supporting cellular life. Here we explore the origins and evolution of modern metabolism. Using phylogenomic information linked to the structure of metabolic enzymes, we sort out recruitment processes and discover that most enzymatic activities were associated with the nine most ancient and widely distributed protein fold architectures. An analysis of newly discovered functions showed enzymatic diversification occurred early, during the onset of the modern protein world. Most importantly, phylogenetic reconstruction exercises and other evidence suggest strongly that metabolism originated in enzymes with the P-loop hydrolase fold in nucleotide metabolism, probably in pathways linked to the purine metabolic subnetwork. Consequently, the first enzymatic takeover of an ancient biochemistry or prebiotic chemistry was related to the synthesis of nucleotides for the RNA world. PMID:17517598

  15. Metabolic clearance rate and urinary clearance of purified beta-core

    SciTech Connect

    Wehmann, R.E.; Blithe, D.L.; Flack, M.R.; Nisula, B.C. )

    1989-09-01

    We injected a highly purified preparation of the beta-core molecule, a fragment of hCG beta excreted in pregnancy urine, into five men and three women to determine its kinetic parameters, MCR, and urinary clearance. The beta-core molecule was distributed in an initial volume (1950 +/- 156 (mean +/- SEM) mL/m2 body surface area) approximately equal to the estimated plasma volume. Its disappearance was multiexponential on a semilogarithmic plot, with a rapid phase t1/2 of 3.5 +/- 0.7 min and a slow phase t1/2 of 22.4 +/- 4.2 min. The transit time (the mean time spent by a molecule of beta-core in transit) was 20.6 +/- 2.1 min. The MCR was 192.0 +/- 8.0 mL/min.m2 body surface area. About 5% of the injected dose of beta-core was excreted into the urine in the first 30 min after injection, and low levels of excretion persisted for up to 7 days. The urinary clearance rate of beta-core was 13.7 +/- 1.4 mL/min.m2, accounting for about 8% of the elimination of beta-core from the plasma. The beta-core immunoreactivity in serum and urine was characterized by gel filtration and three independent RIA systems to show that its properties were indistinguishable from those of the injected beta-core. Serum levels of beta-core in pregnant women were less than 0.2 ng/mL, while the amounts excreted in their urine were as much as 5 mg/day. Based on these clearance parameters of beta-core in normal subjects, less than 0.2% of the beta-core excreted in pregnancy urine is derived by urinary clearance of plasma beta-core. Therefore, more than 99% of the beta-core excreted in pregnancy urine is derived from beta-core in a compartment separate from plasma. In particular, these data indicate that there is relatively little placental secretion of beta-core into plasma and that placental secretion does not account for the vast majority of beta-core in pregnancy urine.

  16. The iron-sulfur core in Rieske proteins is not symmetric.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ehesan; Nair, Nisanth N; Retegan, Marius; Neese, Frank; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2014-12-01

    At variance with ferredoxins, Rieske-type proteins contain a chemically asymmetric iron-sulfur cluster. Nevertheless, X-ray crystallography apparently finds their [2Fe-2S] cores to be structurally symmetric or very close to symmetric (i.e. the four iron-sulfur bonds in the [2Fe-2S] core are equidistant). Using a combination of advanced density-based approaches, including finite-temperature molecular dynamics to access thermal fluctuations and free-energy profiles, in conjunction with correlated wavefunction-based methods we clearly predict an asymmetric core structure. This reveals a fundamental and intrinsic difference within the iron-sulfur clusters hosted by Rieske proteins and ferredoxins and thus opens up a new dimension for the ongoing efforts in understanding the role of Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster in electron transfer processes that occur in almost all biological systems.

  17. Hepatitis C virus core protein cooperates with ras and transforms primary rat embryo fibroblasts to tumorigenic phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, R B; Lagging, L M; Meyer, K; Ray, R

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein regulates cellular protooncogenes at the transcriptional level; this observation implicates core protein in the alteration of normal hepatocyte growth. In the present study, the transforming potential of the HCV core gene was investigated by using primary rat embryo fibroblast (REF) cells which were transfected with or without cooperative oncogenes. Integration of the HCV core gene resulted in expression of the viral protein in REF stable transformants. REF cells cotransfected with HCV core and H-ras genes became transformed and exhibited rapid proliferation, anchor-independent growth, and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. Results from these studies suggest that the core protein plays an important role in the regulation of HCV-infected cell growth and in the transformation to tumorigenic phenotype. These observations suggest a possible mechanism for this viral protein in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma in HCV-infected humans. PMID:8676467

  18. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  19. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  20. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Yan, Chang-Ling; Gao, Shu-Yan

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  1. Use of Designer G Protein-Coupled Receptors to Dissect Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all metabolic processes, including glucose and energy homeostasis. Recently, the use of designer GPCRs referred to as designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) has made it possible to dissect metabolically relevant GPCR signaling pathways in a temporally and spatially controlled fashion in vivo. PMID:27381463

  2. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  3. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  4. Experimental evaluation of CH-π interactions in a protein core.

    PubMed

    Pace, Christopher J; Kim, Diane; Gao, Jianmin

    2012-05-01

    CH-π stacks up! Using the protein α(2) D as a model system, we estimate that a CH-π contact between cyclohexylalanine (Cha) and phenylalanine (F) contributes approximately -0.7 kcal  mol(-1) to the protein stability. The stacking F-Cha pairs are sequestered in the core of the protein, where water interference does not exist (see figure). Therefore, the observed energetic gain should represent the inherent magnitude and upper limit of the CH-π interactions.

  5. Hepatic autophagy contributes to the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Henagan, Tara M; Laeger, Thomas; Navard, Alexandra M; Albarado, Diana; Noland, Robert C; Stadler, Krisztian; Elks, Carrie M; Burk, David; Morrison, Christopher D

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular response which acts to release stored cellular substrates during nutrient restriction, and particularly plays a key role in the cellular response to amino acid restriction. However, there has been limited work testing whether the induction of autophagy is required for adaptive metabolic responses to dietary protein restriction in the whole animal. Here, we found that moderate dietary protein restriction led to a series of metabolic changes in rats, including increases in food intake and energy expenditure, the downregulation of hepatic fatty acid synthesis gene expression and reduced markers of hepatic mitochondrial number. Importantly, these effects were also associated with an induction of hepatic autophagy. To determine if the induction of autophagy contributes to these metabolic effects, we tested the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction in BCL2-AAA mice, which bear a genetic mutation that impairs autophagy induction. Interestingly, BCL2-AAA mice exhibit exaggerated responses in terms of both food intake and energy expenditure, whereas the effects of protein restriction on hepatic metabolism were significantly blunted. These data demonstrate that restriction of dietary protein is sufficient to trigger hepatic autophagy, and that disruption of autophagy significantly alters both hepatic and whole animal metabolic response to dietary protein restriction. PMID:27173459

  6. Muted protein is involved in the targeting of CD63 to large dense-core vesicles of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Zhenhua, Hao; Wei, Li

    2016-08-01

    Large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are characterized as a class of lysosome-related organelles (LROs), which undergo regulated release and play important roles in development, metabolism and homeostasis. The Muted protein is a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), which functions in the biogenesis of lysosomes and LROs. CD63 is a membrane component of lysosomes and LROs. Whether and how CD63 is sorted into LDCVs is largely unknown. In this study, we aim to identify the localization of CD63 in chromaffin cells by colocalization, living cell imaging and cell fractionation. We found that a proportion of CD63-YFP colocalized with NPY-dsRed labeled LDCVs. By sucrose density gradient fractionation, a proportion of CD63 was found to be highly enriched in LDCVs fractions. The Muted mutant mouse is a model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). We also found that the level of CD63 was significantly decreased in Muted-deficient adrenal glands, suggesting that the Muted protein is important for the steady-state level of CD63. Our results suggest that CD63 is a membrane component of LDCVs and the stability of CD63 is dependent on the Muted protein, which provides a clue to the pathogenesis of LRO defects in HPS. PMID:27531610

  7. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  8. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Mitchell T.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of ‘core PCP’ proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics. PMID:26293301

  9. Interplay of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Bian, Yicong; Jiang, Yan; Qian, Sainan; Yu, Aiming; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of the interplay between metabolizing enzymes and BCRP has drawn more and more attention from people. BCRP, a transporter belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been hypothesized to play roles in many aspects including protecting the human body against therapeutics because it is expressed in the tissues that function as barriers in vivo. Efficient coupling of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes enables rapid elimination of foreign compounds from the body because BCRP could facilitate the excretion of metabolites catalyzed by phase I and II enzymes into bile, urine and feces. Without BCRP coupling, pass through the cell membrane may be difficult for them by passive diffusion because of the increment of the molecular weight and water solubility. Thus the metabolism-efflux alliance has extraordinary importance to drug metabolism, distribution, pharmacological effect, toxicity and elimination. In this manuscript, a brief discussion about the interplays of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes in liver, intestine, kidney, lung and other organs were presented and summarized. Many endogenous and exogenous compounds belong to different chemical groups, for instance, the dietary flavonoids and the steroidal hormones were involved. Clarifying the cooperation mechanisms of BCRP and enzymes could lead to a better prediction of drug clearance in vitro.

  10. Interplay of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Bian, Yicong; Jiang, Yan; Qian, Sainan; Yu, Aiming; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of the interplay between metabolizing enzymes and BCRP has drawn more and more attention from people. BCRP, a transporter belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been hypothesized to play roles in many aspects including protecting the human body against therapeutics because it is expressed in the tissues that function as barriers in vivo. Efficient coupling of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes enables rapid elimination of foreign compounds from the body because BCRP could facilitate the excretion of metabolites catalyzed by phase I and II enzymes into bile, urine and feces. Without BCRP coupling, pass through the cell membrane may be difficult for them by passive diffusion because of the increment of the molecular weight and water solubility. Thus the metabolism-efflux alliance has extraordinary importance to drug metabolism, distribution, pharmacological effect, toxicity and elimination. In this manuscript, a brief discussion about the interplays of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes in liver, intestine, kidney, lung and other organs were presented and summarized. Many endogenous and exogenous compounds belong to different chemical groups, for instance, the dietary flavonoids and the steroidal hormones were involved. Clarifying the cooperation mechanisms of BCRP and enzymes could lead to a better prediction of drug clearance in vitro. PMID:26652256

  11. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  12. Integrating the protein and metabolic engineering toolkits for next-generation chemical biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Christopher M; De Mey, Marjan; Jones Prather, Kristala L; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    2013-04-19

    Through microbial engineering, biosynthesis has the potential to produce thousands of chemicals used in everyday life. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are fields driven by the manipulation of genes, genetic regulatory systems, and enzymatic pathways for developing highly productive microbial strains. Fundamentally, it is the biochemical characteristics of the enzymes themselves that dictate flux through a biosynthetic pathway toward the product of interest. As metabolic engineers target sophisticated secondary metabolites, there has been little recognition of the reduced catalytic activity and increased substrate/product promiscuity of the corresponding enzymes compared to those of central metabolism. Thus, fine-tuning these enzymatic characteristics through protein engineering is paramount for developing high-productivity microbial strains for secondary metabolites. Here, we describe the importance of protein engineering for advancing metabolic engineering of secondary metabolism pathways. This pathway integrated enzyme optimization can enhance the collective toolkit of microbial engineering to shape the future of chemical manufacturing.

  13. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  14. Structure of the TatC core of the twin-arginine protein transport system.

    PubMed

    Rollauer, Sarah E; Tarry, Michael J; Graham, James E; Jääskeläinen, Mari; Jäger, Franziska; Johnson, Steven; Krehenbrink, Martin; Liu, Sai-Man; Lukey, Michael J; Marcoux, Julien; McDowell, Melanie A; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Roversi, Pietro; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Robinson, Carol V; Sansom, Mark S P; Palmer, Tracy; Högbom, Martin; Berks, Ben C; Lea, Susan M

    2012-12-13

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is one of two general protein transport systems found in the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane and is conserved in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. The defining, and highly unusual, property of the Tat pathway is that it transports folded proteins, a task that must be achieved without allowing appreciable ion leakage across the membrane. The integral membrane TatC protein is the central component of the Tat pathway. TatC captures substrate proteins by binding their signal peptides. TatC then recruits TatA family proteins to form the active translocation complex. Here we report the crystal structure of TatC from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This structure provides a molecular description of the core of the Tat translocation system and a framework for understanding the unique Tat transport mechanism.

  15. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  16. Core mutations switch monomeric protein GB1 into an intertwined tetramer.

    PubMed

    Kirsten Frank, M; Dyda, Fred; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2002-11-01

    The structure of a mutant immunoglobulin-binding B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1), which comprises five conservative changes in hydrophobic core residues, was determined by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The oligomeric state and quaternary structure of the mutant protein are drastically changed from the wild type protein. The mutant structure consists of a symmetric tetramer, with intermolecular strand exchange involving all four units. Four of the five secondary structure elements present in the monomeric wild type GB1 structure are retained in the tetrameric structure, although their intra- and intermolecular interactions are altered. Our results demonstrate that through the acquisition of a moderate number of pivotal point mutations, proteins such as GB1 are able to undergo drastic structural changes, overcoming reduced stability of the monomeric unit by multimerization. The present structure is an illustrative example of how proteins exploit the breadth of conformational space.

  17. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  18. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  19. Milk protein for improved metabolic health: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence shows that consumption of dairy products is associated with decreased prevalence of metabolic related disorders, whilst evidence from experimental studies points towards dairy protein as a dietary component which may aid prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Poor metabolic health is a common characteristic of overweight, obesity and aging, and is the forerunner of T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and an ever increasing global health issue. Progressive loss of metabolic control is evident from a blunting of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism, which is commonly manifested through decreased insulin sensitivity, inadequate glucose and lipid control, accompanied by a pro-inflammatory environment and hypertension. Adverse physiological changes such as excess visceral adipose tissue deposition and expansion, lipid overspill and infiltration into liver, muscle and other organs, and sarcopaenia or degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass and function all underpin this adverse profile. ‘Sarcobesity’ and sarcopaenic diabetes are rapidly growing health issues. As well as through direct mechanisms, dairy protein may indirectly improve metabolic health by aiding loss of body weight and fat mass through enhanced satiety, whilst promoting skeletal muscle growth and function through anabolic effects of dairy protein-derived branch chain amino acids (BCAAs). BCAAs enhance muscle protein synthesis, lean body mass and skeletal muscle metabolic function. The composition and processing of dairy protein has an impact on digestion, absorption, BCAA kinetics and function, hence the optimisation of dairy protein composition through selection and combination of specific protein components in milk may provide a way to maximize benefits for metabolic health. PMID:23822206

  20. Heterologous Expression of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein in Oil Seeds of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Roohvand, Farzin; Ajdary, Soheila; Ehsani, Parastoo; Hatef Salmanian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis c virus (HCV), prevalent among 3% of the world population, is a major worldwide public health concern and an effective vaccination could help to overcome this problem. Plant seeds as low-cost vaccine expression platforms are highly desirable to produce antigens. Objectives: The present study was aimed at investigating the possible expression of recombinant HCV core protein, as a leading HCV vaccine candidate, in canola (Brassica napus) plant seeds in order to be used as an effective immunogen for vaccine researches. Materials and Methods: A codon-optimized gene harboring the Kozak sequence, 6 × His-tag, HCVcp (1 - 122 residues) and KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) peptide in tandem was designed and expressed under the control of the seed specific promoter, fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1), to accumulate the recombinant protein in canola (B. napus L.) seeds. Transgenic lines were screened and the presence of the transgene was confirmed in the T0 plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The quantity and quality of the HCV core protein (HCVcp) in transgenic seeds were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot, respectively. Results: Western blot analysis using anti-His antibody confirmed the presence of a 15 kDa protein in the seeds of T1 transgenic lines. The amount of antigenic protein accumulated in the seeds of these transgenic lines was up to 0.05% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Conclusions: The canola oilseeds could provide a useful expression system to produce HCV core protein as a vaccine candidate. PMID:26855744

  1. Polyproteins related to the major core protein of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Atterwill, M

    1978-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) contains several low-molecular-weight proteins which, together with the genomic RNA, constitute the core structure of the virion. The most abundant protein in the core is the 27,000-dalton protein (p27), and, by analogy to the type C viruses, this protein probably forms the core shell. In mouse mammary tumor cell lines (GR and Mm5MT) producing MuMTV the major p57 antigenic specificity resides in a large protein, which migrates in polyacrylamide gels as a doublet of 77,000 and 75,000 daltons (p 77/75). A series of lower-molecular-weight proteins, p61, p48, p38, and p34, is also present in small amounts and is probably derived by proteolytic cleavage of the p 77/75. These proteins have been identified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antiserum, and their sequence relatedness to p27 has been determined by an analysis of the peptides after trypsin digestion. After a 15-min pulse with [35S]-methionine, all of the p27-related proteins in these cell lines were labelled and, during a subsequent chase, progressively disappeared. The p27 was labeled poorly during the pulse, but the amount of label in this protein increased during the chase. A quantitation of these experiments suggested that the majority of the p27-related proteins were quite rapidly turned over in these cell lines. Hence, if p27 is derived by a progressive proteolytic cleavage mechanism, then the process is inefficient in the GR cells and only moderately efficient in the Mm5MT cells. When MuMTV was isolated from the culture medium of these cells harvested at 5-min intervals, the major p27-related protein was p34. The p27 accounted for only 29% of the anti-p27 serum immunoprecipitable proteins compared to 95% in virus isolated from an 18-h harvest. Incubation of the rapid-harvest virus at 37 degrees C for 2 h resulted in some conversion of p34 to p27. These results suggest that some of the p27 in MuMTV is formed in the virions by proteolytic cleavage of p34

  2. Approaches to Optimizing Animal Cell Culture Process: Substrate Metabolism Regulation and Protein Expression Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanxing

    Some high value proteins and vaccines for medical and veterinary applications by animal cell culture have an increasing market in China. In order to meet the demands of large-scale productions of proteins and vaccines, animal cell culture technology has been widely developed. In general, an animal cell culture process can be divided into two stages in a batch culture. In cell growth stage a high specific growth rate is expected to achieve a high cell density. In production stage a high specific production rate is stressed for the expression and secretion of qualified protein or replication of virus. It is always critical to maintain high cell viability in fed-batch and perfusion cultures. More concern has been focused on two points by the researchers in China. First, the cell metabolism of substrates is analyzed and the accumulation of toxic by-products is decreased through regulating cell metabolism in the culture process. Second, some important factors effecting protein expression are understood at the molecular level and the production ability of protein is improved. In pace with the rapid development of large-scale cell culture for the production of vaccines, antibodies and other recombinant proteins in China, the medium design and process optimization based on cell metabolism regulation and protein expression improvement will play an important role. The chapter outlines the main advances in metabolic regulation of cell and expression improvement of protein in animal cell culture in recent years.

  3. Hepatitis C virus core protein triggers hepatic angiogenesis by a mechanism including multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed; Selimovic, Denis; Ghozlan, Hanan; Abdel-kader, Ola

    2009-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the production of serum cytokines, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2. Despite the occurrence of hepatic angiogenesis in liver conditions, the role of HCV proteins in this context is currently unknown. We demonstrated that the development of hepatic neoangiogenesis in patients infected with HCV is associated with the expression of TGF-beta2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and with activation of endothelial cells, as evidenced by CD34 expression. The analysis of liver biopsies of HCV-positive and HCV-negative patients using immunostaining showed significant elevation of TGF-beta2, VEGF, and CD34 expression in patients who were HCV-positive. Using an HCV established culture system, we confirmed further the production of both TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins, in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 by transfection with full-length HCV RNA (JFH1) or by the regulated expression of core. In addition, regulated expression of core protein in HepG2 or Huh7 cells was found to induce expression and activation of the transcription factor E2F1 and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), and transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1), activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding (CREB), E2F1, hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha), and specificity protein 1. Furthermore, data obtained from inhibitor experiments revealed the importance of E2F1 and ASK1 in the modulation of core-induced activation of JNK and p38 pathways and suggested an essential role for JNK, p38, and ERK pathways in the regulation of core-induced production of TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins. Thus, our data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms whereby core protein mediates the development of hepatic angiogenesis in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  4. In vitro inhibition of protein synthesis by purified cores from vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hamida, F; Beaud, G

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of the shutoff of cellular protein synthesis in vaccinia virus-infected cells has been investigated by using in vitro systems. Purified vaccinia cores cause inhibition of endogenous mRNA translation in nonpreincubated reticulocyte lysates and Ehrlich ascites tumor cell-free systems. Translation of viral mRNA from turnip yellow mosaic virus is also impaired in wheat germ cell-free extracts. The block induced by vaccinia cores in protein synthesis is not due to a decrease in the availability of mRNA but rather to an alteration of the cellular translational machinery. No nucleolytic activity able of digesting mRNA could be detected in purified vaccinia cores with three sensitive tests. There is a lack of inhibition in the poly(Phe)-poly(U) system, which bypasses the normal initiation process. An almost complete disaggregation of polyribosomes in the reticulocyte lysate appears when vaccinia cores are present. These results indicate that mRNA translation in a cell-free system is affected predominantly at the level of polypeptide chain initiation. PMID:272632

  5. Structure binding relationship of human surfactant protein D and various lipopolysaccharide inner core structures.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Wehle, Marko; Geissner, Andreas; Crouch, Erika C; Kang, Yu; Yang, You; Anish, Chakkumkal; Santer, Mark; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    As a major player of the innate immune system, surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognizes and promotes elimination of various pathogens such as Gram-negative bacteria. SP-D binds to l-glycero-d-manno-heptose (Hep), a constituent of the partially conserved lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core of many Gram-negative bacteria. Binding and affinity of trimeric human SP-D to Hep in distinct LPS inner core glycans differing in linkages and adjacent residues was elucidated using glycan array and surface plasmon resonance measurements that were compared to in silico interaction studies. The combination of in vitro assays using defined glycans and molecular docking and dynamic simulation approaches provides insights into the interaction of trimeric SP-D with those glycan ligands. Trimeric SP-D wildtype recognized larger LPS inner core oligosaccharides with slightly enhanced affinity than smaller compounds suggesting the involvement of stabilizing secondary interactions. A trimeric human SP-D mutant D324N+D325N+R343K resembling rat SP-D bound to various LPS inner core structures in a similar pattern as observed for the wildtype but with higher affinity. The selective mutation of SP-D promotes targeting of LPS inner core oligosaccharides on Gram-negative bacteria to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27350640

  6. A role for the perlecan protein core in the activation of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Eichstetter, I; Iozzo, R V

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a widespread heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, is directly involved in the storing of angiogenic growth factors, mostly members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) gene family. We have previously shown that antisense targeting of the perlecan gene causes a reduced growth and responsiveness to FGF7 [also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] in human cancer cells, and that the perlecan protein core interacts specifically with FGF7. In the present paper, we have investigated human colon carcinoma cells in which the perlecan gene was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. After screening over 1000 clones, we obtained two clones heterozygous for the null mutation with no detectable perlecan, indicating that the other allele was non-functioning. The perlecan-deficient cells grew more slowly, did not respond to FGF7 with or without the addition of heparin, and were less tumorigenic than control cells. Paradoxically, the perlecan-deficient cells displayed increased FGF7 surface binding. However, the perlecan protein core was required for functional activation of the KGF receptor and downstream signalling. Because heparin could not substitute for perlecan, the HS chains are not critical for FGF7-mediated signalling in this cell system. These results provide the first genetic evidence that the perlecan protein core is a molecular entity implicated in FGF7 binding and activation of its receptor. PMID:11563979

  7. Repacking protein cores with backbone freedom: structure prediction for coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Harbury, P B; Tidor, B; Kim, P S

    1995-08-29

    Progress in homology modeling and protein design has generated considerable interest in methods for predicting side-chain packing in the hydrophobic cores of proteins. Present techniques are not practically useful, however, because they are unable to model protein main-chain flexibility. Parameterization of backbone motions may represent a general and efficient method to incorporate backbone relaxation into such fixed main-chain models. To test this notion, we introduce a method for treating explicitly the backbone motions of alpha-helical bundles based on an algebraic parameterization proposed by Francis Crick in 1953 [Crick, F. H. C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 685-689]. Given only the core amino acid sequence, a simple calculation can rapidly reproduce the crystallographic main-chain and core side-chain structures of three coiled coils (one dimer, one trimer, and one tetramer) to within 0.6-A root-mean-square deviations. The speed of the predictive method [approximately 3 min per rotamer choice on a Silicon Graphics (Mountain View, CA) 4D/35 computer] permits it to be used as a design tool.

  8. Transcriptional Activation of the Interleukin-2 Promoter by Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, Anders; Rice, Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    Most patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become chronic carriers. Viruses that efficiently establish persistent infections must have effective ways of evading host defenses. In the case of HCV, little is known about how chronic infections are established or maintained. Besides hepatocytes, several reports suggest that HCV can infect T and B lymphocytes. Since T cells are essential for viral clearance, direct or indirect effects of HCV on T-cell function could influence the outcome of infection. Given that T-cell growth and differentiation require the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2), we asked whether HCV might modulate synthesis of IL-2. Portions of the HCV polyprotein were expressed in Jurkat cells under a variety of conditions. We found that the highly conserved HCV core protein, in combination with other stimuli, was able to dramatically activate transcription from the IL-2 promoter. The carboxy-terminal hydrophobic portion of the core protein was required for this activity. Activation was dependent on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), occurred in cells deficient in the tyrosine kinase p56lck, and could be blocked by addition of cyclosporin A and by depletion of calcium. These results suggest that the HCV core protein can activate transcription of the IL-2 promoter through the NFAT pathway. This novel activity may have consequences for T-cell development and establishment of persistent infections. PMID:11134290

  9. Dietary Proteins as Determinants of Metabolic and Physiologic Functions of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jahan-Mihan, Alireza; Luhovyy, Bohdan L.; Khoury, Dalia El; Anderson, G. Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake. PMID:22254112

  10. The Core of Chloroplast Nucleoids Contains Architectural SWIB Domain Proteins[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Melonek, Joanna; Matros, Andrea; Trösch, Mirl; Mock, Hans-Peter; Krupinska, Karin

    2012-01-01

    A highly enriched fraction of the transcriptionally active chromosome from chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins involved in structuring of the nucleoid core. Among such plastid nucleoid-associated candidate proteins a 12-kD SWIB (SWI/SNF complex B) domain–containing protein was identified. It belongs to a subgroup of low molecular mass SWIB domain proteins, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has six members (SWIB-1 to SWIB-6) with predictions for localization in the two DNA-containing organelles. Green/red fluorescent protein fusions of four of them were shown to be targeted to chloroplasts, where they colocalize with each other as well as with the plastid envelope DNA binding protein in structures corresponding to plastid nucleoids. For SWIB-6 and SWIB-4, a second localization in mitochondria and nucleus, respectively, could be observed. SWIB-4 has a histone H1 motif next to the SWIB domain and was shown to bind to DNA. Moreover, the recombinant SWIB-4 protein was shown to induce compaction and condensation of nucleoids and to functionally complement a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS. PMID:22797472

  11. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties.

  12. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  13. CELLULAR MECHANISMS OF PROTEIN METABOLISM IN THE NEPHRON

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jean; MacDowell, Muriel

    1958-01-01

    1. The exaggeration of "hyaline droplet" formation observed in the renal lesion of epidemic hemorrhagic fever when treated with the infusion of large amounts of human serum albumin and the histochemical characteristics of the droplets so formed afford evidence towards their identification with the protein absorption droplets of experimental procedures and with those that occur in other renal diseases. 2. Protein absorption droplets (hyaline droplets) are the visible aspect of pathological modifications of a physiological process; i.e., the continuing reabsorption of plasma proteins by the proximal convolutions. 3. The mitochondria of the renal cells are directly involved in both the physiological and the abnormal reabsorption and disposal of the plasma proteins; the absorption droplets are a complex of reabsorbed proteins and mitochondrial substances and enzymes; they result whenever disposal is at a rate insufficient to prevent accumulation. 4. Failure of intracellular disposal of reabsorbed protein is determined by (a) the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the protein and (b) by the functional state of renal cell. 5. Various factors in renal disease that result in disturbances of reabsorption and of intracellular disposal, both with and without droplet formation, are described. PMID:13525582

  14. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  15. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines.

  16. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines. PMID:25475262

  17. Myocardial oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis during mechanical circulatory support by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Priddy, Colleen M O'Kelly; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides essential mechanical circulatory support necessary for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur, which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis. We focused on the amino acid leucine and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart 1) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and 2) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 h of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [(13)C(6),(15)N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-(13)C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (∼40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining 1) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate and 2) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis.

  18. Energizing eukaryotic cell-free protein synthesis with glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Stark, Jessica C; Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is limited by the dependence on costly high-energy phosphate compounds and exogenous enzymes to power protein synthesis (e.g., creatine phosphate and creatine kinase, CrP/CrK). Here, we report the ability to use glucose as a secondary energy substrate to regenerate ATP in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae crude extract CFPS platform. We observed synthesis of 3.64±0.35 μg mL(-1) active luciferase in batch reactions with 16 mM glucose and 25 mM phosphate, resulting in a 16% increase in relative protein yield (μg protein/$ reagents) compared to the CrP/CrK system. Our demonstration provides the foundation for development of cost-effective eukaryotic CFPS platforms.

  19. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma protein carbonylation in virus C and metabolic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Fernando Ariel; Mebarki, Mouniya; Paradis, Valérie; Friguet, Bertrand; Radman, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is becoming the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in MS is peculiar compared to other chronic liver diseases. Carbohydrate and lipid metabolic imbalance in MS increase reactive oxygen species damaging proteins. In the present work we study the difference in protein oxidative damage (carbonylation) in human HCC derived from virus C infection (VHC) and from MS (MS_HCC) as the only subjacent cause. We selected a patient cohort containing of 10 non-tumoral and 10 tumoral liver resections in each study group (virus C and MS HCC) based on clinical patient history and histological parameters. Protein samples were labeled to saturation using CF 647-hydrazide™ dye. This approach allows us to perform carbonyl detection alongside with a DIGE experiment. We detected a total of 1184 spots with 36 differentially expressed proteins and 47 spots differentially carbonylated between VHC and MS_HCC (fold change >1.5, p<0.05). VHC up-regulated proteins are involved in signaling pathways related to cancer development such as signaling by EGFR, Wnt, Cdc20 and cell cycle. Further, up-regulated proteins in MS HCC, are implicated in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids. Differential carbonylation analysis between VHC and MS_HCC showed protein damage in proteins such as glucose phosphate isomerase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase. Higher protein carbonylation in MS_HCC samples was observed in proteins involved in redox response and lipid metabolism. In conclusion, the observed difference in protein oxidative damage between MS and Virus C derived carcinoma could account for the different cancer development pathway. PMID:26461368

  1. Purification and properties of the intact P-700 and Fx-containing Photosystem I core protein.

    PubMed

    Parrett, K G; Mehari, T; Warren, P G; Golbeck, J H

    1989-02-28

    The intact Photosystem I core protein, containing the psaA and psaB polypeptides, and electron transfer components P-700 through FX, was isolated from cyanobacterial and higher plant Photosystem I complexes with chaotropic agents followed by sucrose density ultracentrifugation. The concentrations of NaClO4, NaSCN, NaI, NaBr or urea required for the functional removal of the 8.9 kDa, FA/FB polypeptide was shown to be inversely related to the strength of the chaotrope. The Photosystem I core protein, which was purified to homogeniety, contains 4 mol of acid-labile sulfide and has the following properties: (i) the FX-containing core consists of the 82 and 83 kDa reaction center polypeptides but is totally devoid of the low-molecular-mass polypeptides; (ii) methyl viologen and other bipyridilium dyes have the ability to accept electrons directly from FX; (iii) the difference spectrum of FX from 400 to 900 nm is characteristic of an iron-sulfur cluster; (iv) the midpoint potential of FX, determined optically at room temperature, is 60 mV more positive than in the control; (v) there is indication by ESR spectroscopy of low-temperature heterogeneity within FX; and (vi) the heterogeneity is seen by optical spectroscopy as inefficiency in low-temperature electron flow to FX. The constraints imposed by the amount of non-heme iron and labile sulfide in the Photosystem I core protein, the cysteine content of the psaA and psaB polypeptides, and the stoichiometry of high-molecular-mass polypeptides, cause us to re-examine the possibility that FX is a [4Fe-4S] rather than a [2Fe-2S] cluster ligated by homologous cysteine residues on the psaA and psaB heterodimer.

