Science.gov

Sample records for core potential studies

  1. Effective core potential study of transition metal and lanthanide catalyzed hydrogen exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cundari, Thomas R.; Stevens, Walter J.; Sommerer, Shaun O.

    1993-12-01

    An effective core potential study of H2 activation by the sigma-bond metathesis mechanism is reported for a range of simple Cl2MH catalyst models: M=Sc, Y, La, Lu, Zr+, B, and Al. Several points of interest are noted. Effective core potentials methods allow the study of metals from the transition, lanthanide and main group series with near equal facility. A single-determinant wavefunction is found to be sufficient for a qualitatively correct description of the ground and transition states in these reactions; changes in optimized geometries are minimal upon inclusion of correlation at the multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) level. Calculated barriers are the highest using restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and multiconfiguration self-consistent field wavefunctions and lowest using Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory and second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) methods. Trends as a function of metal species on H2 activation barriers are consistent for all wavefunctions employed. As MP2 and RHF wavefunctions are most amenable to larger, more experimentally relevant systems, the use of RHF wavefunctions to determine stationary point geometries followed by MP2 calculations to assess their relative energies seems to be an attractive theoretical approach for computational investigations of hydrogenation and important related reactions.

  2. Water's potential role: Insights from studies of the p53 core domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Ma, Z; Wang, X; Xiao, Z T; Li, Y; Xue, Z H; Wang, Y H

    2012-02-01

    Soluble proteins with amyloidogenic propensity such as the tumor suppressor protein p53 have high proportion of incompletely desolvated backbone H bonds (HB). Such bonds are vulnerable to water attack, thus potentially leading to the misfolding of these proteins. However, it is still not clear how the surrounding solvent influences the protein native states. To address this, systematic surveys by molecular dynamics simulations and entropy analysis were performed on the p53 core domain in this work. We examined seven wild/mutant X-ray structures and observed two types of water-network hydration in three "hot hydration centers" (DNA- or small molecule- binding surfaces of the p53 core domain). The "tight" water, resulting from the local collective hydrogen-bond interactions, is probably fundamental to the protein structural stability. The second type of water is highly "dynamical" and exchanges very fast within the bulk solution, which is unambiguously assisted by the local protein motions. An entropy mapping of the solvent around the protein and a temperature perturbation analysis further present the main features of the p53 hydration network. The particular environment created by different water molecules around the p53 core domain also partly explains the structural vulnerabilities of this protein.

  3. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  4. Core disgust and moral disgust are related to distinct spatiotemporal patterns of neural processing: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Shen, Weilin; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Ting-yong; Huang, Hao; Li, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Core disgust is thought to rely more on sensory and perceptual processes, whereas moral disgust is thought to rely more on social evaluation processes. However, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying these two types of disgust. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from participants while they performed a lexical decision task in which core- and moral-disgust words were intermixed with neutral words and pseudowords. Lexical judgment was faster for coredisgust words and slower for moral-disgust words, relative to the neutral words. Core-disgust words, relative to neutral words, elicited a larger early posterior negative (EPN), a larger N320, a smaller N400, and a larger late positive component (LPC), whereas moral disgust words elicited a smaller N320 and a larger N400 than neutral words. These results suggest that the N320 and N400 components are particularly sensitive to the neurocognitive processes that overlap in processing both core and moral disgust, whereas the EPN and LPC may reflect process that are particularly sensitive to core disgust.

  5. Multireference study of spin-orbit coupling in the hydrides of the 6p-block elements using the model core potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Klobukowski, Mariusz

    2010-02-01

    Careful spin-orbit multireference studies were carried out for the late p-block elements Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, and Rn and their hydrides using the model core potentials developed in the present work. The model core potentials were designed to treat the scalar-relativistic and spin-orbit coupling effects at the Douglas-Kroll level. The variational stability of the spin-orbit coupling operator was discussed in terms of the relativistic kinematic operators and depicted graphically. A detailed analysis of the spin-orbit multireference dissociation curves of the 6p element hydrides as well as of their atomic spectra allowed to establish the accuracy of the model core potentials with respect to all-electron calculations to be within several mÅ for re, meV (ceV) for De at the correlation level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory), 30 cm-1 for ωe, and about 350 cm-1 for the low-lying atomic and molecular term and level energies. These values are expected to be the maximum error limits for the model core potentials of all the np-block elements (n =2-6). Furthermore, a good agreement with experiment requires that many terms be coupled in the spin-orbit coupling calculations. A timing study of Tl and TlH computations indicates that the model core potentials lead to 20-fold (6-fold) speedup at the level of configuration interaction (multireference perturbation theory) calculations.

  6. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  7. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies.

  8. Electronic Charges and Electric Potential at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces Studied by Core-Level Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Harold

    2011-08-19

    We studied LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces for varying LaAlO{sub 3} thickness by core-level photoemission spectroscopy. In Ti 2p spectra for conducting 'n-type' interfaces, Ti{sup 3+} signals appeared, which were absent for insulating 'p-type' interfaces. The Ti{sup 3+} signals increased with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness, but started well below the critical thickness of 4 unit cells for metallic transport. Core-level shifts with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness were much smaller than predicted by the polar catastrophe model. We attribute these observations to surface defects/adsorbates providing charges to the interface even below the critical thickness.

  9. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  10. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for K to Au including the outermost core orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.J.; Wadt, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio effective core potentials (ECP's) have been generated to replace the innermost core electron for third-row (K--Au), fourth-row (Rb--Ag), and fifth-row (Cs--Au) atoms. The outermost core orbitals: corresponding to the ns/sup 2/np/sup 6/ configuration for the three rows here: are not replaced by the ECP but are treated on an equal footing with the nd, (n+1)s and (n+1)p valence orbitals. These ECP's have been derived for use in molecular calculations where these outer core orbitals need to be treated explicitly rather than to be replaced by an ECP. The ECP's for the forth and fifth rows also incorporate the mass--velocity and Darwin relativistic effects into the potentials. Analytic fits to the potentials are presented for use in multicenter integral evaluation. Gaussian orbital valence basis sets are developed for the (3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, 4p), (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p), and (5s, 5p, 5d, 6s, 6p) ortibals of the three respective rows.

  11. Effective core potentials for the cadmium and mercury atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basch, H.; Newton, M. D.; Jafri, J.; Moskowitz, J. W.; Topiol, S.

    1978-01-01

    Ab initio effective core potentials have been obtained for the cadmium and mercury atoms by the methods of Kahn et al. (1976). Both two and twelve valence electron representations of Cd and Hg were tested for various atom state-configurations by comparison with all-electron calculations. The generated potentials were used to obtain the equilibrium bond distances and molecular binding energies for the dichloride and dimethyl compounds of both atoms from single and optimum-double configuration self-consistent field calculations.

  12. Discrete perturbation theory for continuous soft-core potential fluids.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, L A; Jaime-Muñoz, G; Benavides, A L; Torres-Arenas, J; Sastre, F

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we present an equation of state for an interesting soft-core continuous potential [G. Franzese, J. Mol. Liq. 136, 267 (2007)] which has been successfully used to model the behavior of single component fluids that show some water-type anomalies. This equation has been obtained using discrete perturbation theory. It is an analytical expression given in terms of density, temperature, and the set of parameters that characterize the intermolecular interaction. Theoretical results for the vapor-liquid phase diagram and for supercritical pressures are compared with previous and new simulation data and a good agreement is found. This work also clarifies discrepancies between previous Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation results for this potential.

  13. Spin-orbit configuration interaction study of potential energy curves and transition probabilities of the mercury hydride molecule and tests of relativistic effective core potentials for Hg, Hg + , and Hg2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseyev, Aleksey B.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Hirsch, Gerhard

    1996-03-01

    Ab initio CI calculations have been carried out for the low-energy states of the mercury hydride molecule HgH and its isotopomers. A relativistic effective core potential (RECP) given by Ross et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6654 (1990)] is employed to describe all but the Hg 5d and 6s valence electrons. Tests for a series of low-lying states of Hg, Hg+, and Hg2+ demonstrate that 0.1 eV accuracy is obtained at the SCF level with a high-quality basis set for this RECP in comparison with all-electron Dirac-Fock results up to 32 eV excitation energy. The DF values are themselves in error by 1-3 eV on the average compared to experiment, but the present CI calculations based on this RECP lead to considerably higher accuracy because of the importance of correlation effects in such determinations. Energy differences (12 cases) between states with the same number of electrons are computed to an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 eV in all cases after the spin-orbit interaction is included. These results compare favorably with those obtained by Häussermann et al. [Mol. Phys. 78, 1211 (1993)] with a ... 5s2 5p6 5d10 6s2 RECP and a corresponding larger AO basis to describe the more tightly bound electrons. Good agreement is found for the spectroscopic constants of the HgH molecule in its lowest four electronic states: X 2Σ+1/2, A1 2Π1/2, A2 2Π3/2, and B 2Σ+1/2 (maximal errors of 1000 cm-1 for Te, 0.03 Å for re and 150 cm-1 for ωe). An RKR curve reported for the A1 state is shown to be in error beyond r=4.0 a0 because of its failure to describe a key avoided crossing with the B state. Radiative lifetimes computed for the A 2Π multiplets are both found to agree with values deduced from experiment to within 40%. The calculations find no difference in the HgH and HgD radiative lifetimes for either the A1 or the A2 states, whereas a large distinction in the measured A1 lifetimes of the two isotopomers is observed, thereby supporting the previous experimental conclusion that strong

  14. A logistics and potential hazard study of propellant systems for a Saturn 5 derived heavy lift (three-stage core) launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, E. Dow

    1992-01-01

    The Bush Administration has directed NASA to prepare for a return to the Moon and on to Mars - the Space Exploration Initiative. To meet this directive, powerful rocket boosters will be required in order to lift payloads that may reach the half-million pound range into low earth orbit. In this report an analysis is presented on logistics and potential hazards of the propellant systems envisioned for future Saturn 5 derived heavy lift launch vehicles. In discussing propellant logistics, particular attention has been given to possible problems associated with procurement, transportation, and storage of RP-1, HL2, and LOX, the heavy lift launch vehicle propellants. Current LOX producing facilities will need to be expanded and propellant storage and some support facilities will require relocation if current Launch Pads 39A and/or 39B are to be used for future heavy noise-abatement measures. Included in the report is a discussion of suggested additional studies, primarily economic and environmental, which should be undertaken in support of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative.

  15. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  16. Women's Studies: A Recommended Core Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stineman, Esther; Loeb, Catherine, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography identifies a core collection of over 1,700 books and periodicals that will support a women's studies undergraduate program. Although older materials appear frequently in the bibliography, the main emphasis is on works published since 1970. Books are grouped into 21 subject areas including anthropology, autobiography,…

  17. Electron structure of excited configurations in Ca2V2O7 studied by electron-induced core-ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance-potential spectroscopy, and x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curelaru, I. M.; Strid, K.-G.; Suoninen, E.; Minni, E.; Rönnhult, T.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the electron-induced core-ionization loss (CILS) spectra, the appearance-potential (APS) spectra, and the x-ray-photoelectron (XPS) spectra of Ca2V2O7, that is a prototype for a series of luminescent materials with general formula M2V2O7(M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Hg). From the analysis of the data provided by the edge spectroscopies (CILS and APS) and their comparison with the XPS binding energies, we deduced the electronic structure of the outer orbitals (occupied and empty) involved in these processes. Our data illustrate the strong many-body effects that occur in the excitation and decay of localized atomiclike configurations within the big ionic cluster V2O4-7. Excitation of core levels in calcium, outside the V2O4-7 ion, seems to involve more extended orbitals, since the screening is more efficient. Usefulness of complementary studies by x-ray emission and Auger electron spectroscopy is anticipated.

  18. Effects of molecular potential and geometry on atomic core-level photoemission over an extended energy range - the case study of CO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukk, E.; Ayuso, D.; Thomas, T. D.; Decleva, P.; Patanen, M.; Argenti, L.; Plésiat, E.; Palacios, A.; Kooser, K.; Travnikova, O.; Mondal, S.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, K.; Miron, C.; Martín, F.; Ueda, K.

    2014-04-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of single-molecule inner-shell photoemission over an extended range of photon energies. The vibrational ratios v=1/v=0 from the C 1s photoelectron spectra, although mostly determined by the bond length change, are shown to be affected also by photoelectron recoil and scattering on the neighboring oxygen atom. Density functional theory is used to encompass all these effect in unified treatment. It is also demonstrated that the DFT calculations can be used as a means to extract dynamic and static molecular geometry values.

  19. Effects of molecular potential and geometry on atomic core-level photoemission over an extended energy range: The case study of the CO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukk, E.; Ayuso, D.; Thomas, T. D.; Decleva, P.; Patanen, M.; Argenti, L.; Plésiat, E.; Palacios, A.; Kooser, K.; Travnikova, O.; Mondal, S.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, K.; Miron, C.; Martín, F.; Ueda, K.

    2013-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of single-molecule inner-shell photoemission measured over an extended range of photon energies. The vibrational intensity ratios I(ν=1)/I(ν=0) from the C 1s photoelectron spectra of carbon monoxide, although mostly determined by the bond length change upon ionization, are shown to be affected also by photoelectron recoil and by scattering from the neighboring oxygen atom. Static-exchange density functional theory (DFT) is used to encompass all these effects in a unified theoretical treatment. The ab initio calculations show that the vibrational ratio as a function of the photoelectron momentum is sensitive to both the ground-state internuclear distance and its contraction upon photoionization. We present a proof-of-principle application of DFT calculations as a quantitative structural analysis tool for extracting the dynamic and static molecular geometry parameters simultaneously.

  20. Discrete perturbation theory for the hard-core attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arenas, J.; Cervantes, L. A.; Benavides, A. L.; Chapela, G. A.; del Río, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we apply the discrete perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides and A. Gil-Villegas, Mol. Phys. 97, 1225 (1999)] to obtain an equation of state for the case of two continuous potentials: the hard-core attractive Yukawa potential and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa potential. The main advantage of the presented equation of state is that it is an explicit analytical expression in the parameters that characterize the intermolecular interactions. With a suitable choice of their inverse screening length parameter one can model the behavior of different systems. This feature allows us to make a systematic study of the effect of the variation in the parameters on the thermodynamic properties of this system. We analyze single phase properties at different conditions of density and temperature, and vapor-liquid phase diagrams for several values of the reduced inverse screening length parameter within the interval κ∗=0.1-5.0. The theoretical predictions are compared with available and new Monte Carlo simulation data. Good agreement is found for most of the cases and better predictions are found for the long-range ones. The Yukawa potential is an example of a family of hard-core plus a tail (attractive or repulsive) function that asymptotically goes to zero as the separations between particles increase. We would expect that similar results could be found for other potentials with these characteristics.

  1. Discrete perturbation theory for the hard-core attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials.

    PubMed

    Torres-Arenas, J; Cervantes, L A; Benavides, A L; Chapela, G A; del Río, F

    2010-01-21

    In this work we apply the discrete perturbation theory [A. L. Benavides and A. Gil-Villegas, Mol. Phys. 97, 1225 (1999)] to obtain an equation of state for the case of two continuous potentials: the hard-core attractive Yukawa potential and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa potential. The main advantage of the presented equation of state is that it is an explicit analytical expression in the parameters that characterize the intermolecular interactions. With a suitable choice of their inverse screening length parameter one can model the behavior of different systems. This feature allows us to make a systematic study of the effect of the variation in the parameters on the thermodynamic properties of this system. We analyze single phase properties at different conditions of density and temperature, and vapor-liquid phase diagrams for several values of the reduced inverse screening length parameter within the interval kappa( *)=0.1-5.0. The theoretical predictions are compared with available and new Monte Carlo simulation data. Good agreement is found for most of the cases and better predictions are found for the long-range ones. The Yukawa potential is an example of a family of hard-core plus a tail (attractive or repulsive) function that asymptotically goes to zero as the separations between particles increase. We would expect that similar results could be found for other potentials with these characteristics.

  2. Motion sickness potentiates core cooling during immersion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Tipton, Michael J; Gennser, Mikael; Eiken, Ola

    2001-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that motion sickness affects thermoregulatory responses to cooling in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent three separate head-out immersions in 28 °C water after different preparatory procedures. In the ‘control’ procedure immersion was preceded by a rest period. In the ‘motion sickness’ procedure immersion was preceded by provocation of motion sickness in a human centrifuge. This comprised rapid and repeated alterations of the gravitational (G-) stress in the head-to-foot direction, plus a standardized regimen of head movements at increased G-stress. In the ‘G-control’ procedure, the subjects were exposed to similar G-stress, but without the motion sickness provocation. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and 3rd digit of the right hand (ΔTforearm-fingertip), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception, thermal comfort and level of motion sickness discomfort at regular intervals. No differences were observed in any of the variables between control and G-control procedures. In the motion sickness procedure, the ΔTforearm-fingertip response was significantly attenuated, indicating a blunted vasoconstrictor response, and rectal temperature decreased at a faster rate. No other differences were observed. Motion sickness attenuates the vasoconstrictor response to skin and core cooling, thereby enhancing heat loss and the magnitude of the fall in deep body temperature. Motion sickness may predispose individuals to hypothermia, and have significant implications for survival time in maritime accidents. PMID:11533150

  3. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  4. Pebble-bed core design option for VHTRs - Core configuration flexibility and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, M. L.; Tsvetkov, P. V.

    2006-07-01

    Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of VHTRs with fuel loadings containing minor actinides. This paper presents the analysis of pebble-bed core configurations. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities become more apparent. Effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, Dancoff factor, and core and reflector configurations are investigated. This effort is anticipated to contribute to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. (authors)

  5. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  6. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for main group elements Na to Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Wadt, W.R.; Hay, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A consistent set of ab initio effective core potentials (ECP) has been generated for the main group elements from Na to Bi using the procedure originally developed by Kahn. The ECP's are derived from all-electron numerical Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions and fit to analytical representations for use in molecular calculations. For Rb to Bi the ECP's are generated from the relativistic Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions of Cowan which incorporate the Darwin and mass--velocity terms. Energy-optimized valence basis sets of (3s3p) primitive Gaussians are presented for use with the ECP's. Comparisons between all-electron and valence-electron ECP calculations are presented for NaF, NaCl, Cl/sub 2/, Cl/sub 2//sup -/, Br/sub 2/, Br/sub 2//sup -/, and Xe/sub 2//sup +/. The results show that the average errors introduced by the ECP's are generally only a few percent.

  7. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  8. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  9. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W.; Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D.

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  10. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  11. The potential role of HCV core antigen testing in diagnosing HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Dawson, George J

    2012-01-01

    The potential uses of serological tests that detect HCV core antigens in biological fluids are highlighted. The most common serological tests utilized to detect exposure to HCV rely on the detection of antibodies to HCV. However, these tests cannot distinguish between individuals who have resolved their infection and those who remain actively infected with HCV. By contrast, the HCV core antigen test detects circulating HCV core antigen and identifies individuals who are actively infected with HCV. There is increasing interest in using the HCV core antigen test as a reflex test for seropositive individuals to identify individuals who are actively infected with HCV. In addition, the HCV core antigen test can be utilized to detect the early phase of HCV infection prior to the development of antibodies, both in the blood bank setting and in the diagnostic laboratory. Lastly, quantitative versions of the HCV core antigen test can be used to monitor the effectiveness of antiviral therapy.