  2. Effect of Prolonged Simulated Microgravity on Metabolic Proteins in Rat Hippocampus: Steps toward Safe Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Javed, Iqbal; Liu, Yahui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy in cells but also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in oxidative stress when in space. This oxidative stress is responsible for energy imbalances and cellular damage. In this study, a rat tail suspension model was used in individual experiments for 7 and 21 days to explore the effect of simulated microgravity (SM) on metabolic proteins in the hippocampus, a vital brain region involved in learning, memory, and navigation. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomic strategy was used to observe the differential expression of metabolic proteins. Forty-two and sixty-seven mitochondrial metabolic proteins were differentially expressed after 21 and 7 days of SM, respectively. Mitochondrial Complex I, III, and IV, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were down-regulated. Moreover, DJ-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, which defend against oxidative damage, were up-regulated in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis of proteins DJ-1 and COX 5A confirmed the mass spectrometry results. Despite these changes in mitochondrial protein expression, no obvious cell apoptosis was observed after 21 days of SM. The results of this study indicate that the oxidative stress induced by SM has profound effects on metabolic proteins.

  3. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  4. Quantitative H2S-mediated protein sulfhydration reveals metabolic reprogramming during the integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bederman, Ilya; Majumder, Mithu; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda; Kabil, Omer; Willard, Belinda; Banerjee, Ruma; Wang, Benlian; Bebek, Gurkan; Evans, Charles R; Fox, Paul L; Gerson, Stanton L; Hoppel, Charles L; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The sulfhydration of cysteine residues in proteins is an important mechanism involved in diverse biological processes. We have developed a proteomics approach to quantitatively profile the changes of sulfhydrated cysteines in biological systems. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that sulfhydrated cysteines are part of a wide range of biological functions. In pancreatic β cells exposed to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, elevated H2S promotes the sulfhydration of enzymes in energy metabolism and stimulates glycolytic flux. We propose that transcriptional and translational reprogramming by the integrated stress response (ISR) in pancreatic β cells is coupled to metabolic alternations triggered by sulfhydration of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. PMID:26595448

  5. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  6. Cannibalism Affects Core Metabolic Processes in Helicoverpa armigera Larvae—A 2D NMR Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Fredd; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cannibalism is known in many insect species, yet its impact on insect metabolism has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the effects of cannibalism on the metabolism of fourth-instar larvae of the non-predatory insect Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidotera: Noctuidea). Two groups of larvae were analyzed: one group fed with fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera (cannibal), the other group fed with an artificial plant diet. Water-soluble small organic compounds present in the larvae were analyzed using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and principal component analysis (PCA). Cannibalism negatively affected larval growth. PCA of NMR spectra showed that the metabolic profiles of cannibal and herbivore larvae were statistically different with monomeric sugars, fatty acid- and amino acid-related metabolites as the most variable compounds. Quantitation of 1H-13C HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence) signals revealed that the concentrations of glucose, glucono-1,5-lactone, glycerol phosphate, glutamine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, ornithine, proline, threonine and valine were higher in the herbivore larvae. PMID:27598144

  7. Cannibalism Affects Core Metabolic Processes in Helicoverpa armigera Larvae-A 2D NMR Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Fredd; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cannibalism is known in many insect species, yet its impact on insect metabolism has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the effects of cannibalism on the metabolism of fourth-instar larvae of the non-predatory insect Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidotera: Noctuidea). Two groups of larvae were analyzed: one group fed with fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera (cannibal), the other group fed with an artificial plant diet. Water-soluble small organic compounds present in the larvae were analyzed using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and principal component analysis (PCA). Cannibalism negatively affected larval growth. PCA of NMR spectra showed that the metabolic profiles of cannibal and herbivore larvae were statistically different with monomeric sugars, fatty acid- and amino acid-related metabolites as the most variable compounds. Quantitation of ¹H-(13)C HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence) signals revealed that the concentrations of glucose, glucono-1,5-lactone, glycerol phosphate, glutamine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, ornithine, proline, threonine and valine were higher in the herbivore larvae. PMID:27598144

  8. Mitochondrial Localization of Telomeric Protein TIN2 Links Telomere Regulation to Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liuh-Yow; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qinfen; Li, Hongzhi; Luo, Zhenhua; Fang, Hezhi; Kim, Sok Ho; Qin, Li; Yotnda, Patricia; Xu, Jianmin; Tu, Benjamin P.; Bai, Yidong; Songyang, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Summary Both mitochondria, which are metabolic powerhouses, and telomeres, which help maintain genomic stability, have been implicated in cancer and aging. However, the signaling events that connect these two cellular structures remain poorly understood. Here we report that the canonical telomeric protein TIN2 is also a regulator of metabolism. TIN2 is recruited to telomeres and associates with multiple telomere regulators including TPP1. TPP1 interacts with TIN2 N-terminus, which contains overlapping mitochondrial and telomeric targeting sequences, and controls TIN2 localization. We have found that TIN2 is post-translationally processed in mitochondria, and regulates mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation. Reducing TIN2 expression by RNAi knockdown inhibited glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and production, and enhanced ATP levels and oxygen consumption in cancer cells. These results suggest a link between telomeric proteins and metabolic control, providing an additional mechanism by which telomeric proteins regulate cancer and aging. PMID:22885005

  9. Protein deacetylation by SIRT1: an emerging key post-translational modification in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiujiu; Auwerx, Johan

    2010-07-01

    The biological function of most proteins relies on reversible post-translational modifications, among which phosphorylation is most prominently studied and well recognized. Recently, a growing amount of evidence indicates that acetylation-deacetylation reactions, when applied to crucial mediators, can also robustly affect the function of target proteins and thereby have wide-ranging physiological impacts. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which functions as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent protein deacetylase, deacetylates a wide variety of metabolic molecules in response to the cellular energy and redox status and as such causes significant changes in metabolic homeostasis. This review surveys the evidence for the emerging role of SIRT1-mediated deacetylation in the control of metabolic homeostasis. PMID:20026274

  10. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  11. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  12. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  13. The mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase and the lipogenic switch: new core components of metabolic reprogramming in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufi, Sílvia; Vellon, Luciano; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Menendez, Octavio J; Joven, Jorge; Lupu, Ruth; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-15

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells share some basic properties, such as self-renewal and pluripotency, with cancer cells, and they also appear to share several metabolic alterations that are commonly observed in human tumors. The cancer cells' glycolytic phenotype, first reported by Otto Warburg, is necessary for the optimal routing of somatic cells to pluripotency. However, how iPS cells establish a Warburg-like metabolic phenotype and whether the metabolic pathways that support the bioenergetics of iPS cells are produced by the same mechanisms that are selected during the tumorigenic process remain largely unexplored. We recently investigated whether the reprogramming-competent metabotype of iPS cells involves changes in the activation/expression status of the H(+)-ATPase, which is a core component of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that is repressed at both the activity and protein levels in human carcinomas, and of the lipogenic switch, which refers to a marked overexpression and hyperactivity of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) lipogenic enzymes that has been observed in nearly all examined cancer types. A comparison of a starting population of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and their iPS cell progeny revealed that somatic cell reprogramming involves a significant increase in the expression of ATPase inhibitor factor 1 (IF1), accompanied by extremely low expression levels of the catalytic β-F1-ATPase subunit. The pharmacological inhibition of ACACA and FASN activities markedly decreases reprogramming efficiency, and ACACA and FASN expression are notably upregulated in iPS cells. Importantly, iPS cells exhibited a significant intracellular accumulation of neutral lipid bodies; however, these bodies may be a reflection of intense lysosomal/autophagocytic activity rather than bona fide lipid droplet formation in iPS cells, as they were largely unresponsive to pharmacological modulation of PPARgamma and FASN activities. The

  14. Engineering protein-based machines to emulate key steps of metabolism (biological energy conversion)

    PubMed

    Urry; Peng; Hayes; McPherson; Xu; Woods; Gowda; Pattanaik

    1998-04-01

    Metabolism is the conversion of available energy sources to those energy forms required for sustaining and propagating living organisms; this is simply biological energy conversion. Proteins are the machines of metabolism; they are the engines of motility and the other machines that interconvert energy forms not involving motion. Accordingly, metabolic engineering becomes the use of natural protein-based machines for the good of society. In addition, metabolic engineering can utilize the principles, whereby proteins function, to design new protein-based machines to fulfill roles for society that proteins have never been called upon throughout evolution to fulfill. This article presents arguments for a universal mechanism whereby proteins perform their diverse energy conversions; it begins with background information, and then asserts a set of five axioms for protein folding, assembly, and function and for protein engineering. The key process is the hydrophobic folding and assembly transition exhibited by properly balanced amphiphilic protein sequences. The fundamental molecular process is the competition for hydration between hydrophobic and polar, e.g., charged, residues. This competition determines Tt, the onset temperature for the hydrophobic folding and assembly transition, Nhh, the numbers of waters of hydrophobic hydration, and the pKa of ionizable functions. Reported acid-base titrations and pH dependence of microwave dielectric relaxation data simultaneously demonstrate the interdependence of Tt, Nhh and the pKa using a series of microbially prepared protein-based poly(30mers) with one glutamic acid residue per 30mer and with an increasing number of more hydrophobic phenylalanine residues replacing valine residues. Also, reduction of nicotinamides and flavins is shown to lower Tt, i.e., to increase hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the argument is presented, and related to an extended Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, wherein reduction of nicotinamides represents

  15. The Role of Maternal Dietary Proteins in Development of Metabolic Syndrome in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Jahan-Mihan, Alireza; Rodriguez, Judith; Christie, Catherine; Sadeghi, Marjan; Zerbe, Tara

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity has been increasing. Pre-natal environment has been suggested as a factor influencing the risk of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Both observational and experimental studies showed that maternal diet is a major modifier of the development of regulatory systems in the offspring in utero and post-natally. Both protein content and source in maternal diet influence pre- and early post-natal development. High and low protein dams’ diets have detrimental effect on body weight, blood pressure191 and metabolic and intake regulatory systems in the offspring. Moreover, the role of the source of protein in a nutritionally adequate maternal diet in programming of food intake regulatory system, body weight, glucose metabolism and blood pressure in offspring is studied. However, underlying mechanisms are still elusive. The purpose of this review is to examine the current literature related to the role of proteins in maternal diets in development of characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in offspring. PMID:26561832

  16. A liver stress-endocrine nexus promotes metabolic integrity during dietary protein dilution.

    PubMed

    Maida, Adriano; Zota, Annika; Sjøberg, Kim A; Schumacher, Jonas; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P; Pfenninger, Anja; Christensen, Marie M; Gantert, Thomas; Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Rothermel, Ulrike; Schmoll, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Iovanna, Juan L; Stemmer, Kerstin; Kiens, Bente; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J

    2016-09-01

    Dietary protein intake is linked to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although dietary protein dilution (DPD) can slow the progression of some aging-related disorders, whether this strategy affects the development and risk for obesity-associated metabolic disease such as T2D is unclear. Here, we determined that DPD in mice and humans increases serum markers of metabolic health. In lean mice, DPD promoted metabolic inefficiency by increasing carbohydrate and fat oxidation. In nutritional and polygenic murine models of obesity, DPD prevented and curtailed the development of impaired glucose homeostasis independently of obesity and food intake. DPD-mediated metabolic inefficiency and improvement of glucose homeostasis were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), but required expression of liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in both lean and obese mice. FGF21 expression and secretion as well as the associated metabolic remodeling induced by DPD also required induction of liver-integrated stress response-driven nuclear protein 1 (NUPR1). Insufficiency of select nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) was necessary and adequate for NUPR1 and subsequent FGF21 induction and secretion in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that DPD promotes improved glucose homeostasis through an NEAA insufficiency-induced liver NUPR1/FGF21 axis. PMID:27548521

  17. Integrating gene and protein expression data with genome-scale metabolic networks to infer functional pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of cellular metabolism in the context of high-throughput -omics data has allowed us to decipher novel mechanisms of importance in biotechnology and health. To continue with this progress, it is essential to efficiently integrate experimental data into metabolic modeling. Results We present here an in-silico framework to infer relevant metabolic pathways for a particular phenotype under study based on its gene/protein expression data. This framework is based on the Carbon Flux Path (CFP) approach, a mixed-integer linear program that expands classical path finding techniques by considering additional biophysical constraints. In particular, the objective function of the CFP approach is amended to account for gene/protein expression data and influence obtained paths. This approach is termed integrative Carbon Flux Path (iCFP). We show that gene/protein expression data also influences the stoichiometric balancing of CFPs, which provides a more accurate picture of active metabolic pathways. This is illustrated in both a theoretical and real scenario. Finally, we apply this approach to find novel pathways relevant in the regulation of acetate overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli. As a result, several targets which could be relevant for better understanding of the phenomenon leading to impaired acetate overflow are proposed. Conclusions A novel mathematical framework that determines functional pathways based on gene/protein expression data is presented and validated. We show that our approach is able to provide new insights into complex biological scenarios such as acetate overflow in Escherichia coli. PMID:24314206

  18. Acute metabolic acidosis decreases muscle protein synthesis but not albumin synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kleger, G R; Turgay, M; Imoberdorf, R; McNurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; Ballmer, P E

    2001-12-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis induces negative nitrogen balance by either increased protein breakdown or decreased protein synthesis. Few data exist regarding effects of acute metabolic acidosis on protein synthesis. We investigated fractional synthesis rates (FSRs) of muscle protein and albumin, plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones (free thyroxin [fT(4)] and triiodothyronine [fT(3)]) in seven healthy human volunteers after a stable controlled metabolic period of 5 days and again 48 hours later after inducing metabolic acidosis by oral ammonium chloride intake (4.2 mmol/kg/d divided in six daily doses). Muscle and albumin FSRs were obtained by the [(2)H(5)ring]phenylalanine flooding technique. Ammonium chloride induced a significant decrease in pH (7.43 +/- 0.02 versus 7.32 +/- 0.04; P < 0.0001) and bicarbonate concentration (24.6 +/- 1.6 versus 16.0 +/- 2.7 mmol/L; P < 0.0001) within 48 hours. Nitrogen balance decreased significantly on the second day of acidosis. The FSR of muscle protein decreased (1.94 +/- 0.25 versus 1.30 +/- 0.39; P < 0.02), whereas the FSR of albumin remained constant. TSH levels increased significantly (1.1 +/- 0.5 versus 1.9 +/- 1.1 mU/L; P = 0.03), whereas IGF-I, fT(4), and fT(3) levels showed no significant change. We conclude that acute metabolic acidosis for 48 hours in humans induces a decrease in muscle protein synthesis, which contributes substantially to a negative nitrogen balance. In contrast to prolonged metabolic acidosis of 7 days, a short period of acidosis in the present study did not downregulate albumin synthesis.

  19. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  20. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Charge separation, stabilization, and protein relaxation in photosystem II core particles with closed reaction center.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, M; Sander, J; Nowaczyk, M; Müller, M G; Rögner, M; Holzwarth, A R

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence kinetics of cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) core particles with closed reaction centers (RCs) were studied with picosecond resolution. The data are modeled in terms of electron transfer (ET) and associated protein conformational relaxation processes, resolving four different radical pair (RP) states. The target analyses reveal the importance of protein relaxation steps in the ET chain for the functioning of PSII. We also tested previously published data on cyanobacterial PSII with open RCs using models that involved protein relaxation steps as suggested by our data on closed RCs. The rationale for this reanalysis is that at least one short-lived component could not be described in the previous simpler models. This new analysis supports the involvement of a protein relaxation step for open RCs as well. In this model the rate of ET from reduced pheophytin to the primary quinone Q(A) is determined to be 4.1 ns(-1). The rate of initial charge separation is slowed down substantially from approximately 170 ns(-1) in PSII with open RCs to 56 ns(-1) upon reduction of Q(A). However, the free-energy drop of the first RP is not changed substantially between the two RC redox states. The currently assumed mechanistic model, assuming the same early RP intermediates in both states of RC, is inconsistent with the presented energetics of the RPs. Additionally, a comparison between PSII with closed RCs in isolated cores and in intact cells reveals slightly different relaxation kinetics, with a approximately 3.7 ns component present only in isolated cores.

  2. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  3. Pathway analysis of Pichia pastoris to elucidate methanol metabolism and its regulation for production of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol

    2014-01-01

    This research rationally analyzes metabolic pathways of Pichia pastoris to study the metabolic flux responses of this yeast under methanol metabolism. A metabolic model of P. pastoris was constructed and analyzed by elementary mode analysis (EMA). EMA was used to comprehensively identify the cell's metabolic flux profiles and its underlying regulation mechanisms for the production of recombinant proteins from methanol. Change in phenotypes and flux profiles during methanol adaptation with varying feed mixture of glycerol and methanol was examined. EMA identified increasing and decreasing fluxes during the glycerol-methanol metabolic shift, which well agreed with experimental observations supporting the validity of the metabolic network model. Analysis of all the identified pathways also led to the determination of the metabolic capacities as well as the optimum metabolic pathways for recombinant protein synthesis during methanol induction. The network sensitivity analysis revealed that the production of proteins can be improved by manipulating the flux ratios at the pyruvate branch point. In addition, EMA suggested that protein synthesis is optimum under hypoxic culture conditions. The metabolic modeling and analysis presented in this study could potentially form a valuable knowledge base for future research on rational design and optimization of P. pastoris by determining target genes, pathways, and culture conditions for enhanced recombinant protein synthesis. The metabolic pathway analysis is also of considerable value for production of therapeutic proteins by P. pastoris in biopharmaceutical applications.

  4. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  5. Fluoranthene metabolism and associated proteins in Mycobacterium sp. JS14.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Jun; Li, Qing X

    2007-06-01

    Fluoranthene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) commonly present in PAH-contaminated soils. We studied fluoranthene catabolism and associated proteins in Mycobacterium sp. JS14, a bacterium isolated from a PAH-contaminated soil in Hilo (HI, USA). Fluoranthene degrades in at least three separated pathways via 1-indanone, 2',3'-dihydroxybiphenyl-2,3,-dicarboxylic acid, and naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid. Part of the diverse catabolism is converged into phthalate catabolism. An increased expression of 25 proteins related to fluoranthene catabolism is found with 1-D PAGE or 2-DE and nano-LC-MS/MS. Detection of fluoranthene catabolism associated proteins coincides well with its multiple degradation pathways that are mapped via metabolites identified. Among the up-regulated proteins, PAH ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase alpha-subunit and beta-subunit and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase are notably induced. The up-regulation of trans-2-carboxybenzalpyruvate hydratase suggests that some of fluoranthene metabolites may be further degraded through aromatic dicarboxylic acid pathways. Catalase and superoxide dismutase were up-regulated to control unexpected oxidative stress during the fluoranthene catabolism. The up-regulation of chorismate synthase and nicotine-nucleotide phosphorylase may be necessary for sustaining shikimate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis, respectively. A fluoranthene degradation pathway for Mycobacterium sp. JS14 was proposed and confirmed by proteomic study by identifying almost all the enzymes required during the initial steps of fluoranthene degradation. PMID:17514677

  6. Effects of atorvastatin on human c reactive protein metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goals were to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled...

  7. Data set of interactomes and metabolic pathways of proteins differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Minjarez, Benito; Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Herrera-Aguirre, María Esther; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Mena, Raul; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer׳s disease is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly and its frequency is on the rise worldwide. It is considered the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, being many of them unknown. Therefore, there is a dire necessity for the identification of novel molecular players for the understanding of this disease. In this data article we determined the protein expression profiles of whole protein extracts from cortex regions of brains from patients with Alzheimer׳s disease in comparison to a normal brain. We identified 721 iTRAQ-labeled polypeptides with more than 95% in confidence. We analyzed all proteins that changed in their expression level and located them in the KEGG metabolic pathways, as well as in the mitochondrial complexes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. In addition, we analyzed the over- and sub-expressed polypeptides through IPA software, specifically Core I and Biomarkers I modules. Data in this article is related to the research article "Identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer's disease using iTRAQ labeling and tandem mass spectrometry" (Minjarez et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27257613

  8. Data set of interactomes and metabolic pathways of proteins differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Minjarez, Benito; Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Herrera-Aguirre, María Esther; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Mena, Raul; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer׳s disease is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly and its frequency is on the rise worldwide. It is considered the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, being many of them unknown. Therefore, there is a dire necessity for the identification of novel molecular players for the understanding of this disease. In this data article we determined the protein expression profiles of whole protein extracts from cortex regions of brains from patients with Alzheimer׳s disease in comparison to a normal brain. We identified 721 iTRAQ-labeled polypeptides with more than 95% in confidence. We analyzed all proteins that changed in their expression level and located them in the KEGG metabolic pathways, as well as in the mitochondrial complexes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. In addition, we analyzed the over- and sub-expressed polypeptides through IPA software, specifically Core I and Biomarkers I modules. Data in this article is related to the research article "Identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer's disease using iTRAQ labeling and tandem mass spectrometry" (Minjarez et al., 2016) [1].

  9. Glucocorticoids and 11β-HSD1 are major regulators of intramyocellular protein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Doig, Craig L; Sherlock, Mark; Stewart, Paul M; Lavery, Gareth G

    2016-01-01

    The adverse metabolic effects of prescribed and endogenous glucocorticoid excess, ‘Cushing’s syndrome’, create a significant health burden. While skeletal muscle atrophy and resultant myopathy is a clinical feature, the molecular mechanisms underpinning these changes are not fully defined. We have characterized the impact of glucocorticoids upon key metabolic pathways and processes regulating muscle size and mass including: protein synthesis, protein degradation, and myoblast proliferation in both murine C2C12 and human primary myotube cultures. Furthermore, we have investigated the role of pre-receptor modulation of glucocorticoid availability by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) in these processes. Corticosterone (CORT) decreased myotube area, decreased protein synthesis, and increased protein degradation in murine myotubes. This was supported by decreased mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF1), decreased activating phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), decreased phosphorylation of 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and increased mRNA expression of key atrophy markers including: atrogin-1, forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), myostatin (MSTN), and muscle-ring finger protein-1 (MuRF1). These findings were endorsed in human primary myotubes, where cortisol also decreased protein synthesis and increased protein degradation. The effects of 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11DHC) (in murine myotubes) and cortisone (in human myotubes) on protein metabolism were indistinguishable from that of CORT/cortisol treatments. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition blocked the decrease in protein synthesis, increase in protein degradation, and reduction in myotube area induced by 11DHC/cortisone. Furthermore, CORT/cortisol, but not 11DHC/cortisone, decreased murine and human myoblast proliferative capacity. Glucocorticoids are potent regulators of skeletal muscle protein homeostasis and myoblast proliferation. Our data underscores the potential use

  10. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  11. Rotavirus RNA polymerase requires the core shell protein to synthesize the double-stranded RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Patton, J T; Jones, M T; Kalbach, A N; He, Y W; Xiaobo, J

    1997-12-01

    Rotavirus cores contain the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, RNA polymerase VP1, and guanylyltransferase VP3 and are enclosed within a lattice formed by the RNA-binding protein VP2. Analysis of baculovirus-expressed core-like particles (CLPs) has shown that VP1 and VP2 assemble into the simplest core-like structures with replicase activity and that VP1, but not VP3, is essential for replicase activity. To further define the role of VP1 and VP2 in the synthesis of dsRNA from viral mRNA, recombinant baculoviruses containing gene 1 (rBVg1) and gene 2 (rBVg2) of SA11 rotavirus were generated and used to express recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and rVP2, respectively. After purification, the proteins were assayed individually and together for the ability to catalyze the synthesis of dsRNA in a cell-free replication system. The results showed that dsRNA was synthesized only in assays containing rVP1 and rVP2, thus establishing that both proteins are essential for replicase activity. Even in assays containing a primer-linked mRNA template, neither rVP1 nor rVP2 alone directed RNA synthesis. Characterization of the cis-acting replication signals in mRNA recognized by the replicase of rVP1 and rVP2 showed that they were the same as those recognized by the replicase of virion-derived cores, thus excluding a role for VP3 in recognition of the mRNA template by the replicase. Analysis of RNA-protein interactions indicated that the mRNA template binds strongly to VP2 in replicase assays but that the majority of the dsRNA product neither is packaged nor stably associates with VP2. The results of replicase assays performed with mutant VP2 containing a deletion in its RNA-binding domain suggests that the essential role for VP2 in replication is linked to the protein's ability to bind the mRNA template for minus-strand synthesis.

  12. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  13. Maternal protein restriction impairs the transcriptional metabolic flexibility of skeletal muscle in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; Pérez-García, Georgina; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco

    2014-08-14

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a remarkable flexibility in the usage of fuel in response to the nutrient intake and energy demands of the organism. In fact, increased physical activity and fasting trigger a transcriptional programme in skeletal muscle cells leading to a switch from carbohydrate to lipid oxidation. Impaired metabolic flexibility has been reported to be associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, but it is not known whether the disability to adapt to metabolic demands is a cause or a consequence of these pathological conditions. Inasmuch as a poor nutritional environment during early life is a predisposing factor for the development of metabolic diseases in adulthood, in the present study, we aimed to determine the long-term effects of maternal malnutrition on the metabolic flexibility of offspring skeletal muscle. To this end, the transcriptional responses of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles to fasting were evaluated in adult rats born to dams fed a control (17 % protein) or a low-protein (8 % protein, protein restricted (PR)) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. With the exception of reduced body weight and reduced plasma concentrations of TAG, PR rats exhibited a metabolic profile that was the same as that of the control rats. In the fed state, PR rats exhibited an enhanced expression of key regulatory genes of fatty acid oxidation including CPT1a, PGC-1α, UCP3 and PPARα and an impaired expression of genes that increase the capacity for fat oxidation in response to fasting. These results suggest that impaired metabolic inflexibility precedes and may contribute to the development of metabolic disorders associated with early malnutrition. PMID:24823946

  14. In Silico Studies of C3 Metabolic Pathway Proteins of Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Kashif; Rauf, Sobiah; Iqbal, Hina; Nawaz Shah, Muhammad Kausar; Mir, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis is essential for plant productivity and critical for plant growth. More than 90% of plants have a C3 metabolic pathway primarily for carbon assimilation. Improving crop yields for food and fuel is a major challenge for plant biology. To enhance the production of wheat there is need to adopt the strategies that can create the change in plants at the molecular level. During the study we have employed computational bioinformatics and interactomics analysis of C3 metabolic pathway proteins in wheat. The three-dimensional protein modeling provided insight into molecular mechanism and enhanced understanding of physiological processes and biological systems. Therefore in our study, initially we constructed models for nine proteins involving C3 metabolic pathway, as these are not determined through wet lab experiment (NMR, X-ray Crystallography) and not available in RCSB Protein Data Bank and UniProt KB. On the basis of docking interaction analysis, we proposed the schematic diagram of C3 metabolic pathway. Accordingly, there also exist vice versa interactions between 3PGK and Rbcl. Future site and directed mutagenesis experiments in C3 plants could be designed on the basis of our findings to confirm the predicted protein interactions. PMID:23484105

  15. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  16. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends*

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. PMID:27514743

  17. The RHOX Homeodomain Proteins Regulate the Expression of Insulin and Other Metabolic Regulators in the Testis*

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, James A.; Hu, Zhiying; Welborn, Joshua P.; Song, Hye-Won; Rao, Manjeet K.; Wayne, Chad M.; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2013-01-01

    Defects in cellular metabolism have been widely implicated in causing male infertility, but there has been little progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Here we report that several key metabolism genes are regulated in the testis by Rhox5, the founding member of a large X-linked homeobox gene cluster. Among these Rhox5-regulated genes are insulin 2 (Ins2), resistin (Retn), and adiponectin (Adipoq), all of which encode secreted proteins that have profound and wide-ranging effects on cellular metabolism. The ability of Rhox5 to regulate their levels in the testis has the potential to dictate metabolism locally in this organ, given the existence of the blood-testes barrier. We demonstrate that Ins2 is a direct target of Rhox5 in Sertoli cells, and we show that this regulation is physiologically significant, because Rhox5-null mice fail to up-regulate Ins2 expression during the first wave of spermatogenesis and have insulin-signaling defects. We identify other Rhox family members that induce Ins2 transcription, define protein domains and homeodomain amino acid residues crucial for this property, and demonstrate that this regulation is conserved. Rhox5-null mice also exhibit altered expression of other metabolism genes, including those encoding the master transcriptional regulators of metabolism, PPARG and PPARGC1A, as well as SCD1, the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid metabolism. These results, coupled with the known roles of RHOX5 and its target metabolism genes in spermatogenesis in vivo, lead us to propose a model in which RHOX5 is a central transcription factor that promotes the survival of male germ cells via its effects on cellular metabolism. PMID:24121513

  18. The RHOX homeodomain proteins regulate the expression of insulin and other metabolic regulators in the testis.

    PubMed

    MacLean, James A; Hu, Zhiying; Welborn, Joshua P; Song, Hye-Won; Rao, Manjeet K; Wayne, Chad M; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2013-11-29

    Defects in cellular metabolism have been widely implicated in causing male infertility, but there has been little progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Here we report that several key metabolism genes are regulated in the testis by Rhox5, the founding member of a large X-linked homeobox gene cluster. Among these Rhox5-regulated genes are insulin 2 (Ins2), resistin (Retn), and adiponectin (Adipoq), all of which encode secreted proteins that have profound and wide-ranging effects on cellular metabolism. The ability of Rhox5 to regulate their levels in the testis has the potential to dictate metabolism locally in this organ, given the existence of the blood-testes barrier. We demonstrate that Ins2 is a direct target of Rhox5 in Sertoli cells, and we show that this regulation is physiologically significant, because Rhox5-null mice fail to up-regulate Ins2 expression during the first wave of spermatogenesis and have insulin-signaling defects. We identify other Rhox family members that induce Ins2 transcription, define protein domains and homeodomain amino acid residues crucial for this property, and demonstrate that this regulation is conserved. Rhox5-null mice also exhibit altered expression of other metabolism genes, including those encoding the master transcriptional regulators of metabolism, PPARG and PPARGC1A, as well as SCD1, the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid metabolism. These results, coupled with the known roles of RHOX5 and its target metabolism genes in spermatogenesis in vivo, lead us to propose a model in which RHOX5 is a central transcription factor that promotes the survival of male germ cells via its effects on cellular metabolism.

  19. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  20. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and distribution of PEGs and PEGylated proteins: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andreas; Tuerck, Dietrich; Prabhu, Saileta; Dickmann, Leslie; Sims, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism and biodistribution of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in PEGylated proteins are important to understand the increased cellular vacuolation reported in various tissues in animals. The tissue distribution profile of PEGylated proteins and 'metabolic' PEG is guided largely by absolute PEG load, PEG molecular weight and, where applicable, receptor-mediated uptake via the protein moiety. High molecular weight PEGs show slow renal clearance, and consequently have a greater potential to accumulate within cells. The intracellular nonbiodegradable PEG can accumulate within the lysosome ultimately causing distension and vacuolation observed by standard histological examinations. Improved bioanalytical methodologies will contribute to the identification of specific PK parameters including distribution behavior to support development of PEGylated proteins as therapeutics.

  1. Role of Protein–Protein Interactions in Cytochrome P450-Mediated Drug Metabolism and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein–protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP–protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein–protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein–protein interactions with CYP enzymes. PMID:25133307

  2. The effects of dietary protein and amino acids on skeletal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bihuniak, Jessica D; Insogna, Karl L

    2015-07-15

    Dietary protein is required for optimal skeletal growth and maturation. Although Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) exist for global dietary protein intake, the level and sources of dietary protein that are optimal for skeletal health over the life continuum have not been established. This is partly due to the difficulty in quantifying the effects of variable levels of a nutrient's intake over a lifetime as well as the complex nature of the relationships between dietary protein and calcium economy. Areas of current uncertainty include the precise source and amount of dietary protein required for optimal skeletal accretion and maintenance of skeletal mass, as well as the site-specific effects of dietary protein. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin the actions of dietary protein on mineral metabolism and skeletal homeostasis remain unclear. This review attempts to summarize recent data bearing on these questions. PMID:25843057

  3. Amino acid metabolism, substrate availability and the control of protein dynamics in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Garibotto, G; Tessari, P; Sacco, P; Deferrari, G

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling protein metabolism in the human kidney are not well understood. During adult life, kidney protein content and the size of the kidney remain fairly constant, indicating that protein synthesis and degradation within the kidney are tightly regulated. However, kidney protein turnover may change in response to stimuli such as alterations in substrate availability, hormones or growth factors, acid-base balance, renal work or renal injury with a progressive decrease in the number of nephrons. These factors have been evaluated mainly in animals, in vitro or in vivo. Amino acids, the kidneys substrates for protein synthesis, are provided by several routes. Like in other organs, amino acids can reach the kidney cells through the arterial blood flow. However, they may also come from the degradation of reabsorbed low-molecular weight proteins filtered by the glomerulus. The human kidney has high rates of protein turnover and leucine oxidation. The magnitude of the protein turnover across the human kidney suggests that the protein dynamics is partly determined by intrarenal protein catabolism. As evaluated by a steady-state leucine multiple compartment analysis, kidney protein synthesis is dependent to a similar extent on intrarenal generation of amino acids from protein breakdown and from amino acids taken up from the arterial blood. Kidney mass may therefore depend not only on the availability of free amino acids, but also on filtered proteins which are degraded within the kidney. Future studies could define the mechanisms, metabolic pathways and mediators influencing kidney protein turnover in humans, with a view to better comprehension of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:10493563

  4. Targeting anandamide metabolism rescues core and associated autistic-like symptoms in rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Servadio, M; Melancia, F; Manduca, A; di Masi, A; Schiavi, S; Cartocci, V; Pallottini, V; Campolongo, P; Ascenzi, P; Trezza, V

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by altered sociability, compromised communication and stereotyped/repetitive behaviors, for which no specific treatments are currently available. Prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) is a known, although still underestimated, environmental risk factor for ASD. Altered endocannabinoid activity has been observed in autistic patients, and endocannabinoids are known to modulate behavioral traits that are typically affected in ASD. On this basis, we tested the hypothesis that changes in the endocannabinoid tone contribute to the altered phenotype induced by prenatal VPA exposure in rats, with focus on behavioral features that resemble the core and associated symptoms of ASD. In the course of development, VPA-exposed rats showed early deficits in social communication and discrimination, compromised sociability and social play behavior, stereotypies and increased anxiety, thus providing preclinical proof of the long-lasting deleterious effects induced by prenatal VPA exposure. At the neurochemical level, VPA-exposed rats displayed altered phosphorylation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in different brain areas, associated with changes in anandamide metabolism from infancy to adulthood. Interestingly, enhancing anandamide signaling through inhibition of its degradation rescued the behavioral deficits displayed by VPA-exposed rats at infancy, adolescence and adulthood. This study therefore shows that abnormalities in anandamide activity may underlie the deleterious impact of environmental risk factors on ASD-relevant behaviors and that the endocannabinoid system may represent a therapeutic target for the core and associated symptoms displayed by autistic patients. PMID:27676443

  5. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes. PMID:25966259

  6. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation.

    PubMed

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intramitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage.

  7. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes.

  8. Role of the mixed-lineage protein kinase pathway in the metabolic stress response to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Shashi; Barrett, Tamera; Vertii, Anastassiia; Noh, Yun Hee; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Saturated free fatty acid (FFA) is implicated in the metabolic response to obesity. In vitro studies indicate that FFA signaling may be mediated by the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) pathway that activates cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Here we examined the role of the MLK pathway in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. The ubiquitously expressed MLK2 and MLK3 protein kinases have partially redundant functions. We therefore compared wild-type and compound mutant mice that lack expression of MLK2 plus MLK3. MLK-deficiency protected mice against high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity. Reduced JNK activation and increased energy expenditure contribute to the metabolic effects of MLK-deficiency. These data confirm that the MLK pathway plays a critical role in the metabolic response to obesity. PMID:23954791

  9. Sarcocystis fusiformis: some protein metabolic enzymes in various fractions of sarcocysts of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1993-01-01

    An investigation on the relative presence of some protein metabolic enzymes, namely aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), NAD+ and NADP+ dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and arginase in cyst wall (CW), cyst fluid (CF) and zoite (ZT) fractions of the sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis in the oesophageal muscles of Indian water buffalo was carried out. Both the transaminases were present in all the fractions of the cyst, although in variable amounts. There was a higher level of AST activity than of ALT activity. AST activity was the highest in ZT, whereas ALT activity was at a maximum in the CF fraction. The levels of activity of NAD+ and NADP+ dependent GLDH and arginase remained beyond detectable limits. The study revealed that the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism are linked to protein metabolism by transaminases. The possibility of concomitant removal of ammonia and its subsequent incorporation into the urea cycle is ruled out in this parasitic protozoan.

  10. Regulatory mechanism of protein metabolic pathway during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zuo, Qisheng; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Qingqing; Zhang, Zhentao; Wang, Yingjie; Ahmed, Mahmoud F; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-08-01

    We explored the regulatory mechanism of protein metabolism during the differentiation process of chicken male germ cells and provide a basis for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro. We sequenced the transcriptome of embryonic stem cells, primordial germ cells, and spermatogonial stem cells with RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), bioinformatics analysis methods, and detection of the key genes by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Finally, we found 16 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the biological metabolism during the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to primordial germ cells and 15 amino acid metabolic pathways enriched in the differentiation stage of primordial germ cells to spermatogonial stem cells. We found three pathways, arginine-proline metabolic pathway, tyrosine metabolic pathway, and tryptophan metabolic pathway, significantly enriched in the whole differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to spermatogonial stem cells. Moreover, for these three pathways, we screened key genes such as NOS2, ADC, FAH, and IDO. qRT-PCR results showed that the expression trend of these genes were the same to RNA-Seq. Our findings showed that the three pathways and these key genes play an important role in the differentiation process of embryonic stem cells to male germ cells. These results provide basic information for improving the induction system of embryonic stem cell differentiation to male germ cells in vitro.

  11. [Protein metabolism in the cerebral hemispheres during the emotional-algesic stress].

    PubMed

    Yakushev, V S; Davydov, V V; Bushueva, V V; Skurygin, V P; Krisanova, N V

    1985-01-01

    Emotional-algesic stress causes essential changes in the protein metabolism of cerebral hemispheres. These changes may be of great importance for the functioning of the brain and cause the disturbances of the higher nervous activity when the organism is influenced by the emotional stress factors. PMID:4039861

  12. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White, Richard A.; Neilan, Brett A.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-05-29

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth’s earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic nextgeneration sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats.

  13. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White, Richard Allen; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth's earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic next-generation sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats. PMID:26023869

  14. Unravelling core microbial metabolisms in the hypersaline microbial mats of Shark Bay using high-throughput metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Ruvindy, Rendy; White, Richard Allen; Neilan, Brett Anthony; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Modern microbial mats are potential analogues of some of Earth's earliest ecosystems. Excellent examples can be found in Shark Bay, Australia, with mats of various morphologies. To further our understanding of the functional genetic potential of these complex microbial ecosystems, we conducted for the first time shotgun metagenomic analyses. We assembled metagenomic next-generation sequencing data to classify the taxonomic and metabolic potential across diverse morphologies of marine mats in Shark Bay. The microbial community across taxonomic classifications using protein-coding and small subunit rRNA genes directly extracted from the metagenomes suggests that three phyla Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominate all marine mats. However, the microbial community structure between Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay (Bahamas) marine systems appears to be distinct from each other. The metabolic potential (based on SEED subsystem classifications) of the Shark Bay and Highbourne Cay microbial communities were also distinct. Shark Bay metagenomes have a metabolic pathway profile consisting of both heterotrophic and photosynthetic pathways, whereas Highbourne Cay appears to be dominated almost exclusively by photosynthetic pathways. Alternative non-rubisco-based carbon metabolism including reductive TCA cycle and 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathways is highly represented in Shark Bay metagenomes while not represented in Highbourne Cay microbial mats or any other mat forming ecosystems investigated to date. Potentially novel aspects of nitrogen cycling were also observed, as well as putative heavy metal cycling (arsenic, mercury, copper and cadmium). Finally, archaea are highly represented in Shark Bay and may have critical roles in overall ecosystem function in these modern microbial mats.

  15. Detection of specific antibodies to HCV-ARF/CORE+1 protein in patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Karamitros, T; Kakkanas, A; Katsoulidou, A; Sypsa, V; Dalagiorgou, G; Mavromara, P; Hatzakis, A

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause for chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV-ARF/core+1 protein is an alternative product of HCV core-encoding sequence of unknown biological function. Highly purified HCV core and ARF/core+1 recombinant proteins from HCV genotype 1a and HCV-ARF/core+1 recombinant protein from HCV genotype 3a were expressed in Escherichia coli. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we assessed the prevalence of anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies in 90 chronic hepatitis C patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a/1b or 3a, treated with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN-a-2a) plus ribavirin. Samples derived from 92 healthy blood donors were used as negative controls. All HCV-RNA-positive serum samples reacted with core 1a antigen, while 15 (37.5%) of 40 and 14 (28%) of 50 patients infected with HCV-1a/1b and HCV-3a, respectively, were found to have anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies into their serum before treatment initiation. These antibodies were persistently present during treatment follow-up and linked to elevated levels of HCV-RNA at baseline. PMID:22329372

  16. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  17. Intein Applications: From Protein Purification and Labeling to Metabolic Control Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David W.; Camarero, Julio A.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of inteins in the early 1990s opened the door to a wide variety of new technologies. Early engineered inteins from various sources allowed the development of self-cleaving affinity tags and new methods for joining protein segments through expressed protein ligation. Some applications were developed around native and engineered split inteins, which allow protein segments expressed separately to be spliced together in vitro. More recently, these early applications have been expanded and optimized through the discovery of highly efficient trans-splicing and trans-cleaving inteins. These new inteins have enabled a wide variety of applications in metabolic engineering, protein labeling, biomaterials construction, protein cyclization, and protein purification. PMID:24700459

  18. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  19. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  20. Thermodynamic origins of protein folding, allostery, and capsid formation in the human hepatitis B virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Crispin G; Jürgens, Maike C; Shepherd, Dale A; Freund, Stefan M V; Ashcroft, Alison E; Ferguson, Neil

    2013-07-23

    HBc, the capsid-forming "core protein" of human hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multidomain, α-helical homodimer that aggressively forms human HBV capsids. Structural plasticity has been proposed to be important to the myriad functions HBc mediates during viral replication. Here, we report detailed thermodynamic analyses of the folding of the dimeric HBc protomer under conditions that prevented capsid formation. Central to our success was the use of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and microscale thermophoresis, which allowed folding mechanisms to be characterized using just micrograms of protein. HBc folds in a three-state transition with a stable, dimeric, α-helical intermediate. Extensive protein engineering showed thermodynamic linkage between different structural domains. Unusual effects associated with mutating some residues suggest structural strain, arising from frustrated contacts, is present in the native dimer. We found evidence of structural gatekeepers that, when mutated, alleviated native strain and prevented (or significantly attenuated) capsid formation by tuning the population of alternative native conformations. This strain is likely an evolved feature that helps HBc access the different structures associated with its diverse essential functions. The subtle balance between native and strained contacts may provide the means to tune conformational properties of HBc by molecular interactions or mutations, thereby conferring allosteric regulation of structure and function. The ability to trap HBc conformers thermodynamically by mutation, and thereby ablate HBV capsid formation, provides proof of principle for designing antivirals that elicit similar effects.

  1. Pulsatile protein release from monodisperse liquid-core microcapsules of controllable shell thickness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujie; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulsatile delivery of proteins, in which release occurs over a short time after a period of little or no release, is desirable for many applications. This paper investigates the effect of biodegradable polymer shell thickness on pulsatile protein release from biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Methods Using precision particle fabrication (PPF) technology, monodisperse microcapsules were fabricated encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a liquid core surrounded by a drug-free poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) shell of uniform, controlled thickness from 14 to 19 μm. Results When using high molecular weight PLG (Mw 88 kDa), microparticles exhibited the desired core-shell structure with high BSA loading and encapsulation efficiency (55-65%). These particles exhibited very slow release of BSA for several weeks followed by rapid release of 80-90% of the encapsulated BSA within seven days. Importantly, with increasing shell thickness the starting time of the pulsatile release could be controlled from 25 to 35 days. Conclusions Biodegradable polymer microcapsules with precisely controlled shell thickness provide pulsatile release with enhanced control of release profiles. PMID:24831313

  2. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  3. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Yan, Shicui; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsid proteins (VP5 and VP7), within VIBs in co-transfected or infected cells. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NS80 could interact with each core protein respectively. In addition, we found that newly synthesized viral RNAs co-localized with VIBs. Furthermore, time-course analysis of viral structural proteins expression showed that the expression of NS80 was detected first, followed by the detection of inner shell protein VP3, and then of other inner-capsid proteins, suggesting that VIBs were essential for the formation of viral core frame or progeny virion. Moreover, knockdown of NS80 by shRNA not only inhibited the expression of aquareovirus structural proteins, but also inhibited viral infection. These results indicated that NS80-based VIBs were formed at earlier stage of infection, and NS80 was able to coordinate the expression of viral structural proteins and viral replication.

  4. Model based engineering of Pichia pastoris central metabolism enhances recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Nocon, Justyna; Steiger, Matthias G.; Pfeffer, Martin; Sohn, Seung Bum; Kim, Tae Yong; Maurer, Michael; Rußmayer, Hannes; Pflügl, Stefan; Ask, Magnus; Haberhauer-Troyer, Christina; Ortmayr, Karin; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda; Gasser, Brigitte; Lee, Sang Yup; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    The production of recombinant proteins is frequently enhanced at the levels of transcription, codon usage, protein folding and secretion. Overproduction of heterologous proteins, however, also directly affects the primary metabolism of the producing cells. By incorporation of the production of a heterologous protein into a genome scale metabolic model of the yeast Pichia pastoris, the effects of overproduction were simulated and gene targets for deletion or overexpression for enhanced productivity were predicted. Overexpression targets were localized in the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle, while knockout targets were found in several branch points of glycolysis. Five out of 9 tested targets led to an enhanced production of cytosolic human superoxide dismutase (hSOD). Expression of bacterial β-glucuronidase could be enhanced as well by most of the same genetic modifications. Beneficial mutations were mainly related to reduction of the NADP/H pool and the deletion of fermentative pathways. Overexpression of the hSOD gene itself had a strong impact on intracellular fluxes, most of which changed in the same direction as predicted by the model. In vivo fluxes changed in the same direction as predicted to improve hSOD production. Genome scale metabolic modeling is shown to predict overexpression and deletion mutants which enhance recombinant protein production with high accuracy. PMID:24853352

  5. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  6. Effects of dairy protein and fat on the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with the amino acid composition; in particular branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) seem to be of vital importance. Dairy protein-derived peptides may also contribute to the insulinotropic effect via dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitory activity, and may lower the blood pressure (BP). The lipid metabolism may be improved by whey protein (WP), which acts to reduce the postprandial triglyceride (TG) response. The effect of dairy fat is much more controversial because of the potentially harmful effect exerted by saturated fatty acid (SFA) on metabolic health. Recent observations suggest less adverse effects of SFA on metabolic health than previous assumed. However, little is known about dairy lipid fractions belonging to the groups of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and phospholipids (PL). Dairy fat seems to act differently depending on the dairy product and the composition of macronutrients in the meal. Therefore, for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the dairy protein and fat effect on MetS, we suggest that more human studies should be carried out to clarify the interactions of dairy protein and fat with macronutrients in the meal and other dairy components, such as micronutrients and microorganisms from fermented products.

  7. Effects of Dairy Protein and Fat on the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with the amino acid composition; in particular branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) seem to be of vital importance. Dairy protein-derived peptides may also contribute to the insulinotropic effect via dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitory activity, and may lower the blood pressure (BP). The lipid metabolism may be improved by whey protein (WP), which acts to reduce the postprandial triglyceride (TG) response. The effect of dairy fat is much more controversial because of the potentially harmful effect exerted by saturated fatty acid (SFA) on metabolic health. Recent observations suggest less adverse effects of SFA on metabolic health than previous assumed. However, little is known about dairy lipid fractions belonging to the groups of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and phospholipids (PL). Dairy fat seems to act differently depending on the dairy product and the composition of macronutrients in the meal. Therefore, for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the dairy protein and fat effect on MetS, we suggest that more human studies should be carried out to clarify the interactions of dairy protein and fat with macronutrients in the meal and other dairy components, such as micronutrients and microorganisms from fermented products. PMID:25396403

  8. The Role of the Renal Ammonia Transporter Rhcg in Metabolic Responses to Dietary Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bounoure, Lisa; Ruffoni, Davide; Müller, Ralph; Kuhn, Gisela Anna; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    High dietary protein imposes a metabolic acid load requiring excretion and buffering by the kidney. Impaired acid excretion in CKD, with potential metabolic acidosis, may contribute to the progression of CKD. Here, we investigated the renal adaptive response of acid excretory pathways in mice to high-protein diets containing normal or low amounts of acid-producing sulfur amino acids (SAA) and examined how this adaption requires the RhCG ammonia transporter. Diets rich in SAA stimulated expression of enzymes and transporters involved in mediating NH4+ reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The SAA-rich diet increased diuresis paralleled by downregulation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels. The absence of Rhcg transiently reduced NH4+ excretion, stimulated the ammoniagenic pathway more strongly, and further enhanced diuresis by exacerbating the downregulation of the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) and AQP2, with less phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256. The high protein acid load affected bone turnover, as indicated by higher Ca2+ and deoxypyridinoline excretion, phenomena exaggerated in the absence of Rhcg. In animals receiving a high-protein diet with low SAA content, the kidney excreted alkaline urine, with low levels of NH4+ and no change in bone metabolism. Thus, the acid load associated with high-protein diets causes a concerted response of various nephron segments to excrete acid, mostly in the form of NH4+, that requires Rhcg. Furthermore, bone metabolism is altered by a high-protein acidogenic diet, presumably to buffer the acid load. PMID:24652796

  9. Hepatitis C virus core protein abrogates the DDX3 function that enhances IPS-1-mediated IFN-beta induction.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masanori; Matsumoto, Misako; Watanabe, Ayako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Seya, Tsukasa

    2010-01-01

    The DEAD box helicase DDX3 assembles IPS-1 (also called Cardif, MAVS, or VISA) in non-infected human cells where minimal amounts of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein are expressed. DDX3 C-terminal regions directly bind the IPS-1 CARD-like domain as well as the N-terminal hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. DDX3 physically binds viral RNA to form IPS-1-containing spots, that are visible by confocal microscopy. HCV polyU/UC induced IPS-1-mediated interferon (IFN)-beta promoter activation, which was augmented by co-transfected DDX3. DDX3 spots localized near the lipid droplets (LDs) where HCV particles were generated. Here, we report that HCV core protein interferes with DDX3-enhanced IPS-1 signaling in HEK293 cells and in hepatocyte Oc cells. Unlike the DEAD box helicases RIG-I and MDA5, DDX3 was constitutively expressed and colocalized with IPS-1 around mitochondria. In hepatocytes (O cells) with the HCV replicon, however, DDX3/IPS-1-enhanced IFN-beta-induction was largely abrogated even when DDX3 was co-expressed. DDX3 spots barely merged with IPS-1, and partly assembled in the HCV core protein located near the LD in O cells, though in some O cells IPS-1 was diminished or disseminated apart from mitochondria. Expression of DDX3 in replicon-negative or core-less replicon-positive cells failed to cause complex formation or LD association. HCV core protein and DDX3 partially colocalized only in replicon-expressing cells. Since the HCV core protein has been reported to promote HCV replication through binding to DDX3, the core protein appears to switch DDX3 from an IFN-inducing mode to an HCV-replication mode. The results enable us to conclude that HCV infection is promoted by modulating the dual function of DDX3. PMID:21170385

  10. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Daniela; Froy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of milk and dairy products has been associated with reduced risk of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Milk contains two primary sources of protein, casein (80%) and whey (20%). Recently, the beneficial physiological effects of whey protein on the control of food intake and glucose metabolism have been reported. Studies have shown an insulinotropic and glucose-lowering properties of whey protein in healthy and Type 2 diabetes subjects. Whey protein seems to induce these effects via bioactive peptides and amino acids generated during its gastrointestinal digestion. These amino acids and peptides stimulate the release of several gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin, peptide YY and the incretins gastric inhibitory peptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 that potentiate insulin secretion from β-cells and are associated with regulation of food intake. The bioactive peptides generated from whey protein may also serve as endogenous inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) in the proximal gut, preventing incretin degradation. Indeed, recently, DPP-4 inhibitors were identified in whey protein hydrolysates. This review will focus on the emerging properties of whey protein and its potential clinical application for obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

  11. Innovative strategies to treat protein misfolding in inborn errors of metabolism: pharmacological chaperones and proteostasis regulators.

    PubMed

    Muntau, Ania C; Leandro, João; Staudigl, Michael; Mayer, Felix; Gersting, Søren W

    2014-07-01

    To attain functionality, proteins must fold into their three-dimensional native state. The intracellular balance between protein synthesis, folding, and degradation is constantly challenged by genetic or environmental stress factors. In the last ten years, protein misfolding induced by missense mutations was demonstrated to be the seminal molecular mechanism in a constantly growing number of inborn errors of metabolism. In these cases, loss of protein function results from early degradation of missense-induced misfolded proteins. Increasing knowledge on the proteostasis network and the protein quality control system with distinct mechanisms in different compartments of the cell paved the way for the development of new treatment strategies for conformational diseases using small molecules. These comprise proteostasis regulators that enhance the capacity of the proteostasis network and pharmacological chaperones that specifically bind and rescue misfolded proteins by conformational stabilization. They can be used either alone or in combination, the latter to exploit synergistic effects. Many of these small molecule compounds currently undergo preclinical and clinical pharmaceutical development and two have been approved: saproterin dihydrochloride for the treatment of phenylketonuria and tafamidis for the treatment of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis. Different technologies are exploited for the discovery of new small molecule compounds that belong to the still young class of pharmaceutical products discussed here. These compounds may in the near future improve existing treatment strategies or even offer a first-time treatment to patients suffering from nowadays-untreatable inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:24687294

  12. Acrylamide administration alters protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.; Schrama, L.; LoPachin, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of ACR on protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism were assessed in rat sciatic nerve. After 5 days of ACR administration (50 mg/kg/day) an increase in the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylcholine was detected in proximal sciatic nerve segments. In contrast, no changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in distal segments. After 9 days of ACR treatment when neurotoxicological symptoms were clearly apparent, a generalized increase in radiolabel uptake into phospholipids was noted exclusively in proximal nerve regions. ACR-induced increases in phospholipid metabolism were toxicologically specific since comparable administration of MBA (108 mg/kg/day X 5 or 9 days) produced only minor changes. ACR intoxication was also associated with a rise in sciatic nerve protein phosphorylation. After 9 days of ACR treatment, phosphorylation of beta-tubulin, P0, and several unidentified proteins (38 and 180 kDa) was increased in distal segments. In contrast, chronic administration of MBA caused increases in phosphorylation of beta-tubulin and the major myelin proteins of proximal nerve segments. In cell free homogenates prepared from sciatic nerves of treated and control rats, MBA caused an increase in phosphorylation of major myelin proteins similar to its effect in intact proximal nerve segments. The most striking effect observed in nerve homogenates of ACR-treated rats was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of an 80-kDa protein. Addition of ACR (1 mM) to homogenates of normal nerve had no effect on protein phosphorylation. Our results indicate that changes in the phosphorylation of phospholipids and proteins in sciatic nerve might be a component of the neurotoxic mechanism of ACR.

  13. Role of the AMP-activated protein kinase in regulating fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory R

    2009-06-01

    During moderate-intensity exercise, fatty acids are the predominant substrate for working skeletal muscle. The release of fatty acids from adipose tissue stores, combined with the ability of skeletal muscle to actively fine tune the gradient between fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism, depending on substrate availability and energetic demands, requires a coordinated system of metabolic control. Over the past decade, since the discovery that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased in accordance with exercise intensity, there has been significant interest in the proposed role of this ancient stress-sensing kinase as a critical integrative switch controlling metabolic responses during exercise. In this review, studies examining the role of AMPK as a regulator of fatty acid metabolism in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle during exercise will be discussed. Exercise induces activation of AMPK in adipocytes and regulates triglyceride hydrolysis and esterfication through phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyl-transferase, respectively. In skeletal muscle, exercise-induced activation of AMPK is associated with increases in fatty acid uptake, phosphorylation of HSL, and increased fatty acid oxidation, which is thought to occur via the acetyl-CoA carboxylase-malony-CoA-CPT-1 signalling axis. Despite the importance of AMPK in regulating fatty acid metabolism under resting conditions, recent evidence from transgenic models of AMPK deficiency suggest that alternative signalling pathways may also be important for the control of fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

  14. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase regulates hepatic nutrient metabolism through Sirt1 protein stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shangyu; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M; Wei, Xiaojing; Kikukawa, Yusuke; Tzameli, Iphigenia; Prasad, Deepthi; Lee, Yoonjin; Asara, John M; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Pissios, Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) methylates nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, to produce N1-methylnicotinamide (MNAM). Nnmt is an emerging metabolic regulator in adipocytes but its role in the liver, a tissue with the strongest Nnmt expression, is not known. In spite of its overall high expression, here we find that hepatic expression of Nnmt is highly variable and correlates with multiple metabolic parameters in mice and in humans. Further, we find that suppression of hepatic Nnmt expression in vivo alters glucose and cholesterol metabolism and that the metabolic effects of Nnmt in the liver are mediated by its product MNAM. Supplementation of high fat diet with MNAM decreases serum and liver cholesterol and liver triglycerides levels in mice. Mechanistically, increasing Nnmt expression or MNAM levels stabilizes sirtuin 1 protein, an effect, which is required for their metabolic benefits. In summary, we describe a novel regulatory pathway for vitamin B3 that could provide a new opportunity for metabolic disease therapy. PMID:26168293

  15. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Harg, J M; Nölle, A; Zwart, R; Boerema, A S; van Haastert, E S; Strijkstra, A M; Hoozemans, J JM; Scheper, W

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic stress induces the phosphorylation of endogenous tau via activation of the UPR. Strikingly, upon restoration of the metabolic homeostasis, not only the levels of the UPR markers pPERK, pIRE1α and BiP, but also tau phosphorylation are reversed both in cell models as well as in torpor, a physiological hypometabolic model in vivo. Intervention in the UPR using the global UPR inhibitor TUDCA or a specific small-molecule inhibitor of the PERK signaling pathway, inhibits the metabolic stress-induced phosphorylation of tau. These data support a role for UPR-mediated tau phosphorylation as part of an adaptive response to metabolic stress. Failure to restore the metabolic homeostasis will lead to prolonged UPR activation and tau phosphorylation, and may thus contribute to AD pathogenesis. We demonstrate that the UPR is functionally involved in the early stages of tau pathology. Our data indicate that targeting of the UPR may be employed for early intervention in tau-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25165879

  16. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Michel, Sébastien; Vannuvel, Kayleen; Wanet, Anaïs; Renard, Patricia; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion. PMID:24710422

  17. Protein sorting gone wrong--VPS10P domain receptors in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-02-01

    VPS10P domain receptors are a unique class of sorting receptors that direct intracellular transport of target proteins in neurons and that play central roles in neurodegenerative processes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies now implicate the very same receptors in cardiovascular and metabolic disturbances. In this review, we discuss current findings that uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms whereby sorting receptors, such as SORLA, sortilin, and SORCS1 control homeostasis in cardiovascular and metabolic tissues, and how they promote hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, obesity, and diabetes, when being altered. PMID:26724530

  18. Myocardial Reloading After Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart, providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. ECMO also induces stress which can adversely affect the ability to reload or wean the heart from the circuit. Metabolic impairments induced by altered loading and/or stress conditions may impact weaning. However, cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading with ECMO modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Methods and Results Sixteen immature piglets (7.8 to 15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8‐hour ECMO (UNLOAD) and postwean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused into the coronary artery [2‐13C]‐pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]‐L‐leucine as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. Upon RELOAD, each functional parameter, which were decreased substantially by ECMO, recovered to near‐baseline level with the exclusion of minimum dP/dt. Accordingly, myocardial oxygen consumption was also increased, indicating that overall mitochondrial metabolism was reestablished. At the metabolic level, when compared to UNLOAD, RELOAD altered the contribution of various substrates/pathways to tissue pyruvate formation, favoring exogenous pyruvate versus glycolysis, and acetyl‐CoA formation, shifting away from pyruvate decarboxylation to endogenous substrate, presumably fatty acids. Furthermore, there was also a significant increase of tissue concentrations for all CAC intermediates (≈80%), suggesting enhanced anaplerosis, and of fractional protein synthesis rates (>70%). Conclusions RELOAD alters both cytosolic and mitochondrial energy substrate metabolism, while favoring leucine incorporation into protein synthesis rather than oxidation in the CAC. Improved understanding of factors governing these metabolic perturbations may

  19. Expression of metabolism-related proteins in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Do-Hee; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja-Seung

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dominant metabolic type of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and evaluate its clinical implication through analysis of protein expression related to glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Tissue samples from 129 patients with TNBC who underwent mastectomy due to invasive breast cancer from 2000 to 2005 were prepared for tissue microarray. By immunohistochemical staining of the tissue microarrays, the markers of glycolysis-related proteins (Glut-1, CAIX, MCT4), glutaminolysis-related proteins (GLS1, GDH, ASCT2), and mitochondrial enzymes (ATP synthase, SDHA and SDHB) were analyzed. Based on the results, the metabolic phenotypes were defined based on positivity for more than two of three markers for each phenotype as follows: glycolysis type (Glut-1, CAIX and MCT4), glutaminolysis type (GLS1, GDH and ASCT2) and mitochondrial type (ATP synthase, SDHA and SDHB). The percentages of samples with metabolic phenotypes of tumor and stroma of TNBC were as follows: for tumor, mitochondrial type (85.3%) > glutaminolysis type (67.4%) > glycolysis type (63.0%); and for stroma, glutaminolysis type (37.2%) > glycolysis type (16.3%) > mitochondrial type (14.0%). The most common metabolic phenotype of TNBC was glycolysis type for basal-like type and non-glycolysis type for non-basal-like type (p=0.047). The correlation between glutaminolysis and mitochondrial type was statistically significant in both tumor and stroma (p<0.001). In conclusion, tumor cells of TNBC express glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism-related proteins. Glycolysis type is the most common phenotype of basal-like type, and reversely, non-glycolysis type is the most common phenotype of non basal-like type. PMID:24427351

  20. Putative drug and vaccine target protein identification using comparative genomic analysis of KEGG annotated metabolic pathways of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Suh, Joo-Won; Lee, Seung-Jin; Yohannes, Sileshi Belew; Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Seung-Chun

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, a computational comparative and subtractive genomic/proteomic analysis aimed at the identification of putative therapeutic target and vaccine candidate proteins from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotated metabolic pathways of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was performed for drug design and vaccine production pipelines against M.hyopneumoniae. The employed comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analysis with a predefined computational systemic workflow extracted a total of 41 annotated metabolic pathways from KEGG among which five were unique to M. hyopneumoniae. A total of 234 proteins were identified to be involved in these metabolic pathways. Although 125 non homologous and predicted essential proteins were found from the total that could serve as potential drug targets and vaccine candidates, additional prioritizing parameters characterize 21 proteins as vaccine candidate while druggability of each of the identified proteins evaluated by the DrugBank database prioritized 42 proteins suitable for drug targets.