  12. Preserving Social Studies as Core Curricula in an Era of Common Core Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David W.; Sink, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Education reform over the last two decades has changed perceptions of core curricula. Although social studies has traditionally been part of the core, emphasis on standards-based teaching and learning, along with elaborate accountability schemes, is causing unbalanced treatment of subjects. While the research literature indicates teachers are…

  13. Core history from paleomagnetic data: Potential changes in stratification but no evidence for a Mesoproterozoic inner core age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Aleksey; Tarduno, John; Kulakov, Evgeniy; McEnroe, Suzanne; Bono, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Data on the long-term evolution of Earth's magnetic field intensity are crucial for understanding the mechanisms of the geodynamo and planetary evolution. However, the paleointensity record in rocks may be adversely affected by a plethora of physical processes which must be taken into account when analyzing the paleointensity database. Recently, a statistical analysis of the Precambrian paleointensity database was used to claim that the solid inner core formed in the Mesoproterozoic, and that this onset time constrains the thermal conductivity in the core to "moderate" values. Here, we demonstrate that the data selection criteria used in this analysis failed to filter out data that significantly overestimate the true paleofield strength due to the presence of non-ideal carriers of paleointensity signals and/or viscous re-magnetizations. Moreover, the use of site-mean data led to an additional statistical bias by giving equal weight to time-averaged and non-time-averaged data. When the paleointensity overestimates are removed, and the study-mean data are used instead of site-mean data, the Precambrian database does not indicate a robust change in geomagnetic field intensity during the Mesoproterozoic. Our analyses indicate that the presently available paleointensity data of Mesoproterozoic age are insufficient in number and quality to constrain the timing of solid inner core formation, or the outstanding problem of core thermal conductivity. More promising available data sets that reflect long-term core structure are geomagnetic reversal rate and field morphology. The latter suggests changes that may reflect differences in Archean to Proterozoic core stratification, whereas the former suggest an interval of geodynamo hyperactivity at ca 550 Ma.

  14. Soft-core potentials in thermodynamic integration: comparing one- and two-step transformations.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Joung, InSuk; Case, David A

    2011-11-30

    Molecular dynamics-based free energy calculations allow the determination of a variety of thermodynamic quantities from computer simulations of small molecules. Thermodynamic integration (TI) calculations can suffer from instabilities during the creation or annihilation of particles. This "singularity" problem can be addressed with "soft-core" potential functions which keep pairwise interaction energies finite for all configurations and provide smooth free energy curves. "One-step" transformations, in which electrostatic and van der Waals forces are simultaneously modified, can be simpler and less expensive than "two-step" transformations in which these properties are changed in separate calculations. Here, we study solvation free energies for molecules of different hydrophobicity using both models. We provide recommended values for the two parameters α(LJ) and β(C) controlling the behavior of the soft-core Lennard-Jones and Coulomb potentials and compare one- and two-step transformations with regard to their suitability for numerical integration. For many types of transformations, the one-step procedure offers a convenient and accurate approach to free energy estimates.

  15. Mercury's Core Molten, Radar Study Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Scientists using a high-precision planetary radar technique for the first time have discovered that the innermost planet Mercury probably has a molten core, resolving a mystery of more than three decades. The discovery, which used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia and Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, and NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory antennas in California, is an important step toward a better understanding of how planets form and evolve. Planetary Radar High-precision planetary radar technique sent signal to Mercury, received reflection. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (447 KB) "For a long time it was thought we'd have to land spacecraft on Mercury to learn if its core is solid or molten. Now we've answered that question using ground-based telescopes," said Jean-Luc Margot, of Cornell University, leader of the research team, which published its results in the May 4 issue of the journal Science. Mercury is one of the least-understood of the planets in our Solar System. Its distance from the Sun is just over one-third that of the Earth, and it contains a mass just 5½ percent that of Earth. Only about half of Mercury's surface has been photographed by a spacecraft, Mariner 10, back in 1974. Mariner 10 also discovered that Mercury has a weak magnetic field, about one percent as strong as Earth's. That discovery spurred a scientific debate about the planet's core. Scientists normally expect a rocky planet's magnetic field to be caused by an electromagnetic dynamo in a molten core. However, Mercury is so small that most scientists expected its core to have cooled and solidified long ago. Those scientists speculated that the magnetic field seen today may have been "frozen" into the planet when the core cooled. "Whether the core is molten or solid today depends greatly on the chemical composition of the core. That chemical composition can provide important clues about the

  16. Chemical composition of core samples from Newark Basin, a potential carbon sequestration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, A. M.; Yang, Q.; Goldberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers has been identified as a promising mitigation option of greenhouse gases, the successful management of which is considered to be one of the most urgent and important challenges. Given the high energy production in the New York metropolitan area, the Newark Basin region is considered to be a potential future sequestration site. However, the risk of an upward leak of sequestered CO2, especially to a shallow drinking water aquifer, is a key concern facing geological sequestration as a safe and viable mitigation option. In this study, we measured the chemical composition of 25 cores from various depths throughout Newark Basin as a precursor for an ex situ incubation experiment using these rock samples and aquifer water to simulate a leak event. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of microwave-assisted digested rock powders and X-ray fluorescence analysis of the rock powders were conducted to obtain the concentrations of major and trace elements. Most of the major and trace elements show wide concentration ranges at one to two orders of magnitude. Understanding the chemical composition of these Newark Basin core samples is important not only for characterizing materials used for the later lab incubation, but also for gaining a broader understanding of the chemistry of the Newark Basin and profiling the region according to the varying risks associated with a leak of sequestered CO2 to a drinking water aquifer.

  17. Performance potential of gas-core and fusion rockets - A mission applications survey.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    This paper reports an evaluation of the performance potential of five nuclear rocket engines for four mission classes. These engines are: the regeneratively cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the light bulb gas-core nuclear rocket; the space-radiator cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the fusion rocket; and an advanced solid-core nuclear rocket which is included for comparison. The missions considered are: earth-to-orbit launch; near-earth space missions; close interplanetary missions; and distant interplanetary missions. For each of these missions, the capabilities of each rocket engine type are compared in terms of payload ratio for the earth launch mission or by the initial vehicle mass in earth orbit for space missions (a measure of initial cost). Other factors which might determine the engine choice are discussed. It is shown that a 60 day manned round trip to Mars is conceivable.-

  18. Paleomagnetic study of antarctic deep-sea cores.

    PubMed

    Opdyke, N D; Glass, B; Hays, J D; Foster, J

    1966-10-21

    detritus, approximately 2.5 million years ago. One can also calculate rates of sedi mentation, which vary in the cores studied from 1.1 to about 8.0 millimeters per 1000 years. Sedimentation rates for the Indian Ocean cores are higher than for the Bellingshausen Sea cores. The near coincidence of faunal changes and reversals in the cores suggests but does not prove a causal relation. We conclude from this study that paleomagnetic stratigraphy is a unique method for correlating and dating deep sea cores, and that future work with such cores may provide a complete or nearly complete record of the history of the earth's magnetic field beyond 4 million years.

  19. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  20. Relation between occupation in the first coordination shells and Widom line in core-softened potentials.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Evy; Barraz, Ney M; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2013-04-28

    Three core-softened families of potentials are checked for the presence of density and diffusion anomalies. These potentials exhibit a repulsive core with a softening region and at larger distances an attractive well. We found that the region in the pressure-temperature phase diagram in which the anomalies are present increases if the slope between the core-softened scale and the attractive part of the potential decreases. The anomalous region also increases if the range of the core-softened or of the attractive part of the potential decreases. We also show that the presence of the density anomaly is consistent with the non-monotonic changes of the radial distribution function at each one of the two scales when temperature and density are varied. Then, using this anomalous behavior of the structure we show that the pressure and the temperature at which the radial distribution function of one of the two length scales equals the radial distribution function of the other length scales identify the Widom line.

  1. Core compressor exit stage study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Korn, N. D.

    1979-01-01

    A total of two three-stage compressors were designed and tested to determine the effects of aspect ratio on compressor performance. The first compressor was designed with an aspect ratio of 0.81; the other, with an aspect ratio of 1.22. Both compressors had a hub-tip ratio of 0.915, representative of the rear stages of a core compressor, and both were designed to achieve a 15.0% surge margin at design pressure ratios of 1.357 and 1.324, respectively, at a mean wheel speed of 167 m/sec. At design speed the 0.81 aspect ratio compressor achieved a pressure ratio of 1.346 at a corrected flow of 4.28 kg/sec and an adiabatic efficiency of 86.1%. The 1.22 aspect ratio design achieved a pressure ratio of 1.314 at 4.35 kg/sec flow and 87.0% adiabatic efficiency. Surge margin to peak efficiency was 24.0% with the lower aspect ratio blading, compared with 12.4% with the higher aspect ratio blading.

  2. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for the transition metal atoms Sc to Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.J.; Wadt, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio effective core potentials (ECP's) have been generated to replace the Coulomb, exchange, and core-orthogonality effects of the chemically inert core electron in the transition metal atoms Sc to Hg. For the second and third transition series relative ECP's have been generated which also incorporate the mass--velocity and Darwin relativistic effects into the potential. The ab initio ECP's should facilitate valence electron calculations on molecules containing transition-metal atoms with accuracies approaching all-electron calculations at a fraction of the computational cost. Analytic fits to the potentials are presented for use in multicenter integral evaluation. Gaussian orbital valence basis sets are developed for the (3d,4s,4p), (4d,5s,5p), and (5d,6s,6p) orbitals of the first, second, and third transition series atoms, respectively. All-electron and valence-electron atomic excitation energies are also compared for the low-lying states of Sc--Hg, and the valence-electron calculations are found to reproduce the all-electron excitation energies (typically within a few tenths of an eV).

  3. Feasibility Studies of Teacher Core Job Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W. W., Jr.; And Others

    Work redesign for improving satisfaction or productivity depends partially on employee attributes because employees respond differently to work conditions. The Hackman-Oldham theory distinguishes "job" from employee responses to job. A job's motivating potential is thus linked to five core characteristics that affect three psychological…

  4. The potential of asteroseismology for probing the core chemical stratification in white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Charpinet, S.; Brassard, P.; Fontaine, G.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The details of the C/O core structure in white dwarf stars has mostly remained inaccessible to the technique of asteroseismology, despite several attempts carried out in the past. Aims: We aim to re-assess the potential of asteroseismology for probing the chemical stratification in white dwarf cores, in light of new highly efficient tools recently developed for that purpose. Methods: Using the forward modeling approach and a new parameterization for the core chemical stratification in ZZ Ceti stars, we tested several situations typical of the usually limited constraints available, such as small numbers of observed independent modes, to carry out asteroseismology of these stars. Results: We find that, even with a limited number of modes, the core chemical stratification (in particular, the location of the steep chemical transitions expected in the oxygen profile) can be determined quite precisely due to the significant sensitivity of some confined modes to partial reflexion (trapping) effects. These effects are similar to the well known trapping induced by the shallower chemical transitions at the edge of the core and at the bottom of the H-rich envelope. We also find that success to unravel the core structure depends on the information content of the available seismic data. In some cases, it may not be possible to isolate a unique, well-defined seismic solution and the problem remains degenerate. Conclusions: Our results establish that constraining the core chemical stratification in white dwarf stars based solely on asteroseismology is possible, an opportunity that we have begun to exploit.

  5. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Izvekov, Sergei Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O–Si–O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O–O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O–O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  6. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  7. A mean spherical model for soft potentials: The hard core revealed as a perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Y.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mean spherical approximation for fluids is extended to treat the case of dense systems interacting via soft-potentials. The extension takes the form of a generalized statement concerning the behavior of the direct correlation function c(r) and radial distribution g(r). From a detailed analysis that views the hard core portion of a potential as a perturbation on the whole, a specific model is proposed which possesses analytic solutions for both Coulomb and Yukawa potentials, in addition to certain other remarkable properties. A variational principle for the model leads to a relatively simple method for obtaining numerical solutions.

  8. New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gapsys, Vytautas; Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L

    2012-07-10

    The fields of rational drug design and protein engineering benefit from accurate free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic integration scheme is often used to calculate changes in the free energy of a system by integrating the change of the system's Hamiltonian with respect to a coupling parameter. These methods exploit nonphysical pathways over thermodynamic cycles involving particle introduction and annihilation. Such alchemical transitions require the modification of the classical nonbonded potential energy terms by applying soft-core potential functions to avoid singularity points. In this work, we propose a novel formulation for a soft-core potential to be applied in nonequilibrium free energy calculations that alleviates singularities, numerical instabilities, and additional minima in the potential energy for all combinations of nonbonded interactions at all intermediate alchemical states. The method was validated by application to (a) the free energy calculations of a closed thermodynamic cycle, (b) the mutation influence on protein thermostability, (c) calculations of small ligand solvation free energies, and (d) the estimation of binding free energies of trypsin inhibitors. The results show that the novel soft-core function provides a robust and accurate general purpose solution to alchemical free energy calculations.

  9. Hard sphere perturbation theory for fluids with soft-repulsive-core potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor; Stell, George

    2004-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of fluids with very soft repulsive-core potentials, resembling those of some liquid metals, are predicted with unprecedented accuracy using a new first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory. This theory is an extension of Mansoori-Canfield/Rasaiah-Stell (MCRS) perturbation theory, obtained by including a configuration integral correction recently identified by Mon, who evaluated it by computer simulation. In this work we derive an analytic expression for Mon's correction in terms of the radial distribution function of the soft-core fluid, g0(r), approximated using Lado's self-consistent extension of Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) theory. Comparisons with WCA and MCRS predictions show that our new extended-MCRS theory outperforms other first-order theories when applied to fluids with very soft inverse-power potentials (n⩽6), and predicts free energies that are within 0.3kT of simulation results up to the fluid freezing point.

  10. Core Curriculum Assessment Program: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Peter M.; Weimer, Don

    This paper reviews the development of a curriculum assessment plan by the Business and Management Division of Cardinal Stritch College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and reports the results of a study to determine the effectiveness of the plan. The division, which delivers accelerated instruction in evening courses, used the comprehensive outcomes…

  11. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  12. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  13. Mossbauer study of sediment cores from Victoria harbour, Hong Kong

    PubMed

    Tanner; Leong; Pan; Yu

    2000-12-01

    The concentrations of Fe and other abundant metals in 6 m-long sediment cores from four locations in the world's largest container port, Hong Kong, have been determined, in addition to physical characteristics and 210Pb activities. Fe is generally present at concentrations between 2% and 3% (depending on the particle size), similar to values found in granitic rocks. Its speciation was studied by room temperature Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two Fe(II) species and one Fe(III) species were found to be present in the cores. The relative proportions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) generally changed with the depth of sediment. Most noticeably, for the core taken from near the Star Ferry Pier at the Kowloon side of Victoria harbour, the proportion of Fe(II) was fairly constant down to 4.75 m, but then decreased with depth, so that near the core base (6 m depth), the iron was present almost exclusively as Fe(III). The colour of the core changed from olive grey to olive yellow between 5 and 6 m. According to the core chronology, this depth represents ca. 1900, before the ferry pier construction, when the harbour was unpolluted.

  14. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  15. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  16. Implications of Common Core State Standards on the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William B., III.

    2014-01-01

    Social studies teachers have often been on the outside looking in during much of the era billed as the standards-based educational reform (SBER), but with the adoption and implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), social studies teachers seem to have been invited back inside. Yet, how will the standards impact social studies…

  17. The paleoclimatic and geochronologic utility of coring red beds and evaporites: a case study from the RKB core (Permian, Kansas, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Benison, Kathleen C.; Foster, Tyler M.; Zambito, Jay; Soreghan, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Drill core is critical for robust and high-resolution reconstructions of Earth's climate record, as well demonstrated from both marine successions and modern long-lived lake systems. Deep-time climate reconstructions increasingly require core-based data, but some facies, notably red beds and evaporites, have garnered less attention for both paleoclimatic and geochronologic analyses. Here, we highlight studies from the Rebecca K. Bounds (RKB) core, a nearly continuous, >1.6 km drill core extending from the Cretaceous to the Mississippian, recovered from the US Midcontinent by Amoco Production Company in 1988, and serendipitously made available for academic research. Recent research conducted on this core illustrates the potential to recover high-resolution data for geochronologic and climatic reconstructions from both the fine-grained red bed strata, which largely represent paleo-loess deposits, and associated evaporite strata. In this case, availability of core was instrumental for (1) accessing a continuous vertical section that establishes unambiguous superposition key to both magnetostratigraphic and paleoclimatic analyses, and (2) providing pristine sample material from friable, soluble, and/or lithofacies and mineralogical species otherwise poorly preserved in surface exposures. The potential for high-resolution paleoclimatic reconstruction from coring of deep-time loess strata in particular remains severely underutilized.

  18. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study

    PubMed Central

    Whistance, Robert N.; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Macefield, Rhiannon; Pullyblank, Anne M.; Avery, Kerry N. L.; Brookes, Sara T.; Thomas, Michael G.; Sylvester, Paul A.; Russell, Ann; Oliver, Alfred; Morton, Dion; Kennedy, Robin; Jayne, David G.; Huxtable, Richard; Hackett, Roland; Card, Mia; Brown, Julia; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard “core” set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery. Methods and Findings The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals) from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods). Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78%) centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35%) patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%). Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained

  19. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  20. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems.

    PubMed

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-08

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter [Formula: see text]. In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  1. Lesson Study: The Core of Japanese Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine

    This paper describes research lessons, which form the core of a larger process called lesson study within Japanese elementary science faculty development. Research lessons are actual classroom lessons with students which are: observed by others; planned for a long time, usually collaboratively; designed to bring to life particular goals of…

  2. Cores in dwarf galaxies from dark matter with a Yukawa potential.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham; Weiner, Neal

    2011-04-29

    We show that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the recently observed cores in dwarf galaxies without affecting the dynamics of objects with a much larger velocity dispersion, such as clusters of galaxies. The velocity dependence of the associated cross section as well as the possible exothermic nature of the interaction alleviates earlier concerns about strongly interacting dark matter. Dark matter evaporation in low-mass objects might explain the observed deficit of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way halo and have important implications for the first galaxies and reionization.

  3. Exposure studies of core-shell Fe/Fe(3)O(4) and Cu/CuO NPs to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants: Are they a potential physiological and nutritional hazard?

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Majumdar, S; Botez, C E; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2014-02-28

    Iron and copper nanomaterials are widely used in environmental remediation and agriculture. However, their effects on physiological parameters and nutritional quality of terrestrial plants such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are still unknown. In this research, 18-day-old hydroponically grown lettuce seedlings were treated for 15 days with core-shell nanoscale materials (Fe/Fe(3)O(4), Cu/CuO) at 10 and 20mg/L, and FeSO(4)·7H(2)O and CuSO(4)·5H(2)O at 10mg/L. At harvest, Fe, Cu, micro and macronutrients were determined by ICP-OES. Also, we evaluated chlorophyll content, plant growth, and catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Our results showed that iron ions/NPs did not affect the physiological parameters with respect to water control. Conversely, Cu ions/NPs reduced water content, root length, and dry biomass of the lettuce plants. ICP-OES results showed that nano-Cu/CuO treatments produced significant accumulation of Cu in roots compared to the CuSO(4)·5H(2)O treatment. In roots, all Cu treatments increased CAT activity but decreased APX activity. In addition, relative to the control, nano-Cu/CuO altered the nutritional quality of lettuce, since the treated plants had significantly more Cu, Al and S but less Mn, P, Ca, and Mg.