  1. Effect of branched chain amino acid infusions on body protein metabolism in cirrhosis of liver.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P D; Holdsworth, J D; Dionigi, P; Clague, M B; James, O F

    1986-01-01

    Thirty seven patients with established cirrhosis of the liver were subjected to measurement of body protein metabolism using L-(1-14C) labelled leucine as a tracer. The effects of disease severity and those of solutions containing 0%, 16%, 35%, 53%, and 100% branched chain amino acids were evaluated. Significant increases in protein synthesis were noted with solutions containing 35%, 53%, and 100% branched chain amino acids, but in patients receiving 100% branched chain amino acids without additional essential amino acid supplement the increase in synthesis was matched by a significant increase in protein breakdown. Protein balance was thus improved only in patients receiving 35% and 53% branched chain amino acids. It was concluded that the high increase in protein breakdown in patients receiving 100% branched chain amino acids was undesirable, and such a solution should not be recommended for clinical use. PMID:3539714

  2. Protein metabolism in growing pigs fed corn or cassava peel based diets containing graded protein levels.

    PubMed

    Tewe, O O

    1985-05-01

    Sixty-four Large White cross Landrace weanling pigs were randomly allotted to eight treatments in a two by four factorial arrangement. The two dietary variables were cassava peel (0 and 40 per cent) and crude protein (20, 15, 10 and 5 per cent). Total serum protein concentration was significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced by protein deficiency and by its interaction with cassava peel. The multiple coefficient of determination (R2) showed that protein intake was the primary factor determining changes in serum protein. R2 values for cyanide intake (independent variable) on serum protein (dependent variable) increased from day 30 to 90 of the trial. Serum urea was increased on the 5 per cent protein diets on days 60 and 90 of the trial. The R2 values for cyanide and protein intake on serum urea concentration increased from day 30 to day 90 of the trial. Serum creatinine increased (P less than 0.05) on the 5 per cent protein diet on day 90 of the trial. The R2 value for the effects of protein intake on serum creatinine was higher than for cyanide intake on days 30 and 90. The results confirm the progressive and pronounced effects of long term cyanide intake on serum nitrogenous metabolites in pigs consuming between 110 and 120 ppm hydrocyanic acid, especially in diets containing 10 per cent or less protein. PMID:2989987

  3. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  4. Metabolic and Genomic Response to Dietary Isocaloric Protein Restriction in the Rat*

    PubMed Central

    Kalhan, Satish C.; Uppal, Sonal O.; Moorman, Jillian L.; Bennett, Carole; Gruca, Lourdes L.; Parimi, Prabhu S.; Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Serre, David; Hanson, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We have examined hepatic, genomic, and metabolic responses to dietary protein restriction in the non-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat. Animals were pair-fed either a 6 or 24% casein-based diet for 7–10 days. At the end of the dietary period, a microarray analysis of the liver was performed, followed by validation of the genes of interest. The rates of appearance of phenylalanine, methionine, serine, and glucose and the contribution of pyruvate to serine and glucose were quantified using tracer methods. Plasma and tissue amino acid levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic intermediates were measured. Protein restriction resulted in significant differential expression of a number of genes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, transport, transcription, and metabolic processes. RT-PCR showed that the expression of genes involved in serine biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation was higher, and those involved in fatty acid synthesis and urea synthesis were lower in the liver of protein-restricted animals. Free serine and glycine levels were higher and taurine levels lower in all tissues examined. Tracer isotope studies showed an ∼50% increase in serine de novo synthesis. Pyruvate was the primary (∼90%) source of serine in both groups. Transmethylation of methionine was significantly higher in the protein-restricted group. This was associated with a higher S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio and lower cystathione β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase activity. Dietary isocaloric protein restriction results in profound changes in hepatic one-carbon metabolism within a short period. These may be related to high methylation demands placed on the organism and caused by possible changes in cellular osmolarity as a result of the efflux of the intracellular taurine. PMID:21147771

  5. Evidence that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in tropical reef corals.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Peter J; Wall, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    Early life stages of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum were used to test the hypothesis that the depression of dark respiration in coral recruits by high pCO2 is caused by perturbed protein metabolism. First, the contribution of protein anabolism to respiratory costs under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the aerobic respiration of S. caliendrum recruits with and without the protein synthesis inhibitor emetine following 1 to 4 days at 45 Pa versus 77 Pa pCO2. Second, protein catabolism under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the flux of ammonium (NH4 (+)) from juvenile colonies of S. caliendrum incubated in darkness at 47 Pa and 90 Pa pCO2. Two days after settlement, respiration of recruits was affected by an interaction between emetine and pCO2, with emetine reducing respiration 63% at 45 Pa pCO2 and 27% at 77 Pa pCO2. The interaction disappeared 5 days after settlement, when respiration was reduced 27% by emetine under both pCO2 conditions. These findings suggest that protein anabolism accounted for a large proportion of metabolic costs in coral recruits and was affected by high pCO2, with consequences detected in aerobic respiration. Juvenile S. caliendrum showed net uptake of NH4 (+) at 45 Pa pCO2 but net release of NH4 (+) at 90 Pa pCO2, indicating that protein catabolism, NH4 (+) recycling, or both were affected by high pCO2. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in corals.

  6. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  7. SplitCore: An exceptionally versatile viral nanoparticle for native whole protein display regardless of 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Andreas; Skamel, Claudia; Nassal, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles displaying native proteins are attractive for many applications, including vaccinology. Virus-based nanoparticles are easily tailored by genetic means, commonly by inserting heterologous sequences into surface-exposed loops. The strategy works well with short peptides but is incompatible with the structures of most native proteins, except those with closely juxtaposed termini. Here we overcome this constraint by splitting the capsid protein of hepatitis B virus, one of the most advanced and most immunogenic display platforms, inside the insertion loop (SplitCore). The split parts, coreN and coreC, efficiently form capsid-like particles (CLPs) in E. coli and so do numerous fusions to coreN and/or coreC of differently structured proteins, including human disease related antigens of >300 amino acids in length. These CLPs induced high-titer antibodies, including neutralizing ones, in mice. The concept was easily expanded to triple-layer CLPs carrying reporter plus targeting domains, and should be applicable to protein-based nanoparticle design in general. PMID:22355524

  8. Studies on beef heart ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. Topological studies on the core proteins using proteolytic digestion and immunoreplication.

    PubMed

    Mendel-Hartvig, I; Nelson, B D

    1983-02-01

    The topology of beef heart Complex III has been studied by tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of isolated Complex III, Mg2+-ATP submitochondrial particles, and mitoplasts. Degradation products were detected by the immunoreplication technique using specific antibodies against core protein 1 (50 K) and core protein 2 (47 K). It can be shown that both peptides are digested from the matrix side of the inner membrane. However, no evidence was found that these peptides were digested by trypsin or chymotrypsin from the cytoplasmic side. It is concluded that the beef heart core proteins are membrane-bound peptides containing tryptic and chymotryptic digestion sites only on the matrix surface of the inner membrane. The data also suggest that beef heart core protein 2 contains multiple domains which are inserted into the membrane from the matrix surface. Proteolytic treatment of submitochondrial particles under conditions which digested at least 50% of the core proteins from the matrix surface did not, however, influence NADH oxidation rates or the respiratory control ratios.

  9. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  10. Sulfate resupply accentuates protein synthesis in coordination with nitrogen metabolism in sulfur deprived Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Lee, Bok-Rye; Park, Sang-Hyun; Zaman, Rashed; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Ourry, Alain; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the regulatory interactions between S assimilation and N metabolism in Brassica napus, de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins was quantified by (15)N and (34)S tracing, and the responses of transporter genes, assimilatory enzymes and metabolites pool involving in nitrate and sulfate metabolism were assessed under continuous sulfur supply, sulfur deprivation and sulfate resupply after 3 days of sulfur (S) deprivation. S-deprived plants were characterized by a strong induction of sulfate transporter genes, ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), and by a repressed activity of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS). Sulfate resupply to the S-deprived plants strongly increased cysteine, amino acids and proteins concentration. The increase in sulfate and cysteine concentration caused by sulfate resupply was not matched with the expression of sulfate transporters and the activity of ATPS and APR which were rapidly decreased by sulfate resupply. A strong induction of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), NR and GS upon sulfate resupply was accompanied with the increase in cysteine, amino acids and proteins pool. Sulfate resupply resulted in a strong increase in de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins, as evidenced by the increases in N and S incorporation into amino acids (1.8- and 2.4-fold increase) and proteins (2.2-and 6.3-fold increase) when compared to S-deprived plants. The results thus indicate that sulfate resupply followed by S-deprivation accelerates nitrate assimilation for protein synthesis.

  11. Quantitative H2S-mediated protein sulfhydration reveals metabolic reprogramming during the integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bederman, Ilya; Majumder, Mithu; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda; Kabil, Omer; Willard, Belinda; Banerjee, Ruma; Wang, Benlian; Bebek, Gurkan; Evans, Charles R.; Fox, Paul L.; Gerson, Stanton L.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The sulfhydration of cysteine residues in proteins is an important mechanism involved in diverse biological processes. We have developed a proteomics approach to quantitatively profile the changes of sulfhydrated cysteines in biological systems. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that sulfhydrated cysteines are part of a wide range of biological functions. In pancreatic β cells exposed to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, elevated H2S promotes the sulfhydration of enzymes in energy metabolism and stimulates glycolytic flux. We propose that transcriptional and translational reprogramming by the integrated stress response (ISR) in pancreatic β cells is coupled to metabolic alternations triggered by sulfhydration of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10067.001 PMID:26595448

  12. The Effect of Casein Protein Prior to Sleep on Fat Metabolism in Obese Men.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Amber W; Cappadona, Stacy R; Panton, Lynn B; Allman, Brittany R; Contreras, Robert J; Hickner, Robert C; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that ingesting protein at night before sleep is either beneficial or non-detrimental to metabolism, health, and body composition in obese women. However, the overnight protein-induced lipolytic actions and mechanism for improved metabolism and body composition have not been fully established. Therefore, in a crossover design, twelve obese men (age, 27.0 ± 2.2 years) were randomly assigned to ingest (within 30 min of sleep) casein protein (CAS, 120 kcal) or a non-nutritive placebo (PLA) before going to sleep. Markers of fat metabolism (lipolysis, substrate utilization, growth hormone), insulin, glucose, resting energy expenditure (REE), and appetite (questionnaire and ghrelin) were measured. During sleep and the next morning, interstitial glycerol from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) was measured using microdialysis. There were no differences in SCAAT glycerol (overnight: CAS, 177.4 ± 26.7; PLA, 183.8 ± 20.2 μmol/L; morning: CAS, 171.6 ± 19.1; PLA, 161.5 ± 18.6 μmol/L), substrate utilization, REE, or any blood markers between CAS and PLA. Desire to eat was greater for CAS compared to baseline (p = 0.03), but not different from PLA (baseline: 39 ± 6, CAS: 62 ± 8, PLA: 55 ± 5 mm). CAS consumption before sleep did not affect fat or glucose metabolism, REE, or suppress appetite in hyperinsulemic obese men. CAS may be consumed before sleep without impeding overnight or morning fat metabolism in young, obese men.

  13. The Effect of Casein Protein Prior to Sleep on Fat Metabolism in Obese Men.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Amber W; Cappadona, Stacy R; Panton, Lynn B; Allman, Brittany R; Contreras, Robert J; Hickner, Robert C; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that ingesting protein at night before sleep is either beneficial or non-detrimental to metabolism, health, and body composition in obese women. However, the overnight protein-induced lipolytic actions and mechanism for improved metabolism and body composition have not been fully established. Therefore, in a crossover design, twelve obese men (age, 27.0 ± 2.2 years) were randomly assigned to ingest (within 30 min of sleep) casein protein (CAS, 120 kcal) or a non-nutritive placebo (PLA) before going to sleep. Markers of fat metabolism (lipolysis, substrate utilization, growth hormone), insulin, glucose, resting energy expenditure (REE), and appetite (questionnaire and ghrelin) were measured. During sleep and the next morning, interstitial glycerol from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) was measured using microdialysis. There were no differences in SCAAT glycerol (overnight: CAS, 177.4 ± 26.7; PLA, 183.8 ± 20.2 μmol/L; morning: CAS, 171.6 ± 19.1; PLA, 161.5 ± 18.6 μmol/L), substrate utilization, REE, or any blood markers between CAS and PLA. Desire to eat was greater for CAS compared to baseline (p = 0.03), but not different from PLA (baseline: 39 ± 6, CAS: 62 ± 8, PLA: 55 ± 5 mm). CAS consumption before sleep did not affect fat or glucose metabolism, REE, or suppress appetite in hyperinsulemic obese men. CAS may be consumed before sleep without impeding overnight or morning fat metabolism in young, obese men. PMID:27472361

  14. The Effect of Casein Protein Prior to Sleep on Fat Metabolism in Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Amber W.; Cappadona, Stacy R.; Panton, Lynn B.; Allman, Brittany R.; Contreras, Robert J.; Hickner, Robert C.; Ormsbee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that ingesting protein at night before sleep is either beneficial or non-detrimental to metabolism, health, and body composition in obese women. However, the overnight protein-induced lipolytic actions and mechanism for improved metabolism and body composition have not been fully established. Therefore, in a crossover design, twelve obese men (age, 27.0 ± 2.2 years) were randomly assigned to ingest (within 30 min of sleep) casein protein (CAS, 120 kcal) or a non-nutritive placebo (PLA) before going to sleep. Markers of fat metabolism (lipolysis, substrate utilization, growth hormone), insulin, glucose, resting energy expenditure (REE), and appetite (questionnaire and ghrelin) were measured. During sleep and the next morning, interstitial glycerol from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) was measured using microdialysis. There were no differences in SCAAT glycerol (overnight: CAS, 177.4 ± 26.7; PLA, 183.8 ± 20.2 μmol/L; morning: CAS, 171.6 ± 19.1; PLA, 161.5 ± 18.6 μmol/L), substrate utilization, REE, or any blood markers between CAS and PLA. Desire to eat was greater for CAS compared to baseline (p = 0.03), but not different from PLA (baseline: 39 ± 6, CAS: 62 ± 8, PLA: 55 ± 5 mm). CAS consumption before sleep did not affect fat or glucose metabolism, REE, or suppress appetite in hyperinsulemic obese men. CAS may be consumed before sleep without impeding overnight or morning fat metabolism in young, obese men. PMID:27472361

  15. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  16. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Makde, Ravindra D; Tan, Song

    2013-11-15

    The molecular details of how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understanding fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty in producing diffraction-quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300-kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex that diffract to 2.9-Å resolution. These steps include both pre- and postcrystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1/nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths, as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1/nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of postcrystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0- to 2.9-Å resolution.

  17. Immunocytochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and the metabolism of cytoskeletal proteins in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, M E; Somera, F P; Eng, L F

    1983-04-01

    Spinal cord sections from Lewis rats with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) showed greatly increased staining of astrocytes when stained immunocytochemically for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Fibrous processes in white matter were heavily stained early in the course of the disease when paralysis was first evident (10-12 days after injection of guinea pig spinal cord myelin), then protoplasmic astrocytes were stained in the gray matter and became more heavily stained at 20 days post-injection. The stained astrocytes were evenly distributed throughout the tissue, and did not correspond to the sites of the lesions. Spinal cord slices of control and EAE rats were incubated with [3H]amino acids, then cytoskeletal proteins were prepared in an enriched fraction, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the protein bands counted for radioactivity. In the EAE rat all cytoskeletal proteins, including the neurofilaments, vimentin, microtubules, GFAP and actin, showed increased uptake of radioactive amino acids. Immunoprecipitation of GFAP with specific antiserum showed increased radioactivity in the complex beginning at day 10 when cellular infiltration was beginning in the EAE animals. As the disease became acute, the radioactivity in the immunoprecipitated GFAP increased, in some cases to very high levels, then by day 18 when recovery was underway, the radioactivity had fallen to normal levels. Possible agents causing metabolic activation of protein synthesis in EAE animals include stimulating substances elaborated by infiltrating lymphoid cells, and the generalized edema accompanying the demyelinative condition. The activation of GFAP protein staining and metabolism in EAE might serve as a model for the activated growth of astrocyte processes which cause the severe gliosis seen in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Grafted block complex coacervate core micelles and their effect on protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Agata M; de Keizer, Arie; Norde, Willem; Detrembleur, Christophe; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the formation and the stability of grafted block complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) in solution and the influence of grafted block C3M coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme. The C3Ms consist of a grafted block copolymer PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) (poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylate methoxy poly(ethylene oxide)), with a negatively charged PAA block and a neutral PAPEO block and a positively charged homopolymer P2MVPI (poly(N-methyl 2-vinyl pyridinium iodide). In solution, these C3Ms partly disintegrate at salt concentrations between 50 and 100 mM NaCl. Adsorption of C3Ms and proteins has been studied with fixed-angle optical reflectometry, at salt concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mM NaCl. In comparison with the adsorption of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) alone adsorption of C3Ms significantly increases the amount of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) on the surface. This results in a higher surface density of PEO chains. The stability of the C3M coatings and their influence on protein adsorption are determined by the composition and the stability of the C3Ms in solution. A C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) coating strongly suppresses the adsorption of all proteins on silica and polystyrene. The reduction of protein adsorption is the highest at 100 mM NaCl (>90%). The adsorbed C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) layer is partly removed from the surface upon exposure to an excess of beta-lactoglobulin solution, due to formation of soluble aggregates consisting of beta-lactoglobulin and P2MVPI(43). In contrast, C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(228) which has a fivefold longer cationic block enhances adsorption of the negatively charged proteins on both surfaces at salt concentrations above 1 mM NaCl. A single PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) layer causes only a moderate reduction of protein adsorption.

  19. The Mediterranean diet: Effects on proteins that mediate fatty acid metabolism in the colon

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Zora

    2012-01-01

    A Mediterranean diet appears to have health benefits in many domains of human health, mediated perhaps by its anti-inflammatory effects. Metabolism of fatty acids and subsequent eicosanoid production is a key mechanism by which a Mediterranean diet can exert anti-inflammatory effects. Both dietary fatty acids and fatty acid metabolism determine fatty acid availability for cyclooxygenase- and lipoxygenase-dependent production of eicosanoids, namely prostaglandins and leukotrienes. In dietary intervention studies and in observational studies of the Mediterranean diet, blood levels of fatty acids do reflect dietary intakes but are attenuated. Small differences in fatty acid levels, however, appear to be important, especially when exposures occur over long periods of time. This review summarizes how fat intakes from a Greek-style Mediterranean diet can be expected to affect fatty acid metabolizing proteins, with an emphasis on the metabolic pathways that lead to the formation of proinflammatory eicosanoids. The proteins involved in these pathways are ripe for investigation using proteomic approaches and may be targets for colon cancer prevention. PMID:22133197

  20. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism.

  1. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism. PMID:27496951

  2. Aberrant protein acylation is a common observation in inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pougovkina, Olga; Te Brinke, Heleen; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M; de Boer, Vincent C J

    2014-09-01

    Inherited disorders of acyl-CoA metabolism, such as defects in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid oxidation can present with severe clinical symptoms either neonatally or later in life, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are often incompletely understood. We now report the discovery of a novel biochemical mechanism that could contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. We identified increased protein lysine butyrylation in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice as a result of the accumulation of butyryl-CoA. Similarly, in SCAD deficient fibroblasts, lysine butyrylation was increased. Furthermore, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) deficient patient cells had increased levels of malonylated lysines and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) deficient patient cells had increased propionylation of lysines. Since lysine acylation can greatly impact protein function, aberrant lysine acylation in inherited disorders associated with acyl-CoA accumulation may well play a role in their disease pathophysiology. PMID:24531926

  3. The Ribosomal Protein-Mdm2-p53 Pathway and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deisenroth, Chad; Zhang, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    Cellular growth and division are two fundamental processes that are exquisitely sensitive and responsive to environmental fluctuations. One of the most energetically demanding functions of these processes is ribosome biogenesis, the key component to regulating overall protein synthesis and cell growth. Perturbations to ribosome biogenesis have been demonstrated to induce an acute stress response leading to p53 activation through the inhibition of Mdm2 by a number of ribosomal proteins. The energy status of a cell is a highly dynamic variable that naturally contributes to metabolic fluctuations, which can affect both the rates of ribosome biogenesis and p53 function. This, in turn, determines whether a cell is in an anabolic, growth-promoting state or a catabolic, growth-suppressing state. Here the authors integrate the known functions of p53 to postulate how changes in nutrient availability may induce the ribosomal protein–Mdm2-p53 signaling pathway to modulate p53-dependent metabolic regulation. PMID:21779508

  4. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  5. The Roles of Vitamin A in the Regulation of Carbohydrate, Lipid, and Protein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Guoxun

    2014-01-01

    Currently, two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese. This high prevalence of overweight/obesity negatively affects the health of the population, as obese individuals tend to develop several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Due to obesity’s impact on health, medical costs, and longevity, the rise in the number of obese people has become a public health concern. Both genetic and environmental/dietary factors play a role in the development of metabolic diseases. Intuitively, it seems to be obvious to link over-nutrition to the development of obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Dietary nutrients not only provide energy derived from macronutrients, but also factors such as micronutrients with regulatory roles. How micronutrients, such as vitamin A (VA; retinol), regulate macronutrient homeostasis is still an ongoing research topic. As an essential micronutrient, VA plays a key role in the general health of an individual. This review summarizes recent research progress regarding VA’s role in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Due to the large amount of information regarding VA functions, this review focusses on metabolism in metabolic active organs and tissues. Additionally, some perspectives for future studies will be provided. PMID:26237385

  6. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on carbohydrate metabolism protein synthesis in the myocardium during sustained hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Glycolysis and the intensity of protein synthesis were studied in 140 white male rats in subcellular fractions of the myocardium during 45 day hypodynamia and hyperbaric oxygenation. Hypodynamia increased: (1) the amount of lactic acids; (2) the amount of pyruvic acid; (3) the lactate/pyruvate coefficient; and (4) the activities of aldolase and lactate dehydrogenase. Hyperbaric oxygenation was found to have a favorable metabolic effect on the animals with hypodynamia.

  7. CtIP: A DNA damage response protein at the intersection of DNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Paull, Tanya T

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian CtIP protein and its orthologs in other eukaryotes promote the resection of DNA double-strand breaks and are essential for meiotic recombination. Here we review the current literature supporting the role of CtIP in DNA end processing and the importance of CtIP endonuclease activity in DNA repair. We also examine the regulation of CtIP function by post-translational modifications, and its involvement in transcription- and replication-dependent functions through association with other protein complexes. The tumor suppressor function of CtIP likely is dependent on a combination of these roles in many aspects of DNA metabolism.

  8. The T=1 Capsid Protein of Penicillium chrysogenum Virus Is Formed by a Repeated Helix-Rich Core Indicative of Gene Duplication▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M.; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A.; Havens, Wendy M.; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 Å resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of α-helices, forming a repeated α-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the α-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability. PMID:20463071

  9. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  10. APL-1, the Alzheimer's Amyloid precursor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, modulates multiple metabolic pathways throughout development.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Raps, Daniel A; Li, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development.

  11. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  12. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. PMID:25518064

  13. Using comparative genomics to uncover new kinds of protein-based metabolic organelles in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Lopez, David; Wheatley, Nicole M; Yeates, Todd O

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartment (MCP) organelles are cytosolic, polyhedral structures consisting of a thin protein shell and a series of encapsulated, sequentially acting enzymes. To date, different microcompartments carrying out three distinct types of metabolic processes have been characterized experimentally in various bacteria. In the present work, we use comparative genomics to explore the existence of yet uncharacterized microcompartments encapsulating a broader set of metabolic pathways. A clustering approach was used to group together enzymes that show a strong tendency to be encoded in chromosomal proximity to each other while also being near genes for microcompartment shell proteins. The results uncover new types of putative microcompartments, including one that appears to encapsulate B12-independent, glycyl radical-based degradation of 1,2-propanediol, and another potentially involved in amino alcohol metabolism in mycobacteria. Preliminary experiments show that an unusual shell protein encoded within the glycyl radical-based microcompartment binds an iron-sulfur cluster, hinting at complex mechanisms in this uncharacterized system. In addition, an examination of the computed microcompartment clusters suggests the existence of specific functional variations within certain types of MCPs, including the alpha carboxysome and the glycyl radical-based microcompartment. The findings lead to a deeper understanding of bacterial microcompartments and the pathways they sequester. PMID:23188745

  14. Role of inter-domain cavity in the attachment of the orange carotenoid protein to the phycobilisome core and to the fluorescence recovery protein.

    PubMed

    Zlenko, Dmitry V; Krasilnikov, Pavel M; Stadnichuk, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular modeling and known spatial structure of proteins, we have derived a universal 3D model of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) and phycobilisome (PBS) interaction in the process of non-photochemical PBS quenching. The characteristic tip of the phycobilin domain of the core-membrane linker polypeptide (LCM) forms the attachment site on the PBS core surface for interaction with the central inter-domain cavity of the OCP molecule. This spatial arrangement has to be the most advantageous one because the LCM, as the major terminal PBS-fluorescence emitter, accumulates energy from the most other phycobiliproteins within the PBS before quenching by OCP. In agreement with the constructed model, in cyanobacteria, the small fluorescence recovery protein is wedged in the OCP's central cavity, weakening the PBS and OCP interaction. The presence of another one protein, the red carotenoid protein, in some cyanobacterial species, which also can interact with the PBS, also corresponds to this model. PMID:25905572

  15. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-02-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  16. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L. H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  17. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteoglycans by human fibroblasts involves recognition of the protein core.

    PubMed Central

    Glössl, J; Schubert-Prinz, R; Gregory, J D; Damle, S P; von Figura, K; Kresse, H

    1983-01-01

    Endocytosis by cultured human skin fibroblasts of 35SO4(2-)-labelled or [3H]leucine-labelled proteoglycans from fibroblast secretions and of 125I-proteodermatan sulphate from pig skin was quantitatively investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) Core proteins prepared by digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase were at least as efficiently endocytosed as native proteoglycans. Pig skin proteodermatan sulphate was a competitive inhibitor of endocytosis of 35SO4(2-)-labelled proteoglycans. (2) Proteoglycans produced in the presence of tunicamycin and native proteoglycans degraded with endoglycosaminidase H were internalized at a normal rate. Several monosaccharides that can be bound by mammalian lectins were unable to influence the internalization of proteoglycans. Treatment of proteoglycans with neuraminidase, however, resulted in an increased clearance rate. (3) Reductive methylation or acetoacetylation of lysine residues was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the rate of proteoglycan endocytosis. Reversal of acetoacetylation normalized the uptake properties. Endocytosis of native proteoglycans was also reduced in the presence of poly-L-lysine, and this reduction in endocytosis was observed as well with proteoglycans synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethylcysteine. These results suggest that the recognition marker required for receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteodermatan sulphate resides in its protein moiety and involves lysine residues. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6316923

  18. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  19. A low-protein diet during pregnancy alters glucose metabolism and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Souza, Denise de Fátima I; Ignácio-Souza, Letícia M; Reis, Sílvia Regina de L; Reis, Marise Auxiliadora de B; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrizio; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz

    2012-03-01

    In pancreatic islets, glucose metabolism is a key process for insulin secretion, and pregnancy requires an increase in insulin secretion to compensate for the typical insulin resistance at the end of this period. Because a low-protein diet decreases insulin secretion, this type of diet could impair glucose homeostasis, leading to gestational diabetes. In pancreatic islets, we investigated GLUT2, glucokinase and hexokinase expression patterns as well as glucose uptake, utilization and oxidation rates. Adult control non-pregnant (CNP) and control pregnant (CP) rats were fed a normal protein diet (17%), whereas low-protein non-pregnant (LPNP) and low-protein pregnant (LPP) rats were fed a low-protein diet (6%) from days 1 to 15 of pregnancy. The insulin secretion in 2.8 mmol l(-1) of glucose was higher in islets from LPP rats than that in islets from CP, CNP and LPNP rats. Maximal insulin release was obtained at 8.3 and 16.7 mmol l(-1) of glucose in LPP and CP groups, respectively. The glucose dose-response curve from LPNP group was shifted to the right in relation to the CNP group. In the CP group, the concentration-response curve to glucose was shifted to the left compared with the CNP group. The LPP groups exhibited an "inverted U-shape" dose-response curve. The alterations in the GLUT2, glucokinase and hexokinase expression patterns neither impaired glucose metabolism nor correlated with glucose islet sensitivity, suggesting that β-cell sensitivity to glucose requires secondary events other than the observed metabolic/molecular events. PMID:22034157

  20. Significance of the photosystem II core phosphatase PBCP for plant viability and protein repair in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Woodiwiss, Timothy; Knoerdel, Ryan; Zia, Ahmad; Wood, Magnus; Hoehner, Ricarda; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    PSII undergoes photodamage, which results in photoinhibition-the light-induced loss of photosynthetic activity. The main target of damage in PSII is the reaction center protein D1, which is buried in the massive 1.4 MDa PSII holocomplex. Plants have evolved a PSII repair cycle that degrades the damaged D1 subunit and replaces it with a newly synthesized copy. PSII core proteins, including D1, are phosphorylated in high light. This phosphorylation is important for the mobilization of photoinhibited PSII from stacked grana thylakoids to the repair machinery in distant unstacked stroma lamellae. It has been recognized that the degradation of the damaged D1 is more efficient after its dephosphorylation by a protein phosphatase. Recently a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C)-type PSII core phosphatase (PBCP) has been discovered, which is involved in the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. Its role in PSII repair, however, is unknown. Using a range of spectroscopic and biochemical techniques, we report that the inactivation of the PBCP gene affects the growth characteristic of plants, with a decreased biomass and altered PSII functionality. PBCP mutants show increased phosphorylation of core subunits in dark and photoinhibitory conditions and a diminished degradation of the D1 subunit. Our results on D1 turnover in PBCP mutants suggest that dephosphorylation of PSII subunits is required for efficient D1 degradation. PMID:24793754

  1. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  2. Glycosaminoglycan-free small proteoglycan core protein is secreted by fibroblasts from a patient with a syndrome resembling progeroid.

    PubMed Central

    Kresse, H; Rosthøj, S; Quentin, E; Hollmann, J; Glössl, J; Okada, S; Tønnesen, T

    1987-01-01

    A male patient, 4 years 9 mo old and having progeroidal appearance, exhibited delayed mental development and multiple abnormalities of connective tissues including growth failure, osteopenia of all and dysplasia of some bones, defective deciduous teeth, loose but elastic skin, delayed wound healing with formation of thin atrophic scars, scanty scalp hair, hypotonic muscles, and hypermobile joints. Skin fibroblasts of the patient converted only about half of the core protein of the small proteodermatan sulfate to a mature glycosaminoglycan chain-bearing proteoglycan. The remaining core protein, which contained complex-type asparagine-bound oligosaccharides, was secreted with almost normal kinetics. Xylosyltransferase activity and the synthesis of other proteoglycan types were normal. Normal induction of glycosaminoglycan synthesis occurred in the presence of 1 mM, but there was very little induction in the presence of 0.01 mM p-nitrophenyl-beta-xyloside. An antibody against an N-terminal pentadecapeptide of the core protein recognized the glycosaminoglycan-free core protein from the patient less well than the chain-bearing protein treated with chondroitin ABC lyase. Though these results do not define the basic defect unambiguously, they provide the first report of a disorder being due to an abnormality in small proteoglycan biosynthesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:3631078

  3. Small heat shock proteins in redox metabolism: implications for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Christians, Elisabeth S; Ishiwata, Takahiro; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2012-10-01

    A timely review series on small heat shock proteins has to appropriately examine their fundamental properties and implications in the cardiovascular system since several members of this chaperone family exhibit robust expression in the myocardium and blood vessels. Due to energetic and metabolic demands, the cardiovascular system maintains a high mitochondrial activity but irreversible oxidative damage might ensue from increased production of reactive oxygen species. How equilibrium between their production and scavenging is achieved becomes paramount for physiological maintenance. For example, heat shock protein B1 (HSPB1) is implicated in maintaining this equilibrium or redox homeostasis by upholding the level of glutathione, a major redox mediator. Studies of gain or loss of function achieved by genetic manipulations have been highly informative for understanding the roles of those proteins. For example, genetic deficiency of several small heat shock proteins such as HSPB5 and HSPB2 is well-tolerated in heart cells whereas a single missense mutation causes human pathology. Such evidence highlights both the profound genetic redundancy observed among the multigene family of small heat shock proteins while underscoring the role proteotoxicity plays in driving disease pathogenesis. We will discuss the available data on small heat shock proteins in the cardiovascular system, redox metabolism and human diseases. From the medical perspective, we envision that such emerging knowledge of the multiple roles small heat shock proteins exert in the cardiovascular system will undoubtedly open new avenues for their identification and possible therapeutic targeting in humans. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology.

  4. Metabolism of histones and nonhistone proteins of the nuclei and chromatin of liver cells in rats of different ages

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, A.I.; Malyshev, A.B.; Kulachenko, B.V.

    1986-10-10

    The metabolism of various classes of histones and nonhistone proteins in whole nuclei and liver chromatin of albino Wistar rats 1, 3, 12, and 24 months of age was studied. It was shown that in the course of postnatal ontogenesis, the metabolism of nonhistone proteins, extractable by a 0.14 M solution of NaCl, is increased in the animals. The incorporation of labeled precursors into the HMG 14 and HMG 17 proteins decreases with age of the animals; a higher level of specific radioactivity was established for the HMG 1+2 proteins in the 3- and 24-month old animals. The intensity of the metabolism of nonhistone proteins and histones is higher in the chromatin complex than in the whole nucleus at all stages of postnatal development of the animals. Among the histone proteins, H1 histones possess a higher level of specific radioactivity in animals of all age groups.

  5. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  6. Protein-loaded microspheres prepared by sequential adsorption of dextran sulphate and protamine on melamine formaldehyde core.

    PubMed

    Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Larionova, Natalia I

    2009-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer microspheres were fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of a dextran sulphate and a protamine on melamine formaldehyde cores, followed by the partial decomposition of the core. Effects of pH on the encapsulation of proteins and enzymes with different physico-chemical properties (insulin, aprotinin, peroxidase, glucose oxidase (GOD), catalase (Cat)) in the prepared microspheres were then studied. This method of protein encapsulation demonstrated a high loading capacity and efficiency. The protein incorporation and release was regulated by the pH of the solution. Encapsulated enzymes retained a high specific activity depending on the amount of protein incorporated. Bienzyme system GOD/Cat immobilized in the microspheres was suitable for the glucose content assay.

  7. Cooperation of two mRNA-binding proteins drives metabolic adaptation to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Sergi; Vergara, Sandra V.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Iron (Fe) is an essential co-factor for a wide range of cellular processes. We have previously demonstrated that during Fe-deficiency yeast Cth2 is expressed and promotes degradation of a battery of mRNAs leading to reprogramming of Fe-dependent metabolism and Fe-storage. We report that the Cth2-homologous protein, Cth1, is transiently expressed during Fe-deprivation and participates in the response to Fe-deficiency through the degradation of mRNAs primarily involved in mitochondrially-localized activities including respiration and amino acid biosynthesis. In parallel, wild type but not cth1Δ cth2Δ cells accumulate mRNAs encoding proteins that function in glucose import and storage and store high levels of glycogen. In addition, Fe-deficiency leads to Snf1 phosphorylation, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase family required for the cellular response to glucose starvation. These studies demonstrate a metabolic reprogramming as a consequence of Fe-starvation that is dependent on the coordinated activities of two mRNA-binding proteins. PMID:18522836

  8. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism. PMID:26700148

  9. Growth, feeding frequency, protein turnover, and amino acid metabolism in European lobster Homarus gammarus L.

    PubMed

    Mente, E; Houlihan, D F; Smith, K

    2001-06-01

    The effect of feeding frequency on growth and protein metabolism in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, was investigated. Fourth (IV) stage lobsters H. gammarus were fed individually a marine animal meal (herring/mussels meal) for 56 days. Feeding a daily ration equivalent to 10% of their body weight gave better growth than feeding daily rations of 5% and 20%. Protein synthesis rates were similar for the three food rations but protein growth rates were significantly lower and protein degradation rates highest in the 5% body weight per day ration group. The efficiency with which synthesised protein was retained as growth was found to be 38% in the in the 10% ratio group. Protein synthesis rates of lobsters were found to be lower than those for shrimps (Penaeus vannamei). The amino acid flux also suggests a lower protein conversion efficiency than shrimps P. vannamei. The results suggests that lobsters are slow, periodic feeders and that growth can be readily increased by manipulation of particular environmental factors such as feeding frequency. PMID:11351329

  10. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  11. Mcy protein, a potential antidiabetic agent: evaluation of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Marella, Saritha; Maddirela, Dilip Rajasekhar; Kumar, E G T V; Tilak, Thandaiah Krishna; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Chippada, Apparao

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to elucidate the long-term effects of anti-hyperglycemic active principle, Mcy protein (MCP), isolated from the fruits of Momordica cymbalaria on carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative stress in experimental diabetic rats. We used streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for the current studies. Our studies showed that MCP (2.5mg/kg.b.w) treatment significantly normalized the deranged activities of critical carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase. In addition MCP showed inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase and aldose reductase enzymes in in vitro assays. Further MCP treatment improved the antioxidant defensive mechanism by preventing deleterious oxidative products of cellular metabolism, which initiates the lipid peroxidation and by normalizing the antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) activities. Additional structural studies using circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that MCP contains majorly α-helix. Our findings suggest MCP regulates blood glucose and better manage diabetes mellitus associated complications by regulating carbohydrate metabolism and by protecting from the deleterious effects of oxidative stress. PMID:26826289

  12. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  13. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  14. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Anila K.; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  15. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  16. Uncoupling protein 2 regulates metabolic reprogramming and fate of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Kos, Ferdynand; Shrikant, Protul A

    2016-07-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) employing ex vivo-generated tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells shows tumor efficacy when the transferred cells possess both effector and memory functions. New strategies based on understanding of mechanisms that balance CD8+ T cell differentiation toward effector and memory responses are highly desirable. Emerging information confirms a central role for antigen-induced metabolic reprogramming in CD8+ T cell differentiation and clonal expansion. The mitochondrial protein uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is induced by antigen stimulation of CD8+ T cells; however, its role in metabolic reprogramming underlying differentiation and clonal expansion has not been reported. Employing genetic (siRNA) and pharmacologic (Genipin) approaches, we note that antigen-induced UCP2 expression reduces glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and production of reactive oxygen species to balance differentiation with survival of effector CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of UCP2 promotes CD8+ T cell terminal differentiation into short-lived effector cells (CD62L(lo)KLRG1(Hi)IFNγ(Hi)) that undergo clonal contraction. These findings are the first to reveal a role for antigen-induced UCP2 expression in balancing CD8+ T cell differentiation and survival. Targeting UCP2 to regulate metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells is an attractive new approach to augment efficacy of tumor therapy by ACT. PMID:27271549

  17. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control vacuole trafficking and developmental programs through the regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Sun, Ruobai; Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2015-01-01

    The vacuole is the most prominent compartment in plant cells and is important for ion and protein storage. In our effort to search for key regulators in the plant vacuole sorting pathway, ribosomal large subunit 4 (rpl4d) was identified as a translational mutant defective in both vacuole trafficking and normal development. Polysome profiling of the rpl4d mutant showed reduction in polysome-bound mRNA compared with wild-type, but no significant change in the general mRNA distribution pattern. Ribsomal profiling data indicated that genes in the lipid metabolism pathways were translationally down-regulated in the rpl4d mutant. Live imaging studies by Nile red staining suggested that both polar and nonpolar lipid accumulation was reduced in meristem tissues of rpl4d mutants. Pharmacological evidence showed that sterol and sphingolipid biosynthetic inhibitors can phenocopy the defects of the rpl4d mutant, including an altered vacuole trafficking pattern. Genetic evidence from lipid biosynthetic mutants indicates that alteration in the metabolism of either sterol or sphingolipid biosynthesis resulted in vacuole trafficking defects, similar to the rpl4d mutant. Tissue-specific complementation with key enzymes from lipid biosynthesis pathways can partially rescue both vacuole trafficking and auxin-related developmental defects in the rpl4d mutant. These results indicate that lipid metabolism modulates auxin-mediated tissue differentiation and endomembrane trafficking pathways downstream of ribosomal protein function.

  18. Avidin-based targeting and purification of a protein IX-modified, metabolically biotinylated adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Campos, Samuel K; Parrott, M Brandon; Barry, Michael A

    2004-06-01

    While genetic modification of adenoviral vectors can produce vectors with modified tropism, incorporation of targeting peptides/proteins into the structural context of the virion can also result in destruction of ligand targeting or virion integrity. To combat this problem, we have developed a versatile targeting system using metabolically biotinylated adenoviral vectors bearing biotinylated fiber proteins. These vectors have been demonstrated to be useful as a platform for avidin-based ligand screening and vector targeting by conjugating biotinylated ligands to the virus using high-affinity tetrameric avidin (K(d) = 10(-15) M). The biotinylated vector could also be purified by biotin-reversible binding on monomeric avidin (K(d) = 10(-7) M). In this report, a second metabolically biotinylated adenovirus vector, Ad-IX-BAP, has been engineered by fusing a biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) to the C-terminus of the adenovirus pIX protein. This biotinylated vector displays twice as many biotins and was markedly superior for single-step affinity purification on monomeric avidin resin. However, unlike the fiber-biotinylated vector, Ad-IX-BAP failed to retarget to cells with biotinylated antibodies including anti-CD71 against the transferrin receptor. In contrast, Ad-IX-BAP was retargeted if transferrin, the cognate ligand for CD71, was used as a ligand rather than the anti-CD71. This work demonstrates the utility of metabolic biotinylation as a molecular screening tool to assess the utility of different viral capsid proteins for ligand display and the biology and compatibility of different ligands and receptors for vector targeting applications. These results also demonstrate the utility of the pIX-biotinylated vector as a platform for gentle single-step affinity purification of adenoviral vectors.

  19. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Filiano, Ashley N; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase) knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  20. Removal of Available Decorin Core-Protein from Powdered Bovine Hide by Treatments used to Process Intact Hides into Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a modification of a previously developed sandwich Elisa procedure to measure decorin core-protein (DCP), we determined the available decorin content of a sample of raw powdered bovine hide before and after treatment with the reagents used in the early steps of the process for converting a hide...

  1. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections.

  2. Effect of protein modification by malondialdehyde on the interaction between the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein and photosystem II core proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2010-04-01

    Previously we observed that the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein (OEC33) which stabilizes the Mn cluster in photosystem II (PSII), was modified with malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of peroxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the modification increased in heat-stressed plants (Yamauchi et al. 2008). In this study, we examined whether the modification of OEC33 with MDA affects its binding to the PSII complex and causes inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Purified OEC33 and PSII membranes that had been removed of extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (PSIIOEE) of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were separately treated with MDA. The binding was diminished when both OEC33 and PSIIOEE were modified, but when only OEC33 or PSIIOEE was treated, the binding was not impaired. In the experiment using thylakoid membranes, release of OEC33 from PSII and corresponding loss of oxygen-evolving activity were observed when thylakoid membranes were treated with MDA at 40 degrees C but not at 25 degrees C. In spinach leaves treated at 40 degrees C under light, maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F(v)/F(m) ratio of chlorophyll fluorescence) and oxygen-evolving activity decreased. Simultaneously, MDA contents in heat-stressed leaves increased, and OEC33 and PSII core proteins including 47 and 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding proteins were modified with MDA. In contrast, these changes were to a lesser extent at 40 degrees C in the dark. These results suggest that MDA modification of PSII proteins causes release of OEC33 from PSII and it is promoted in heat and oxidative conditions.

  3. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... for example, glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  4. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... e.g., glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  5. Human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) protects murine cells from injury during metabolic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R S; Thomas, J A; Fina, M; German, Z; Benjamin, I J

    1993-01-01

    Expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) is stimulated during ischemia, but its proposed cytoprotective function during metabolic stress has remained conjectural. We introduced a human hsp70 gene into mouse 10T1/2 cells and assessed the susceptibility of these cells to injury in response to conditions that mimic ischemia. Transiently transfected cells, in the absence of stress, expressed human hsp70 to levels equal to or greater than those induced by heat shock, as assessed by RNAse protection, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. By comparison to cells transfected with a control plasmid, cells expressing the human hsp70 transgene were resistant to injury induced by glucose deprivation and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. These results provide direct evidence for a cytoprotective function of hsp70 during metabolic stress. Images PMID:8326014

  6. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  7. UNCOUPLING PROTEIN-2 MODULATES THE LIPID METABOLIC RESPONSE TO FASTING IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Anthony R.; Fülöp, Péter; Derdák, Zoltán; Kassai, Andrea; Sabo, Edmond; Mark, Nicholas M.; Paragh, György; Wands, Jack R.; Baffy, György

    2008-01-01

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) regulates insulin secretion by controlling ATP levels in β cells. While UCP2 deficiency improves glycemic control in mice, increased expression of UCP2 interferes with glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These observations link UCP2 to β cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes with a perplexing evolutionary role. We found higher residual serum insulin levels and blunted lipid metabolic responses in fasted ucp2−/− mice, supporting the concept that UCP2 evolved to suppress insulin effects and to accommodate the fuel switch to fatty acids during starvation. In the absence of UCP2, fasting initially promotes peripheral lipolysis and hepatic fat accumulation at less than expected rates, but culminates in protracted steatosis indicating diminished hepatic utilization and clearance of fatty acids. We conclude that UCP2-mediated control of insulin secretion is a physiologically relevant mechanism of the metabolic response to fasting. PMID:18292186

  8. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  9. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-03-07

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer.

  10. Nitrogen metabolism, digestive parameters, and protein requirements for the maintenance of buffalo growth.

    PubMed

    Machado, Erica; Yoshimura, Emerson Henri; Santos, Nadine Woruby; Agustinho, Bruna Calvo; Pereira, Lucelia de Moura; Samensari, Rafael Barreiros; de Aguiar, Silvia Cristina; Zeoula, Lucia Maria

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of crude protein (CP) levels in the diet of growing female buffaloes on nitrogen metabolism and estimate protein requirements for maintenance. Four female buffaloes were used, cannulated in the rumen, with an average initial body weight (BW) of 355 ± 3.5 kg, in a Latin square (4 × 4) with four animals and four levels of CP in the diet (70, 90, 110, and 130 g/kg dry matter (DM)) composed of corn silage and concentrate. The increase in protein intake with increasing levels of dietary CP resulted in a higher concentration of ammonia in the rumen and higher ruminal disappearance of PB. However, omasal flow of protein increased linearly as did the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis. The CP levels affected DM intake and other nutrients positively, but there was no effect on nutrient total digestibility. Nitrogen (N) balance, when expressed relative to N intake, had an average value of 48.5 % observed across. The protein requirement for the maintenance of growing female buffaloes was 4.6 g CP/kg BW(0.75). PMID:26590610

  11. Odorant-binding proteins and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: implications in olfactory perireceptor events.

    PubMed

    Heydel, Jean-Marie; Coelho, Alexandra; Thiebaud, Nicolas; Legendre, Arièle; Le Bon, Anne-Marie; Faure, Philippe; Neiers, Fabrice; Artur, Yves; Golebiowski, Jérôme; Briand, Loïc

    2013-09-01

    At the periphery of the olfactory system, the binding of odorants on olfactory receptors (ORs) is usually thought to be the first level of the perception of smell. However, at this stage, there is evidence that other molecular mechanisms also interfere with this chemoreception by ORs. These perireceptor events are mainly supported by two groups of proteins present in the olfactory nasal mucus or in the nasal epithelium. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), the first group of proteins have been investigated for many years. OBPs are small carrier proteins capable of binding odorants with affinities in the micromolar range. Although there is no absolute evidence to support their functional roles in vertebrates, OBPs are good candidates for the transport of inhaled odorants towards the ORs via the nasal mucus. The second group of proteins involves xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, which are strongly expressed in the olfactory epithelium and supposed to be involved in odorant transformation, degradation, and/or olfactory signal termination. Following an overview of these proteins, this review explores their roles, which are still a matter of debate.

  12. Controlled protein embedment onto Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles for immuno-labeling of nanosilver surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2014-05-28

    Difficulties in stable conjugation of biomolecules to nanosilver surfaces have severely limited the use of silver nanostructures in biological applications. Here, we report a facile antibody conjugation onto gold/silver (Au/Ag) core-shell nanoparticles by stable and uniform embedment of an antibody binding protein, protein G, in silver nanoshells. A rigid helical peptide linker with a terminal cysteine residue was fused to protein G. A mixture of the peptide-fused protein G and space-filling free peptide was reacted with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a protein G-linked peptide layer on the particle surface. Uniform silver nanoshells were successfully formed on these protein G-AuNPs, while stably embedding protein G-linked peptide layers. Protein G specifically targets the Fc region of an antibody and thus affords properly orientated antibodies on the particle surface. Compared to Au nanoparticles of similar size with randomly adsorbed antibodies, the present immuno-labeled Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles offered nearly 10-fold higher sensitivities for naked-eye detection of surface bound antigens. In addition, small dye molecules that were bonded to the peptide layer on Au nanoparticles exhibited highly enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals upon Ag shell formation. The present strategy provides a simple but efficient way to conjugate antibodies to nanosilver surfaces, which will greatly facilitate wider use of the superior optical properties of silver nanostructures in biological applications. PMID:24801432

  13. Growth in the slow lane: protein metabolism in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna (Strebel 1908).

    PubMed

    Fraser, Keiron P P; Clarke, Andrew; Peck, Lloyd S

    2007-08-01

    Growth rates in Antarctic ectotherms are generally considered to be low in comparison to temperate and tropical species. Food consumption plays a major role in determining animal growth rates, but once food is ingested soft tissue growth rates are largely determined by the protein synthesis retention efficiency (PSRE), a measure of the efficiency with which proteins are synthesised and retained as protein growth. The effect of water temperatures on the PSRE of polar organisms has not previously been investigated, and it is possible that reduced PSRE at polar water temperatures may at least partially explain low growth rates in Antarctic organisms. We also currently lack any information on the potential effects of predicted increases in seawater temperatures on protein metabolism in Antarctic ectotherms. We have measured seasonal protein synthesis, degradation and growth rates in free-ranging Antarctic limpets (Nacella concinna), together with protein synthesis rates at temperatures ranging between -1.5 degrees C and 6.0 degrees C. PSRE were not significantly different in summer (15.69+/-4.41%) or winter (20.59+/-4.45%), but values were considerably lower than those previously reported in temperate and tropical species. A meta-analysis of published ectotherm PSRE suggested there was a positive relationship with temperature (y=449.9-114.9x, r(2)=28.8%, P<0.05). In turn, this suggests that temperature may be an important factor in determining ectotherm growth efficiency via an influence on PSRE. Maximal fractional and absolute protein synthesis rates occurred at approximately 1 degrees C in N. concinna, the approximate summer water temperature at the study site, and protein synthesis rates decreased above this temperature. In the absence of adaptation, predicted increases in Antarctic water temperatures would result in reduced, rather than increased, rates of protein synthesis and, in turn, possibly growth.

  14. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  15. Protein costs do not explain evolution of metabolic strategies and regulation of ribosomal content: does protein investment explain an anaerobic bacterial Crabtree effect?

    PubMed

    Goel, Anisha; Eckhardt, Thomas H; Puri, Pranav; de Jong, Anne; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Giera, Martin; Fusetti, Fabrizia; de Vos, Willem M; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Molenaar, Douwe; Kuipers, Oscar P; Teusink, Bas

    2015-07-01

    Protein investment costs are considered a major driver for the choice of alternative metabolic strategies. We tested this premise in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium that exhibits a distinct, anaerobic version of the bacterial Crabtree/Warburg effect; with increasing growth rates it shifts from a high yield metabolic mode [mixed-acid fermentation; 3 adenosine triphosphate (ATP) per glucose] to a low yield metabolic mode (homolactic fermentation; 2 ATP per glucose). We studied growth rate-dependent relative transcription and protein ratios, enzyme activities, and fluxes of L. lactis in glucose-limited chemostats, providing a high-quality and comprehensive data set. A three- to fourfold higher growth rate rerouted metabolism from acetate to lactate as the main fermentation product. However, we observed hardly any changes in transcription, protein levels and enzyme activities. Even levels of ribosomal proteins, constituting a major investment in cellular machinery, changed only slightly. Thus, contrary to the original hypothesis, central metabolism in this organism appears to be hardly regulated at the level of gene expression, but rather at the metabolic level. We conclude that L. lactis is either poorly adapted to growth at low and constant glucose concentrations, or that protein costs play a less important role in fitness than hitherto assumed.

  16. pH/sugar dual responsive core-cross-linked PIC micelles for enhanced intracellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Gan; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Kong, Deling; Shi, Linqi

    2013-10-14

    Herein, a series of biocompatible, robust, pH/sugar-sensitive, core-cross-linked, polyion complex (PIC) micelles based on phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction were developed for protein intracellular delivery. The rationally designed poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid-co-glutamicamidophenylboronic acid) (PEG-b-P(Glu-co-GluPBA)) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine-co-ε-3,4-dihydroxyphenylcarboxyl-L-lysine) (PEG-b-P(Lys-co-LysCA)) copolymers were successfully synthesized and self-assembled under neutral aqueous condition to form uniform micelles. These micelles possessed a distinct core-cross-linked core-shell structure comprised of the PEG outer shell and the PGlu/PLys polyion complex core bearing boronate ester cross-linking bonds. The cross-linked micelles displayed superior physiological stabilities compared with their non-cross-linked counterparts while swelling and disassembling in the presence of excess fructose or at endosomal pH. Notably, either negatively or positively charged proteins can be encapsulated into the micelles efficiently under mild conditions. The in vitro release studies showed that the release of protein cargoes under physiological conditions was minimized, while a burst release occurred in response to excess fructose or endosomal pH. The cytotoxicity of micelles was determined by cck-8 assay in HepG2 cells. The cytochrome C loaded micelles could efficiently delivery proteins into HepG2 cells and exhibited enhanced apoptosis ability. Hence, this type of core-cross-linked PIC micelles has opened a new avenue to intracellular protein delivery.

  17. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic depression in animals.

    PubMed

    Rider, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinase that controls cellular and whole body energy homoeostasis. AMPK is activated during energy stress by a rise in AMP:ATP ratio and maintains energy balance by phosphorylating targets to switch on catabolic ATP-generating pathways, while at the same time switching off anabolic ATP-consuming processes. Metabolic depression is a strategy used by many animals to survive environmental stress and has been extensively studied across phylogeny by comparative biochemists and physiologists, but the role of AMPK has only recently been addressed. This review first deals with the evolution of AMPK in eukaryotes (excluding plants and fungi) and its regulation. Changes in adenine nucleotides and AMPK activation are described in animals during environmental energy stress, before considering the involvement of AMPK in controlling β-oxidation, fatty acid synthesis, triacylglycerol mobilization and protein synthesis. Lastly, strategies are presented to validate the role of AMPK in mediating metabolic depression by phosphorylating downstream targets.

  18. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  19. Automated Protein Turnover Calculations from 15N Partial Metabolic Labeling LC/MS Shotgun Proteomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Staudinger, Christiana; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a well-controlled process in which polypeptides are constantly being degraded and subsequently replaced with newly synthesized copies. Extraction of composite spectral envelopes from complex LC/MS shotgun proteomics data can be a challenging task, due to the inherent complexity of biological samples. With partial metabolic labeling experiments this complexity increases as a result of the emergence of additional isotopic peaks. Automated spectral extraction and subsequent protein turnover calculations enable the analysis of gigabytes of data within minutes, a prerequisite for systems biology high throughput studies. Here we present a fully automated method for protein turnover calculations from shotgun proteomics data. The approach enables the analysis of complex shotgun LC/MS 15N partial metabolic labeling experiments. Spectral envelopes of 1419 peptides can be extracted within an hour. The method quantifies turnover by calculating the Relative Isotope Abundance (RIA), which is defined as the ratio between the intensity sum of all heavy (15N) to the intensity sum of all light (14N) and heavy peaks. To facilitate this process, we have developed a computer program based on our method, which is freely available to download at http://promex.pph.univie.ac.at/protover. PMID:24736476

  20. Role of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Pakaski, M; Kasa, P

    2003-06-01

    Potentiation of central cholinergic activity has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for improving the cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing the acetylcholine concentration in the brain by modulating acetylcholine-sterase (AChE) activity is among the most promising therapeutic strategies. Efforts to treat the underlying pathology based on the modulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing in order to decrease the accumulation of beta-amyloid are also very important. Alterations in APP metabolism have recently been proposed to play a key role in the long-lasting effects of AChE inhibitors. This review surveys recent data from in vivo and in vitro studies that have contributed to our understanding of the role of AChE inhibitors in APP processing. The regulatory mechanisms relating to the muscarinic agonist effect, protein kinase C activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, involving the alpha-secretase or the 5 -UTR region of the APP gene, are also discussed. Further work is warranted to elucidate the exact roles in APP metabolism of the AChE inhibitors used in AD therapy at present. PMID:12769797

  1. Intracellular protein O-GlcNAc modification integrates nutrient status with transcriptional and metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Alexis K; Ball, Lauren E

    2015-01-01

    The inducible, nutrient-sensitive posttranslational modification of protein Ser/Thr residues with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) occurs on histones, transcriptional regulators, metabolic enzymes, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and many critical intermediates of growth factor signaling. Cycling of O-GlcNAc modification on and off of protein substrates is catalyzed by the actions of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), respectively. To date, there are less than 150 publications addressing the role of O-GlcNAc modification in cancer and over half were published in the last 2 years. These studies have clearly established that increased expression of OGT and hyper-O-GlcNAcylation is common to human cancers of breast, prostate, colon, lung, and pancreas. Furthermore, attenuating OGT activity reduces tumor growth in vitro and metastasis in vivo. This chapter discusses the structure and function of the O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes, mechanisms by which protein O-GlcNAc modification sense changes in nutrient status, the influence of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes on glucose metabolism, and provides an overview of recent observations regarding the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cancer.

  2. Protein corona hampers targeting potential of MUC1 aptamer functionalized SN-38 core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Hosseinzadeh, Hosniyeh; Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Zahra H; Amini, Mohsen; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2015-10-15

    Nanoparticles have been considered to improve delivery and physicochemical characteristics of bioactive agents in recent years. In this study, a core-shell chitosan nanoparticulate system was prepared for the targeted delivery of SN-38. SN-38, an active metabolite of camptothecin, conjugated to hyaluronic acid (HA) was used as the shell of chitosan nanoparticles decorated with MUC1 aptamer. The conjugation was confirmed by UV and (1)H NMR techniques. Targeting efficiency was evaluated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. It was shown that MUC1 decoration increased the uptake of nanoparticles by HT29 cells, MUC1 positive cell line, while CHO as MUC1 negative cell line showed no enhanced uptake of decorated nanoparticles. Compared to non-targeted nanoparticles, flow cytometric annexin V/PI analyses showed that the nanoparticles exert cytotoxicity through apoptosis. It was, however, shown that protein corona adsorption at the surface of nanoparticles hampered the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles, as there was no difference between the cytotoxicity of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles, when treated with bovine serum albumin prior to cytotoxicity study.

  3. Metabolic functions of atypical protein kinase C: "good" and "bad" as defined by nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Sajan, Mini P

    2010-03-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms mediate insulin effects on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tissues and lipid synthesis in liver and support other metabolic processes, expression of enzymes needed for islet insulin secretion and hepatic glucose production/release, CNS appetite suppression, and inflammatory responses. In muscle, selective aPKC deficiency impairs glucose uptake and produces insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which, by activating hepatic aPKC, provokes inordinate increases in lipid synthesis and produces typical "metabolic syndrome" features. In contrast, hepatic aPKC deficiency diminishes lipid synthesis and protects against metabolic syndrome features. Unfortunately, aPKC is deficient in muscle but paradoxically conserved in liver in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus; this combination is particularly problematic because it promotes lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities. Accordingly, metabolic effects of aPKCs can be "good" or "bad," depending upon nutritional status; thus, muscle glucose uptake, islet insulin secretion, hepatic glucose and lipid production/release, and adipose fat synthesis/storage would be important for survival during periods of limited food availability and therefore be "good." However, during times of food surfeit, excessive activation of hepatic aPKC, whether caused by overnutrition or impairments in extrahepatic effects of insulin, would lead to inordinate increases in hepatic lipid synthesis and metabolic syndrome features and therefore be "bad." In keeping with these ideas, the inhibition of hepatic aPKC markedly ameliorates lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in experimental models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. We postulate that a similar approach may be useful for treating humans. PMID:19996389

  4. Metabolic functions of atypical protein kinase C: "good" and "bad" as defined by nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Sajan, Mini P

    2010-03-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms mediate insulin effects on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tissues and lipid synthesis in liver and support other metabolic processes, expression of enzymes needed for islet insulin secretion and hepatic glucose production/release, CNS appetite suppression, and inflammatory responses. In muscle, selective aPKC deficiency impairs glucose uptake and produces insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which, by activating hepatic aPKC, provokes inordinate increases in lipid synthesis and produces typical "metabolic syndrome" features. In contrast, hepatic aPKC deficiency diminishes lipid synthesis and protects against metabolic syndrome features. Unfortunately, aPKC is deficient in muscle but paradoxically conserved in liver in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus; this combination is particularly problematic because it promotes lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities. Accordingly, metabolic effects of aPKCs can be "good" or "bad," depending upon nutritional status; thus, muscle glucose uptake, islet insulin secretion, hepatic glucose and lipid production/release, and adipose fat synthesis/storage would be important for survival during periods of limited food availability and therefore be "good." However, during times of food surfeit, excessive activation of hepatic aPKC, whether caused by overnutrition or impairments in extrahepatic effects of insulin, would lead to inordinate increases in hepatic lipid synthesis and metabolic syndrome features and therefore be "bad." In keeping with these ideas, the inhibition of hepatic aPKC markedly ameliorates lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in experimental models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. We postulate that a similar approach may be useful for treating humans.

  5. SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism and cancer growth by repressing iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S M; Lee, J; Finley, L W S; Schmidt, P J; Fleming, M D; Haigis, M C

    2015-04-16

    Iron metabolism is essential for many cellular processes, including oxygen transport, respiration and DNA synthesis, and many cancer cells exhibit dysregulation in iron metabolism. Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs), which control the expression of iron-related genes by binding iron-responsive elements (IREs) of target mRNAs. Here, we report that mitochondrial SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism by modulating IRP1 activity. SIRT3 loss increases reactive oxygen species production, leading to elevated IRP1 binding to IREs. As a consequence, IRP1 target genes, such as the transferrin receptor (TfR1), a membrane-associated glycoprotein critical for iron uptake and cell proliferation, are controlled by SIRT3. Importantly, SIRT3 deficiency results in a defect in cellular iron homeostasis. SIRT3 null cells contain high levels of iron and lose iron-dependent TfR1 regulation. Moreover, SIRT3 null mice exhibit higher levels of iron and TfR1 expression in the pancreas. We found that the regulation of iron uptake and TfR1 expression contribute to the tumor-suppressive activity of SIRT3. Indeed, SIRT3 expression is negatively correlated with TfR1 expression in human pancreatic cancers. SIRT3 overexpression decreases TfR1 expression by inhibiting IRP1 and represses proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Our data uncover a novel role of SIRT3 in cellular iron metabolism through IRP1 regulation and suggest that SIRT3 functions as a tumor suppressor, in part, by modulating cellular iron metabolism. PMID:24909164

  6. Perturbed rhythmic activation of signaling pathways in mice deficient for Sterol Carrier Protein 2-dependent diurnal lipid transport and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jouffe, Céline; Gobet, Cédric; Martin, Eva; Métairon, Sylviane; Morin-Rivron, Delphine; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gachon, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Through evolution, most of the living species have acquired a time keeping system to anticipate daily changes caused by the rotation of the Earth. In all of the systems this pacemaker is based on a molecular transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop able to generate rhythmic gene expression with a period close to 24 hours. Recent evidences suggest that post-transcriptional regulations activated mostly by systemic cues play a fundamental role in the process, fine tuning the time keeping system and linking it to animal physiology. Among these signals, we consider the role of lipid transport and metabolism regulated by SCP2. Mice harboring a deletion of the Scp2 locus present a modulated diurnal accumulation of lipids in the liver and a perturbed activation of several signaling pathways including PPARα, SREBP, LRH-1, TORC1 and its upstream regulators. This defect in signaling pathways activation feedbacks upon the clock by lengthening the circadian period of animals through post-translational regulation of core clock regulators, showing that rhythmic lipid transport is a major player in the establishment of rhythmic mRNA and protein expression landscape. PMID:27097688

  7. Analysis of the binding of high mobility group protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cook, G R; Minch, M; Schroth, G P; Bradbury, E M

    1989-01-25

    The binding of high mobility group (HMG) protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle has been studied in D2O solution using 1H NMR at 500 MHz. Spectra were obtained for purified HMG 17, purified nucleosome core particles, and the reconstituted HMG 17-nucleosome core particle complex at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 M NaCl. Subtraction of the core particle spectra from spectra of the core particle reconstituted with HMG 17 demonstrated those regions of HMG 17 which interact with the nucleosome at different ionic strengths; the resonance peaks of interacting groups are broadened due to their restricted mobility. At 0.1 M NaCl, the mobility of all the amino acid side chains of HMG 17 was restricted, indicating complete binding of HMG 17 to the much larger nucleosome core particle. At 0.2 M NaCl most of the amino acids were free with the exception of arginine and proline which are confined to or predominant in the basic central region of HMG 17. These amino acids were completely free only at 0.4 M NaCl. We conclude that the entire HMG 17 molecule interacts with the nucleosome core particle at physiological ionic strength. The acidic COOH-terminal region of HMG 17 is released from interaction with the core histones at an NaCl concentration between 0.1 and 0.2 M and so binds weakly at physiological ionic strength. The basic central region binds more strongly to the core particle DNA, being completely released only at much higher ionic strength, between 0.3 and 0.4 M NaCl.