  4. A simple model for solute-solvent separation through nanopores based on core-softened potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vasconcelos, Cláudia K. B.; Batista, Ronaldo J. C.; da Rocha Régis, McGlennon; Manhabosco, Taíse M.; de Oliveira, Alan B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an effective model for solute separation from fluids through reverse osmosis based on core-softened potentials. Such potentials have been used to investigate anomalous fluids in several situations under a great variety of approaches. Due to their simplicity, computational simulations become faster and mathematical treatments are possible. Our model aims to mimic water desalination through nano-membranes through reverse osmosis, for which we have found reasonable qualitative results when confronted against all-atoms simulations found in the literature. The purpose of this work is not to replace any fully atomistic simulation at this stage, but instead to pave the first steps towards coarse-grained models for water desalination processes. This may help to approach problems in larger scales, in size and time, and perhaps make analytical theories more viable.

  5. Multidisciplinary Study of the Core and Computation of Core Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoolst, T.; Dehant, V.

    2002-12-01

    In 1998, the IERS established the Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC), which consists of eight Special Bureaus for the different geophysical fluids. The Special Bureau for the Core (SBC) focuses on theoretical modelling and observations related to core flow, and on inner core - outer core - mantle interactions. The fluid outer core is in constant motion, and related changes in core angular momentum are known to cause length-of-day variations of a few milliseconds at decadal time scales. This poster will give an overview of the activities of the SBC. Since its creation in 1998, the SBC has created a web site (www.astro.oma.be/SBC/main.html) as the central mechanism for providing services to the geodynamic community. The web site contains documented model data on core flow and core angular momentum and an extensive bibliography. In addition, a description is given of the relevant theories and of the dynamical assumptions used for constructing the flow. Reference Core Dynamics, structure, and rotation. eds. V. Dehant, K. Creager, S. Karato, S. Zatman, AGU monograph, 2002, in press, and articles therein such as Ponsar, S., Dehant, V., Holme, R., Jault, D., Pais, A., Van Hoolst, T., The Core and fluctuations in the Earth's rotation

  6. Taxonomic characterization and the bio-potential of bacteria isolated from glacier ice cores in the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Roy, Utpal

    2016-03-01

    Glacier ice and firn cores have ecological and biotechnological importance. The present study is aimed at characterizing bacteria in crustal ice cores from Svalbard, the Arctic. Counts of viable isolates ranged from 10 to 7000 CFU/ml (mean 803 CFU/ml) while the total bacterial numbers ranged from 7.20 × 10(4) to 2.59 × 10(7)  cells ml(-1) (mean 3.12 × 10(6)  cells ml(-1) ). Based on 16S rDNA sequence data, the identified species belonged to seven species, namely Bacillus barbaricus, Pseudomonas orientalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas syncyanea, Sphingomonas dokdonensis, and Sphingomonas phyllosphaerae, with a sequence similarity ranging between 93.5 and 99.9% with taxa present in the database. The isolates exhibited unique phenotypic properties, and three isolates (MLB-2, MLB-5, and MLB-9) are novel species, yet to be described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of cultured bacterial communities from Svalbard ice cores. We conclude that high lipase, protease, cellulase, amylase, and urease activities expressed by most of the isolates provide a clue to the potential industrial applications of these organisms. These microbes, producing cold-adapted enzymes may provide an opportunity for biotechnological research.

  7. Hydrocarbon potential of lower Duperow Formation as cored in Hill and Chouteau Counties, central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, G.C.; Bereskin, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    A paleotopographic ridge existed in north-central Montana during southward transgression of Souris River (Giventian) and lower Duperow (Frasnian) seas. This ridge represented a southeasterly extension of Canadian Alberta Ridge, which served as a locus for reef development in western Alberta during the Devonian. Located on the back-reef shelf between the Cordilleran barrier reef and the intracratonic Williston basin, this ridge formed a regional high favorable to patch-reef development, much like the Alberta Ridge did for more extensive reef complexes in western Canada. Extensive coring of lower Duperow and Souris River carbonates in four wells detailed several depositional facies and demonstrated wide-spread distribution of stromatoporoidal buildups up to 20 ft in individual thickness. Faunal assemblages indicate mostly normal marine conditions and potential for patch-reef development. Equally attractive reservoir facies comprised of cross-bedded detrital dolomite bars and/or channels, leached soil horizons, and bedded anhydrite-laminated carbonate sabkha facies were encountered in cored intervals. These reservoir facies reflect lateral stratigraphic variations in otherwise regionally extensive cyclic sequences. Each regional cycle is terminated by an anhydritic phase reflecting separate pulses in the overall transgressive advance of the Devonian seas. The capping anhydrite and lateral facies variation within each cycle provide numerous opportunities for stratigraphic traps. Residual oil extracted from cored samples correlates well with Williston basin Red River-type oil. Source rock evaluation of Souris River carbonates coupled with diagenetic evidence of early oil migration into lower Duperow and Souris River reservoir facies indicate a favorable thermal history for oil preservation.

  8. The absence of a dense potential core in supercritical injection: A thermal break-up mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel T.; Hannemann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Certain experiments in quasi-isobaric supercritical injection remain unexplained by the current state of theory: Without developing a constant value potential core as expected from the mechanical view of break-up, density is observed to drop immediately upon entering the chamber. Furthermore, this phenomenon has never been captured in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) despite having become a de facto standard case for real fluid CFD validation. In this paper, we present strong evidence for a thermal jet disintegration mechanism (in addition to classical mechanical break-up) which resolves both the theoretical and the computational discrepancies. A new interpretation of supercritical jet disintegration is introduced, based on pseudo-boiling, a nonlinear supercritical transition from gas-like to liquid-like states. We show that thermal disintegration may dominate classical mechanical break-up when heat transfer takes place in the injector and when the fluid state is sufficiently close to the pseudo-boiling point. A procedure which allows to capture subsided cores with standard CFD is provided and demonstrated.

  9. Functional splicing network reveals extensive regulatory potential of the core spliceosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Tejedor, J Ramón; Vigevani, Luisa; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Pre-mRNA splicing relies on the poorly understood dynamic interplay between >150 protein components of the spliceosome. The steps at which splicing can be regulated remain largely unknown. We systematically analyzed the effect of knocking down the components of the splicing machinery on alternative splicing events relevant for cell proliferation and apoptosis and used this information to reconstruct a network of functional interactions. The network accurately captures known physical and functional associations and identifies new ones, revealing remarkable regulatory potential of core spliceosomal components, related to the order and duration of their recruitment during spliceosome assembly. In contrast with standard models of regulation at early steps of splice site recognition, factors involved in catalytic activation of the spliceosome display regulatory properties. The network also sheds light on the antagonism between hnRNP C and U2AF, and on targets of antitumor drugs, and can be widely used to identify mechanisms of splicing regulation.

  10. Efficient implementation of effective core potential integrals and gradients on graphical processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Sachse, Torsten; Preiß, Julia; Presselt, Martin; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-07-01

    Effective core potential integral and gradient evaluations are accelerated via implementation on graphical processing units (GPUs). Two simple formulas are proposed to estimate the upper bounds of the integrals, and these are used for screening. A sorting strategy is designed to balance the workload between GPU threads properly. Significant improvements in performance and reduced scaling with system size are observed when combining the screening and sorting methods, and the calculations are highly efficient for systems containing up to 10 000 basis functions. The GPU implementation preserves the precision of the calculation; the ground state Hartree-Fock energy achieves good accuracy for CdSe and ZnTe nanocrystals, and energy is well conserved in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Automated Code Engine for Graphical Processing Units: Application to the Effective Core Potential Integrals and Gradients.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenchen; Wang, Lee-Ping; Martínez, Todd J

    2016-01-12

    We present an automated code engine (ACE) that automatically generates optimized kernels for computing integrals in electronic structure theory on a given graphical processing unit (GPU) computing platform. The code generator in ACE creates multiple code variants with different memory and floating point operation trade-offs. A graph representation is created as the foundation of the code generation, which allows the code generator to be extended to various types of integrals. The code optimizer in ACE determines the optimal code variant and GPU configurations for a given GPU computing platform by scanning over all possible code candidates and then choosing the best-performing code candidate for each kernel. We apply ACE to the optimization of effective core potential integrals and gradients. It is observed that the best code candidate varies with differing angular momentum, floating point precision, and type of GPU being used, which shows that the ACE may be a powerful tool in adapting to fast evolving GPU architectures.

  12. Structural and spectral studies of sunspots. [umbral core modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyller, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of umbral cores, both by multicolor photometry and by narrow band photometry in the vicinity of the sodium D lines, are described, and evidence is given which supports the validity of many umbral models, each of which describes different aspects of the observed umbral cores. Theoretical studies carried on at the observatory include the following: (1) Zeeman profiles of the sodium D sub 2 line and other lines; (2) turbulent heat conduction, sound waves, and the missing flux in sunspots; (3) chromospheric heating above spots by Alfven waves; (4) magnetic convection in the sun and solar neutrinos; (5) models of starspots on flare stars; (5) starspots on the primaries of contact binary systems; and (6) implications of starspots on red dwarfs.

  13. Neutrino oscillation studies with IceCube-DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2016-07-01

    IceCube, a gigaton-scale neutrino detector located at the South Pole, was primarily designed to search for astrophysical neutrinos with energies of PeV and higher. This goal has been achieved with the detection of the highest energy neutrinos to date. At the other end of the energy spectrum, the DeepCore extension lowers the energy threshold of the detector to approximately 10 GeV and opens the door for oscillation studies using atmospheric neutrinos. An analysis of the disappearance of these neutrinos has been completed, with the results produced being complementary with dedicated oscillation experiments. Following a review of the detector principle and performance, the method used to make these calculations, as well as the results, is detailed. Finally, the future prospects of IceCube-DeepCore and the next generation of neutrino experiments at the South Pole (IceCube-Gen2, specifically the PINGU sub-detector) are briefly discussed.

  14. Multi-Core Processor Memory Contention Benchmark Analysis Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Tyler; McGalliard, James

    2009-01-01

    Multi-core processors dominate current mainframe, server, and high performance computing (HPC) systems. This paper provides synthetic kernel and natural benchmark results from an HPC system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that illustrate the performance impacts of multi-core (dual- and quad-core) vs. single core processor systems. Analysis of processor design, application source code, and synthetic and natural test results all indicate that multi-core processors can suffer from significant memory subsystem contention compared to similar single-core processors.

  15. Hyperspherical treatment of the three-nucleon system with soft core potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Zaky, M.; Allam, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The trinucleon system is considered as the bound state of three-nucleons interacting via spin and isospin dependent two-body central and noncentral tensor potentials. The hyperspherical expansion approach transforms the trinucleon Schroedinger equation to an infinite set of coupled second order differential equations only in one variable being the hyperradius. By a suitable selecting of the orthonormal basis of the wave function expansion using an optimal subset, the infinite set of coupled equations is reduced to a limited number of coupled equations to be solved practically. The trinucleon binding energy and the associated wave function are numerically calculated using spin and isospin dependent two-body central and noncentral tensor interactions. The central part of the potential is taken to be the exponential, Yukawa and Gaussian types with and without soft core. The charge form factors of the trinucleon system are also calculated and used to deduce the energy difference between the {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He nuclei. The present calculations using the optimal subset are in good agreement with the experimental measurements and with previous calculations from the variational and Faddeev methods. The tensor forces are found important and improve the results considerably.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L{sub cm} (I), {beta}{sup 18} (II), and {alpha}{sup AP-B} (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A{sub max} = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of Synechococcus sp PCC 7002 phycobilisome core mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Gindt, Y.M.

    1993-04-01

    The role of the L[sub cm] (I), [beta][sup 18] (II), and [alpha][sup AP-B] (III) chromoproteins in the phycobilisome (PBS) core was investigated using genetically engineered strains of Synechococcus missing different polypeptides. Intact cells, isolated PBS, and subcore preparations for each mutant were studied to determine the effect of that mutation on energy transfer within the PBS core and to the reaction centers. Three mutants lacked the II and/or III polypeptides, while the I chromophore was altered in others. A lower energy absorbing chromophore, A[sub max] = 695 nm, was substituted for the I chromophore. The deletion of the II and III subunits had no discernible effect on energy transfer from the PBS to PSII. In cells and isolated PBS, the altered I chromophore acts to quench the PBS complex and to redirect the energy which would be transferred to PSII. In the PBS and subcore preparations, deletion of the III subunit did not alter energy transfer within the core. The deletion of the II subunit from the PBS caused a small decrease in the excited state lifetimes of the final emitters indicating more disorder within the core. The I chromophore was found to absorb at 670nm and to emit at 683nm within the intact PBS. The II chromophore emits at 679nm while the III chromophore emits at 682nm. A strong interaction exists between the I chromophore and the II subunit. Upon deletion of the II subunit from the PBS core, the I chromophore emits at a higher energy. The II subunit could act to stabilize the I chromophore-binding pocket, or exciton coupling could be occurring between the two. The role of the III chromophore is still unclear at this time. The III chromophore does contribute to the RT emission of the isolated PBS, but it transfers energy to I at 77 K. One can conclude that the III subunit is adjacent to the trimer containing the I polypeptide.

  18. Isotope Fractionation Studies in Prestellar Cores: The Case of Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is considered, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing, thus preserving the fractionation. In interstellar molecular clouds, ion-molecule chemistry continually cycles nitrogen between the two main reservoirs - N and N2 - leading to only minor N-15 enrichments. Charnley and Rodgers showed that depletion of CO removes oxygen from the gas and weakens this cycle such that significant N-15 fractionation can occur for N2 and other N-bearing species in such cores. Observations are being conducted at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths employing various facilities in order to both spatially and spectrally, resolve emission from these cores. A preliminary study to obtain the N-14/N-15 ratio in nitriles (HCN and HNC) was conducted at the Arizona Radio Observatory's 12m telescope on Kitt Peak, AZ. Spectra were obtained at high resolution (0.08 km/s) in order to resolve dynamic properties of each source as well as to resolve hyperfine structure present in certain isotopologues. This study included four dark cloud cores, observed to have varying levels of molecular depletion: L1521E, L1498, L1544, and L1521F. Previous studies of the N-14/N-15 ratio towards LI544 were obtained with N2H+ and NIH3, yielding ratios of 446 and >700, respectively. The discrepancy observed in these two measurements suggests a strong chemical dependence on the fractionation of nitrogen. Ratios (C,N, and D) obtained from isotopologues for a particular molecule are likely tracing the same chemical heritage and are directly comparable within a given source. Results and comparisons between the protostellar evolutionary state and isomer isotope fractionation as well as between other N-bearing species will be presented.

  19. Nondestructive X-Ray Computed Tomography Analysis of Sediment Cores: A Case Study from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Cook, A.; Dipre, G.

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of marine sediment records can help elucidate recent changes in the Arctic Ocean circulation and sea ice conditions. We examine sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean, representing Late to Early Quaternary age (potentially up to 1 Ma). Previous studies of Arctic sediment cores indicate that interglacial/interstadial periods with relatively high sea levels and reduced ice cover are characterized by vigorous bioturbation, while glacial intervals have little to no bioturbation. Traditional methods for studying bioturbation require physical dissection of the cores, effectively destroying them. To treat this limitation, we evaluate archival sections of the cores using an X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) scanner, which noninvasively images the sediment cores in three dimensions. The scanner produces density sensitive images suitable for quantitative analysis and for identification of bioturbation based on size, shape, and orientation. We use image processing software to isolate burrows from surrounding sediment, reconstruct them three-dimensionally, and then calculate their surface areas, volumes, and densities. Preliminary analysis of a core extending to the early Quaternary shows that bioturbation ranges from 0 to approximately 20% of the core's volume. In future research, we will quantitatively define the relationship between bioturbation activity and glacial regimes. XCT examination of bioturbation and other sedimentary features has the potential to shed light on paleoceanographic conditions such as sedimentation patterns and food flux. XCT is an alternative, underexplored investigation method that bears implications not only for illustrating paleoclimate variations but also for preserving cores for future, more advanced technologies.

  20. Multipurpose Advanced 'inherently' Safe Reactor (MARS): Core design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Golfier, H.; Poinot, C.; Delpech, M.; Mignot, G.

    2006-07-01

    In the year 2005, in collaboration with CEA, the University of Rome 'La Sapienza' investigated a new core model with the aim at increasing the performances of the reference one, by extending the burn-up to 60 GWD/t in the case of multi-loading strategy and investigating the characteristics and limitations of a 'once-through' option, in order to enhance the proliferation resistance. In the first part of this paper, the objectives of this study and the methods of calculation are briefly described, while in the second part the calculation results are presented. (authors)

  1. Experimental Study of the Compression Response of Fluted-Core Composite Panels with Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Guzman, J. Carlos; McCarville, Douglas; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Fluted-core sandwich composites consist of integral angled web members spaced between laminate face sheets, and may have the potential to provide benefits over traditional sandwich composites for certain aerospace applications. However, fabrication of large autoclave-cured fluted-core cylindrical shells with existing autoclaves will require that the shells be fabricated in segments, and joined longitudinally to form a complete barrel. Two different longitudinal fluted-core joint designs were considered experimentally in this study. In particular, jointed fluted-core-composite panels were tested in longitudinal compression because longitudinal compression is the primary loading condition in dry launch-vehicle barrel sections. One of the joint designs performed well in comparison with unjointed test articles, and the other joint design failed at loads approximately 14% lower than unjointed test articles. The compression-after-impact (CAI) performance of jointed fluted-core composites was also investigated by testing test articles that had been subjected to 6 ft-lb impacts. It was found that such impacts reduced the load-carrying capability by 9% to 40%. This reduction is dependent on the joint concept, component flute size, and facesheet thickness.

  2. Comparing XRF core scan data to conventional geochemical analyses for high resolution paleoenvironmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennekam, Rick; De Lange, Gert J.