  8. Protein serine/threonine kinases in signal transduction for secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, T; Lee, P-C; Horinouchi, S

    2002-08-01

    A number of proteins in the Gram-positive bacterial genus Streptomyces are phosphorylated on their serine/threonine and tyrosine residues in response to developmental phases. AfsR is one of these proteins and acts as a transcriptional factor in both the regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces griseus. In S. coelicolor A3(2), AfsR is phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by more than three protein kinases whose kinase activity is enhanced by means of autophosphorylation on their serine and threonine residues. The degree of autophosphorylation of AfsK is regulated by KbpA which, by binding directly to the kinase domain of AfsK, inhibits its autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of AfsR enhances its DNA-binding activity and causes it to bind the promoter elements, including -35, of afsS, thus resulting in activation of afsS transcription. ATPase activity of AfsR is essential for this transcriptional activation, probably because the energy available from ATP hydrolysis is required for the isomerization of the closed complex between AfsR and RNA polymerase to a transcriptionally competent open complex. afsS, encoding a 63-amino-acid protein, then activates transcription of actII-ORF4, a pathway-specific transcriptional activator in the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster, in an as yet unknown way. Distribution of the afsK- afsR systems in a wide variety of Streptomyces species and the presence of many phosphorylated proteins in a given Streptomyces strain suggest that the signal transduction via not only two-component regulatory systems but also serine/threonine kinases generally regulates secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in this genus.

  9. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  10. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  11. The effect of hypodynamia on mineral and protein metabolism in calcified tissues of the maxillodental system (experimental radioisotope study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhonchukov, A. A.; Kovalenko, Y. A.; Kolesnik, A. G.; Kondratyev, Y. I.; Ilyushko, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Mineral and protein metabolism was studied in experiments on 60 white rats, using P-32 and Ca-45 uptake in the mineral fractions, 2C-14-glycine in the protein fractions, and P-32 in both fractions of calcified tissues as indices over a 100 day period of experimental hypodynamia. Combined alterations in mineral and protein metabolism occurred in the calcified tissues of the experimental animals. The most pronounced changes were found in P-32 and 2C-14-glycine metabolism. In the incisors and femoral bones, these alterations occurred in two phases: P-32 and 2C-14-glycine uptake first increased, then decreased. Changes in Ca-45 metabolism were less pronounced, particularly in the initial period of the experiment. A marked reduction in P-32, Ca-45, and 2C-14-glycine uptake was found in various fractions of the calcified tissues on the 100th day of experimental hypodynamia.

  12. Interaction of hepatitis C virus core protein with janus kinase is required for efficient production of infectious viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choongho

    2013-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein plays not only a structural role in the virion morphogenesis by encapsidating a virus RNA genome but also a non-structural role in HCV-induced pathogenesis by blocking innate immunity. Especially, it has been shown to regulate JAK-STAT signaling pathway through its direct interaction with Janus kinase (JAK) via its proline-rich JAK-binding motif ((79)PGYPWP(84)). However, little is known about the physiological significance of this HCV core-JAK association in the context of the virus life cycle. In order to gain an insight, a mutant HCV genome (J6/JFH1-79A82A) was constructed to express the mutant core with a defective JAK-binding motif ((79)AGYAWP(84)) using an HCV genotype 2a infectious clone (J6/JFH1). When this mutant HCV genome was introduced into hepatocarcinoma cells, it was found to be severely impaired in its ability to produce infectious viruses in spite of its robust RNA genome replication. Taken together, all these results suggest an essential requirement of HCV core-JAK protein interaction for efficient production of infectious viruses and the potential of using core-JAK blockers as a new anti-HCV therapy.

  13. Investigation of carbohydrate and protein metabolism in the digestive organs of the rabbit under the combined influence of vibration, acceleration and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuy, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    During spaceflight, the organism is subjected to the influence of various extremal factors such as acceleration, vibration, irradiation, etc. The study of the influence of these factors on metabolism, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism, in young rabbits is of great significance in simulation experiments. Dynamic factors and irradiation, depending on dose and duration, lead to reduced RNA and protein metabolism.

  14. Role of Protein Farnesylation in Burn-Induced Metabolic Derangements and Insulin Resistance in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomokazu; Kramer, Joshua; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J.; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Kaneki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic derangements, including insulin resistance and hyperlactatemia, are a major complication of major trauma (e.g., burn injury) and affect the prognosis of burn patients. Protein farnesylation, a posttranslational lipid modification of cysteine residues, has been emerging as a potential component of inflammatory response in sepsis. However, farnesylation has not yet been studied in major trauma. To study a role of farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic aberration, we examined the effects of farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibitor, FTI-277, on burn-induced insulin resistance and metabolic alterations in mouse skeletal muscle. Methods A full thickness burn (30% total body surface area) was produced under anesthesia in male C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. After the mice were treated with FTI-277 (5 mg/kg/day, IP) or vehicle for 3 days, muscle insulin signaling, metabolic alterations and inflammatory gene expression were evaluated. Results Burn increased FTase expression and farnesylated proteins in mouse muscle compared with sham-burn at 3 days after burn. Simultaneously, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, Akt and GSK-3β was decreased. Protein expression of PTP-1B (a negative regulator of IR-IRS-1 signaling), PTEN (a negative regulator of Akt-mediated signaling), protein degradation and lactate release by muscle, and plasma lactate levels were increased by burn. Burn-induced impaired insulin signaling and metabolic dysfunction were associated with increased inflammatory gene expression. These burn-induced alterations were reversed or ameliorated by FTI-277. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that burn increased FTase expression and protein farnesylation along with insulin resistance, metabolic alterations and inflammatory response in mouse skeletal muscle, all of which were prevented by FTI-277 treatment. These results indicate that increased protein farnesylation plays a pivotal role in burn

  15. The N-Terminus of Murine Leukaemia Virus p12 Protein Is Required for Mature Core Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Darren J.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Wanaguru, Madushi; Elis, Efrat; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Li, Wilson; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Bacharach, Eran; Bishop, Kate N.

    2014-01-01

    The murine leukaemia virus (MLV) gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices. PMID:25356837

  16. Differential regulation of SOCS-1 signalling in B and T lymphocytes by hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Prayther, Deborah; Trabue, Christopher; Dong, Zhi Ping; Moorman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by a strong propensity toward chronicity, autoimmune phenomena and lymphomagenesis, supporting a role for lymphocyte dysregulation during persistent viral infection. We have shown that HCV core protein inhibits T-cell functions through interaction with a complement receptor, gC1qR. Here, we further report that B cells also express gC1qR that can be bound by HCV core protein. Importantly, using flow cytometry, we demonstrated differential regulation of B and T lymphocytes by the HCV core–gC1qR interaction, with down-regulation of CD69 activation in T cells but up-regulation of CD69 activation and cell proliferation in B cells. HCV core treatment led to decreased interferon-γ production in CD8+ T cells but to increased immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G production as well as cell surface expression of costimulatory and chemokine receptors, including CD86 (B7-2), CD154 (CD40L) and CD195 (CCR5), in CD20+ B cells. Finally, we showed down-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 (SOCS-1) using real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, accompanied by up-regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) phosphorylation in B cells in response to HCV core protein, with the opposite pattern observed in HCV core-treated T cells. This study demonstrates differential regulation of B and T lymphocytes by HCV core and supports a mechanism by which lymphocyte dysregulation occurs in the course of persistent HCV infection. PMID:18397267

  17. Protein metabolism in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle during turpentine-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muthny, Tomas; Kovarik, Miroslav; Sispera, Ludek; Tilser, Ivan; Holecek, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the differences in protein and amino acid metabolism after subcutaneous turpentine administration in the soleus muscle (SOL), predominantly composed of red fibres, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) composed of white fibres. Young rats (40–60 g) were injected subcutaneously with 0.2 ml of turpentine oil/100 g body weight (inflammation) or with the same volume of saline solution (control). Twenty-four hours later SOL and EDL were dissected and incubated in modified Krebs–Heinseleit buffer to estimate total and myofibrillar proteolysis, chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasome (CHTLA), leucine oxidation, protein synthesis and amino acid release into the medium. The data obtained demonstrate that in intact rats, all parameters measured except protein synthesis are significantly higher in SOL than in EDL. In turpentine treated animals, CHTLA increased and protein synthesis decreased significantly more in EDL. Release of leucine was inhibited significantly more in SOL. We conclude that turpentine-induced inflammation affects more CHTLA, protein synthesis and leucine release in EDL compared to SOL. PMID:18197871

  18. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases.

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; EL Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  20. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  1. Beclin 2 Functions in Autophagy, Degradation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Congcong; Wei, Yongjie; Sun, Kai; Li, Binghua; Dong, Xiaonan; Zou, Zhongju; Liu, Yang; Kinch, Lisa N.; Khan, Shaheen; Sinha, Sangita; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Grishin, Nick V.; Xiao, Guanghua; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scherer, Philipp E.; Whistler, Jennifer L.; Levine, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Summary The molecular mechanism of autophagy and its relationship to other lysosomal degradation pathways remain incompletely understood. Here, we identified a previously uncharacterized mammalian-specific protein, Beclin 2, which like Beclin 1, functions in autophagy and interacts with class III PI3K complex components and Bcl-2. However, Beclin 2, but not Beclin 1, functions in an additional lysosomal degradation pathway. Beclin 2 is required for ligand-induced endolysosomal degradation of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) through its interaction with GASP1. Beclin 2 homozygous knockout mice have decreased embryonic viability, and heterozygous knockout mice have defective autophagy, increased levels of brain cannabinoid 1 receptor, elevated food intake, and obesity and insulin resistance. Our findings identify Beclin 2 as a novel converging regulator of autophagy and GPCR turnover, and highlight the functional and mechanistic diversity of Beclin family members in autophagy, endolysosomal trafficking and metabolism. PMID:23954414

  2. Effects of supplemental protein on acid-base status and calcium metabolism of nonlactating Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Beede, D K

    1990-11-01

    The objective was to study effects of 11, 15, and 19% dietary CP on acid-base status, Ca balance, and metabolic responses to intravenous infusion of disodium EDTA. Dietary protein content was increased by supplementation of hydrolyzed feather meal and distillers dried grains with solubles to a concentrate combined with cottonseed hulls (40:60). Six nonlactating, nonpregnant multiparous Jersey cows (average 6.7 yr old) were used in two balanced 3 x 3 Latin squares with 24-d periods. Increasing supplemental CP decreased blood base excess, urinary titratable base, and net base excretion, but increased urinary ammonium excretion. Calcium excretion and balance were not affected by supplemental CP. Analysis to detect heterogeneity of regression showed that response of plasma EDTA-free Ca to EDTA infusion over time was not different among treatments. Increasing supplemental protein induced mild acidosis but did not affect Ca balance or responses to Ca removal from blood (via EDTA infusion) of non-lactating cows.

  3. Monitoring Protein O-GlcNAc Status via Metabolic Labeling and Copper-free Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Chin Fen; Wells, Lance

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAc modification found on the serine and threonine residues of intracellular proteins is an inducible post-translational modification that regulates numerous biological processes. In combination with other cell biological and biochemical approaches, a robust and streamlined strategy for detecting the number and stoichiometry of O-GlcNAc modification can provide valuable insights for decoding the functions of O-GlcNAc at the molecular level. Herein, we report an optimized workflow for evaluating the O-GlcNAc status of proteins using a combination of metabolic labeling and click chemistry based mass tagging. This method is strategically complementary to the chemoenzymatic-based mass-tagging method. PMID:24995865

  4. Leptin-mediated changes in hepatic mitochondrial metabolism, structure, and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amandeep; Wirtz, Martin; Parker, Nadeene; Hogan, Matthew; Strahler, John; Michailidis, George; Schmidt, Sarah; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Diano, Sabrina; Andrews, Philip; Brand, Martin D.; Friedman, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Leptin reduces body weight in ob/ob mice by decreasing food intake and increasing energy expenditure; however, the mechanisms by which it does the latter are not known. Here we report that 30% of the weight loss induced by leptin treatment of ob/ob mice is due to changes in energy expenditure. In assessing leptin's effects on specific tissues, we found that hepatic basal metabolic rate was paradoxically decreased 1.7-fold with leptin treatment, which was the result of a 1.6-fold reduction in mitochondrial volume density and altered substrate oxidation kinetics. The altered kinetics were associated with a decrease in protein levels of 2 mitochondrial respiratory chain components—cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIa and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV. In addition to reduced hepatic metabolism, there was reduced long chain fatty acid production and a 2.5-fold increase in hepatic lipid export, both of which explain the reduced steatosis in leptin-treated animals. These data help clarify the role of the liver in leptin-mediated weight loss and define the mechanisms by which leptin alters hepatic metabolism and corrects steatosis. PMID:19622746

  5. Dissociation of the effects of epinephrine and insulin on glucose and protein metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, P.; Luzi, L.; Del Prato, S.; DeFronzo, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The separate and combined effects of insulin and epinephrine on leucine metabolism were examined in healthy young volunteers. Subjects participated in four experimental protocols: (1) euglycemic insulin clamp (+80 microU/ml), (2) epinephrine infusion (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus somatostatin with basal replacement of insulin and glucagon, (3) combined epinephrine (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus insulin (+80 microU/ml) infusion, and (4) epinephrine and somatostatin as in study 2 plus basal amino acid replacement. Studies were performed with a prime-continuous infusion of (1-14C)leucine and indirect calorimetry. Our results indicate that (1) hyperinsulinemia causes a generalized decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations, including leucine; (2) the reduction in plasma leucine concentration is primarily due to an inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; nonoxidative leucine disposal decreases after insulin infusion; (3) epinephrine, without change in plasma insulin concentration, reduces plasma amino acid levels; (4) combined epinephrine-insulin infusion causes a greater decrease in plasma amino levels than observed with either hormone alone; this is because of a greater inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; and (5) when basal amino acid concentrations are maintained constant with a balanced amino acid infusion, epinephrine inhibits the endogenous leucine flux. In conclusion, the present results do not provide support for the concept that epinephrine is a catabolic hormone with respect to amino acid-protein metabolism. In contrast, epinephrine markedly inhibits insulin-mediated glucose metabolism.

  6. Unraveling the actions of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic diseases: Systemic to molecular insights.

    PubMed

    Weikel, Karen A; Ruderman, Neil B; Cacicedo, José M

    2016-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role both in sensing and regulating cellular energy state. In experimental animals, its activation has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, in humans, AMPK activation alone often does not completely resolve these conditions. Thus, an improved understanding of AMPK action and regulation in metabolic and other diseases is needed. Herein, we provide a brief description of the enzymatic regulation of AMPK and review its role in maintaining energy homeostasis. We then discuss tissue-specific actions of AMPK that become distorted during such conditions as obesity, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Finally, we explore recent findings regarding the interactions of AMPK with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the lysosome and discuss how changes in these relationships during overnutrition may lead to AMPK dysfunction. A more thorough understanding of AMPK's molecular interactions during diseases of overnutrition may provide key insights for the development of AMPK-based combinatorial treatments for metabolic disease. PMID:27085772

  7. Markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in term infants

    PubMed Central

    Hytinantti, T; Rutanen, E; Turpeinen, M; Sorva, R; Andersson, S

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To study the relation between fetal growth and markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in term infants.
METHODS—Cord vein plasma was obtained from 67 term infants of gestational age 37.1-41.7 weeks (39 appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 11 large for gestational age (LGA; relative birth weight ⩾ 2.0 SD), and 17 small for gestational age (SGA; relative birth weight ⩽ −2.0 SD)) for analysis of markers of metabolism of collagen type I (PICP and ICTP) and III (PIIINP) and of IGFBP-1.
RESULTS—Negative correlations existed between gestational age and PICP (r = −0.294, p = 0.0158), ICTP (r = −0.338, p = 0.0052), and PIIINP (r = −0.432, p = 0.0003). These correlations were also found in SGA infants (all p < 0.05). IGFBP-1 showed negative correlations with birth weight and relative birth weight (r = −0.644, p = 0.0001, and r = −0.693, p = 0.0001 respectively) but not with gestational age (p>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—In the term fetus, collagen metabolism is primarily dependent on maturity and not on intrauterine growth status, whereas IGFBP-1 reflects intrauterine growth independently of maturity.

 PMID:10873165

  8. Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Maurya, Santosh K; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) (∼ 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to "internal desynchrony" between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.

  9. Cocoa and Whey Protein Differentially Affect Markers of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism and Satiety.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Caroline L; Foegeding, E Allen; Harris, G Keith

    2016-03-01

    Food formulation with bioactive ingredients is a potential strategy to promote satiety and weight management. Whey proteins are high in leucine and are shown to decrease hunger ratings and increase satiety hormone levels; cocoa polyphenolics moderate glucose levels and slow digestion. This study examined the effects of cocoa and whey proteins on lipid and glucose metabolism and satiety in vitro and in a clinical trial. In vitro, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were treated with 0.5-100 μg/mL cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) and/or 1-15 mM leucine (Leu) and assayed for lipid accumulation and leptin production. In vivo, a 6-week clinical trial consisted of nine panelists (age: 22.6 ± 1.7; BMI: 22.3 ± 2.1) consuming chocolate-protein beverages once per week, including placebo, whey protein isolate (WPI), low polyphenolic cocoa (LP), high polyphenolic cocoa (HP), LP-WPI, and HP-WPI. Measurements included blood glucose and adiponectin levels, and hunger ratings at baseline and 0.5-4.0 h following beverage consumption. At levels of 50 and 100 μg/mL, CPE significantly inhibited preadipocyte lipid accumulation by 35% and 50%, respectively, and by 22% and 36% when combined with 15 mM Leu. Leu treatment increased adipocyte leptin production by 26-37%. In the clinical trial, all beverages significantly moderated blood glucose levels 30 min postconsumption. WPI beverages elicited lowest peak glucose levels and HP levels were significantly lower than LP. The WPI and HP beverage treatments significantly increased adiponectin levels, but elicited no significant changes in hunger ratings. These trends suggest that combinations of WPI and cocoa polyphenols may improve markers of metabolic syndrome and satiety. PMID:26987021

  10. Energy requirements, protein-energy metabolism and balance, and carbohydrates in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hay, William W; Brown, Laura D; Denne, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Energy is necessary for all vital functions of the body at molecular, cellular, organ, and systemic levels. Preterm infants have minimum energy requirements for basal metabolism and growth, but also have requirements for unique physiology and metabolism that influence energy expenditure. These include body size, postnatal age, physical activity, dietary intake, environmental temperatures, energy losses in the stool and urine, and clinical conditions and diseases, as well as changes in body composition. Both energy and protein are necessary to produce normal rates of growth. Carbohydrates (primarily glucose) are principle sources of energy for the brain and heart until lipid oxidation develops over several days to weeks after birth. A higher protein/energy ratio is necessary in most preterm infants to approximate normal intrauterine growth rates. Lean tissue is predominantly produced during early gestation, which continues through to term. During later gestation, fat accretion in adipose tissue adds increasingly large caloric requirements to the lean tissue growth. Once protein intake is sufficient to promote net lean body accretion, additional energy primarily produces more body fat, which increases almost linearly at energy intakes >80-90 kcal/kg/day in normal, healthy preterm infants. Rapid gains in adiposity have the potential to produce later life obesity, an increasingly recognized risk of excessive energy intake. In addition to fundamental requirements for glucose, protein, and fat, a variety of non-glucose carbohydrates found in human milk may have important roles in promoting growth and development, as well as production of a gut microbiome that could protect against necrotizing enterocolitis.

  11. Anesthesia with halothane and nitrous oxide alters protein and amino acid metabolism in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Horber, F.F.; Krayer, S.; Rehder, K.; Haymond, M.W.

    1988-09-01

    General anesthesia in combination with surgery is known to result in negative nitrogen balance. To determine whether general anesthesia without concomitant surgery decreases whole body protein synthesis and/or increases whole body protein breakdown, two groups of dogs were studied: Group 1 (n = 6) in the conscious state and Group 2 (n = 8) during general anesthesia employing halothane (1.5 MAC) in 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. Changes in protein metabolism were estimated by isotope dilution techniques employing simultaneous infusions of (4,53H)leucine and alpha-(1-14C)-ketoisocaproate (KIC). Total leucine carbon flux was unchanged or slightly increased in the anesthetized animals when compared to the conscious controls, indicating only a slight increase in the rate of proteolysis. However, leucine oxidation was increased (P less than 0.001) by more than 80% in the anesthetized animals when compared with their conscious controls, whereas whole body nonoxidative leucine disappearance, an indicator of whole body protein synthesis, was decreased. The ratio of leucine oxidation to the nonoxidative rate of leucine disappearance, which provides an index of the catabolism of at least one essential amino acid in the postabsorptive state, was more than twofold increased (P less than 0.001) in the anesthetized animals regardless of the tracer employed. These studies suggest that the administration of anesthesia alone, without concomitant surgery, is associated with a decreased rate of whole body protein synthesis and increased leucine oxidation, resulting in increased leucine and protein catabolism, which may be underlying or initiating some of the protein wasting known to occur in patients undergoing surgery.

  12. Ecdysteroids affect in vivo protein metabolism of the flight muscle of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Wu, M.; Cook, P.; Hodsden, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ecdysteroid growth promotion of the dorsolongitudinal flight muscle of Manduca sexta was studied by measuring in vivo protein metabolism using both "flooding-dose" and "non-carrier" techniques. These procedures differ in that the former method includes injection of non-labelled phenylalanine (30 micromoles/insect) together with the [3H]amino acid. Injected radioactivity plateaued in the haemolymph within 7 min. With the flooding-dose method, haemolymph and intramuscular specific radioactivities were similar between 15 min and 2 h. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into muscle protein was linear with either method between 30 and 120 min. Fractional rates (%/12 h) of synthesis with the flooding-dose technique were best measured after 1 h because of the initial delay in radioactivity equilibration. Estimation of body phenylalanine turnover with the non-carrier method showed 24-53%/h which was negligible with the flooding-dose method. Since the two methods yielded similar rates of protein synthesis, the large injection of non-labelled amino acid did not alter the rate of synthesis. Because the flooding-dose technique requires only a single time point measurement, it is the preferred method. The decline and eventual cessation of flight-muscle growth was mostly a consequence of declining protein synthesis though degradation increased between 76-86 h before eclosion and was relatively rapid. This decline in muscle growth could be prevented by treating pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone (10 micrograms/insect). Protein accretion was promoted by a decline of up to 80% in protein breakdown, which was offset in part by a concurrent though much smaller decrease in protein synthesis. Therefore, ecdysteroids may increase flight-muscle growth by inhibiting proteolysis.

  13. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtech; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-03-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core of globular proteins is believed to be the consequence of exterior hydrophobic forces of entropic nature. This, together with the low occurrence of hydrogen bonds in the protein core, leads to the opinion that the energy contribution of core formation to protein folding and stability is negligible. We show that stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of a small protein, rubredoxin, determined by means of high-level correlated ab initio calculations (complete basis set limit of MP2 stabilization energy + CCSD(T) correction term), amounted to approximately 50 kcal/mol. These results clearly demonstrate strong attraction inside a hydrophobic core. This finding may lead to substantial changes in the current view of protein folding. We also point out the inability of the DFT/B3LYP method to describe a strong attraction between studied amino acids.

  14. Phylogenetic distributions and histories of proteins involved in anaerobic pyruvate metabolism in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hug, Laura A; Stechmann, Alexandra; Roger, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Protists that live in low oxygen conditions often oxidize pyruvate to acetate via anaerobic ATP-generating pathways. Key enzymes that commonly occur in these pathways are pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase (H(2)ase) as well as the associated [FeFe]-H(2)ase maturase proteins HydE, HydF, and HydG. Determining the origins of these proteins in eukaryotes is of key importance to understanding the origins of anaerobic energy metabolism in microbial eukaryotes. We conducted a comprehensive search for genes encoding these proteins in available whole genomes and expressed sequence tag data from diverse eukaryotes. Our analyses of the presence/absence of eukaryotic PFO, [FeFe]-H(2)ase, and H(2)ase maturase sequences across eukaryotic diversity reveal orthologs of these proteins encoded in the genomes of a variety of protists previously not known to contain them. Our phylogenetic analyses revealed: 1) extensive lateral gene transfers of both PFO and [FeFe]-H(2)ase in eubacteria, 2) decreased support for the monophyly of eukaryote PFO domains, and 3) that eukaryotic [FeFe]-H(2)ases are not monophyletic. Although there are few eukaryote [FeFe]-H(2)ase maturase orthologs characterized, phylogenies of these proteins do recover eukaryote monophyly, although a consistent eubacterial sister group for eukaryotic homologs could not be determined. An exhaustive search for these five genes in diverse genomes from two representative eubacterial groups, the Clostridiales and the alpha-proteobacteria, shows that although these enzymes are nearly universally present within the former group, they are very rare in the latter. No alpha-proteobacterial genome sequenced to date encodes all five proteins. Molecular phylogenies and the extremely restricted distribution of PFO, [FeFe]-H(2)ases, and their associated maturases within the alpha-proteobacteria do not support a mitochondrial origin for these enzymes in eukaryotes. However, the unexpected prevalence of PFO

  15. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  16. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-01-01

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  17. Integration and Validation of the Genome-Scale Metabolic Models of Pichia pastoris: A Comprehensive Update of Protein Glycosylation Pathways, Lipid and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tomàs-Gamisans, Màrius; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are tools that allow predicting a phenotype from a genotype under certain environmental conditions. GEMs have been developed in the last ten years for a broad range of organisms, and are used for multiple purposes such as discovering new properties of metabolic networks, predicting new targets for metabolic engineering, as well as optimizing the cultivation conditions for biochemicals or recombinant protein production. Pichia pastoris is one of the most widely used organisms for heterologous protein expression. There are different GEMs for this methylotrophic yeast of which the most relevant and complete in the published literature are iPP668, PpaMBEL1254 and iLC915. However, these three models differ regarding certain pathways, terminology for metabolites and reactions and annotations. Moreover, GEMs for some species are typically built based on the reconstructed models of related model organisms. In these cases, some organism-specific pathways could be missing or misrepresented. Results In order to provide an updated and more comprehensive GEM for P. pastoris, we have reconstructed and validated a consensus model integrating and merging all three existing models. In this step a comprehensive review and integration of the metabolic pathways included in each one of these three versions was performed. In addition, the resulting iMT1026 model includes a new description of some metabolic processes. Particularly new information described in recently published literature is included, mainly related to fatty acid and sphingolipid metabolism, glycosylation and cell energetics. Finally the reconstructed model was tested and validated, by comparing the results of the simulations with available empirical physiological datasets results obtained from a wide range of experimental conditions, such as different carbon sources, distinct oxygen availability conditions, as well as producing of two different recombinant proteins. In

  18. Defining Protein Requirements of Preterm Infants by Using Metabolic Studies in Fetuses and Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Chris H P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids form one of the main building blocks for fetal and neonatal growth. Despite improvements in neonatal care, including postnatal nutrition, growth faltering and suboptimal outcome after premature birth are still frequently encountered. Nutrition can partly be held responsible. Over the years, there has been a trend in delivering amino acids earlier from birth on and in larger quantities. Unfortunately, little is known about the specific metabolism of proteins, especially during fetal life or during disease. This review gives an overview of different methods of studying metabolism during early life and what we have come to learn so far. Different examples are given on the complex interplay between the placenta and the fetus. From both ovine and human studies, we know that amino acids are not only used for protein synthesis in the fetus, they are also oxidized to a large extent. Postnatally, we have succeeded in improving the nitrogen balance in preterm infants, but the preconditions need also to be improved before concluding that today's policy is optimal. Only by gaining more knowledge on both fetal and neonatal physiology and disease will we be able to further optimize growth and functional outcome in premature infants. PMID:27336406

  19. Sm-Like Protein-Mediated RNA Metabolism Is Required for Heat Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masanori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Sm-like proteins play multiple functions in RNA metabolism, which is essential for biological processes such as stress responses in eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana sad1 mutant has a mutation of sm-like protein 5 (LSM5) and shows impaired drought and salt stress tolerances. The lsm5/sad1 mutant also showed hypersensitivity to heat stress. GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 was localized in the nucleus under optimal growth conditions. After heat stress treatment, GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 fluorescence was also observed as small cytoplasmic dots, in addition to nuclear localization. Whole genome transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes in Arabidopsis were drastically changed in response to heat stress. More heat-responsive genes were highly expressed in lsm5/sad1 mutant at both 2 and 6 h after heat stress treatment. Additionally, intron-retained and capped transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant after heat stress treatment. In this study, we also identified non-Arabidopsis Genome Initiative transcripts that were expressed from unannotated regions. Most of these transcripts were antisense transcripts, and many capped non-AGI transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant during heat stress treatment. These results indicated that LSM5/SAD1 functions to degrade aberrant transcripts through appropriate mRNA splicing and decapping, and precise RNA metabolic machinery is required for heat stress tolerance. PMID:27493656

  20. Impaired mitochondrial metabolism and protein synthesis in streptozotocin diabetic rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Memon, R.A.; Bessman, S.P.; Mohan, C. )

    1990-02-26

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from control, streptozotocin diabetic rats were incubated at 30{degrees}C in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.5 mM concentration of each of the 20 natural amino acids. Effect of insulin on the oxidation of 2,3-{sup 14}C and 1,4-{sup 14}C succinate (suc) carbons and their incorporation into hepatocyte protein, lipid and various metabolic intermediates was studied. Mitochondrial oxidation of suc carbons and their incorporation into protein and lipid was significantly lower in diabetic and insulin treated diabetic rats. Diabetic rats failed to exhibit any significant insulin effect on the oxidation of either 2,3 or 1,4-{sup 14}C suc carbons. Amphibolic channeling of 2,3-{sup 14}C suc carbons into amino acids was significantly reduced in hepatocytes of diabetic rats, however, more of these carbons were diverted into the gluconeogenesis pathway. Diabetes caused a far greater decrease in the oxidation of 2,3-{sup 14}C suc carbons as compared to 1,4-{sup 14}C suc. Based on an earlier report that insulin stimulates only the intramitochondrial Krebs cycle reactions, the authors conclude that the diminished level of anabolic activities in the diabetic rat hepatocytes is due to the subsequent reduction in amphibolic channeling of metabolic intermediates.

  1. Retinoic acid metabolism proteins are altered in trichoblastomas induced by mouse papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Suo, Liye; Ghim, Shinge; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer burden is significant as treatment costs have skyrocketed to $8.1 million annually and some forms metastasize, such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and melanoma. cSCC is caused by altered growth factor signaling induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet light (UV) exposure, and infections with papillomaviruses (PVs). One of the few options for preventing cSCC in high-risk patients is oral retinoids. While much is understood about retinoid treatments and metabolism in mouse models of chemically and UV exposure induced cSCC, little is known about the role of retinoids in PV-induced cSCC. To better understand how retinoid metabolism is altered in cSCC, we examined the expression of this pathway in the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1), which produces trichoblastomas in dorsal skin but not cSCC. We found significant increases in a rate-limiting enzyme involved in retinoic acid synthesis and retinoic acid binding proteins, suggestive of increased RA synthesis, in MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J mice. Similar increases in these proteins were seen after acute UVB exposure in Crl:SKH1-Hr(hr) mice and in regressing pre-cancerous lesions in a chemically-induced mouse model, suggesting a common mechanism in limiting the progression of papillomas to full blown cSCC. PMID:26416148

  2. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  3. Role of forkhead box protein A3 in age-associated metabolic decline

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinran; Xu, Lingyan; Gavrilova, Oksana; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased adiposity and diminished thermogenesis, but the critical transcription factors influencing these metabolic changes late in life are poorly understood. We recently demonstrated that the winged helix factor forkhead box protein A3 (Foxa3) regulates the expansion of visceral adipose tissue in high-fat diet regimens; however, whether Foxa3 also contributes to the increase in adiposity and the decrease in brown fat activity observed during the normal aging process is currently unknown. Here we report that during aging, levels of Foxa3 are significantly and selectively up-regulated in brown and inguinal white fat depots, and that midage Foxa3-null mice have increased white fat browning and thermogenic capacity, decreased adipose tissue expansion, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased longevity. Foxa3 gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in inguinal adipose depots demonstrated a cell-autonomous function for Foxa3 in white fat tissue browning. Furthermore, our analysis revealed that the mechanisms of Foxa3 modulation of brown fat gene programs involve the suppression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivtor 1 α (PGC1α) levels through interference with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1-mediated transcriptional regulation of the PGC1α promoter. Overall, our data demonstrate a role for Foxa3 in energy expenditure and in age-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:25225406

  4. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang Yi; Kase, Eili Tranheim; Herskedal, Anette; Schjalm, Camilla; Damme, Markus; Nesset, Cecilie Kasi; Thoresen, G. Hege; Rustan, Arild C.; Eskild, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1) has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmpgt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gtmice) were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmpgt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmpgt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmpgt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmpgt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmpgt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmpgt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmpgt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury. PMID:26047317

  5. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  6. Sm-Like Protein-Mediated RNA Metabolism Is Required for Heat Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masanori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Sm-like proteins play multiple functions in RNA metabolism, which is essential for biological processes such as stress responses in eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana sad1 mutant has a mutation of sm-like protein 5 (LSM5) and shows impaired drought and salt stress tolerances. The lsm5/sad1 mutant also showed hypersensitivity to heat stress. GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 was localized in the nucleus under optimal growth conditions. After heat stress treatment, GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 fluorescence was also observed as small cytoplasmic dots, in addition to nuclear localization. Whole genome transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes in Arabidopsis were drastically changed in response to heat stress. More heat-responsive genes were highly expressed in lsm5/sad1 mutant at both 2 and 6 h after heat stress treatment. Additionally, intron-retained and capped transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant after heat stress treatment. In this study, we also identified non-Arabidopsis Genome Initiative transcripts that were expressed from unannotated regions. Most of these transcripts were antisense transcripts, and many capped non-AGI transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant during heat stress treatment. These results indicated that LSM5/SAD1 functions to degrade aberrant transcripts through appropriate mRNA splicing and decapping, and precise RNA metabolic machinery is required for heat stress tolerance. PMID:27493656

  7. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity.

  8. Sm-Like Protein-Mediated RNA Metabolism Is Required for Heat Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masanori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Morosawa, Taeko; Ishida, Junko; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Sm-like proteins play multiple functions in RNA metabolism, which is essential for biological processes such as stress responses in eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana sad1 mutant has a mutation of sm-like protein 5 (LSM5) and shows impaired drought and salt stress tolerances. The lsm5/sad1 mutant also showed hypersensitivity to heat stress. GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 was localized in the nucleus under optimal growth conditions. After heat stress treatment, GFP-fused LSM5/SAD1 fluorescence was also observed as small cytoplasmic dots, in addition to nuclear localization. Whole genome transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes in Arabidopsis were drastically changed in response to heat stress. More heat-responsive genes were highly expressed in lsm5/sad1 mutant at both 2 and 6 h after heat stress treatment. Additionally, intron-retained and capped transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant after heat stress treatment. In this study, we also identified non-Arabidopsis Genome Initiative transcripts that were expressed from unannotated regions. Most of these transcripts were antisense transcripts, and many capped non-AGI transcripts accumulated in the lsm5/sad1 mutant during heat stress treatment. These results indicated that LSM5/SAD1 functions to degrade aberrant transcripts through appropriate mRNA splicing and decapping, and precise RNA metabolic machinery is required for heat stress tolerance.

  9. Effect of degradable intake protein level on finishing cattle performance and ruminal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shain, D H; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Herold, D W

    1998-01-01

    Two finishing trials and a metabolism trial were conducted to evaluate level of supplemental degradable intake (crude) protein (DIP) in finishing diets on cattle performance, carcass characteristics, and ruminal metabolism. Finishing trials were conducted in two consecutive years using 128 crossbred yearling steers (BW = 343+/-5 kg, Trial 1) and 176 crossbred yearling steers (BW = 375+/-4 kg, Trial 2) in a randomized complete block design. Steers were fed dry-rolled corn diets containing urea at 0, .88, 1.34, or 1.96% (DM basis). No differences in DMI, daily gain, or feed efficiency were noted among steers receiving diets containing supplemental urea. However, steers fed diets supplemented with urea were 5.4% more efficient (P < .01) and gained 6.6% faster (P < .01) than steers receiving no supplemental urea. Metabolizable protein (MP) content of all diets exceeded the steers' requirements. However, diets containing no urea were deficient in DIP. In the metabolism trial, four ruminally fistulated steers (BW = 380+/-22 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design and fed (ad libitum) diets similar to those used in the finishing trials. Nitrogen intake and ruminal ammonia N concentration increased linearly (P < .05) with increasing level of urea supplementation. Diets containing no supplemental urea were calculated to be deficient in DIP, resulting in reduced bacterial synthesis. Results indicate that dry-rolled corn finishing diets containing no supplemental N are deficient in ruminally degradable N. Supplementing these diets with an inexpensive source of ruminally degradable N improved animal performance. However, supplementation with urea above .88% was not beneficial. PMID:9464905

  10. Association of cancer metabolism-related proteins with oral carcinogenesis – indications for chemoprevention and metabolic sensitizing of oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor metabolism is a crucial factor for the carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, TKTL1), mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in OSCC cell lines. Metabolism-related proteins were correlated with proliferation activity (Ki-67) and apoptotic properties (TUNEL assay) in OSCC. Specificity of antibodies was confirmed by western blotting in cancer cell lines. Results Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, LDHA, TKTL1), and mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were significantly increased in the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Metabolic active regions of OSCC were strongly correlated with proliferating cancer (Ki-67+) cells without detection of apoptosis (TUNEL assay). Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, and TKTL1, as well as mitochondrial enzymes SDHA, SDHB, and ATP synthase in the multi-step carcinogenesis of OSCC. Both, hypoxia-related glucose metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation characteristics are associated with the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Acidosis and OXPHOS may drive a metabolic shift towards the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Therefore, inhibition of the PPP, glycolysis, and targeted anti-mitochondrial therapies (ROS generation) by natural compounds or synthetic vitamin derivatives may act as sensitizer for apoptosis in cancer cells mediated by adjuvant therapies in OSCC. PMID:25048361

  11. Metabolic rate and rates of protein turnover in food-deprived cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus 1758).

    PubMed

    Lamarre, Simon G; MacCormack, Tyson J; Sykes, Antonio V; Hall, Jennifer R; Speers-Roesch, Ben; Callaghan, Neal I; Driedzic, William R

    2016-06-01

    To determine the metabolic response to food deprivation, cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) juveniles were either fed, fasted (3 to 5 days food deprivation), or starved (12 days food deprivation). Fasting resulted in a decrease in triglyceride levels in the digestive gland, and after 12 days, these lipid reserves were essentially depleted. Oxygen consumption was decreased to 53% and NH4 excretion to 36% of the fed group following 3-5 days of food deprivation. Oxygen consumption remained low in the starved group, but NH4 excretion returned to the level recorded for fed animals during starvation. The fractional rate of protein synthesis of fasting animals decreased to 25% in both mantle and gill compared with fed animals and remained low in the mantle with the onset of starvation. In gill, however, protein synthesis rate increased to a level that was 45% of the fed group during starvation. In mantle, starvation led to an increase in cathepsin A-, B-, H-, and L-like enzyme activity and a 2.3-fold increase in polyubiquitin mRNA that suggested an increase in ubiquitin-proteasome activity. In gill, there was a transient increase in the polyubiquitin transcript levels in the transition from fed through fasted to the starved state and cathepsin A-, B-, H-, and L-like activity was lower in starved compared with fed animals. The response in gill appears more complex, as they better maintain rates of protein synthesis and show no evidence of enhanced protein breakdown through recognized catabolic processes. PMID:27053650

  12. The orchestra of lipid-transfer proteins at the crossroads between metabolism and signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiapparino, Antonella; Maeda, Kenji; Turei, Denes; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Within the eukaryotic cell, more than 1000 species of lipids define a series of membranes essential for cell function. Tightly controlled systems of lipid transport underlie the proper spatiotemporal distribution of membrane lipids, the coordination of spatially separated lipid metabolic pathways, and lipid signaling mediated by soluble proteins that may be localized some distance away from membranes. Alongside the well-established vesicular transport of lipids, non-vesicular transport mediated by a group of proteins referred to as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) is emerging as a key mechanism of lipid transport in a broad range of biological processes. More than a hundred LTPs exist in humans and these can be divided into at least ten protein families. LTPs are widely distributed in tissues, organelles and membrane contact sites (MCSs), as well as in the extracellular space. They all possess a soluble and globular domain that encapsulates a lipid monomer and they specifically bind and transport a wide range of lipids. Here, we present the most recent discoveries in the functions and physiological roles of LTPs, which have expanded the playground of lipids into the aqueous spaces of cells.

  13. Conformational Changes in the Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Are Consistent with a Role for Allostery in Virus Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Packianathan, Charles; Katen, Sarah P.; Dann, III, Charles E.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-01-12

    In infected cells, virus components must be organized at the right place and time to ensure assembly of infectious virions. From a different perspective, assembly must be prevented until all components are available. Hypothetically, this can be achieved by allosterically controlling assembly. Consistent with this hypothesis, here we show that the structure of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein dimer, which can spontaneously self-assemble, is incompatible with capsid assembly. Systematic differences between core protein dimer and capsid conformations demonstrate linkage between the intradimer interface and interdimer contact surface. These structures also provide explanations for the capsid-dimer selectivity of some antibodies and the activities of assembly effectors. Solution studies suggest that the assembly-inactive state is more accurately an ensemble of conformations. Simulations show that allostery supports controlled assembly and results in capsids that are resistant to dissociation. We propose that allostery, as demonstrated in HBV, is common to most self-assembling viruses.

  14. Intrinsic hepatocyte dedifferentiation is accompanied by upregulation of mesenchymal markers, protein sialylation and core alpha 1,6 linked fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Comunale, Mary Ann; Rawat, Siddhartha; Casciano, Jessica C.; Lamontagne, Jason; Herrera, Harmin; Ramanathan, Aarti; Betesh, Lucy; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Steel, Laura F.; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in N-linked glycosylation have long been associated with cancer but for the most part, the reasons why have remained poorly understood. Here we show that increased core fucosylation is associated with de-differentiation of primary hepatocytes and with the appearance of markers indicative of a transition of cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal state. This increase in core fucosylation was associated with increased levels of two enzymes involved in α-1,6 linked fucosylation, GDP-mannose 4, 6-dehydratase (Gmds) and to a lesser extent fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut8). In addition, the activation of cancer-associated cellular signaling pathways in primary rat hepatocytes can increase core fucosylation and induce additional glycoform alterations on hepatocyte proteins. Specifically, we show that increased levels of protein sialylation and α-1,6-linked core fucosylation are observed following activation of the β-catenin pathway. Activation of the Akt signaling pathway or induction of hypoxia also results in increased levels of fucosylation and sialylation. We believe that this knowledge will help in the better understanding of the genetic factors associated with altered glycosylation and may allow for the development of more clinically relevant biomarkers. PMID:27328854

  15. Expression of neuronal and signaling proteins in penumbra around a photothrombotic infarction core in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Demyanenko, S V; Panchenko, S N; Uzdensky, A B

    2015-06-01

    Photodynamic impact on animal cerebral cortex using water-soluble Bengal Rose as a photosensitizer, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier and remains in blood vessels, induces platelet aggregation, vessel occlusion, and brain tissue infarction. This reproduces ischemic stroke. Irreversible cell damage within the infarction core propagates to adjacent tissue and forms a transition zone - the penumbra. Tissue necrosis in the infarction core is too fast (minutes) to be prevented, but much slower penumbral injury (hours) can be limited. We studied the changes in morphology and protein expression profile in penumbra 1 h after local photothrombotic infarction induced by laser irradiation of the cerebral cortex after Bengal Rose administration. Morphological study using standard hematoxylin/eosin staining showed a 3-mm infarct core surrounded by 1.5-2.0 mm penumbra. Morphological changes in the penumbra were lesser and decreased towards its periphery. Antibody microarrays against 224 neuronal and signaling proteins were used for proteomic study. The observed upregulation of penumbra proteins involved in maintaining neurite integrity and guidance (NAV3, MAP1, CRMP2, PMP22); intercellular interactions (N-cadherin); synaptic transmission (glutamate decarboxylase, tryptophan hydroxylase, Munc-18-1, Munc-18-3, and synphilin-1); mitochondria quality control and mitophagy (PINK1 and Parkin); ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and tissue clearance (UCHL1, PINK1, Parkin, synphilin-1); and signaling proteins (PKBα and ERK5) could be associated with tissue recovery. Downregulation of PKC, PKCβ1/2, and TDP-43 could also reduce tissue injury. These changes in expression of some neuronal proteins were directed mainly to protection and tissue recovery in the penumbra. Some upregulated proteins might serve as markers of protection processes in a penumbra.

  16. Expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in breast phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y Y; Lee, Y K; Koo, J S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins and the implications thereof in phyllodes tumor (PT) of the breast. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed using paraffin blocks from 194 PT patient tissue samples. Immunohistochemical staining for lipid metabolism-related proteins, namely hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin 2, fatty-acid-binding proteins 4 (FABP4), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1), and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was performed, and the immunohistochemical staining results were analyzed with respect to clinicopathologic parameters. The numbers of benign, borderline, and malignant PTs were 151, 27, and 16, respectively. The expression of HSL, perilipin 2, FABP4, CPT-1, and FASN in stromal components was higher in higher grade tumors. On univariate analysis, shorter disease-free survival (DFS) was associated with stromal perilipin 2 positivity (p<0.001) and stromal CPT-1 positivity (p=0.004). Shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with stromal perilipin 2 positivity (p<0.001), stromal FABP4 positivity (p<0.001), stromal CPT-1 positivity (p=0.004), and stromal FASN positivity (p<0.001). Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that stromal perilipin 2 positivity (hazard ratio=31.693, 95% CI: 1.341-748.8, p=0.032) was an independent factor for shorter DFS. In conclusion, higher expressions of HSL, perilipin 2, FABP4, CPT-1 and FASN in the stromal component were observed in higher grade PT. PMID:26774147

  17. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    PubMed Central

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals. PMID:17565188

  18. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems.

  19. Exploiting sulphur-carrier proteins from primary metabolism for 2-thiosugar biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Eita; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, He G.; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Liu, Tsung-lin; Ou, Albert; Li, Jeng-yi; Chen, Yu-hsiang; Ealick, Steven E.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element for life and exists ubiquitously in living systems1,2. Yet, how the sulphur atom is incorporated in many sulphur-containing secondary metabolites remains poorly understood. For C-S bond formation in primary metabolites, the major ionic sulphur sources are the protein-persulphide and protein-thiocarboxylate3,4. In each case, the persulphide and thiocarboxylate group on these sulphur-carrier (donor) proteins are post-translationally generated through the action of a specific activating enzyme. In all bacterial cases reported thus far, the genes encoding the enzyme that catalyzes the actual C-S bond formation reaction and its cognate sulphur-carrier protein co-exist in the same gene cluster5. To study 2-thiosugar production in BE-7585A, an antibiotic from Amycolatopsis orientalis, we identified a putative 2-thioglucose synthase, BexX, whose protein sequence and mode of action appear similar to those of ThiG, the enzyme catalyzing thiazole formation in thiamin biosynthesis6,7. However, no sulphur-carrier protein gene could be located in the BE-7585A cluster. Subsequent genome sequencing revealed the presence of a few sulphur-carrier proteins likely involved in the biosynthesis of primary metabolites, but surprisingly only a single activating enzyme gene in the entire genome of A. orientalis. Further experiments showed that this activating enzyme is capable of adenylating each of these sulphur-carrier proteins, and likely also catalyzing the subsequent thiolation taking advantage of its rhodanese activity. A proper combination of these sulphur delivery systems is effective for BexX-catalyzed 2-thioglucose production. The ability of BexX to selectively distinguish sulphur-carrier proteins is given a structural basis using X-ray crystallography. These studies represent the first complete characterization of a thiosugar formation in nature and also demonstrate the receptor promiscuity of the sulphur-delivery system in A. orientalis. Our

  20. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  1. Synergistic transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of ESC characteristics by core pluripotency transcription factors in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Leijie; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Guiyou; Feng, Rennan; Jiang, Yongshuai; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shihua; Liao, Mingzhi; Hua, Jinlian

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that maintains the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is not well understood but may be reflected in complex biological networks. However, there have been few studies on the effects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the development of ESCs from the perspective of computational systems biology. In this study, we analyzed the topological properties of the "core" pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs). Further, we identified synergistic interactions between these TFs and microRNAs (miRNAs) in PPINs during ESC development. Results show that there were significant differences in centrality characters between TF-targets and non-TF-targets in PPINs. We also found that there was consistent regulation of multiple "core" pluripotency TFs. Based on the analysis of shortest path length, we found that the module properties were not only within the targets regulated by common or multiple "core" pluripotency TFs but also between the groups of targets regulated by different TFs. Finally, we identified synergistic regulation of these TFs and miRNAs. In summary, the synergistic effects of "core" pluripotency TFs and miRNAs were analyzed using computational methods in both human and mouse PPINs. PMID:25171496

  2. A meiotic chromosomal core consisting of cohesin complex proteins recruits DNA recombination proteins and promotes synapsis in the absence of an axial element in mammalian meiotic cells.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, J; Hoja, M R; Yuan, L; Liu, J G; Brundell, E; Moens, P; Santucci-Darmanin, S; Jessberger, R; Barbero, J L; Heyting, C; Höög, C

    2001-08-01

    The behavior of meiotic chromosomes differs in several respects from that of their mitotic counterparts, resulting in the generation of genetically distinct haploid cells. This has been attributed in part to a meiosis-specific chromatin-associated protein structure, the synaptonemal complex. This complex consist of two parallel axial elements, each one associated with a pair of sister chromatids, and a transverse filament located between the synapsed homologous chromosomes. Recently, a different protein structure, the cohesin complex, was shown to be associated with meiotic chromosomes and to be required for chromosome segregation. To explore the functions of the two different protein structures, the synaptonemal complex and the cohesin complex, in mammalian male meiotic cells, we have analyzed how absence of the axial element affects early meiotic chromosome behavior. We find that the synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3) is a main determinant of axial-element assembly and is required for attachment of this structure to meiotic chromosomes, whereas SCP2 helps shape the in vivo structure of the axial element. We also show that formation of a cohesin-containing chromosomal core in meiotic nuclei does not require SCP3 or SCP2. Our results also suggest that the cohesin core recruits recombination proteins and promotes synapsis between homologous chromosomes in the absence of an axial element. A model for early meiotic chromosome pairing and synapsis is proposed. PMID:11463847

  3. Emerging roles of the myocardin family of proteins in lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Swärd, Karl; Stenkula, Karin G; Rippe, Catarina; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Members of the myocardin family bind to the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) and act as coactivators controlling genes of relevance for myogenic differentiation and motile function. Binding of SRF to DNA is mediated by genetic elements called CArG boxes, found often but not exclusively in muscle and growth controlling genes. Studies aimed at defining the full spectrum of these CArG elements in the genome (i.e. the CArGome) have in recent years, unveiled unexpected roles of the myocardin family proteins in lipid and glucose homeostasis. This coactivator family includes the protein myocardin (MYOCD), the myocardin-related transcription factors A and B (MRTF-A/MKL1 and MRTF-B/MKL2) and MASTR (MAMSTR). Here we discuss growing evidence that SRF-driven transcription is controlled by extracellular glucose through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway and actin polymerization. We also describe data showing that adipogenesis is influenced by MLK activity through actions upstream of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ with consequences for whole body fat mass and insulin sensitivity. The recently demonstrated involvement of myocardin coactivators in the biogenesis of caveolae, Ω-shaped membrane invaginations of importance for lipid and glucose metabolism, is finally discussed. These novel roles of myocardin proteins may open the way for new unexplored strategies to combat metabolic diseases such as diabetes, which, at the current incidence, is expected to reach 333 million people worldwide by 2025. This review highlights newly discovered roles of myocardin-related transcription factors in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as novel insights into their well-established role as mediators of stretch-dependent effects in smooth muscle. As co-factors for serum response factor (SRF), MKLs regulates transcription of genes involved in the contractile function of smooth muscle cells. In addition to mechanical stimuli, this regulation has now been found to

  4. A Proteomic Approach for the Identification of Up-Regulated Proteins Involved in the Metabolic Process of the Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Franchin, Cinzia; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign smooth muscle cell tumor of the uterus. Proteomics is a powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures of proteins. In our study, we focused on proteins that were upregulated in the leiomyoma compared to the myometrium. Paired samples of eight leiomyomas and adjacent myometrium were obtained and submitted to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry for protein identification and to Western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The comparison between the patterns revealed 24 significantly upregulated (p < 0.05) protein spots, 12 of which were found to be associated with the metabolic processes of the leiomyoma and not with the normal myometrium. The overexpression of seven proteins involved in the metabolic processes of the leiomyoma was further validated by Western blotting and 2D Western blotting. Four of these proteins have never been associated with the leiomyoma before. The 2-DE approach coupled with mass spectrometry, which is among the methods of choice for comparative proteomic studies, identified a number of proteins overexpressed in the leiomyoma and involved in several biological processes, including metabolic processes. A better understanding of the mechanism underlying the overexpression of these proteins may be important for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27070597

  5. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  6. Altered development and protein metabolism in skeletal muscles of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) by corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Lin, H; Jiao, H C; Song, Z G; Zhao, J P; Jiang, K J

    2007-05-01

    Two trials were conducted to investigate the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on protein metabolism and the amino acid composition in muscle tissues of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). In Trial 1, two groups of 30 broiler chickens were subjected to control or CORT treatment (30 mg/kg diet) from 28 to 39 days of age. In Trial 2, three groups of chickens of 28 days of age were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 7 days: CORT (30 mg/kg diet), pair-fed (maintaining the same feed intake as CORT treatment) and control treatments. The body mass gain and feed efficiency was significantly decreased by CORT treatment, while the food intake was decreased. The breast and thigh masses (% body mass) were significantly suppressed by CORT treatment, while the abdominal fat and liver masses (%) were obviously increased. The plasma levels of glucose, urate and total amino acid were significantly elevated by CORT treatment. The capacity for protein synthesis, estimated by RNA:protein ratio, were significantly suppressed by CORT in M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris. The 3-methylhistidine concentrations were significantly increased in both M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris of CORT chickens, compared to control but not the pair-fed chickens. The amino acid composition of M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris was not significantly affected by CORT treatment. In conclusion, the arrested growth in skeletal muscles induced by CORT administration has tissue specificity. The CORT treatment retards the growth of skeletal muscle by suppressed protein synthesis and augmented protein catabolism.

  7. M. tuberculosis Secretory Protein ESAT-6 Induces Metabolic Flux Perturbations to Drive Foamy Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varshneya; Kaur, Charanpreet; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Rao, Kanury V S; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2015-01-01

    The Foamy Macrophage (FM) differentiation forms a major component of the host dependent survival axis of M. tuberculosis. The FM which are characterized by the intracellular accumulation of lipid bodies (LBs), ensure a privileged existence for the bacilli through ready provision of nutrients and by conferring protection against bactericidal pathways. The mycobacterial secretory protein ESAT-6 has been identified as the molecular mediator of the FM differentiation process although little is known about the mechanism through which it induces this process. In the present study, we show that ESAT-6 induces GLUT-1 mediated enhanced glucose uptake by macrophages which is coupled to metabolic flux perturbations in the glycolytic pathway caused by differential rates of reaction at several steps in the pathway. Two major changes identified were the simultaneous buildup of DHAP (for Triglyceride synthesis) and AcCoA (for synthesis of 3-HB, ligand for the anti-lipolytic GPR109A). We also show that part of the observed effects involve protein- protein interactions between ESAT-6 and the macrophage glycolytic enzymes, Enolase1 and Phosphoglycerate kinase1. PMID:26250836

  8. Low-Protein Diet during Lactation and Maternal Metabolism in Rats.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Vera L; Ballen, Marcia O; Gonçalves, Talita S S; Kawashita, Nair H; Stoppiglia, Luiz F; Veloso, Roberto V; Latorraca, Márcia Q; Martins, Maria Salete F; Gomes-da-Silva, Maria Helena G

    2011-01-01

    Some metabolic alterations were evaluated in Wistar rats which received control or low-protein (17%; 6%) diets, from the pregnancy until the end of lactation: control non-lactating (CNL), lactating (CL), low-protein non-lactating (LPNL) and lactating (LPL) groups. Despite the increased food intake by LPL dams, both LP groups reduced protein intake and final body mass was lower in LPL. Higher serum glucose occurred in both LP groups. Lactation induced lower insulin and glucagon levels, but these were reduced by LP diet. Prolactin levels rose in lactating, but were impaired in LPL, followed by losses of mammary gland (MAG) mass and, a fall in serum leptin in lactating dams. Lipid content also reduced in MAG and gonadal white adipose tissue of lactating and, in LPL, contributed to a decreased daily milk production, and consequent impairment of body mass gain by LPL pups. Liver mass, lipid content and ATP-citrate enzyme activity were increased by lactation, but malic enzyme and lipid: glycogen ratio elevated only in LPL. Conclusion. LP diet reduced the development of MAG and prolactin secretion which compromised milk production and pups growth. Moreover, this diet enhanced the store of lipid to glycogen ratio and suggests a higher risk of fatty liver development. PMID:21637364

  9. Low-Protein Diet during Lactation and Maternal Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Vera L.; Ballen, Marcia O.; Gonçalves, Talita S. S.; Kawashita, Nair H.; Stoppiglia, Luiz F.; Veloso, Roberto V.; Latorraca, Márcia Q.; Martins, Maria Salete F.; Gomes-da-Silva, Maria Helena G.

    2011-01-01

    Some metabolic alterations were evaluated in Wistar rats which received control or low-protein (17%; 6%) diets, from the pregnancy until the end of lactation: control non-lactating (CNL), lactating (CL), low-protein non-lactating (LPNL) and lactating (LPL) groups. Despite the increased food intake by LPL dams, both LP groups reduced protein intake and final body mass was lower in LPL. Higher serum glucose occurred in both LP groups. Lactation induced lower insulin and glucagon levels, but these were reduced by LP diet. Prolactin levels rose in lactating, but were impaired in LPL, followed by losses of mammary gland (MAG) mass and, a fall in serum leptin in lactating dams. Lipid content also reduced in MAG and gonadal white adipose tissue of lactating and, in LPL, contributed to a decreased daily milk production, and consequent impairment of body mass gain by LPL pups. Liver mass, lipid content and ATP-citrate enzyme activity were increased by lactation, but malic enzyme and lipid: glycogen ratio elevated only in LPL. Conclusion. LP diet reduced the development of MAG and prolactin secretion which compromised milk production and pups growth. Moreover, this diet enhanced the store of lipid to glycogen ratio and suggests a higher risk of fatty liver development. PMID:21637364

  10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a cytosolic protein required for sorbitol metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, María Francisca; Ampuero, Diego; Mandujano, Patricio; Parada, Roberto; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Gallart, Marta; Altabella, Teresa; Cabrera, Ricardo; Stange, Claudia; Handford, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Sorbitol is converted to fructose in Rosaceae species by SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), especially in sink organs. SDH has also been found in non-Rosaceae species and here we show that the protein encoded by At5g51970 in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. possesses the molecular characteristics of an SDH. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged version and anti-SDH antisera, we determined that SDH is cytosolically localized, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. We also show that SDH is widely expressed, and that SDH protein accumulates in both source and sink organs. In the presence of NAD+, recombinant SDH exhibited greatest oxidative activity with sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol as substrates; other sugar alcohols were oxidized to a lesser extent. Under standard growth conditions, three independent sdh- mutants developed as wild-type. Nevertheless, all three exhibited reduced dry weight and primary root length compared to wild-type when grown in the presence of sorbitol. Additionally, under short-day conditions, the mutants were more resistant to dehydration stress, as shown by a reduced loss of leaf water content when watering was withheld, and a greater survival rate on re-watering. This evidence suggests that limitations in the metabolism of sugar alcohols alter the growth of Arabidopsis and its response to drought.

  11. Serum bone gla protein (BGP) and other markers of bone mineral metabolism in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, F; Epstein, S; Pacifici, R; Droke, D; Thomas, S B; Avioli, L V

    1986-10-01

    Bone gla protein, the vitamin K-dependent protein synthesized by osteoblasts and measured in blood by radioimmunoassay, has been used as an index of the rate of bone turnover. The relationship of bone gla protein with other markers of bone mineral metabolism was determined in 31 untreated postmenopausal women with the osteoporotic syndrome. In addition to serum osteocalcin (BGP) we measured parathyroid hormone (PTH) (carboxyl and mid-molecule fragments), 25(OH)D, alkaline phosphatase, estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), dietary calcium intake, 24 hour urinary calcium excretion, and bone mineral density by CT scan of the lumbar vertebrae. Significant osteopenia was present on CT in untreated postmenopausal osteoporotic women (bone density in 18 out of 31 was below the critical value of 60 mg/cm3). Serum BGP correlated positively with CT scan (r + 0.647, P less than 0.001). CT and age were negatively correlated (r - 0.661, P less than 0.001) while CT and E2 showed a positive correlation (r + 0.554, P less than 0.01). Unexpectedly, BGP and age revealed a significant negative correlation (r - 0.421, P less than 0.05). These findings suggest a state of low bone turnover in this group with untreated postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  12. Comparison of methods for simultaneous identification of bacterial species and determination of metabolic activity by protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) experiments.

    PubMed

    Jehmlich, Nico; Schmidt, Frank; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2009-06-01

    We developed a concept for analysing carbon and nitrogen fluxes in microbial communities by employing protein-based stable isotope probing (Protein-SIP) in metabolic labelling experiments with stable isotope labelled substrates. For identification of microbial species intact protein profiling (IPP) can be used, whereas the assessment of their metabolic activity is achieved by shotgun mass mapping (SMM). Microbial cultures were grown on substrates containing (13)C or (15)N. For identification of species we tested both the IPP and the SMM approaches. Mass spectra (MALDI-MS) were taken from mixtures of either intact proteins or peptides from tryptic digestion for generating species-specific peak patterns. In the case of SMM, the fragmentation of peptides was additionally used to obtain sequence information for species identification. Mass spectra of peptide sequences allow calculation of the amount of (13)C or (15)N incorporation within peptides for determining metabolic activity of the specific species. The comparison of IPP and SMM revealed a higher robustness of species identification by SMM. In addition, the assessment of incorporation levels of (13)C and (15)N into peptides by SMM revealed a lower uncertainty (0.5-0.8 atom %) compared to IPP (6.4-8.9 atom %). The determination of metabolic activity and function of individual species by Protein-SIP can help to analyse carbon and nitrogen fluxes within microbial communities.

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Newton, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  14. Metabolism and excretion of anacetrapib, a novel inhibitor of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein, in humans.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Tan, Eugene Y; Hartmann, Georgy; Biddle, Zachary; Bergman, Arthur J; Dru, James; Ho, Jonathan Z; Jones, Allen N; Staskiewicz, Steve J; Braun, Matthew P; Karanam, Bindhu; Dean, Dennis C; Gendrano, Isaias Noel; Graves, Mark W; Wagner, John A; Krishna, Rajesh

    2010-03-01

    Anacetrapib is a novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor being developed for the treatment of primary hypercholesterolemia and mixed dyslipidemia. The absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of anacetrapib were investigated in an open-label study in which six healthy male subjects received a single oral dose of 150 mg and 165 microCi of [(14)C]anacetrapib. Plasma, urine, and fecal samples were collected at predetermined times for up to 14 days postdose and were analyzed for total radioactivity, the parent compound, and metabolites. The majority of the administered radioactivity (87%) was eliminated by fecal excretion, with negligible amounts present in urine (0.1%). The peak level of radioactivity in plasma (approximately 2 microM equivalents of [(14)C]anacetrapib) was achieved approximately 4 h postdose. The parent compound was the major radioactive component (79-94% of total radioactivity) in both plasma and feces. Three oxidative metabolites, M1, M2, and M3, were detected in plasma and feces and were identified as the O-demethylated species (M1) and two secondary hydroxylated derivatives of M1 (M2 and M3). Each metabolite was detected at low levels, representing metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 to form M1, M2, and M3. Overall, these data, along with those from other preclinical and clinical studies, indicate that anacetrapib probably exhibits a low-to-moderate degree of oral absorption in humans and the absorbed fraction of the dose is eliminated largely via CYP3A4-catalyzed oxidative metabolism, followed by excretion of metabolites by the biliary-fecal route.

  15. Regulation of HepG2 cell apoptosis by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein via the sirt1-p53-bax pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shenghu; Li, Min; Zhang, Jinqian; Liu, Shunai; Wang, Qi; Quan, Min; Zhang, Mengran; Cheng, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein stimulates many signaling pathways related to apoptosis inhibition resulting in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been reported that sirt1 is involved in regulating apoptosis; therefore, we investigated the influence of HCV core protein on sirt1 expression and apoptosis in human HepG2 cells. Our study showed that HCV core protein inhibited apoptosis of HepG2 cells as well as caspase-3 expression and activity (P < 0.05). At the same time, sirt1 expression was increased at both the mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein (P < 0.05) levels. Furthermore, apoptosis inhibition was reversed when sirt1 was knocked down (P < 0.05). Our study provides further evidence that the sirt1-p53-Bax signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the suppression of cell apoptosis induced by HCV core protein.