    2013-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning is becoming an increasingly common method to rapidly obtain paleo-environmental data from untreated (marine) sediments. There is a large potential for this method, being cheap, rapid, and non-destructive. However, the sediment surface is not an ideal substrate for XRF-analysis, thus measurement artefacts may occur relating to water content, grain size, surface roughness, film formation, and sediment inhomogeneity. A high resolution analysis of an Eastern Mediterranean sediment core is used to compare such potential artefacts and signal-to-noise ratio of XRF core scan measurements to those of traditional analyses using XRF glass bead and ICP-AES on distinct samples. A suit of major elements (and elemental ratios), often used as paleo-proxies, have been examined in this way so as to compare the robustness of the more 'relative' XRF-scan method compared to these more 'absolute' measurements. XRF core scan data only reflect the chemical composition of a thin (5-500 µm) layer of the sediment surface. Any inhomogeneity in this surface can cause large deviations thus may result in large 'deduced' paleo-environmental variability. It is shown that (random) water-rich spots can form underneath the Ultralene covering foil, having a substantial effect on the lighter elements with shallow response depths. This can create non-existing peaks in the XRF core scan -produced paleo-environmental record. Such deviations especially occur for elemental ratios when various elements are measured in different runs (e.g. other tube-voltage settings). This study urges to verify high/low amplitudinal variability observed in XRF corescans by means of (destructive) conventional geochemical analyses prior to their interpretation.. Reference: Hennekam R. and G. de Lange. X-ray fluorescence core scanning of wet marine sediments: methods to improve quality and reproducibility of high-resolution paleoenvironmental records. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods

  3. Doppler Scanning of Sediment Cores: A Useful Method for Studying Sedimentary Structures and Defining the Cutting Angle for Half Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namik; Biltekin, Demet; Eris, Kadir; Albut, Gulum; Ogretmen, Nazik; Arslan, Tugce; Sari, Erol

    2014-05-01

    We tested the doppler ultrasound scanning of sediment cores in PVC liners using 8 megahertz ultrasonic waves for detection of angular laminations. The method was tested with artificially prepared cores as well as marine and lake sediment cores, and proven to be a useful and fast technique for imaging and determining the vertical angularity of sedimentary structures, such as laminations and beddings. Random cutting axes provide two angularities on X and Y dimensions. In this study, the main scientific problem is 'sequential angular disconformity'. Importance of detection of these anomalies on whole cores before dividing into half cores based on determining the right cutting axes. Successful imaging was obtained from top three centimeter depth of the sediments below the PVC liner, using a linear Doppler probe. Other Doppler probes (e.g., convex probe) did not work for core scanning because of their wave-form and reflection characteristics. Longitudinal and rotational scanning with gap filler and ultrasonic wave conductive gel material for keeping energy range of wave is necessary for detecting the variation in the dip of the bedding and laminae in the cores before separation. Another angular reasoned problem is about horizontal surface and can be easily solved with adjustable position of sensor or ray source placement. Border of sampling points between two different lithology must be stay with regard to neighbour sediment angles. Vertical angularity correction is not easy and its effect on signal propagation, detection biases and effectible to mixed samples contamination during physical sampling (particle size analyzing). Determining the attitude of angled bedding before core splitting is important for further core analyses such as elemental analysis and digital X-ray radiography. After Doppler scanning, the splitting direction (i.e., vertical to bedding and lamination) can be determined. The method is cheap, quick and non- hazardous to health, unlike the x

  4. Preliminary design study of advanced multistage axial flow core compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Koch, C. C.; Smith, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to identify an advanced core compressor for use in new high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to be introduced into commercial service in the 1980's. An evaluation of anticipated compressor and related component 1985 state-of-the-art technology was conducted. A parametric screening study covering a large number of compressor designs was conducted to determine the influence of the major compressor design features on efficiency, weight, cost, blade life, aircraft direct operating cost, and fuel usage. The trends observed in the parametric screening study were used to develop three high-efficiency, high-economic-payoff compressor designs. These three compressors were studied in greater detail to better evaluate their aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility.

  5. Experimental study of the Biot coefficient of Bakken cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed a series of exhaustive experiments to measure the Biot coefficient (α) of the tight cores from the Bakken shale oil play. Five distinct, bedding-normal cores from a vertical well were tested, covering the sequences of Three Forks, Lower, Middle, and Upper Bakken, and Lodgepole. The scope of this laboratory study is two-fold: (1) to obtain realistic Biot coefficient for modeling reservoir stress changes due to depletion and injection; (2) to characterize the poromechanical properties in relation to rock's mineral composition and microstructure. The experiments were carried out as follows: Argon-saturated specimen (1-inch length, 1-inch diameter) was subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure under drained conditions. Pore pressure was regulated as Argon was injected into both ends of the specimen. We drilled multiple non-through-going boreholes (1-mm diameter) in the specimen to facilitate pressure equilibrium, without compromising its integrity. The specimen was put through a loading path to experience confining pressure and pore pressure up to 70 and 60 MPa, respectively. Axial and lateral strains were recorded and used to calculate the rock's bulk stiffness, and subsequently the static Biot coefficient, which is related to reservoir deformation and associated stress changes. Results of all five cores unanimously show that α is less than unity and is a function of both confining and pore pressure. α generally varies between 0.3 and 0.9 for the pressure levels we applied. This implies that models of reservoir deformation and its stress change using Terzaghi's simple effective stress law (α = 1) or a constant α less than 1 may be erroneous. Typically, α rises significantly with pore pressure, but declines with confining pressure to the degree that is dependent on rock's bulk stiffness. We found the stiffness of these rocks does not correlate well with the content of compliant components (e.g., clay and kerogen), and the drastic difference in

  6. Simple peptides derived from the ribosomal core potentiate RNA polymerase ribozyme function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, Shunsuke; Attwater, James; Holliger, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    The emergence of functional interactions between nucleic acids and polypeptides was a key transition in the origin of life and remains at the heart of all biology. However, how and why simple non-coded peptides could have become critical for RNA function is unclear. Here, we show that putative ancient peptide segments from the cores of both ribosomal subunits enhance RNA polymerase ribozyme (RPR) function, as do derived homopolymeric peptides comprising lysine or the non-proteinogenic lysine analogues ornithine or, to a lesser extent, diaminobutyric acid, irrespective of chirality or chiral purity. Lysine decapeptides enhance RPR function by promoting holoenzyme assembly through primer-template docking, accelerate RPR evolution, and allow RPR-catalysed RNA synthesis at near physiological (≥1 mM) Mg2+ concentrations, enabling templated RNA synthesis within membranous protocells. Our results outline how compositionally simple, mixed-chirality peptides may have augmented the functional potential of early RNAs and promoted the emergence of the first protocells.

  7. Simple peptides derived from the ribosomal core potentiate RNA polymerase ribozyme function.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Shunsuke; Attwater, James; Holliger, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of functional interactions between nucleic acids and polypeptides was a key transition in the origin of life and remains at the heart of all biology. However, how and why simple non-coded peptides could have become critical for RNA function is unclear. Here, we show that putative ancient peptide segments from the cores of both ribosomal subunits enhance RNA polymerase ribozyme (RPR) function, as do derived homopolymeric peptides comprising lysine or the non-proteinogenic lysine analogues ornithine or, to a lesser extent, diaminobutyric acid, irrespective of chirality or chiral purity. Lysine decapeptides enhance RPR function by promoting holoenzyme assembly through primer-template docking, accelerate RPR evolution, and allow RPR-catalysed RNA synthesis at near physiological (≥1 mM) Mg(2+) concentrations, enabling templated RNA synthesis within membranous protocells. Our results outline how compositionally simple, mixed-chirality peptides may have augmented the functional potential of early RNAs and promoted the emergence of the first protocells.

  8. Random pinning changes the melting scenario of a two-dimensional core-softened potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiok, E. N.; Dudalov, D. E.; Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    In experiments two-dimensional systems are realized mainly on solid substrates, which introduce quenched disorder due to some inherent defects. The defects of substrates influence the melting scenario of the systems and have to be taken into account in the interpretation of experimental results. We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of a two-dimensional system with a core-softened potential in which a small fraction of the particles is pinned, inducing quenched disorder. Ppotentials of this type are widely used for the qualitative description of systems with waterlike anomalies. In our previous publications it was shown that the system demonstrates an anomalous melting scenario: at low densities the system melts through two continuous transitions in accordance with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) theory with an intermediate hexatic phase, while at high densities the conventional first-order melting transition takes place. We find that the well-known disorder-induced widening of the hexatic phase occurs at low densities, while in the high-density part of the phase diagram random pinning transforms the first-order melting into two transitions: a continuous KTHNY-like solid-hexatic transition and a first-order hexatic-isotropic liquid transition.

  9. XNBR-grafted halloysite nanotube core-shell as a potential compatibilizer for immiscible polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paran, S. M. R.; Naderi, G.; Ghoreishy, M. H. R.

    2016-09-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) grafted with carboxylated nitrile byutadiene rubber (XNBR) were synthesized via a sol-gel method. The HNTs as an inorganic cores were pre-treated with 3-Glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane, then successfully coated with the XNBR as an organic shell. The properties of XNBR-grafted HNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results suggested that the XNBR grafted to the surfaces of HNTs successfully. Then the TPE nanocomposites based on polyamide-6 (PA6) and nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) containing various XNBR-grafted and pristine HNTs were prepared via a direct melt mixing method. The morphology, mechanical, dynamic mechanical and rheological properties of the prepared TPE nanocomposites were investigated. The results show that the XNBR-grafted HNTs can effectively improve the morphology and mechanical properties of the PA6/NBR TPEs. The morphology study of the prepared nanocomposites show that the effect of XNBR-grafted HNTs on the size reduction of NBR phase is markedly more effective than the pristine HNTs and rose by 50% in the same concentrations. Mechanical measurements show that the Young's modulus of the TPE nanocomposites rose by 60% in just 7 wt% of XNBR-grafted HNT loading. The results indicate that the introduction of HNT/XNBR core-shells into the PA6/NBR TPEs can enhances the interfacial interactions and provides a more fine rubber phase morphology and controlled mechanical properties in comparison with the accordingly TPE nanocomposites containing pristine HNTs.

  10. Study on Spatial Cultural Heritage Integrated into the Core Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, W. H.; Lai, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    These Many countries have put a lot of efforts, promoting education of cultural heritage, to raise the conservation awareness and increase people's participation. However, the development of Taiwan's higher education about cultural heritage has not shown a significant growth, so it didn't train talents with enough cultural heritage awareness. In the workplace, these professionals will inevitably lack of comprehensions and the appropriate professional assessments for cultural heritage. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to study and combine these concepts into the core curriculum of Department of Construction and Spatial Design at Tungnan University. It takes the local "Shenkeng historic cultural district" as a case study, and will gradually develop an proper interdisciplinary course in order to help local residents implement projects of conserving cultural heritage. This plan not only can increase schools' engagements toward communities, with an ability of social civilization, but also it can encourage the conservation and maintenance of cultural heritages.

  11. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  12. Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only

  13. N Reactor core heatup sensitivity study for the 32-inch unit cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Zimmerman, B.; Heard, F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of N Reactor core heatup studies have been performed using the TRUMP-BD computer code. These studies were performed to address questions concerning the dependency of results on potential variations in the material properties and/or modeling assumptions. This report described and documents a series of 31 TRUMP-BD runs that were performed to determine the sensitivity of calculated inner-fuel temperatures to a variety of TRUMP input parameters and also to a change in the node density in a high-temperature-gradient region. The results of this study are based on the 32-in. model. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tab.

  14. Calculations of current densities for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes using effective core potentials.

    PubMed

    Rauhalahti, Markus; Taubert, Stefan; Sundholm, Dage; Liégeois, Vincent

    2017-03-08

    Magnetically induced current density susceptibilities and ring-current strengths have been calculated for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes C6X6 and C6X6(2+) with X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, SeH, SeMe, TeH, TeMe, and SbH2. The current densities have been calculated using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method, which has been interfaced to the Gaussian electronic structure code rendering current density calculations using effective core potentials (ECP) feasible. Relativistic effects on the ring-current strengths have been assessed by employing ECP calculations of the current densities. Comparison of the ring-current strengths obtained in calculations on C6At6 and C6At6(2+) using relativistic and non-relativistic ECPs show that scalar relativistic effects have only a small influence on the ring-current strengths. Comparisons of the ring-current strengths and ring-current profiles show that the C6I6(2+), C6At6(2+), C6(SeH)6(2+), C6(SeMe)6(2+), C6(TeH)6(2+), C6(TeMe)6(2+), and C6(SbH2)6(2+) dications are doubly aromatic sustaining spatially separated ring currents in the carbon ring and in the exterior of the molecule. The C6I6(+) radical cation is also found to be doubly aromatic with a weaker ring current than obtained for the dication.

  15. Thermal property and density measurements of samples taken from drilling cores from potential geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Lagedrost, J.F.; Capps, W.

    1983-12-01

    Density, steady-state conductivity, enthalpy, specific heat, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and linear thermal expansion were measured on 59 materials from core drill samples of several geologic media, including rock salt, basalt, and other associated rocks from 7 potential sites for nuclear waste isolation. The measurements were conducted from or near to room temperature up to 500/sup 0/C, or to lower temperatures if limited by specimen cracking or fracturing. Ample documentation establishes the reliability of the property measurement methods and the accuracy of the results. Thermal expansions of salts reached 2.2 to 2.8 percent at 500/sup 0/C. Associated rocks were from 0.6 to 1.6 percent. Basalts were close to 0.3 percent at 500/sup 0/C. Specific heats of salts varied from 0.213 to 0.233 cal g/sup -1/C/sup -1/, and basalts averaged 0.239 cal g/sup -1/C/sup -1/. Thermal conductivities of salts at 50/sup 0/C were from 0.022 to 0.046 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/, and at 500/sup 0/C, from 0.012 to 0.027 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/. Basalts conductivities ranged from 0.020 to 0.022 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/ at 100/sup 0/C and 0.016 to 0.018 at 500/sup 0/C. There were no obvious conductivity trends relative to source location. Room temperature densities of salts were from 2.14 to 2.29 gcm/sup -3/, and basalts, from 2.83 to 2.90 gcm/sup -3/. The extreme friability of some materials made specimen fabrication difficult. 21 references, 17 figures, 28 tables.

  16. Geochemical studies of backfill aggregates, lake sediment cores and the Hueco Bolson Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapalia, Anita

    This dissertation comprises of three different researches that focuses on the application of geochemistry from aggregates, lake sediment cores and Hueco Bolson Aquifer. Each study is independent and presented in the publication format. The first chapter is already published and the second chapter is in revision phase. Overall, three studies measure the large scale (field) as well as bench scale (lab) water-rock interactions influenced by the climatic and anthropogenic factors spans from the field of environmental geology to civil engineering. The first chapter of this dissertation addresses the chemical evaluation of coarse aggregates from six different quarries in Texas. The goal of this work is to find out the best geochemical methods for assessing the corrosion potential of coarse aggregates prior to their use in mechanically stabilized earth walls. Electrochemical parameters help to define the corrosion potential of aggregates following two different leaching protocols. Testing the coarse and fine aggregates demonstrate the chemical difference due to size-related kinetic leaching effects. Field fines also show different chemistry than the bulk rock indicating the weathering impact on carbonate rocks. The second chapter investigates zinc (Zn) isotopic signatures from eight lake sediment cores collected both from pristine lakes and those impacted by urban anthropogenic contamination. Zinc from the natural weathering of rocks and anthropogenic atmospheric pollutants are transported to these lakes and the signatures are recorded in the sediments. Isotopic analysis of core samples provides the signature of anthropogenic contamination sources. Dated sediment core and isotopic analysis can identify Zn inputs that are correlated to the landuse and population change of the watersheds. Comparison of isotopic data from both pristine and urban lake sediment core also serves as an analog in other lake sediment cores in the world. The third chapter studies on Hueco Bolson

  17. Self-assembly of core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticles and their potential as drug delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Loe, David T.; Awino, Joseph K.; Kröger, Martin; Rouge, Jessica L.; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Herein a new multifunctional formulation, referred to as a core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle, has been proposed and studied in silico via large scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A PEGylated core with surface tethered polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains is used as the starting configuration, where the free ends of the PEG chains are covalently bonded with lipid molecules (lipid heads). A complete lipid bilayer is formed at the surface of the PEGylated particle core upon addition of free lipids, driven by the hydrophobic properties of the lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The self-assembly process is found to be sensitive to the grafting density and molecular weight of the tethered PEG chains, as well as the amount of free lipids added. At low grafting densities the assembly of CPLS nanoparticles cannot be accomplished. As demonstrated by simulations, a lipid bud/vesicle can be formed on the surface when an excess amount of free lipids is added at high grafting density. Therefore, the CPLS nanoparticles can only be formed under appropriate conditions of both PEG and free lipids. The CPLS nanoparticle has been recognized to be able to store a large quantity of water molecules, particularly with high molecular weight of PEG chains, indicating its capacity for carrying hydrophilic molecules such as therapeutic biomolecules or imaging agents. Under identical size and surface chemistry conditions of a liposome, it has been observed that the CPLS particle can be more efficiently wrapped by the lipid membrane, indicating its potential for a greater efficiency in delivering its hydrophilic cargo. As a proof-of-concept, the experimental realization of CPLS nanoparticles is explicitly demonstrated in this study. To test the capacity of the CPLS to store small molecule cargo a hydrophilic dye was successfully encapsulated in the particles' water soluble layer. The results of this study show the power and

  18. Bibliometric study of grey literature in core veterinary medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, Nancy L.; Wiese, William H.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Grey literature has been perceived by many as belonging to the primary sources of information and has become an accepted method of nonconventional communication in the sciences and medicine. Since little is known about the use and nature of grey literature in veterinary medicine, a systematic study was done to analyze and characterize the bibliographic citations appearing in twelve core veterinary journals. Methods: Citations from 2,159 articles published in twelve core veterinary journals in 2000 were analyzed to determine the portion of citations from grey literature. Those citations were further analyzed and categorized according to the type of publication. Results: Citation analysis yielded 55,823 citations, of which 3,564 (6.38%) were considered to be grey literature. Four veterinary specialties, internal medicine, pathology, theriogenology, and microbiology, accounted for 70% of the total number of articles. Three small-animal clinical practice journals cited about 2.5–3% grey literature, less than half that of journals with basic research orientations, where results ranged from almost 6% to approximately 10% grey literature. Nearly 90% of the grey literature appeared as conferences, government publications, and corporate organization literature. Conclusions: The results corroborate other reported research that the incidence of grey literature is lower in medicine and biology than in some other fields, such as aeronautics and agriculture. As in other fields, use of the Internet and the Web has greatly expanded the communication process among veterinary professionals. The appearance of closed community email forums and specialized discussion groups within the veterinary profession is an example of what could become a new kind of grey literature. PMID:14566374

  19. Critical behavior of k -core percolation: Numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deokjae; Jo, Minjae; Kahng, B.

    2016-12-01

    k -core percolation has served as a paradigmatic model of discontinuous percolation for a long time. Recently it was revealed that the order parameter of k -core percolation of random networks additionally exhibits critical behavior. Thus k -core percolation exhibits a hybrid phase transition. Unlike the critical behaviors of ordinary percolation that are well understood, those of hybrid percolation transitions have not been thoroughly understood yet. Here, we investigate the critical behavior of k -core percolation of Erdős-Rényi networks. We find numerically that the fluctuations of the order parameter and the mean avalanche size diverge in different ways. Thus, we classify the critical exponents into two types: those associated with the order parameter and those with finite avalanches. The conventional scaling relations hold within each set, however, these two critical exponents are coupled. Finally we discuss some universal features of the critical behaviors of k -core percolation and the cascade failure model on multiplex networks.

  20. Core Proteomic Analysis of Unique Metabolic Pathways of Salmonella enterica for the Identification of Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Salmonella enterica, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are major threats to the health of humans and animals. The recent availability of complete genome data of pathogenic strains of the S. enterica gives new avenues for the identification of drug targets and drug candidates. We have used the genomic and metabolic pathway data to identify pathways and proteins essential to the pathogen and absent from the host. Methods We took the whole proteome sequence data of 42 strains of S. enterica and Homo sapiens along with KEGG-annotated metabolic pathway data, clustered proteins sequences using CD-HIT, identified essential genes using DEG database and discarded S. enterica homologs of human proteins in unique metabolic pathways (UMPs) and characterized hypothetical proteins with SVM-prot and InterProScan. Through this core proteomic analysis we have identified enzymes essential to the pathogen. Results The identification of 73 enzymes common in 42 strains of S. enterica is the real strength of the current study. We proposed all 73 unexplored enzymes as potential drug targets against the infections caused by the S. enterica. The study is comprehensive around S. enterica and simultaneously considered every possible pathogenic strain of S. enterica. This comprehensiveness turned the current study significant since, to the best of our knowledge it is the first subtractive core proteomic analysis of the unique metabolic pathways applied to any pathogen for the identification of drug targets. We applied extensive computational methods to shortlist few potential drug targets considering the druggability criteria e.g. Non-homologous to the human host, essential to the pathogen and playing significant role in essential metabolic pathways of the pathogen (i.e. S. enterica). In the current study, the subtractive proteomics through a novel approach was applied i.e. by considering only proteins

  1. Effect of a potential softness on the solid-liquid transition in a two-dimensional core-softened potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudalov, D. E.; Tsiok, E. N.; Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper, using a molecular dynamics simulation, we study a nature of melting of a two-dimensional (2D) system of classical particles interacting through a purely repulsive isotropic core-softened potential which is used for the qualitative description of the anomalous behavior of water and some other liquids. We show that the melting scenario drastically depends on the potential softness and changes with increasing the width of the smooth repulsive shoulder. While at small width of the repulsive shoulder the melting transition exhibits what appears to be weakly first-order behavior, at larger values of the width a reentrant-melting transition occurs upon compression for not too high pressures, and in the low density part of the 2D phase diagram melting is a continuous two-stage transition, with an intermediate hexatic phase in accordance with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young scenario. On the other hand, at high density part of the phase diagram one first-order transition takes place. These results may be useful for the qualitative understanding the behavior of water confined between two hydrophobic plates.

  2. Cadmium Telluride, Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide Core/Shell, and Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide/Zinc Sulfide Core/Shell/Shell Quantum Dots Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yueran

    CdTe, CdTe/CdS core/shell, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs) are potential candidates for bio-imaging and solar cell applications because of some special physical properties in these nano materials. For example, the band gap energy of the bulk CdTe is about 1.5 eV, so that principally they can emit 790 nm light, which is in the near-infrared range (also called biological window). Moreover, theoretically hot exciton generated by QDs is possible to be caught since the exciton relaxation process in QDs is slower than in bulk materials due to the large intraband energy gap in QDs. In this dissertation, we have synthesized the CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, characterized their structure, and analyzed their photophysical properties. We used organometallic methods to synthesize the CdTe QDs in a noncoordinating solvent. To avoid being quenched by air, ligands, solvent, or other compounds, CdS shell was successfully deposited on the CdTe QDs by different methods, including the slow injection method, the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and thermal-cycling coupled single precursor method (TC-SP). Our final product, quasi-type- II CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were able to emit at 770 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield as high as 70%. We also tried to deposit a second shell ZnS on CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs since some compounds can quench CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Even though different methods were used to deposit ZnS shell on the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs still can be quenched. Furthermore, the CdTe/CdS core/shell and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs were transferred into aqueous phase, phosphate buffered saline or deionized water, by switching the hydrophilic ligands (thiol or PEG ligands). The thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs can be kept in aqueous phase with high fluorescence quantum yield (60%--70%) for more than two months. However, some other compounds in organic or

  3. Core curricula for postdoctoral dental students: recent problems, potential solutions, and a model for the future.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, Anthony M; Taft, Thomas B

    2007-11-01

    Development of common core curricula for the graduate advanced education/specialty programs in dental schools presents significant challenges. Similarities in graduate education accreditation standards justify such an approach, yet a core curriculum is difficult to achieve for a variety of reasons including scheduling constraints and the capacity of a common, single pathway curriculum to address the specific educational needs of postgraduate students in different disciplines. Additionally, many dental schools are experiencing severe shortages of qualified faculty to provide graduate program instruction. There are no previous reports regarding graduate core curricula and the definition/delivery of such core curricula in advanced education programs in dentistry although there are several reports in the medical literature that support the educational value of a unified core curriculum implemented in a modular format. Graduate curricula are typically designed to provide residents with advanced education/training beyond what is acquired during their predoctoral dental school experience. Advanced education programs must emphasize knowledge and skills that are discipline-specific; however, there is a large amount of common foundational material within the early phases of these programs. Dental schools have attempted to identify and present this common material within the context of an organized shared set of courses/seminars where residents from each advanced education program are scheduled simultaneously. However, there have been problems with the implementation of a shared core curricula including the following: 1) dissimilar educational backgrounds/abilities among residents; 2) relevance of material to all residents; 3) lack of central management; 4) scheduling conflicts; and 5) lack of adequate and consistent program evaluation. In an attempt to resolve these problems, a new comprehensive graduate core curriculum was implemented at the Marquette University School of

  4. Record of PCB congeners, sorbents and potential toxicity in core samples in Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2011-10-01

    Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) is an active navigational system that serves a heavily industrial area of southern Lake Michigan. We have determined the amount of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), congener distributions, sorbent types and potential for dioxin-like PCB toxicity from two IHSC sediment cores. Vertical distributions of ΣPCBs (sum of 161 individual or coeluting congeners) ranged from 410 to 91000 and 1800 to 41000 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.) for cores 1 and 2, respectively. Core 1 showed its highest accumulation rate for the year ∼1979 and exhibits a strong Aroclor 1248 signal in sediments accumulating over the last 60 years. It appears that from the late 1930s until the beginning of the 1980s there was a large and constant input of PCBs into this system. This pattern differs from lake cores from the Great Lakes region which commonly exhibit a rapid increase, a peak, followed by a sharp decrease in the PCB accumulation rates. Core 2 also has a strong Aroclor 1248 signal in the top layers, but deeper layers show evidence of mixtures of Aroclors and/or weathering processes. High levels of black carbon as a fraction of total organic carbon were found in both cores (median ∼30%), which reflect the long history of local combustion sources. No strong relationship was found between ΣPCB concentration and sorbents. Both cores contain dioxin-like PCBs that are highest in concentration below the surface. The high levels of PCBs in the deep sediments are of concern because of plans to dredge this system.

  5. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  6. 1024 QAM, 7-core (60 Gbit/s x 7) fiber transmission over 55 km with an aggregate potential spectral efficiency of 109 bit/s/Hz.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Beppu, Shohei; Kasai, Keisuke; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2015-08-10

    We report the first 1024 QAM polarization-multiplexed transmission at 3 Gsymbol/s over a 55 km 7-core fiber, with a total bit rate of 420 Gbit/s (60 Gbit/s x 7 cores). The potential spectral efficiency per core reached 15.6 bit/s/Hz, which corresponds to an aggregate spectral efficiency as high as 109 bit/s/Hz in a multi-core single-mode fiber.

  7. Gains in efficiency and scientific potential of continental climate reconstruction provided by the LRC LacCore Facility, University of Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, A.; Brady, K.; Myrbo, A.; Ito, E.

    2007-12-01

    Lacustrine sediment cores comprise an integral archive for the determination of continental paleoclimate, for their potentially high temporal resolution and for their ability to resolve spatial variability in climate across vast sections of the globe. Researchers studying these archives now have a large, nationally-funded, public facility dedicated to the support of their efforts. The LRC LacCore Facility, funded by NSF and the University of Minnesota, provides free or low-cost assistance to any portion of research projects, depending on the specific needs of the project. A large collection of field equipment (site survey equipment, coring devices, boats/platforms, water sampling devices) for nearly any lacustrine setting is available for rental, and Livingstone-type corers and drive rods may be purchased. LacCore staff can accompany field expeditions to operate these devices and curate samples, or provide training prior to device rental. The Facility maintains strong connections to experienced shipping agents and customs brokers, which vastly improves transport and importation of samples. In the lab, high-end instrumentation (e.g., multisensor loggers, high-resolution digital linescan cameras) provides a baseline of fundamental analyses before any sample material is consumed. LacCore staff provide support and training in lithological description, including smear-slide, XRD, and SEM analyses. The LRC botanical macrofossil reference collection is a valuable resource for both core description and detailed macrofossil analysis. Dedicated equipment and space for various subsample analyses streamlines these endeavors; subsamples for several analyses may be submitted for preparation or analysis by Facility technicians for a fee (e.g., carbon and sulfur coulometry, grain size, pollen sample preparation and analysis, charcoal, biogenic silica, LOI, freeze drying). The National Lacustrine Core Repository now curates ~9km of sediment cores from expeditions around the world

  8. Theoretical consideration of osmotic pressure in aqueous protein/salt systems based on extended hard core Lennard-Jones potential.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sung Jin; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-10-21

    A simple and analytical pair potential function was developed to represent the osmotic pressures in aqueous protein/salt systems under various conditions. Based on a hard core Lennard-Jones (HCLJ) potential model, the new potential function considers various interactions by extending the attractive Lennard-Jones potential. A temperature-dependent coefficient term was introduced to take into account the specific properties of given materials. Comparison of the new potential function with the HCLJ model in hydrocarbon and water systems showed that consideration of the temperature dependence in the potential function was effective, especially for strong polar systems such as water. To predict the osmotic pressures of aqueous lysozyme/(NH(4))(2)SO(4) solutions of various ionic strength and pH, the energy parameters of lysozyme were correlated with the experimental cloud point temperature. The proposed model agreed fairly well with the experimental osmotic pressure data with only previously obtained parameters.

  9. Theoretical consideration of osmotic pressure in aqueous protein/salt systems based on extended hard core Lennard-Jones potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Sung Jin; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-10-01

    A simple and analytical pair potential function was developed to represent the osmotic pressures in aqueous protein/salt systems under various conditions. Based on a hard core Lennard-Jones (HCLJ) potential model, the new potential function considers various interactions by extending the attractive Lennard-Jones potential. A temperature-dependent coefficient term was introduced to take into account the specific properties of given materials. Comparison of the new potential function with the HCLJ model in hydrocarbon and water systems showed that consideration of the temperature dependence in the potential function was effective, especially for strong polar systems such as water. To predict the osmotic pressures of aqueous lysozyme/(NH4)2SO4 solutions of various ionic strength and pH, the energy parameters of lysozyme were correlated with the experimental cloud point temperature. The proposed model agreed fairly well with the experimental osmotic pressure data with only previously obtained parameters.

  10. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.

    2002-10-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog 4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  11. Potential Psychosocial and Instructional Consequences of the Common Core State Standards: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeki, Elina; Pendergast, Laura; Segool, Natasha K.; von der Embse, Nathaniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent rollout of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), CCSS-aligned assessments, and test-based teacher evaluation systems, questions remain regarding the impact that these accountability policies will have on teachers and students. This article discusses the psychosocial and instructional consequences of test-based accountability…

  12. Evaluation of the Erosion Potential of Embankment Core Materials Using the Laboratory Triaxial Erosion Test Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    forces are inversely proportional to some high power of the interparticle distance, the attractive forces decrease with in- creasing water content due...P.K. (l^’e;, "Cracking of Embankment Dam Cores and the De- sign of Filters for their Protection," Sociedad Espanola De Mecanica De Sueio y

  13. Potential Ramifications of Common Core State Standards Adoption on Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Jacob Paul

    2014-01-01

    As of this writing, 45 United States and four territories have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The quick implementation on the part of state policymakers is a marked response to the growing demand for career and college ready high school graduates. Current figures suggest that over the next 15 years the need for post-secondary…

  14. Identifying a core set of outcome domains to measure in clinical trials for shoulder disorders: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To achieve consensus on the most important outcome domains to measure across all clinical trials for shoulder disorders. Methods We performed an online modified Delphi study with an international, multidisciplinary and multistakeholder panel. A literature review and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to generate a list of potential core domains, which were presented to patients, clinicians and researchers in two Delphi rounds. Participants were asked to judge the importance of each potential core domain and provide a rationale for their response. A core domain was defined a priori as a domain that at least 67% of participants considered core. Results In both rounds, 335 individuals were invited to participate (268 clinicians/researchers and 67 patients); response rates were 27% (n=91) and 29% (n=96), respectively. From a list of 41 potential core domains, four domains met our criteria for inclusion: ‘pain’, ‘physical functioning’, ‘global assessment of treatment success’ and ‘health-related quality of life’. Two additional domains, ‘sleep functioning’ and ‘psychological functioning’, met the criteria for inclusion by some, but not all stakeholder groups. There was consensus that ‘number of deaths’ was not a core domain, but insufficient agreement on whether or not several other domains, including ‘range of motion’ and ‘muscle strength’, were core domains. Conclusions Based on international consensus from patients, clinicians and researchers, ‘pain’, ‘physical functioning’, ‘global assessment of treatment success’ and ‘health-related quality of life’ were considered core outcome domains for shoulder disorder trials. The value of several other domains needs further consideration. PMID:28123775

  15. Neutron scattering studies and modeling of high mobility group 14 core nucleosome complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Mardian, J.K.; Rossi, R.M.; Olins, D.E.; Bunick, G.J.

    1982-09-01

    Considerable evidence relates the nonhistone proteins high mobility group (HMG) 14 and HMG 17 with the structure of active or potentially active chromatin. In this study, bulk nucleosome core particles prepared from chicken erythrocytes and the complex formed by binding two HMG 14 molecules per nucleosome core were studied by use of small-angle neutron scattering techniques. By varying the H/sub 2/O//sup 2/H/sub 2/O ratio, and hence the contrast between the solvent and the particles, it was possible to determine the radius of gyration of the protein and of the DNA independently and as a function of HMG 14 binding. The results show an increase of 0.9 +/- 0.6 angstrom (mean +/- SEM) in the protein radius of gyration and of 2.7 +/- 0.6 angstrom in the DNA radius of gyration upon binding of HMG 14 to the nucleosome. These changes are considered in the light of several postulated modes for the unfolding or perturbation of the nucleosome structure. Modeling calculations demonstrate that the observed changes in radius of gyration for the DNA and for the protein are too small to be consistent with an overall unfolding or opening of the core particle upon HMG 14 binding. However, the observed changes are consistent with several models that involve only minor changes in the structure. It is postulated that the differences observed may be an indication of the type of conformational changes occurring in active nucleosomes.

  16. Physical studies of small asteroids and cometary cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, Wieslaw Z.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is to carry on an extensive study of physical properties (colors and variability) of asteroids in the 1 to 10 km diameter range and of cometary cores, with the use of a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, PMT photometer, or both. Particular attention is paid to asteroids being observed by radar because the greatest gain is found from the combination of radar results with the data obtained by optical techniques. To satisfy the goal, 100 nights/year have been scheduled on the 2.3 m and 1.5 m telescopes. During the past 2 years small asteroids were observed. Out of 22 asteroids for which periods of rotation could be precisely measured, 17 have periods of rotation less than 5 hours. This indicates that small objects rotate faster. By now researchers know 14 asteroids with rotation periods in the 2 hour range. At the same time they confirmed the existence of a number of exceptionally slow rotators e.g., 1367 Nongoma with P = 5.65 days. Taxonomic observations lead to a conclusion that Apollo, Amor, and Aten asteroids represent a variety of classes and are not predominantly of class S. Apollo asteroid 3361 Orpheus was found to belong to the rare class V. In collaboration with Dr A. Harris of JPL the opposition effect was studied for 30 Urania and 64 Angelina. Seven comets: P/Helin, P/Brooks 2, P/Klemola, P/Borrelly, Wilson (1986 1) and Shoemaker (1987 o) were monitored for variability. The results were negative with the exception of P/Brooks 2 for which 0.35 mag amplitude was detected.

  17. Regional climate signal modified by local factors - multi core study records (Lake Czechowskie region, N Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments can be utilized as valuable paleoclimate and environmental archives as they contain information of past changes. Multi-proxy analyses of sedimentary compartments (e.g. pollen, diatoms, Cladocera) reveal those changes. However, to decipher the spatial variability of past climate changes and to define the proxies suited for local and regional scale reconstructions archive comparisons are needed. Here we present a detailed multi-proxy study from four different sediment cores covering the Younger Dryas cold period from the Lake Czechowskie region (N Poland). Three cores are located along a transect in the Lake Czechowskie basin from its deepest point towards a former lake bay close to today's shoreline. The fourth lacustrine sediment core was retrieved from the Trzechowskie paleolake, app. 1 km W from Lake Czechowskie. The dataset comprises information from pollen (AP, NAP, Juniperus, Betula-tree, Pinus silvestris), diatom (planktonic/benthic index, diatom valve concentration, dominant species), Cladocera (planktonic/benthic index, dominant species, number of Cladocera species, total sum of specimens) and geochemical (TOC and CaCO3 content, mineral matter, titanium) analyses. At the beginning of the Younger Dryas the AP pollen share decreased and NAP and Juniperus pollen increased in all studied locations. The mineral matter and titanium record showed higher values in two cores taken from the deepest parts of Lake Czechowskie and the core from Trzechowskie paleolake while in the core located at the marginal part of the lake it was already high in Allerød and it did not change much in Younger Dryas. The Cladocera based indexes: total sum of specimens and number of species decreased at the beginning of YD but on the contrary the Cladocera species composition changes were site-specific. The diatoms valve concentration index significantly lowered in core from the deep location while on the contrary increased in core from paleolake Trzechowskie. Our results

  18. A study of the core module simulator floor capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foreman, James W.

    1993-01-01

    The floor of the Core Module Simulator (CMS) is required to support various combinations of dead load and live load during the testing process. Even though there is published data on the structural capability of the grating, it is not always evident if the combined loadings with joint loads will cause structural failure.

  19. Soft-core processor study for node-based architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Houten, Jonathan Roger; Jarosz, Jason P.; Welch, Benjamin James; Gallegos, Daniel E.; Learn, Mark Walter

    2008-09-01

    Node-based architecture (NBA) designs for future satellite projects hold the promise of decreasing system development time and costs, size, weight, and power and positioning the laboratory to address other emerging mission opportunities quickly. Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based modules will comprise the core of several of the NBA nodes. Microprocessing capabilities will be necessary with varying degrees of mission-specific performance requirements on these nodes. To enable the flexibility of these reconfigurable nodes, it is advantageous to incorporate the microprocessor into the FPGA itself, either as a hardcore processor built into the FPGA or as a soft-core processor built out of FPGA elements. This document describes the evaluation of three reconfigurable FPGA based processors for use in future NBA systems--two soft cores (MicroBlaze and non-fault-tolerant LEON) and one hard core (PowerPC 405). Two standard performance benchmark applications were developed for each processor. The first, Dhrystone, is a fixed-point operation metric. The second, Whetstone, is a floating-point operation metric. Several trials were run at varying code locations, loop counts, processor speeds, and cache configurations. FPGA resource utilization was recorded for each configuration. Cache configurations impacted the results greatly; for optimal processor efficiency it is necessary to enable caches on the processors. Processor caches carry a penalty; cache error mitigation is necessary when operating in a radiation environment.

  20. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Jun; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-04-01

    We report a novel approach for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin core-shell nanoparticles based on an apoferritin template, conjugated to the protein biotin. To prepare the nanoparticle conjugates, we used non-radioactive lutetium as a model target or surrogate for radiolutetium (177Lu). The central cavity, multi-channel structure, and chemical properties of apoferritin are well-suited for sequentially diffusing lutetium and phosphate ions into the cavity--resulting in a stable core-shell composite. We characterized the synthesized LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We tested the pre-targeting capability of biotin-modified lutetium/apoferritin nanoparticle using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This paper presents a simple, fast, and efficient method for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugates with biotin for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging of cancer.

  1. Relativistic semiempirical-core-potential calculations of Sr+ using Laguerre and Slater spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Mitroy, J.; Cheng, Yongjun; Bromley, Michael W. J.

    2016-12-01

    A relativistic description of the structure of heavy alkali-metal atoms and alkali-like ions using S-spinors and L-spinors is developed. The core wave function is defined by a Dirac-Fock calculation using an S-spinor basis. The S-spinor basis is then supplemented with a large set of L-spinors for calculation of the valence wave function in a frozen-core model. The numerical stability of the L-spinor approach is demonstrated by computing the energies and decay rates of several low-lying hydrogen eigenstates, along with the polarizabilities of a Z =60 hydrogenic ion. The approach is then applied to calculate the dynamic polarizabilities of the 5 s , 4 d , and 5 p states of Sr+. The magic wavelengths at which the Stark shifts between different pairs of transitions are 0 are computed. Determination of the magic wavelengths for the 5 s →4 d3/2 and 5 s →4 d5/2 transitions near 417 nm (near the wavelength for the 5 s →5 pj transitions) would allow determination of the oscillator strength ratio for the 5 s →5 p1/2 and 5 s →5 p3/2 transitions.

  2. A PILOT STUDY OF CORE STABILITY AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE: IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP?

    PubMed Central

    Sharrock, Chris; Cropper, Jarrod; Mostad, Joel; Johnson, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Study Design: Correlation study Objectives: To objectively evaluate the relationship between core stability and athletic performance measures in male and female collegiate athletes. Background: The relationship between core stability and athletic performance has yet to be quantified in the available literature. The current literature does not demonstrate whether or not core strength relates to functional performance. Questions remain regarding the most important components of core stability, the role of sport specificity, and the measurement of core stability in relation to athletic performance. Methods: A sample of 35 volunteer student athletes from Asbury College (NAIA Division II) provided informed consent. Participants performed a series of five tests: double leg lowering (core stability test), the forty yard dash, the T-test, vertical jump, and a medicine ball throw. Participants performed three trials of each test in a randomized order. Results: Correlations between the core stability test and each of the other four performance tests were determined using a General Linear Model. Medicine ball throw negatively correlated to the core stability test (r –0.389, p=0.023). Participants that performed better on the core stability test had a stronger negative correlation to the medicine ball throw (r =–0.527). Gender was the most strongly correlated variable to core strength, males with a mean measurement of double leg lowering of 47.43 degrees compared to females having a mean of 54.75 degrees. Conclusions: There appears to be a link between a core stability test and athletic performance tests; however, more research is needed to provide a definitive answer on the nature of this relationship. Ideally, specific performance tests will be able to better define and to examine relationships to core stability. Future studies should also seek to determine if there are specific sub-categories of core stability which are most important to allow for optimal training and

  3. Numerical studies of the margin of vortices with decaying cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G. C.; Ting, L.

    1986-01-01

    The merging of vortices to a single one is a canonical incompressible viscous flow problem. The merging process begins when the core sizes or the vortices are comparable to their distances and ends when the contour lines of constant vorticity lines are circularized around one center. Approximate solutions to this problem are constructed by adapting the asymptotic solutions for distinct vortices. For the early stage of merging, the next-order terms in the asymptotic solutions are added to the leading term. For the later stage of merging, the vorticity distribution is reinitialized by vortices with overlapping core structures guided by the 'rule of merging' and the velocity of the 'vortex centers' are then defined by a minimum principle. To show the accuracy of the approximate solution, it is compared with the finite-difference solution.

  4. Synthesis and cytotoxicity study of magnesium ferrite-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nonkumwong, Jeeranan; Pakawanit, Phakkhananan; Wipatanawin, Angkana; Jantaratana, Pongsakorn; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the core-magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal technique. Completed gold (Au) shell coating on the surfaces of MgFe2O4 nanoparticles was obtained by varying core/shell ratios via a reduction method. Phase identification, morphological evolution, optical properties, magnetic properties and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of these MgFe2O4 core coated with Au nanoparticles were examined by using a combination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), vibrating sample magnetometry and resazurin microplate assay techniques. In general, TEM images revealed different sizes of the core-shell nanoparticles generated from various core/shell ratios and confirmed the completed Au shell coating on MgFe2O4 core nanoparticles via suitable core/shell ratio with particle size less than 100 nm. The core-shell nanoparticle size and the quality of coating influence the optical properties of the products. The UV-vis spectra of complete coated MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles exhibit the absorption bands in the near-Infrared (NIR) region indicating high potential for therapeutic applications. Based on the magnetic property measurement, it was found that the obtained MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles still exhibit superparamagnetism with lower saturation magnetization value, compared with MgFe2O4 core. Both of MgFe2O4 and MgFe2O4-Au core-shell also showed in vitro non-cytotoxicity to mouse areola fibroblast (L-929) cell line.

  5. Tests of Rock Cores Scott Study Area, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-05-01

    4.5) represent this rock; they are described below. The bulk composition is quartz, plagioclase (near oligoclase), and potash feldspar , with minor...little potassium feldspar is present in these cores. The bulk composition of this rock is quartz, plagio- clase feldspar (near oligoclase), chlorite...biotite, and magnetite (Table 4.6). The phenocrysts are plagioclase feldspar and quartz; by composition, the rock is classified as dacite porphyry in the

  6. Tests of Rock Cores Michigamme Study Area, Michigan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-06-01

    predvinately tonalil;e, potash granite, and amphibolite, with relatively minor amounts of hiotite schist and pegmatite . Most specienb contained fractures...critical angle fractures. 3.5 PEGMATITE Several specimens received from Holes MG-CR-26 and -28 were pet- rographically identified as pegmatite . All of...the moduli determined (two specimens) for the pegmatite cores were moderately high, but again slightly lower than those de- termined for the intact

  7. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  8. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Study of Barnett Shale Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameena, Fnu; Alsleben, Helge; Quarles, Carroll A.

    Measurements are reported of positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening parameters on 14 samples of Barnett shale core selected from 196 samples ranging from depths of 6107 to 6402 feet. The Barnett shale core was taken from EOG well Two-O-Five 2H located in Johnson county TX. The selected samples are dark clay-rich mudstone consisting of fine-grained clay minerals. The samples are varied in shape, typically a few inches long and about 1/2 inch in width and thickness, and are representative of the predominant facies in the core. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), petrographic analysis and geochemical analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) were already available for each of the selected samples. The lifetime data are analyzed in terms of three lifetime components with the shortest lifetime fixed at 125 ps. The second lifetime is attributed to positron annihilation in the bulk and positron trapping; and the third lifetime is due to positronium. Correlations of the lifetimes, intensities, the average lifetime and S and W parameters with TOC, XRF and XRD parameters are discussed. The observed correlations suggest that positron spectroscopy may be a useful tool in characterizing shale.

  9. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-29

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  10. Expression studies of the HCV-1a core+1 open reading frame in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vassilaki, Niki; Boleti, Haralabia; Mavromara, Penelope

    2008-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome possesses an open reading frame overlapping the core gene in the +1 frame (core+1 ORF). Initial studies, mainly in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, indicated that the HCV-1 core+1 ORF is expressed by a -2/+1 frameshift at codons 8-11 during translation elongation of the viral polyprotein, resulting in a protein known as alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), frameshift (F), or core+1. However, subsequent investigation, based on reporter constructs carrying portions of the core+1 ORF, suggested the function of alternative mechanisms for core+1 expression in mammalian cells, including translation initiation from internal codons 85/87 or 26. Because results from these studies have been variable, we sought to re-evaluate expression of the core+1 ORF using constructs carrying the complete core+1 coding sequence fused to GFP or LUC. We showed here that codons 85/87 serve as the predominant initiation sites for internal translation initiation of core+1 ORF in Huh-7 and Huh-7/T7 mammalian cells, which support nuclear or cytoplasmic transcription, respectively. We also showed that internal translation initiation can occur concomitantly with the expression of the core+1/F protein that is produced artificially in Huh-7 or naturally in Huh-7/T7 cells. Furthermore, translation of core+1 ORF is not significantly affected by the presence of the HCV IRES element. The core+1/S-GFP protein is cytoplasmic and exhibits an ER distribution similar to that of the core+1/F-GFP protein.

  11. The Kinematic and Chemical Properties of a Potential Core-forming Clump: Perseus B1-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Shirley, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Henning, Th.; Currie, M. J.; André, Ph.; Pezzuto, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 13CO and {{C}18}O (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) maps toward the core-forming Perseus B1-E clump using observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory, and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that the 13CO and {{C}18}O line emission both have very complex velocity structures, indicative of multiple velocity components within the ambient gas. The (1-0) transitions reveal a radial velocity gradient across B1-E of ˜ 1 km {{s}-1} p{{c}-1} that increases from northwest to southeast, whereas the majority of the Perseus cloud has a radial velocity gradient increasing from southwest to northeast. In contrast, we see no evidence of a velocity gradient associated with the denser Herschel-identified substructures in B1-E. Additionally, the denser substructures have much lower systemic motions than the ambient clump material, which indicates that they are likely decoupled from the large-scale gas. Nevertheless, these substructures themselves have broad line widths (˜0.4 km {{s}-1}) similar to that of the {{C}18}O gas in the clump, which suggests they inherited their kinematic properties from the larger-scale, moderately dense gas. Finally, we find evidence of {{C}18}O depletion only toward one substructure, B1-E2, which is also the only object with narrow (transonic) line widths. We suggest that as prestellar cores form, their chemical and kinematic properties are linked in evolution, such that these objects must first dissipate their turbulence before they deplete in CO.

  12. Substrate Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia: Late Potentials, Scar Dechanneling, Local Abnormal Ventricular Activities, Core Isolation, and Homogenization.

    PubMed

    Briceño, David F; Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Villablanca, Pedro A; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are a frequent cause of mortality in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Scar-related reentry represents the most common arrhythmia substrate in patients with recurrent episodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). Initial mapping of scar-related VT circuits is focused on identifying arrhythmogenic tissue. The substrate-based strategies include targeting late potentials, scar dechanneling, local abnormal ventricular activities, core isolation, and homogenization of the scar. Even though substrate-based strategies for VT ablation have shown promising outcomes for patients with structural heart disease related to ischemic cardiomyopathy, the data are scarce for patients with nonischemic substrates.

  13. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  14. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  15. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  16. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  17. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  18. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  19. Experimental Study of Brownian Dynamics of Bent-core Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chun-Zhen; Joshi, Bhuwan; Huang, Ji-Ping; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2009-03-01

    Bent-core or banana-shaped molecules exhibit a variety of intriguing liquid crystalline mesophases including nematics and smectic phases. We try to develop suspensions of bent-core shaped colloidal particles to mimic the bent-core liquid crystals. This report will focus on the fabrication of bent-core colloidal particle suspension, and optical microscopic studies of the Brownian dynamics of individual bent-core colloidal particles. The bent-core colloidal particles confined between two glass substrates are observed through dark-field optical microscopy, and their orientation and position are obtained through imaging processing. Results on the translational and rotational Brownian dynamics of these type of particles will be reported.

  20. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. I. BASIC MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MODELS AND PARAMETER STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores and investigate the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH{sub 3} and CO, NH{sub 2} and CO, and NH{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.

  1. Potential Transference of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Contaminated Coring Knife to Field-cored Lettuce and Impact of Holding Time and Temperature on Its Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field coring is a recent development in iceberg lettuce harvesting, where the outer leaves and the cores of the lettuce heads are removed at the time of harvesting in order to reduce shipping waste and maximize production yield during processing for fresh-cut products. However, research on the effe...

  2. A Core Invasiveness Gene Signature Reflects Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition but Not Metastatic Potential in Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Marsan, Melike; Van den Eynden, Gert; Limame, Ridha; Neven, Patrick; Hauspy, Jan; Van Dam, Peter A.; Vergote, Ignace; Dirix, Luc Y.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Van Laere, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. Methods & Results We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001). When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896–1.019, P = 0.186). Discussion These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential. PMID:24586640

  3. Issues of Sustainable Redevelopment of City Core: A Study of Developed and Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoth, N.; Jain, R. K.; Raheja, G.; Brar, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    The inner city core has undergone maximum misuse and transformation in the absence of building bye laws and regulation, resulting in decay and dilapidated buildings. These city core areas have been places of life, vitality, wealth, power, enlightenment and culture. However these inner city areas have become marginalized in the process of urban growth and has problems related to decay, dwindling economic conditions and dilapidation leading to migration of the population to better and modern areas. This study intends to investigate the impacts of redevelopment within the core area of developed and developing countries, involving environmental, technical, socioeconomic and legal issues that may influence the attainment of sustainable targets for city core redevelopment.

  4. Thermo-Kinetic Study of Core-Shell Nanothermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A.; McCormick, A. V.; Zachariah, M. R.

    2006-07-01

    This article presents the formulation of a new nano-thermite mixture (AL/KMnO4) for application in energetic materials. Reactivities of different thermite mixtures have been compared by a constant volume combustion experiment and the results indicate that the reactivity of the new formulation is two orders of magnitude greater than the traditional formulations. We also present a generic technique for synthesizing core-shell nanostructured composite particles as a means of controlling the reactivity and initiation. By coating a strong oxidizer nanoparticle (KMnO4; ˜150 nm) by a layer of mild oxidizer (Fe2O3; ˜4-15 nm) the measured reactivity in terms of pressurization rate (psi/μs) could be varied by more than a factor of 10. The composite oxidizer particles were synthesized by a two-temperature aerosol process where the non-wetting interaction between the two components of the particle causes phase segregation into a core-shell structure. We also show that the characteristic reaction times and particle length scales can be used to measure characteristic diffusion rates which are indicative of the reactivity of a thermite nanocomposite.

  5. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies is provided to assist state officials, regulators, legislators, and others in implementing the recommendations of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency.

  6. Developing a common bean core collection suitable for association mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Silva, Gliciane Micaele Borges; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Marçal, Jéssica Fernanda; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2015-03-01

    Because of the continuous introduction of germplasm from abroad, some collections have a high number of accessions, making it difficult to explore the genetic variability present in a germplasm bank for conservation and breeding purposes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify and analyze the structure of genetic variability among 500 common bean accessions to construct a core collection. A total of 58 SSRs were used for this purpose. The polymorphism information content (PIC) in the 180 common bean accessions selected to compose the core collection ranged from 0.17 to 0.86, and the discriminatory power (DP) ranged from 0.21 to 0.90. The 500 accessions were clustered into 15 distinct groups and the 180 accessions into four distinct groups in the Structure analysis. According to analysis of molecular variance, the most divergent accessions comprised 97.2% of the observed genetic variability present within the base collection, confirming the efficiency of the selection criterion. The 180 selected accessions will be used for association mapping in future studies and could be potentially used by breeders to direct new crosses and generate elite cultivars that meet current and future global market needs.

  7. Developing a common bean core collection suitable for association mapping studies

    PubMed Central

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Silva, Gliciane Micaele Borges; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Marçal, Jéssica Fernanda; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2015-01-01

    Because of the continuous introduction of germplasm from abroad, some collections have a high number of accessions, making it difficult to explore the genetic variability present in a germplasm bank for conservation and breeding purposes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify and analyze the structure of genetic variability among 500 common bean accessions to construct a core collection. A total of 58 SSRs were used for this purpose. The polymorphism information content (PIC) in the 180 common bean accessions selected to compose the core collection ranged from 0.17 to 0.86, and the discriminatory power (DP) ranged from 0.21 to 0.90. The 500 accessions were clustered into 15 distinct groups and the 180 accessions into four distinct groups in the Structure analysis. According to analysis of molecular variance, the most divergent accessions comprised 97.2% of the observed genetic variability present within the base collection, confirming the efficiency of the selection criterion. The 180 selected accessions will be used for association mapping in future studies and could be potentially used by breeders to direct new crosses and generate elite cultivars that meet current and future global market needs. PMID:25983627

  8. Revisiting Traveling Books: Early Literacy, Social Studies, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Holly Hilboldt; Coleman, Julianne

    2015-01-01

    With the development and institution of the Common Core Standards, teachers must be prepared to integrate content areas such as social studies within the language arts curriculum. Teachers following the suggestions of the Common Core Standards should develop practical and meaningful strategies within their classrooms that encourage and support…

  9. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  10. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Time Commitment When Addressing the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William Benedict, III

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were officially released in America for mathematics and English language arts and soon adopted by 45 of the 50 states. However, within the English langue arts domain there were standards intended for secondary social studies teachers under the title, Common Core State Standards for English Language…

  11. Ab initio study of 2p core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in ferromagnetic transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2012-02-01

    We study the 2p core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in ferromagnetic transition metals, Fe, Co, and Ni using a recently developed ab initio method. The excited final states are set up by distributing electrons on the one-electron states calculated under the fully screened potential in the presence of the core hole. We evaluate the overlap between these excited states and the ground state by using one-electron wave functions, and obtain the spectral curves as a function of binding energy. The calculated spectra reproduce well the observed spectra displaying interesting dependence on the element and on the spin of the removed core electron. The origin of the spectral shapes is elucidated in terms of the one-electron states screening the core hole. The magnetic splitting of the threshold energy is also estimated by using the coherent potential approximation within the fully screened potential approximation. It decreases more rapidly than the local spin moment with moving from Fe to Ni. It is estimated to be almost zero for Ni despite the definite local moment about 0.6μB, in agreement with the experiment.

  12. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  13. A Systematic Study of Explosions in Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swesty, F. Douglas; Mihalas, Dimitri; Norman, Michael

    1997-01-01

    This report covers the research conducted from September 1996 to August 1997 (eighteen months into the three year grant). We have obtained a number of significant findings based on the on the work that we have conducted under this grant during the past year. As we stated in our original proposal the work has focused on multi-dimensional models of the convective epoch in core collapse supernovae. During the past year we have developed a large number of models of the convective epoch in 2-D under two levels of neutrino transport approximation and we are currently working on 3-D models. In the following pages will endeavor to give brief descriptions of our results.

  14. Study on surface-enhanced Raman scattering efficiency of Ag core-Au shell bimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiao; Gu, Huaimin; Kang, Jian; Yuan, Xiaojuan

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the relationship between the states of Ag core-Au shell (core-shell) nanoparticles (NP) and the intensity of Raman scattering of analytes dissolved in the water and adsorbed on the NP was studied. The core-shell NP were synthesised by coating Au layers over Ag seeds by the method of "seed-growth". To highlight the advantage of the core-shell NP, Ag colloid and Au colloid were chosen for contrasting. The analyte that were chosen for this testing were methylene blue (MB) for the reason that MB has very strong signal in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The SERS activity of optimalizing states of Ag and Au colloids were compared with that of core-shell NP when MB was used as analyte. In this study, sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium nitrate were used as aggregating agents for Ag, Au colloids and core-shell NP, because anions have a strong influence on the SERS efficiency and the stability of colloids. The results indicate that core-shell NP can obviously enhance the SERS of MB. The aim of this study is to prove that compared with the metal colloid, the core-shell NP is a high efficiency SERS active substrate.

  15. Three new phthalocyanines with potential for PDT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihter, Boris D.; Bohorquez, Maria D.; Rodgers, Michael A. J.; Kenney, Malcolm E.

    1992-06-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a tetradibenzobarrelenoocta-n-butoxyzinc phthalocyanine, as well as the phthalocyanines t-butyldimethylsiloxy-N(3(beta) -acetoxy-23, 24-dinor-5-cholenoyl)-4-amino-n-butyldimethylsiloxysilicon phthalocyanine and bis- N(3(beta) -acetoxy-23,24-dinor-5-cholenoyl)-4-amino-n-butyldimethylsiloxysilicon phthalocyanine are reported. The zinc phthalocyanine is soluble, open at its center and highly hindered. It has a deep red absorption and a long triplet state lifetime. The silicon phthalocyanines have red absorptions and ligands bearing functions that have a resemblance to a part of the core of the low density lipoprotein fraction of blood serum. The zinc phthalocyanine has the potential to be a good photosensitizer, and the silicon phthalocyanines or related compounds have the potential to be preferentially accumulated by tumor cells. All three compounds are of interest for photodynamic therapy studies.

  16. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-08-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  17. Reactor pulse repeatability studies at the annular core research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, K.R.; Trinh, T.Q.; Luker, S. M.

    2011-07-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories is a water-moderated pool-type reactor designed for testing many types of objects in the pulse and steady-state mode of operations. Personnel at Sandia began working to improve the repeatability of pulse operations for experimenters in the facility. The ACRR has a unique UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel that makes the task of producing repeatable pulses difficult with the current operating procedure. The ACRR produces a significant quantity of photoneutrons through the {sup 9}Be({gamma}, n){sup 8}Be reaction in the fuel elements. The photoneutrons are the result of the gammas produced during fission and in fission product decay, so their production is very much dependent on the reactor power history and changes throughout the day/week of experiments in the facility. Because the photoneutrons interfere with the delayed-critical measurements required for accurate pulse reactivity prediction, a new operating procedure was created. The photoneutron effects at delayed critical are minimized when using the modified procedure. In addition, the pulse element removal time is standardized for all pulse operations with the modified procedure, and this produces less variation in reactivity removal times. (authors)

  18. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of

  19. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Core/shell nano-structuring of metal oxide semiconductors and their photocatalytic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakumar, S.; Rakkesh, R. Ajay

    2013-02-01

    Core/Shell Nanostructures of Metal Oxide Semiconductors (MOS) have attracted much attention because of their most fascinating tunable applications. These core shell morphologies can be easily engineered to enhance the unique properties of the metal-oxide nanostructures, which make them suitable as photocatalyst due to their high catalytic activity, substantial stability, and brilliant perspective in applications. This paper provides an overview on our work on the synthesis of some interesting core/ shell nanostructures of MOS such as ZnO-TiO2, ZnO-MoO3, and V2O5-TiO2 using a low temperature wet chemical route and hydrothermal techniques and their photocatalytic properties from the aspects of different shell materials and shell thicknesses. The effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature, and ratio of core and shell materials, was systematically studied. Here the evidence for the core shell formation with different shell thicknesses came from the X-ray diffraction peak intensities. The shell thickness variation was also confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopic studies. Effect of shell thickness on optical band gap of the core shell fabricated was also investigated using DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. A comprehensive study was carried out for the photocatalytic efficiency of core shell nanostructures by evaluating the photo-degradation of Acridine Orange (AO) dye in aqueous solution under visible and solar light irradiations. These results offered simple approaches to the nanoscale engineering and synthesis of MOS hybrid systems to serve as better photocatalytic materials.

  1. Identifying and Tracking Individual Updraft Cores using Cluster Analysis: A TWP-ICE case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Collis, S. M.; Varble, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus parameterizations in GCMs depend strongly on the vertical velocity structures of convective updraft cores, or plumes. There hasn't been an accurate way of identifying these cores. The majority of previous studies treat the updraft as a single grid column entity, thus missing many intrinsic characteristics, e.g., the size, strength and spatial orientation of an individual core, its life cycle, and the time variations of the entrainment/detrainment rates associated with its life cycle. In this study, we attempt to apply an innovative algorithm based on the centroid-based k-means cluster analysis to improve our understanding of convection and its associated updraft cores. Both 3-D Doppler radar retrievals and cloud-resolving model simulations of a TWP-ICE campaign case during the monsoon period will be used to test and improve this algorithm. This will provide for more in-depth comparisons between CRM simulations and observations that were not possible previously using the traditional piecewise analysis with each updraft column. The first step is to identify the strongest cores (maximum velocity >10 m/s), since they are well defined and produce definite answers when the cluster analysis algorithm is applied. The preliminary results show that the radar retrieved updraft cores are smaller in size and with the maximum velocity located uniformly at higher levels compared with model simulations. Overall, the model simulations produce much stronger cores compared with the radar retrievals. Within the model simulations, the bulk microphysical scheme simulation produces stronger cores than the spectral bin microphysical scheme. Planned researches include using high temporal-resolution simulations to further track the life cycle of individual updraft cores and study their characteristics.

  2. Toy model of the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kamuntavicius, G. P.; Masalaite, A.; Mickevicius, S.

    2007-09-15

    We study the simplest quark model assuming that the sea of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs can be treated as a part of a static force and proceeding to calculate the hadronic states by solving the Schroedinger equation for a static confining interaction. We refer to this model, starting from a system of six interacting constituent quarks, and examine how the picture of two structureless nucleons can change when the effects caused by the substructure of the nucleons are taken into account.

  3. 2240-MW(th) high-temperature reactor core power density study

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-09-01

    This study was done to estimate the effects of reducing the design power density of a 2240-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Core history and thermal hydraulics calculations were performed for average power densities of 5.8 and 7.2 W/cm/sup 3/ and the use of highly enriched fuel was considered. The fuel temperature conditions for the higher power density were found to be only moderately elevated at normal operating conditions. Economic considerations associated with changes in core performance, core size, and coolant pumping requirements were assessed.

  4. Study of the F ring core at high and low resolutions with Cassini ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, Estelle

    2014-11-01

    Saturn’s F ring evolution is still a mystery since its discovery by Pioneer 11. This ring is unique by its changing appearance, its spiral shape, its shepherd satellites Prometheus and Pandora, its ephemeral satellites, and its chaotic behavior. We focus here on the brightest and central region of the F ring called the core. Using Voyager data, the core was primarily believed to be one of the four strands of the F ring (Murray et al., 1997, Icarus, vol.129, p.304-316). However, the core is very different from the other stands, because we have demonstrated previously that the core reconnects on itself over 360 degrees, while the strands don't (Charnoz et al. 2005, Science, vol.310, p.1300-1304). Indeed, the strands originate from the core and are connected between themselves in a single feature that is a spiral, as explained in our previous works (Charnoz et al. 2005, Science, vol.310, p.1300-1304, Deau, 2007, PhD thesis University Paris 7 Denis Diderot). Our present study focus on the F ring core. We have established a protocol in (Deau, 2007, PhD thesis University Paris 7 Denis Diderot) to calculate the radial width and the radial local variations of the core using a Gaussian model. We use this method on Cassini ISS data to derive azimuthal profiles of core's radial width and local kicks. Our study shows that the F ring core is very stable on scale of several months, as suggested by the recent chaos theory of Cuzzi et al. (2014, Icarus, vol.232, p.157-175), while the spiral has a much smaller timescale, i.e. the order of a few weeks.

  5. Multifrequency studies of massive cores with complex spatial and kinematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, L. E.; Shul'ga, V. M.; Zinchenko, I. I.; Zemlyanukha, P. M.; Patoka, A. N.; Tomasson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Five regions of massive-star formation have been observed in various molecular lines in the frequency range˜85-89 GHz. The studied regions comprise dense cores, which host young stellar objects. The physical parameters of the cores are estimated, including the kinetic temperatures (˜20-40 K), the sizes of the emitting regions (˜0.1-0.6 pc), and the virial masses (˜40-500 M ⊙). The column densities and abundances of various molecules are calculated assuming Local Thermodynamical Equilibrium(LTE). The core in 99.982+4.17, which is associated with the weakest IRAS source, is characterized by reduced molecular abundances. The molecular line widths decrease with increasing distance from the core centers ( b). For b ≳ 0.1 pc, the dependences Δ V ( b) are close to power laws (∝ b - p ), where p varies from ~0.2 to ~0.5, depending on the object. In four cores, the asymmetries of the optically thick HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) lines indicates systematicmotions along the line of sight: collapse in two cores and expansion in two others. Approximate estimates of the accretion rates in the collapsing cores indicate that the forming stars have masses exceeding the solar mass.

  6. HRTEM and EELS study of screw dislocation cores in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zaoli; Sigle, Wilfried; Kurtz, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    A [100] twist low-angle grain boundary in SrTiO3 was systemically studied by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), lattice distortion analysis, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A dislocation network is formed in the grain boundary by two sets of a<100> screw dislocations. HRTEM images show that the image contrast in the core region is different from that in the surrounding bulk. Image analysis reveals that compared with an ideal screw dislocation the dislocation core is expanded, probably due to both surface relaxation and a reconstruction of the core. The EELS spectra show a small increase of the Ti/O ratio but no significant change of the Sr/Ti ratio in the core region. From the increase of the Ti/O ratio it is concluded that the dislocation cores are oxygen deficient, which may be responsible for the expansion of the core. Ti L2,3 EELS spectra show a reduction of Ti in the screw dislocation cores as well as a reduced crystal field splitting, both of which are in accordance with a loss of oxygen.

  7. Cadmium-free aqueous synthesis of ZnSe and ZnSe@ZnS core-shell quantum dots and their differential bioanalyte sensing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Irshad Ahmad; Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H. B.

    2016-10-01

    Herein we report a facile and cadmium-free approach to prepare water-soluble fluorescent ZnSe@ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs), using thioglycolic acid (TGA) ligand as a stabilizer and thiourea as a sulfur source. The optical properties and morphology of the obtained core-shell QDs were characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. TEM analysis, and electrophoresis data showed that ZnSe core had an average size of 3.60 ± 0.12 nm and zeta potential of -38 mV; and for ZnSe@ZnS QDs, the mean size was 4.80 ± 0.20 nm and zeta potential was -45 mV. Compared to the core ZnSe QDs, the quantum yield of these core-shell structures was higher (13% versus 32%). These were interacted with five common bioanalytes such as, ascorbic acid, citric acid, oxalic acid, glucose and cholesterol which revealed fluorescence quenching due to concentration dependent binding of analytes to the core only, and core-shell QDs. The binding pattern followed the sequence: cholesterol < glucose < ascorbic acid < oxalic acid < citric acid for ZnSe, and cholesterol < glucose < oxalic acid < ascorbic acid < citric acid for core-shell QDs. Thus, enhanced binding was noticed for the analyte citric acid which may facilitate development of a fluorescence-based sensor based on the ZnSe core-only quantum dot platform. Further, the hydrophilic core-shell structure may find use in cell imaging applications.

  8. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  9. Development of lycopene-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules: physicochemical characterization and stability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Priscilla Pereira; Paese, Karina; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Costa, Tania Hass; Jablonski, André; Flôres, Simone Hickmann; Rios, Alessandro de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop lycopene-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (Lyc-LNCs) by the interfacial deposition of preformed poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL). Lyc extract (93.9 %) was obtained from tomatoes, and the organic phase was prepared with polymer (PCL), caprylic/capric triglycerides, sorbitan monostearate, and Lyc in a mixture of acetone and ethanol under magnetic stirring at 40 °C. The organic phase was injected into an aqueous phase containing polysorbate 80, and the suspension was concentrated under reduced pressure. The formulation with a Lyc concentration of 85 µg/mL was characterized in terms of size distribution, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, pH, viscosity, and color. The Lyc-LNC formulation presented stable values for the z-average (193 ± 4.7 nm) and zeta potential (-11.5 ± 0.40 mV). Despite the lower pH, Lyc content, and color change of the suspension, the nanocapsules showed satisfactory stability, presenting around 50 % Lyc content after 14 days of storage at room temperature (25 °C).

  10. Core outcome measures for opioid abuse liability laboratory assessment studies in humans: IMMPACT recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Zacny, James P.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.; Bigelow, George E.; Foltin, Richard W.; Jasinski, Donald R.; Sellers, Edward M.; Adams, Edgar H.; Balster, Robert; Burke, Laurie B.; Cerny, Igor; Colucci, Robert D.; Cone, Edward; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T.; Haddox, J. David; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Junor, Roderick; Katz, Nathaniel P.; Klein, Michael; Kopecky, Ernest A.; Leiderman, Deborah B.; McDermott, Michael P.; O’Brien, Charles; O’Connor, Alec B.; Palmer, Pamela P.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rowbotham, Michael C.; Sampaio, Cristina; Setnik, Beatrice; Sokolowska, Marta; Stauffer, Joseph W.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    A critical component in development of opioid analgesics is assessment of their abuse liability (AL). Standardization of approaches and measures used in assessing AL has the potential to facilitate comparisons across studies, research laboratories, and drugs. The goal of this report is to provide consensus recommendations regarding core outcome measures for assessing abuse potential of opioid medications in humans in a controlled laboratory setting. Although many of the recommended measures are appropriate for assessing the AL of medications from other drug classes, the focus here is on opioid medications because they present unique risks from both physiological (e.g., respiratory depression, physical dependence) and public health (e.g., individuals in pain) perspectives. A brief historical perspective on AL testing is provided and then those measures that can be considered primary and secondary outcomes and possible additional outcomes in AL assessment are discussed. These outcome measures include: (1) subjective effects (some of which comprise the primary outcome measures, including drug liking); (2) physiological responses; (3) drug self-administration behavior; and (4) cognitive and psychomotor performance. Prior to presenting recommendations for standardized approaches and measures to be used in AL assessments, the appropriateness of using these measures in clinical trials with patients in pain is discussed. PMID:22998781

  11. The fabrication and characterization of stable core-shell superparamagnetic nanocomposites for potential application in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifabad, M. Eizadi; Mercer, T.; Sen, T.

    2015-05-01

    Two systems of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the size range of 45-80 nm have been fabricated by the coating of bare magnetite particles with either mesoporous silica or liposomes and the loading/release of the anti-cancer drug Mitomycin C (MMC) from their surfaces has been investigated. The magnetic cores of size ˜10 nm were produced by a co-precipitation method in aqueous solution, with the silica coating containing an unstructured network of pores of size around 6 nm carried out using a surfactant-templating approach and the liposome coating achieved by an evaporation-immersion technique of the particles in a lipid solution. Stability measurements using a scanning column magnetometry technique indicated that the lipid-coating of the particles halts the sedimentation otherwise apparent in <1 h for the bare magnetite to produce an ultra-stable system and thereby overcome one of the main barriers to potential in-vivo applications. Whilst an increase in stability was also observed in the silica-coated system, it was still unstable over a few hours and will require further investigation. Magnetization curves of the coated systems were indicative of superparamagnetic behavior whilst the in vitro loading and release of MMC resulted in two distinctly different outcomes for the two systems: (i) the silica-coated particles saturated in <4 h to a loading of around 7 μg/mg of material, releasing about 6% at a near constant rate over 48 h whilst (ii) the lipid-coated particles saturated to around only 4 μg/mg over the same time period but with a subsequent rapid release rate over the first 3 h to 27% then rising near-linearly to a value of about 45% at the 48 h mark. This gives scope for systems' to be tuned to the appropriate rate and load delivery as required by clinical need with further investigations underway.

  12. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Ilas, Dan; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Cisneros, Anselmo T; Kelly, Ryan P; Gehin, Jess C

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  13. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  14. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  15. Core Scientific Effort for Biosurface Studies (TASK I).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    Microbiology), were used to study the physiological status of bacteria in biofilms . The Members Advisory Board has suggested an action plan for better...exposed surface qualities of the original substrata and of representative biofilm components previously analyzed (singly and in combination) by "ambient...Techniques, Transactions of the Academy of Dental Materials, 1:6-29, 1990. Vrolijk, N.H., Targett, N.M., BkLRE., and Meyer, A.E., Surface

  16. Core competencies for UK occupational health nurses: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Demou, E.; Kiran, S.; Gaffney, M.; Stevenson, M.; Macdonald, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational health nurses (OHNs) play a pivotal role in the delivery of occupational health (OH) services. Specific competency guidance has been developed in a number of countries, including the UK. While it is acknowledged that UK OHN practice has evolved in recent years, there has been no formal research to capture these developments to ensure that training and curricula remain up-to-date and reflect current practice. Aims To identify current priorities among UK OHNs of the competencies required for OH practice. Methods A modified Delphi study undertaken among representative OHN networks in the UK. This formed part of a larger study including UK and international occupational physicians. The study was conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire based on available guidance on training competencies for OH practice, the published literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Consensus among OHNs was high with 7 out of the 12 domains scoring 100% in rating. ‘Good clinical care’ was the principal domain ranked most important, followed by ‘general principles of assessment & management of occupational hazards to health’. ‘Research methods’ and ‘teaching & educational supervision’ were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established UK OHNs’ current priorities on the competencies required for OH practice. The timing of this paper is opportune with the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing planned in 2018 and should inform the development of competency requirements as part of the Faculty’s goals for standard setting in OHN education and training. PMID:27492470

  17. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayles, Fred L.; Manheim, Frank T.; Waterman, Lee S.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of pore fluids from reducing environments demonstrate that reduction of SO4 is accompanied by large increases in alkalinity and strong depletion of Ca and Mg. The data are compatible with a model of replacement of Fe3+ in clay lattices by Mg from the interstitial solutions and the precipitation of pyrite. Depletions of Na in the interstitial solutions are related to Mg losses by a ratio of approximately 1:3. Pore fluids from oxidizing pelagic sediments exhibit little SO4 depletion. Losses of Mg are accompanied by the addition of Ca to the pore solutions on a nearly 1:1 basis. Strong Sr enrichment is also found in these solutions. The magnitude of the Sr increase suggests that considerable carbonate recrystallization has occurred. As part of an extensive interlaboratory and analytical calibration, the effect of squeezing sediment at different temperatures has been studied in depth. Samples of a variety of lithologies have been included. Enrichment of K by as much as 24 percent and depletion of Mg and Ca by up to 7 percent occurs during warming. However, no significant effect upon Cl and SO4 could be detected. The strongest effects are seen in the minor constituents studied. On warming, Sr, Si, and B are enriched as much as 19, 40, and 60 percent, respectively. The size of the observed concentration changes varies with the mineralogy of the sediment, but is significant in all types studied, particularly with regards to Mg and K.

  18. A Global Study of Inner Core Boundary Topography and its Temporal Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibourichene, A.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB) separates the solid inner core from the surrounding liquid outer core. Its detailed properties, such as its shape, the density jump across it or its topography are key for understanding the dynamics of the core and, ultimately, the generation and sustained character of the Earth's magnetic field. The determination of the ICB topography and its variation with time could also enhance our understanding of the inner core growth and its past history.Seismology makes use of two phases to study the shallow inner core : the PKiKP, reflected at the ICB and the PKIKP, refracted into the inner core. The PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratio and the travel time residual of these phases characterize the vicinity of the ICB and may help constrain ICB topography. Different studies propose various wavelengths for this topography: from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers. Several parameters can affect PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratios and the corresponding differential travel time, such as the quality factor of the shallow inner core, the density jump at the ICB, the geometry of the ray paths or even the reflection coefficient at the ICB. We present a global map of PKiKP/PKIKP amplitude ratios and differential travel times filtered in different pass-bands, with regional densification based, in particular, on the relatively short wavelength sampling afforded by large aperture broadband arrays, such as USArray, and discuss their spatial variability and interpretation in terms of ICB topography, as appropriate.We also have assembled a catalog of high quality doublets which provide a reference for the stability of the measurements, and point to possible time variability of the topography.

  19. Cycle 0(CY1991) NLS trade studies and analyses report. Book 1: Structures and core vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report (SR-1: Structures, Trades, and Analysis), documents the Core Tankage Trades and analyses performed in support of the National Launch System (NLS) Cycle 0 preliminary design activities. The report covers trades that were conducted on the Vehicle Assembly, Fwd Skirt, LO2 Tank, Intertank, LH2 Tank, and Aft Skirt of the NLS Core Tankage. For each trade study, a two page executive summary and the detail trade study are provided. The trade studies contain study results, recommended changes to the Cycle 0 Baselines, and suggested follow on tasks to be performed during Cycle 1.

  20. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  1. A study on reactor core failure thresholds to safety operation of LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuo, Haga; Hiroshi, Endo; Tomoko, Ishizu; Yoshihisa, Shindo

    2006-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (JNES) has been developing the methodology and computer codes for applying level-1 PSA to LMFBR. Many of our efforts have been directed to the judging conditions of reactor core damage and the time allowed to initiate the accident management. Several candidates of the reactor core failure threshold were examined to a typical proto-type LMFBR with MOX fuel based on the plant thermal-hydraulic analyses to the actual progressions leading to the core damage. The results of the present study showed that the judging condition of coolant-boundary integrity failure, 750 degree-C of the boundary temperature, is enough as the threshold of core damage to PLOHS (protected loss-of-heat sink). High-temperature fuel cladding creep failure will not take place before the coolant-boundary reaches the judging temperature and sodium boiling will not occur due to the system pressure rise. In cases of ATWS (anticipated transient without scrum) the accident progression is so fast and the reactor core damage will be inevitable even a realistic negative reactivity insertion due to the temperature rise is considered. Only in the case of ULOHS (unprotected loss-of-heat sink) a relatively long time of 11 min will be allowed till the shut-down of the reactor before the core damage. (authors)

  2. Study on Ultra-Long Life,Small U-Zr Metallic Fuelled Core With Burnable Poison

    SciTech Connect

    Kenji Tsuji; Hiromitsu Inagaki; Akira Nishikawa; Hisato Matsumiya; Yoshiaki Sakashita; Yasuyuki Moriki; Mitsuaki Yamaoka; Norihiko Handa

    2002-07-01

    A conceptual design for a 50 MWe sodium cooled, U-Pu-Zr metallic fuelled, fast reactor core, which aims at a core lifetime of 30 years, has been performed [1]. As for the compensation for a large burn-up reactivity through 30 years, an axially movable reflector, which is located around the core, carries the major part of it and a burnable poison does the rest. This concept has achieved not only a long core lifetime but also a high discharged burn-up. On this study, a conceptual design for a small fast reactor loading U-Zr metallic fuelled core instead of U-Pu-Zr fuelled core has been conducted, based on the original core arrangement of 4S reactor [2]. Within the range of this study including safety requirements, adopting the burnable poison would be effective to construct a core concept that achieves both a long lifetime and a high discharged burn-up. (authors)

  3. Synthesis and magnetic studies of Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsha, C.; Anumol, C. N.; Chithra, M.; Sahu, B. N.; Sahoo, Subasa C.

    2015-06-01

    Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction method followed by oxidation by two different methods; (a) in air and (b) in microwave oven. Structural studies showed that the thickness of NiO shell on Ni core is less in air oxidized sample than the microwave oxidized samples which were supported by the magnetic studies. The samples prepared by air oxidation showed positive exchange biasing where as the samples prepared by microwave oxidation showed negative exchange biasing. Our study also showed that the thickness of the antiferromagnetic NiO is responsible for the different types of magnetic interactions at the interfaces between antiferromagnetic NiO and ferromagnetic Ni in Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles.

  4. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  5. High School Teachers' Perspectives on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2016-01-01

    This was an exploratory study that examined high school teachers' perspectives about their early experiences with the English language arts Common Core State Standards. The sources of data for the study included a survey and structured interviews. Twenty-three high school ELA teachers from one unified school district in Southern California…

  6. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength and flexural strength of conventional core materials with nanohybrid composite resin core material an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, Narasimha; Vinod, V

    2013-09-01

    Several dental materials have been used for core build-up procedures. Most of these materials were not specifically developed for this purpose, but as a consequence of their properties, have found application in core build-up procedures. Improvements in composites and the development of nanocomposites have led to their use as a core build up material due to their superior mechanical properties, optical properties and ease of handling. However it is not clear if they have better mechanical properties than the conventional core build up materials like amalgam, GIC and dual cure composite core build up material. The strength of the core material is very important and this study was undertaken to compare the mechanical properties of materials used for direct core foundations. The differences between the compressive strength and flexural strength of Filtek Z350 nanocomposite with conventional core build up materials like Amalgam, Vitremer GIC and Fluorocore were tested. Cylindrical plexi glass split molds of dimension 6 ± 1 mm [height] x4 ± 1 mm [diameter] were used to fabricate 15 samples of each core material for testing the compressive strength and rectangular plexi glass split molds of dimension 25 ± 1 mm [length] x 2 ± 1 mm[height] x2 ± 1 mm [width] used for fabricating samples for flexural strength. The samples were stored a water bath at 250 °C for 24 h before testing. The samples were tested using a Universal Instron testing machine. The results of the study showed that Fluorocore had the highest compressive strength and flexural strength followed by Filtek Z350 [nanocomposite] Amalgam had the least flexural strength and Vitremer GIC had the least compressive strength. Thus flurocore and nanocomposite are stronger than other core build up materials and hence should be preferred over other conventional core build up materials in extensively damaged teeth.

  7. Structure Optimization of 21,23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    promising dithiaporphyrin from in vitro studies is being evaluated in toxicity studies in vivo. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photodynamic therapy , breast cancer...objectives of this project are two fold: one was to train the former PI, Dr. Youngjae You, as an photodynamic cancer therapy expert in breast cancer...of core- modified porphyrins as photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy of cancer. In the first year, we made eighteen new 21,23-core

  8. Studies of mixed HEU-LEU-MTR cores using 3D models

    SciTech Connect

    Haenggi, P.; Lehmann, E.; Hammer, J.; Christen, R.

    1997-08-01

    Several different core loadings were assembled at the SAPHIR research reactor in Switzerland combining the available types of MTR-type fuel elements, consisting mainly of both HEU and LEU fuel. Bearing in mind the well known problems which can occur in such configurations (especially power peaking), investigations have been carried out for each new loading with a 2D neutron transport code (BOXER). The axial effects were approximated by a global buckling value and therefore the radial effects could be studied in considerably detail. Some of the results were reported at earlier RERTR meetings and were compared to those obtained by other methods and with experimental values. For the explicit study of the third dimension of the core, another code (SILWER), which has been developed in PSI for LWR power plant cores, has been selected. With the help of an adapted model for the MTR-core of SAPHIR, several important questions have been addressed. Among other aspects, the estimation of the axial contribution to the hot channel factors, the influence of the control rod position and of the Xe-poisoning on the power distribution were studied. Special attention was given to a core position where a new element was assumed placed near a empty, water filled position. The comparison of elements of low and high enrichments at this position was made in terms of the induced power peaks, with explicit consideration of axial effects. The program SILWER has proven to be applicable to MTR-cores for the investigation of axial effects. For routine use as for the support of reactor operation, this 3D code is a good supplement to the standard 2D model.

  9. Optical studies of the nematic phase of an oxazole-derived bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, J. A.; Stojadinovic, S.; Dingemans, T.; Sprunt, S.; Jákli, A.

    2003-10-01

    Various optical and dynamic light scattering studies have been conducted on the nematic phase of an oxazole-derived bent-core liquid crystal. At optical length scales and in the absence of applied fields, homogeneously aligned samples of this material, which has an oxazole heterocyclic ring in the central core, are found to behave more like a conventional straight-core nematic than a previously investigated ester-based class of bent-core molecules that have a benzene ring as the core linkage between the two arms of the bow-shaped molecule. In particular, the nematic refractive indices of the oxazole compound combine in the standard way [i.e., ((2n2o+n2e)/3)] to match the isotropic value throughout the nematic range, and the observed director fluctuation modes have relaxation rates comparable to those of the usual thermotropics. However, polarized light scattering data reveal evidence of weak biaxial fluctuations, and indications of electric-field-induced biaxiality are observed in the refractive index measurements.

  10. Central core disease. A correlated genetic, histochemical, ultramicroscopic, and biochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, H; Heffron, J J; Badenhorst, M

    1975-01-01

    Two patients suffering from central core disease are presented. The condition is associated with musculoskeletal abnormalities which have been traced back over five generations. In addition to the typical histochemical findings, electronmicroscopic study has revealed the presence of both structured and non-structured cores in adjacent areas. The calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum was reduced to one-third of normal. Phosphorylase activity was normal in the one case and reduced to 63% in the other. Actomyosin Mg2+-activated ATPase activity was decreased, as was the Ca2+-dependent ATPase of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Images PMID:130467

  11. Long core study on natural and anthropogenic acidification of Huzenbachersee, Black Forest, Federal Republic of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, C.; Arzet, K.; Krause-Dellin, D. )

    1987-06-01

    The pH history of Huzenbachersee in the northern Black Forest was studied by using diatom records of a long core and a short core. The results reveal that the pH of the lake has decreased by 1 unit since the end of the ice age until about 1,800, owing to natural long-term acidification. The impact of man in the last 200 years, such as catchment afforestation and especially acid deposition, have caused additional dramatic pH declines in a much shorter period of time. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Wetland paleoecological study of southwest coastal Louisiana: sediment cores and diatom calibration dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E. L.; Flocks, James G.; Steyer, Gregory D.; Piazza, Sarai C.

    2015-01-01

    Wetland sediment data were collected in 2009 and 2010 throughout the southwest Louisiana Chenier Plain as part of a pilot study to develop a diatom-based proxy for past wetland water chemistry and the identification of sediment deposits from tropical storms. The complete dataset includes forty-six surface sediment samples and nine sediment cores. The surface sediment samples were collected in fresh, intermediate, and brackish marsh and are located coincident with Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) sites. The nine sediment cores were collected at the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge (RWR) located in Grand Chenier, La.

  13. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-07

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  14. Biomarker signatures in sediment cores of Lake Urmia (NW Iran): Potential implications for paleo-climate and paleo-environment reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghipour, Negar; Eglinton, Timothy Ian; McIntyre, Cameron; Darvishi Khatooni, Javad; Hunziker, Daniela; Mohammadi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, in northwest Iran, is the largest saline lake in the Middle East with a surface area of ~ 5000km2. Historical documents indicate its existence since at least 2000 years BC, and palynological investigation of a 100 m-long core suggest it contains a sedimentary record spanning the last 200 ka. Despite this potential as an archive of paleo-climate and paleo-environmental information, to date there has been no molecular organic geochemical investigation or precise dating of these sediments. As part of an exploratory study, we have analyzed material from 3 recently collected 8 m-long cores from the eastern, western and middle part of the lake, with the aim of gaining insight in to past depositional and environmental conditions from biomarker signatures preserved in Lake Urmia sediments. The main objectives are to 1) constrain major source(s) of organic matter and gain insights into carbon cycle and depositional processes from bulk isotopic (δ13Corg, 14Corg) and molecular information, 2) determine the applicability of molecular proxies (TEX86 index derived from glyceroldialkylglycerol tetraethers, GDGTs, and unsaturation index UK37 based on long chain alkenones) for paleo-temperature reconstruction and 3) reconstruct the paleo- vegetation and hydrology from compound-specific stable isotopes (δ13C and δD of n-alkanes). In select samples examined from the three cores, we find the hydrocarbon fractions are dominated by long-chain n-alkanes, with n-C29 and C31 as the dominant homologues in most of the samples. Based on the n-alkane distribution, we distinguish two main types; Type 1 mainly includes the samples deeper than ca 4 m (CPI= 10.2, ACL= 30), characteristic of a terrestrial higher plant source; Type 2 comprises mainly shallower samples (CPI =1.5, ACL = 27.3) which may suggest an increased contribution of aquatic plants. Preliminary GDGT analyses indicate low BIT values for most samples, which suggest little input of soil-derived branched-GDGTs. The

  15. An Exploratory Study of Child Molesters Relationship Patterns Using the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Martin; de Roten, Yves; Korner, Annett

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship patterns of N = 20 child molesters (CM) using the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) method. The relationship patterns of the CMs were compared with those of a control group of N = 20 subjects from an out patient counseling service. Results showed that CMs had significantly less wish to be controlled,…

  16. Studies of pre-Selma Cretaceous core samples from the outcrop area in western Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monroe, Watson Hiner; Bergenback, Richard E.; Sohl, Norman F.; Applin, Esther R.; Leopold, Estella B.; Pakiser, Helen M.; Conant, Louis C.

    1964-01-01

    Quarter-cuts of the cores belonging to the U.S. National Museum have been deposited on indefinite loan with the Alabama Geological Survey at University, Ala., and with the Shell Oil Co. at Jackson, Miss. They are available there for inspection and study.

  17. The 1983 National Teacher Examinations Core Battery Louisiana Validation Study: Final Report. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvue, Robert; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the National Teacher Examinations (NTE) Core Battery for use in teacher certification in Louisiana. This information was produced to assist in the recommendation and establishment of a required score on the NTE. The jury judgment approach was used. Panels of faculty members were drawn from…

  18. Design Core Commonalities: A Study of the College of Design at Iowa State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive study asks what a group of rather diverse disciplines have in common. It involves a cross-disciplinary examination of an entire college, the College of Design at Iowa State University. This research was intended to provide a sense of direction in developing and assessing possible core content. The reasoning was that material…

  19. A Pilot Study of Core Topics in Introductory Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, George I., III; Smith, Stephanie H.; Losonczy-Marshall, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the similarities and differences in the topics and references in selected chapters of eight introductory social psychology textbooks and six developmental psychology textbooks. We wanted to determine the extent to which there were core concepts and references presented in these chapters. We found a relatively small set of core…

  20. History as the Core of the Precollege Social Studies Curriculum. A Statement of Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization of History Teachers, Chicago, IL.

    This policy statement by a national professional association of history teachers from kindergarten through grade 12 begins by pointing out that history currently functions as the core of the social studies curriculum prior to college. This position should be expanded and enhanced as a matter of sound curriculum policy. History alone of the social…

  1. Using the Illinois Core Curriculum for Developing Courses of Study in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ed; Hemp, Paul

    This booklet is designed to serve as a practical guide to assist teachers in using the Illinois Core Curriculum in Agriculture to develop courses of study for local vocational agriculture courses. Provided first is an overview of vocational agriculture programs on the secondary-school level in the state of Illinois. The next section is a guide for…

  2. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Therapy for Deaf Children: Four Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rosalind; Ford, Katie; Thomas, Jane; Oyebade, Natalie; Bennett, Danita; Dodd, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether core vocabulary intervention (CVT) improved single word speech accuracy, consistency and intelligibility in four 9-11-year-old children with profound sensori-neural deafness fitted with cochlear implants and/or digital hearing aids. Their speech was characterized by inconsistent production of different error forms for…

  3. Advanced MOX Core Design Study of Sodium Cooled Reactors in Current Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Niwa, H.

    2002-07-01

    The Sodium cooled MOX core design studies are performed with the target burnup of 150 GWd/t and measures against the recriticality issues in core disruptive accidents (CDAs). Four types of core are comparatively studied in viewpoints of core performance and reliability. Result shows that all the types of core satisfy the target and that the homogeneous core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly is the most superior concept in case the effectiveness of measures against recriticality issues by the axial blanket partial elimination is assured. (authors)

  4. How suitable are peat cores to study historical deposition of PAHs?

    PubMed

    Thuens, Sabine; Blodau, Christian; Radke, Michael

    2013-04-15

    Ombrotrophic peat bogs are natural archives of atmospheric pollution, their depth profiles can be used to study the deposition chronology of harmful contaminants. Prerequisites for deriving historical deposition rates from the peat archive are that contaminants are persistent and immobile in the peat and that the applied dating technique is accurate. To examine these requirements and the accuracy of peat archives for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) 12 peat profiles were sampled in 4 bogs in Ontario, Canada, as well as surface peat in one bog. Additionally we carried out laboratory incubations; no degradation occurred over a 3-year period in these experiments. The standard deviations of PAH concentrations in surface samples and of PAH inventories in whole cores was approximately 30%, and concentrations in surface peat were on average 50% higher in hollows than in hummocks. No indications for mobility of PAHs were observed in peat. Temporal deposition trends inferred from peat cores were generally in agreement with trends derived from a sediment core sampled close by but deposition rates to the sediment were substantially higher. A major source of uncertainty was the rather coarse vertical sampling resolution of 5 cm which introduced substantial uncertainty in the dating of the individual segments. This caused variations of the deposition rates up to 70% per PAH between three replicate cores, and it also impedes the identification of deposition peaks. Overall, we conclude that peat cores are suitable archives for inferring atmospheric deposition trends, but due to their relatively low temporal resolution short-term events may not be identified and the development of sampling methods that allow a higher vertical resolution would greatly improve the performance of the method. The analysis of more than one core per site is suggested to provide a realistic estimate of the historic deposition and total inventories.

  5. Metadynamics study of iron phases at the Earth's inner core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Oganov, A. R.

    2007-12-01

    Iron is the main element in the Earth core and the stable phase of iron in the Earth's solid inner core is still highly controversial (Sambridge, 2003). In order to predict the properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures, here, we use a novel simulation technique, first-principles metadynamics (Martonak et al., 2003, see also Oganov et al., 2005 ), to unveil the stepwise mechanism of the pressure-induced (350 GPa) transformations between bcc, fcc and hcp iron at the temperatures of 2000 K and 6000 K respectively. We predicted the bcc \\{110\\}, fcc \\{111\\} and hcp \\{111\\} slip planes at the Earth inner core conditions. We also predicted some metastable iron phases (e.g. R-3M and P-6M2 structures) on the pathway of the phase transition. The c/a ratios of the iron structures are also calculated at the simulated conditions. Implications of these results for seismic anisotropy in the Earth inner core will be discussed (Zhang, 2007). References: [1] Sambridge M., (2003) An Ensemble View of Earth's Inner Core. Science, 299, 529-530; [2] Martonak R., Laio A., and Parrinello M., (2003). Predicting crystal structures: The Parrinello-Rahman method revisited. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 075503; [3] Oganov A.R., Martonak R., Laio A., Raiteri P., Parrinello M. (2005). Anisotropy of Earth's D" layer and stacking faults in the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase. Nature 438, 1142-1144; [4] Zhang F. & Oganov A.R., (2007) Metadynamics study of iron phases at the Earth's inner core conditions. (in prep.)

  6. Fabrication and Pilot In Vivo Study of a Collagen-BDDGE-Elastin Core-Shell Scaffold for Tendon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Monica; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Savini, Elisa; Sprio, Simone; Cunha, Carla; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Veronesi, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Salvatore, Luca; Sannino, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of bio-devices for complete regeneration of ligament and tendon tissues is presently one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering. Such device must simultaneously possess optimal mechanical performance, suitable porous structure, and biocompatible microenvironment. This study proposes a novel collagen-BDDGE-elastin (CBE)-based device for tendon tissue engineering, by the combination of two different modules: (i) a load-bearing, non-porous, "core scaffold" developed by braiding CBE membranes fabricated via an evaporative process and (ii) a hollow, highly porous, "shell scaffold" obtained by uniaxial freezing followed by freeze-drying of CBE suspension, designed to function as a physical guide and reservoir of cells to promote the regenerative process. Both core and shell materials demonstrated good cytocompatibility in vitro, and