  16. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop. PMID:27800552

  17. Effect of energy metabolism on protein motility in the bacterial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Winther, Tabita; Xu, Lei; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Brown, Stanley; Oddershede, Lene B

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate the energy dependence of the motion of a porin, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli by single molecule investigations. By poisoning the bacteria with arsenate and azide, the bacterial energy metabolism was stopped. The motility of individual lambda-receptors significantly and rapidly decreased upon energy depletion. We suggest two different causes for the ceased motility upon comprised energy metabolism: One possible cause is that the cell uses energy to actively wiggle its proteins, this energy being one order-of-magnitude larger than thermal energy. Another possible cause is an induced change in the connection between the lambda-receptor and the membrane structure, for instance by a stiffening of part of the membrane structure. Treatment of the cells with ampicillin, which directly targets the bacterial cell wall by inhibiting cross-linking of the peptidoglycan layer, had an effect similar to energy depletion and the motility of the lambda-receptor significantly decreased. Since the lambda-receptor is closely linked to the peptidoglycan layer, we propose that lambda-receptor motility is directly coupled to the constant and dynamic energy-consuming reconstruction of the peptidoglycan layer. The result of this motion could be to facilitate transport of maltose-dextrins through the porin.

  18. The role of Monosaccharide Transport Proteins in carbohydrate assimilation, distribution, metabolism and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Anthony J.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The facilitated diffusion of glucose, galactose, fructose, urate, myoinositol and dehydroascorbic acid in mammals is catalyzed by a family of 14 monosaccharide transport proteins called GLUTs. These transporters may be divided into 3 classes according to sequence similarity and function/substrate specificity. GLUT1 appears to be highly expressed in glycolytically active cells and has been co-opted in vitamin C auxotrophs to maintain the redox state of the blood through transport of dehydroascorbate. Several GLUTs are definitive glucose/galactose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5 are physiologically important fructose transporters, GLUT9 appears to be a urate transporter while GLUT13 (HMIT1) is a proton/myoinositol co-transporter. The physiologic substrates of some GLUTs remain to be established. The GLUTs are expressed in a tissue specific manner where affinity, specificity and capacity for substrate transport are paramount for tissue function. Although great strides have been made in characterizing GLUT-catalyzed monosaccharide transport and mapping GLUT membrane topography and determinants of substrate specificity, a unifying model for GLUT structure and function remains elusive. The GLUTs play a major role in carbohydrate homeostasis and the redistribution of sugar-derived carbons among the various organ systems. This is accomplished through a multiplicity of GLUT-dependent glucose sensing and effector mechanisms that regulate monosaccharide ingestion, absorption, distribution, cellular transport and metabolism and recovery/retention. Glucose transport and metabolism have co-evolved in mammals to support cerebral glucose utilization. PMID:22943001

  19. Click-electron microscopy for imaging metabolically tagged non-protein biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, John T.; Adams, Stephen R.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Boassa, Daniela; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances; Palida, Sakina F.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has long been the main technique to image cell structures with nanometer resolution, but has lagged behind light microscopy in the crucial ability to make specific molecules stand out. Here we introduce “Click-EM,” a labeling technique for correlative light microscopy and EM imaging of non-protein biomolecules. In this approach, metabolic labeling substrates containing bioorthogonal functional groups are provided to cells for incorporation into biopolymers by endogenous biosynthetic machinery. The unique chemical functionality of these analogs is exploited for selective attachment of singlet oxygen-generating fluorescent dyes via bioorthogonal “click chemistry” ligations. Illumination of dye-labeled structures generates singlet oxygen to locally catalyze the polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product that is readily imaged by EM. We describe the application of Click-EM in imaging metabolically tagged DNA, RNA, and lipids in cultured cells and neurons, and highlight its use in tracking peptidoglycan synthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:27110681

  20. The G protein alpha o subunit alters morphology, growth kinetics, and phospholipid metabolism of somatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, D B; Bonventre, J V; Neer, E J; Seidman, J G

    1989-01-01

    The physiological role of the alpha o subunit of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein was investigated with a murine adrenal cell line (Y1) transfected with a rat alpha o cDNA cloned in a retroviral expression vector. The parental cell line lacked detectable alpha o subunit. Expression of the alpha o cDNA in transfected cell lines was confirmed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The rat alpha o subunit interacted with murine beta and gamma subunits and associated with cell membranes. Y1 cells containing large amounts of alpha o subunit had altered cellular morphology and reduced rate of cell division. In addition, GTP-gamma S-stimulated release of arachidonic acid from these cells was significantly increased compared with that in control cells. The alpha o subunit appears directly or indirectly to regulate cellular proliferation, morphology, and phospholipid metabolism. Images PMID:2511433

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV.

  2. Construct design, biophysical, and biochemical characterization of the fusion core from mouse hepatitis virus (a coronavirus) spike protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhui; Cole, David K; Lou, Zhiyong; Liu, Yiwei; Qin, Lan; Li, Xu; Bai, Zhihong; Yuan, Fang; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F

    2004-11-01

    Membrane fusion between virus and host cells is the key step for enveloped virus entry and is mediated by the viral envelope fusion protein. In murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), the spike (S) protein mediates this process. Recently, the formation of anti-parallel 6-helix bundle of the MHV S protein heptad repeat (HR) regions (HR1 and HR2) has been confirmed, implying coronavirus has a class I fusion protein. This bundle is also called fusion core. To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). This 2-helix polypeptide subsequently assembled into a typical 6-helix bundle. This bundle has been analyzed by a series of biophysical and biochemical techniques and confirmed that the design technique can be used for coronavirus as we successfully used for members of paramyxoviruses.

  3. Energy Dense, Protein Restricted Diet Increases Adiposity and Perturbs Metabolism in Young, Genetically Lean Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kimberly D.; Scheffler, Tracy L.; Kasten, Steven C.; Reinholt, Brad M.; van Eyk, Gregory R.; Escobar, Jeffery; Scheffler, Jason M.; Gerrard, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood) are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12), containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1–12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11) with 12.2–19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001) energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); blood glucose increased (P<0.05) in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01), even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001). Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05) subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7) was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs. PMID:23991090

  4. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Loïc; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Boyer, Audrey; Desvignes, Virginie; Gaillard, Julien; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Roingeard, Philippe; Hourioux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD) surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis. PMID:26339783

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Protein Turnover by Metabolic Whole Rodent Pulse-Chase Isotopic Labeling and Shotgun Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of protein half-life and degradation dynamics has proven critically important to our understanding of a broad and diverse set of biological conditions ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. Historically these protein turnover measures have been performed in cells by monitoring protein levels after "pulse" labeling of newly synthesized proteins and subsequent chase periods. Comparing the level of labeled protein remaining as a function of time to the initial level reveals the protein's half-life. In this method we provide a detailed description of the workflow required for the determination of protein turnover rates on a whole proteome scale in vivo. Our approach starts with the metabolic labeling of whole rodents by restricting all the nitrogen in their diet to exclusively nitrogen-15 in the form of spirulina algae. After near complete organismal labeling with nitrogen-15, the rodents are then switched to a normal nitrogen-14 rich diet for time periods of days to years. Tissues are harvested, the extracts are fractionated, and the proteins are digested to peptides. Peptides are separated by multidimensional liquid chromatography and analyzed by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS). The nitrogen-15 containing proteins are then identified and measured by the bioinformatic proteome analysis tools Sequest, DTASelect2, and Census. In this way, our metabolic pulse-chase approach reveals in vivo protein decay rates proteome-wide. PMID:26867752

  6. Continual feeding of two types of microalgal biomass affected protein digestion and metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Chou, K; Magnuson, A; Lei, X G

    2015-01-01

    A 14-wk study was conducted to determine the nutritional efficacy and ssmetabolic impact of 2 types of microalgal biomass as alternative protein sources in laying hen diets. Shaver hens (total = 150 and 26 wk old) were fed 1 of 5 diets: a control or a defatted green microalgal biomass (DG; Desmodesmus spp.) at 25% and a full-fatted diatom biomass (FD; Staurosira spp.) at 11.7% inclusion with or without protease. This experiment consisted of 5 replicates per treatment and each replicate contained 6 hens individually reared in cages (1 hen for biochemical data/replicate). Despite decreased ADFI (P = 0.03), hens fed DG or FD had final BW, overall hen-day egg production, and egg quality similar to the controls. Feeding DG or FD did not alter plasma concentrations of insulin, glutamine, and uric acid or alkaline phosphatase activity at wk 8 or 14 but decreased plasma 3-methyhistine concentrations (P = 0.03) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activities (P < 0.001) at wk 14 and improved (P = 0.002) ileal total AA digestibility. Although DG or FD exhibited moderate effects on intestinal brush border protease activities and mRNA levels of duodenal transporters Pept1, Lat1, and Cat1, both substantially enhanced (P < 0.05) phosphorylation of hepatic protein synthesis key regulator S6 ribosomal protein (S6) and the ratio of phospho-S6 to S6 in the liver of hens. However, DG and FD manifested with different impacts on weights of egg and egg albumen, proteolytic activity of jejunal digesta, plasma TRAP activity, ileal total AA digestibility, and several intestinal genes and hepatic proteins. Supplemental protease in the DG and FD diets produced mixed effects on a number of measures. In conclusion, our findings revealed the feasibility of including greater levels of microalgal biomass as a source of feed protein for laying hens and a novel potential of the biomass in improving dietary protein digestion and body protein metabolism than previously perceived. PMID

  7. Co-opting sulphur-carrier proteins from primary metabolic pathways for 2-thiosugar biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Eita; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, He G; Lu, Mei-yeh Jade; Liu, Tsung-lin; Ou, Albert; Li, Jeng-yi; Chen, Yu-hsiang; Ealick, Steven E; Liu, Hung-wen

    2014-06-19

    Sulphur is an essential element for life and is ubiquitous in living systems. Yet how the sulphur atom is incorporated into many sulphur-containing secondary metabolites is poorly understood. For bond formation between carbon and sulphur in primary metabolites, the major ionic sulphur sources are the persulphide and thiocarboxylate groups on sulphur-carrier (donor) proteins. Each group is post-translationally generated through the action of a specific activating enzyme. In all reported bacterial cases, the gene encoding the enzyme that catalyses the carbon-sulphur bond formation reaction and that encoding the cognate sulphur-carrier protein exist in the same gene cluster. To study the production of the 2-thiosugar moiety in BE-7585A, an antibiotic from Amycolatopsis orientalis, we identified a putative 2-thioglucose synthase, BexX, whose protein sequence and mode of action seem similar to those of ThiG, the enzyme that catalyses thiazole formation in thiamine biosynthesis. However, no gene encoding a sulphur-carrier protein could be located in the BE-7585A cluster. Subsequent genome sequencing uncovered a few genes encoding sulphur-carrier proteins that are probably involved in the biosynthesis of primary metabolites but only one activating enzyme gene in the A. orientalis genome. Further experiments showed that this activating enzyme can adenylate each of these sulphur-carrier proteins and probably also catalyses the subsequent thiolation, through its rhodanese domain. A proper combination of these sulphur-delivery systems is effective for BexX-catalysed 2-thioglucose production. The ability of BexX to selectively distinguish sulphur-carrier proteins is given a structural basis using X-ray crystallography. This study is, to our knowledge, the first complete characterization of thiosugar formation in nature and also demonstrates the receptor promiscuity of the A. orientalis sulphur-delivery system. Our results also show that co-opting the sulphur-delivery machinery

  8. Continual feeding of two types of microalgal biomass affected protein digestion and metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Chou, K; Magnuson, A; Lei, X G

    2015-01-01

    A 14-wk study was conducted to determine the nutritional efficacy and ssmetabolic impact of 2 types of microalgal biomass as alternative protein sources in laying hen diets. Shaver hens (total = 150 and 26 wk old) were fed 1 of 5 diets: a control or a defatted green microalgal biomass (DG; Desmodesmus spp.) at 25% and a full-fatted diatom biomass (FD; Staurosira spp.) at 11.7% inclusion with or without protease. This experiment consisted of 5 replicates per treatment and each replicate contained 6 hens individually reared in cages (1 hen for biochemical data/replicate). Despite decreased ADFI (P = 0.03), hens fed DG or FD had final BW, overall hen-day egg production, and egg quality similar to the controls. Feeding DG or FD did not alter plasma concentrations of insulin, glutamine, and uric acid or alkaline phosphatase activity at wk 8 or 14 but decreased plasma 3-methyhistine concentrations (P = 0.03) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activities (P < 0.001) at wk 14 and improved (P = 0.002) ileal total AA digestibility. Although DG or FD exhibited moderate effects on intestinal brush border protease activities and mRNA levels of duodenal transporters Pept1, Lat1, and Cat1, both substantially enhanced (P < 0.05) phosphorylation of hepatic protein synthesis key regulator S6 ribosomal protein (S6) and the ratio of phospho-S6 to S6 in the liver of hens. However, DG and FD manifested with different impacts on weights of egg and egg albumen, proteolytic activity of jejunal digesta, plasma TRAP activity, ileal total AA digestibility, and several intestinal genes and hepatic proteins. Supplemental protease in the DG and FD diets produced mixed effects on a number of measures. In conclusion, our findings revealed the feasibility of including greater levels of microalgal biomass as a source of feed protein for laying hens and a novel potential of the biomass in improving dietary protein digestion and body protein metabolism than previously perceived.

  9. A Small Protein Associated with Fungal Energy Metabolism Affects the Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans in Mammals.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Erin E; Ramagopal, Udupi A; Rivera, Johanna; Cox, James; Nakouzi, Antonio; Prabu, Moses M; Almo, Steven C; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans causes cryptococcosis, a life-threatening fungal disease. C. neoformans has multiple virulence mechanisms that are non-host specific, induce damage and interfere with immune clearance. Microarray analysis of C. neoformans strains serially passaged in mice associated a small gene (CNAG_02591) with virulence. This gene, hereafter identified as HVA1 (hypervirulence-associated protein 1), encodes a protein that has homologs of unknown function in plant and animal fungi, consistent with a conserved mechanism. Expression of HVA1 was negatively correlated with virulence and was reduced in vitro and in vivo in both mouse- and Galleria-passaged strains of C. neoformans. Phenotypic analysis in hva1Δ and hva1Δ+HVA1 strains revealed no significant differences in established virulence factors. Mice infected intravenously with the hva1Δ strain had higher fungal burden in the spleen and brain, but lower fungal burden in the lungs, and died faster than mice infected with H99W or the hva1Δ+HVA1 strain. Metabolomics analysis demonstrated a general increase in all amino acids measured in the disrupted strain and a block in the TCA cycle at isocitrate dehydrogenase, possibly due to alterations in the nicotinamide cofactor pool. Macrophage fungal burden experiments recapitulated the mouse hypervirulent phenotype of the hva1Δ strain only in the presence of exogenous NADPH. The crystal structure of the Hva1 protein was solved, and a comparison of structurally similar proteins correlated with the metabolomics data and potential interactions with NADPH. We report a new gene that modulates virulence through a mechanism associated with changes in fungal metabolism. PMID:27583447

  10. A Small Protein Associated with Fungal Energy Metabolism Affects the Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James; Nakouzi, Antonio; Prabu, Moses M.; Almo, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans causes cryptococcosis, a life-threatening fungal disease. C. neoformans has multiple virulence mechanisms that are non-host specific, induce damage and interfere with immune clearance. Microarray analysis of C. neoformans strains serially passaged in mice associated a small gene (CNAG_02591) with virulence. This gene, hereafter identified as HVA1 (hypervirulence-associated protein 1), encodes a protein that has homologs of unknown function in plant and animal fungi, consistent with a conserved mechanism. Expression of HVA1 was negatively correlated with virulence and was reduced in vitro and in vivo in both mouse- and Galleria-passaged strains of C. neoformans. Phenotypic analysis in hva1Δ and hva1Δ+HVA1 strains revealed no significant differences in established virulence factors. Mice infected intravenously with the hva1Δ strain had higher fungal burden in the spleen and brain, but lower fungal burden in the lungs, and died faster than mice infected with H99W or the hva1Δ+HVA1 strain. Metabolomics analysis demonstrated a general increase in all amino acids measured in the disrupted strain and a block in the TCA cycle at isocitrate dehydrogenase, possibly due to alterations in the nicotinamide cofactor pool. Macrophage fungal burden experiments recapitulated the mouse hypervirulent phenotype of the hva1Δ strain only in the presence of exogenous NADPH. The crystal structure of the Hva1 protein was solved, and a comparison of structurally similar proteins correlated with the metabolomics data and potential interactions with NADPH. We report a new gene that modulates virulence through a mechanism associated with changes in fungal metabolism. PMID:27583447

  11. Effect of corn silage hybrid and metabolizable protein supply on nitrogen metabolism of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; Wyatt, D J

    2006-05-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of corn silage hybrid and supply of metabolizable protein (MP) on manure excretion and N metabolism by lactating dairy cows. Eight Holstein cows in midlactation (replicated 4 x 4 Latin square with 21-d periods) were fed 1 of 4 treatments, arranged factorially. Diets contained 55% corn silage made from a dual-purpose hybrid or a brown midrib (BMR) hybrid, and 45% concentrate that contained either a low or high concentration of rumen undegradable protein (altered by the addition of fish meal and treated soybean meal). Crude protein averaged 14.0 and 17.5% and supply of MP averaged 2,360 and 2,990 g/d for the low and high MP treatments (not affected by hybrid). Increasing supply of MP greatly increased urine output and tended to increase total manure output, whereas diets with BMR silage tended to reduce manure output. Increased MP supply increased daily excretion of manure N by 25% (465 vs. 374 g/d), fecal N by 27 g, and urinary N by 64 g. When the effect of N intake was removed, cows fed BMR silage excreted about 15 g/d less N via manure than cows fed the other silage. Rumen ammonia, volatile fatty acid concentrations, and pH were not affected by treatment. Dry matter intake (overall mean = 24.9 kg/d) tended to be increased with increased MP but was not affected by hybrid. Milk production for cows fed BMR was higher than for cows fed the dual-purpose hybrid (36.9 vs. 35.3 kg/d), but because of changes in fat concentration, yield of energy-corrected milk was not affected by treatment. The only interaction observed was increased yield of milk protein when BMR silage was combined with increased supply of MP.

  12. Alterations in glucose metabolism proteins responsible for the Warburg effect in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Barreto, Ester; de Souza Santos, Paulo Thiago; Bergmann, Anke; de Oliveira, Ivanir Martins; Wernersbach Pinto, Luciana; Blanco, Tania; Rossini, Ana; Pinto Kruel, Cleber Dario; Mattos Albano, Rodolpho; Ribeiro Pinto, Luis Felipe

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the most frequent esophageal tumor in the world. ESCC presents late diagnosis, highly aggressive behavior and poor survival. Changes in tumor cell energy metabolism appear to have a prominent role in malignant transformation. Tumor cells consume glucose avidly and produce lactic acid, even under normoxia. Among the factors that may contribute to the stimulation of glycolysis in tumor cells, there are changes in the glycolytic pathway enzymes such as: pyruvate kinase M1 and M2 (PKM2 and PKM1), hexokinase II (HKII), glucose transporter isoform 1 (GLUT-1), and transcription factor induced by hypoxia (HIF1α), responsible for the transcription of proteins cited. The objective of this study is to evaluate the alterations of these proteins and their association with clinicopathological data in ESCC. We performed immunohistochemistry to determine HIF-1α, GLUT-1, PKM1, PKM2, HK2 and Ki67-expression in ESCC patients and controls. Also, we used RT-qPCR to evaluated mRNA expression of GLUT-1 in esophageal mucosa of individuals without cancer, but are alcohol drinkers and tobacco smokers. Our results showed the exclusively expression of GLUT-1 in tumors cells and dysplastic samples. We also observed a compartmentalization of the expression of PKM1 and PKM2 in relation to tumor cells and stroma associated to tumor areas. All of the proteins evaluated, excepted GLUT-1, were frequently detected in normal mucosa. No correlations between clinicopathological features and protein expressions were observed. GLUT-1 expression appears in initial tumor lesions and is maintained through ESCC evolution. We reported for the first time PKM1 staining in normal esophagus and ESCC, being mostly present in more differentiated cells. PMID:27260309

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-11-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21.

  14. The crystal structure of a heptameric archaeal Sm protein: Implications for the eukaryotic snRNP core.

    PubMed

    Mura, C; Cascio, D; Sawaya, M R; Eisenberg, D S

    2001-05-01

    Sm proteins form the core of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), making them key components of several mRNA-processing assemblies, including the spliceosome. We report the 1.75-A crystal structure of SmAP, an Sm-like archaeal protein that forms a heptameric ring perforated by a cationic pore. In addition to providing direct evidence for such an assembly in eukaryotic snRNPs, this structure (i) shows that SmAP homodimers are structurally similar to human Sm heterodimers, (ii) supports a gene duplication model of Sm protein evolution, and (iii) offers a model of SmAP bound to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) that explains Sm binding-site specificity. The pronounced electrostatic asymmetry of the SmAP surface imparts directionality to putative SmAP-RNA interactions.

  15. Relative Abundance of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins in Arabidopsis Leaf and Root Tissue Determined by Metabolic Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bernfur, Katja; Larsson, Olaf; Larsson, Christer; Gustavsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of proteins with a stable isotope (15N) in intact Arabidopsis plants was used for accurate determination by mass spectrometry of differences in protein abundance between plasma membranes isolated from leaves and roots. In total, 703 proteins were identified, of which 188 were predicted to be integral membrane proteins. Major classes were transporters, receptors, proteins involved in membrane trafficking and cell wall-related proteins. Forty-one of the integral proteins, including nine of the 13 isoforms of the PIP (plasma membrane intrinsic protein) aquaporin subfamily, could be identified by peptides unique to these proteins, which made it possible to determine their relative abundance in leaf and root tissue. In addition, peptides shared between isoforms gave information on the proportions of these isoforms. A comparison between our data for protein levels and corresponding data for mRNA levels in the widely used database Genevestigator showed an agreement for only about two thirds of the proteins. By contrast, localization data available in the literature for 21 of the 41 proteins show a much better agreement with our data, in particular data based on immunostaining of proteins and GUS-staining of promoter activity. Thus, although mRNA levels may provide a useful approximation for protein levels, detection and quantification of isoform-specific peptides by proteomics should generate the most reliable data for the proteome. PMID:23990937

  16. The F-box protein Ppa is a common regulator of core EMT factors Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1.

    PubMed

    Lander, Rachel; Nordin, Kara; LaBonne, Carole

    2011-07-11

    A small group of core transcription factors, including Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1, control epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) during both embryonic development and tumor metastasis. However, little is known about how these factors are coordinately regulated to mediate the requisite behavioral and fate changes. It was recently shown that a key mechanism for regulating Snail proteins is by modulating their stability. In this paper, we report that the stability of Twist is also regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We found that the same E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate Snail family proteins, Partner of paired (Ppa), also controlled Twist stability and did so in a manner dependent on the Twist WR-rich domain. Surprisingly, Ppa could also target the third core EMT regulatory factor Sip1 for proteasomal degradation. Together, these results indicate that despite the structural diversity of the core transcriptional regulatory factors implicated in EMT, a common mechanism has evolved for controlling their stability and therefore their function.

  17. Changes in the protein metabolism in liver and kidney of Mus booduga gray after oral BHC feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, G.H.; Reddy, P.M.; Ramamurthi, R.

    1988-12-01

    Recent years have seen phenomenal increases in the use of pesticides to control various types of pests to increase food supply. Among them the organochlorine (OC) group of insecticides are widely used in India because of their cheapness and long persistency. The technical grade Benzenehexachloride is a mixture of several stereo isomers and it has low acute toxicity but high chronic toxicity to animals mainly due to the accumulation and slow degradation of ..beta..-isomer in animal tissues. Since the derrangement in tissue protein degradation is reflected by changes in protein composition, later may be considered in assessing the protein metabolic perturberations during toxic stress. So, the present work is aimed to study the effect of BHC on the protein metabolism in the mice, Mus booduga.

  18. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis carbon core metabolism to simultaneous nutrient limitation and osmotic challenge: a multi-omics perspective.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Michael; Sappa, Praveen K; Meyer, Hanna; Maaß, Sandra; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Becker, Judith; Steil, Leif; Hecker, Michael; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Lalk, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg; Bremer, Erhard; Völker, Uwe; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encounters nutrient limitations and osmotic stress in its natural soil ecosystem. To ensure survival and sustain growth, highly integrated adaptive responses are required. Here, we investigated the system-wide response of B. subtilis to different, simultaneously imposed stresses. To address the anticipated complexity of the cellular response networks, we combined chemostat experiments under conditions of carbon limitation, salt stress and osmoprotection with multi-omics analyses of the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome. Surprisingly, the flux through central carbon and energy metabolism is very robust under all conditions studied. The key to achieve this robustness is the adjustment of the biocatalytic machinery to compensate for solvent-induced impairment of enzymatic activities during osmotic stress. Specifically, increased production of several enzymes of central carbon metabolism compensates for their reduced activity in the presence of high salt. A major response of the cell during osmotic stress is the production of the compatible solute proline. This is achieved through the concerted adjustment of multiple reactions around the 2-oxoglutarate node, which drives metabolism towards the proline precursor glutamate. The fine-tuning of the transcriptional and metabolic networks involves functional modules that overarch the individual pathways.

  19. Soy Protein Supplementation Reduces Clinical Indices in Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Bo; Chi, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials have studied the use of soy protein for treating type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The purpose of this study was to outline evidence on the effects of soy protein supplementation on clinical indices in T2D and MS subjects by performing a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Materials and Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases up to March 2015 for RCTs. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by the fixed-and-random-effects model. A total of eleven studies with eleven clinical variables met the inclusion criteria. Results The meta-analysis showed that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) [weighted mean difference (WMD), -0.207; 95% CI, -0.374 to -0.040; p=0.015], fasting serum insulin (FSI) (WMD, -0.292; 95% CI, -0.496 to -0.088; p=0.005), homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) (WMD, -0.346; 95% CI, -0.570 to -0.123; p=0.002), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (WMD, -0.230; 95% CI, -0.441 to -0.019; p=0.033), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (WMD, -0.304; 95% CI, -0.461 to -0.148; p=0.000), total cholesterol (TC) (WMD, -0.386; 95% CI, -0.548 to -0.225; p=0.000), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (WMD, -0.510; 95% CI, -0.722 to -0.299; p=0.000) are significant reduced with soy protein supplementation, compared with a placebo control group, in T2D and MS patients. Furthermore, soy protein supplementation for longer duration (≥6 mo) significantly reduced FPG, LDL-C, and CRP, while that for a shorter duration (<6 mo) significantly reduced FSI and HOMA-IR. Conclusion Soy protein supplementation could be beneficial for FPG, FSI, HOMA-IR, DBP, LDL-C, TC, and CRP control in plasma. PMID:26996569

  20. The interplay between lnRNAs, SNPs, and protein complexes - what does it mean for cancer metabolism?

    PubMed

    Redis, Roxana S; Calin, George A

    2016-07-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) exert most of their functions through protein interactions. A better understanding of these interactions will facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Recently, we described how the lncRNA CCAT2 located at the 8q24 cancer amplicon reprograms cancer metabolism by directly interacting in an allele-specific manner with a protein complex. PMID:27652320

  1. [Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on physiological metabolism, DNA and protein of crops: a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; He, Yongmei; Zu, Yanqun

    2006-01-01

    Ozone depletion in stratosphere has led to the increase of solar UV-B radiation reaching to the earth surface, which would affect crops to various extents. This review dealt with the effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on the physiological metabolism, DNA damage and protein content of crops. Enhanced UV-B radiation could increase crops' flavonoid content but decrease their chlorophyll content and photosynthesis, induce gene change, and result in DNA damage and change of protein content.

  2. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145492

  3. Rice bran proteins and their hydrolysates modulate cholesterol metabolism in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Gong, Lingxiao; Sun, Baoguo

    2016-06-15

    The hypolipidemic properties of defatted rice bran protein (DRBP), fresh rice bran protein (FRBP), DRBP hydrolysates (DRBPH), and FRBP hydrolysates (FRBPH) were determined in mice on high fat diets for four weeks. Very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) contents, and the hepatic total cholesterol content were reduced while fecal total cholesterol and total bile acid (TBA) contents were increased in the FRBPH diet group. The expression levels of hepatic genes for cholesterol biosynthesis HMG-CoAR and SREBP-2 were lowest in the FRBPH diet group. The mRNA level of HMG-CoAR was significantly positively correlated with the hepatic TG content (r = 0.82, P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of genes related to bile acid biosynthesis and cholesterol efflux, CYP7A1, ABCA1, and PPARγ were up-regulated in all test groups. The results suggest that FRBPH regulates cholesterol metabolism in mice fed the high fat and cholesterol diet by increasing fecal steroid excretion and expression levels of genes related to bile acid synthesis and cholesterol efflux, and the down-regulation of the expression levels of genes related to cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27216972

  4. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein-mediated regulation of hepatocyte metabolic pathways affects viral replication.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Rawat, Siddhartha; Ajenjo, Marcia; Bouchard, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Chronic HBV infection is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx protein stimulates HBV replication and likely influences the development of HBV-associated HCC. Whether HBx affects regulators of metabolism in normal hepatocytes has not been addressed. We used an ex vivo, cultured primary rat hepatocyte system to assess the interplay between HBV replication and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. HBx activated mTORC1 signaling; however, inhibition of mTORC1 enhanced HBV replication. HBx also decreased ATP levels and activated the energy-sensing factor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK decreased HBV replication. Inhibition of AMPK activates mTORC1, and we showed that activated mTORC1 is one factor that reduces HBV replication when AMPK is inhibited. HBx activation of both AMPK and mTORC1 suggests that these activities could provide a balancing mechanism to facilitate persistent HBV replication. HBx activation of mTORC1 and AMPK could also influence HCC development.

  5. Evidence for in-situ metabolic activity in ice sheets based on anomalous trace gas records from the Vostok and other ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, T.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of trace gas species in ice cores are the primary means for reconstructing the composition of the atmosphere. The longest such record comes from the Vostok core taken from the central portion of the East Antarctic ice sheet [Petit et al., 1999]. In general, the trace gas records from Vostok are utilized as the reference signal when correlating trace gas measurements from other ice cores. The underlying assumption implicit in such endeavors is that the bubbles recovered from the ice cores record the composition of the atmosphere at the time the bubbles were formed. Another implicit assumption is that the composition of the bubbles has not been compromised by the extremely long storage periods within the ice sheet. While there is ample evidence that certain trace gas records (e.g. CO2 and CH4) have probably not been compromised, anomalous nitrous oxide (N2O) measurements from the penultimate glacial termination at Vostok are consistent with in-situ (N2O) production [Sowers, 2001]. In general, trace gas measurements from high altitude tropical/temperate glaciers are higher than expected based on contemporaneous measurements from polar cores. Measurements spanning the last 25kyr from the Sajama ice core from central Bolivia (18oS, 69oW, 6542masl), for example, were 1X-5X higher than contemporaneous values recorded in polar ice cores [Campen et al., 2003]. While other physical factors (like temperature/melting) may contribute to the elevated trace gas levels at these sites, the most likely explanation involves the accumulation of in-situ metabolic trace gas byproducts. Stable isotope measurements provide independent information for assessing the origin of the elevated trace gas levels in select samples. For the penultimate glacial termination at Vostok, the anomalous (N2O) values carry high δ15Nbulk and low δ18Obulk values that would be predicted if the added (N2O) was associated with in-situ nitrification. At Sajama, low δ13CH4 values observed during

  6. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  7. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  8. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  9. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC. PMID:26187821

  10. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age.

    PubMed

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks. PMID:24944020

  11. [Role of the adaptins, dynamin like GTP-ases and Rab proteins in metabolic disorders and various infections].

    PubMed

    Kierczak, Marcin; Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Numerous metabolic and genetic diseases are due to mutations in adaptins, dynamin-like GTP-ases or disorders in trafficking machinery mediated by Rab proteins. A great number of pathogenes including viruses (HIV, SIV), bacteria and protozoa use various elements of endocytic/trafficking machinery to get into the host cells and to make their infection successful. Their different strategies are discussed.

  12. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection.

  13. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  14. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  15. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels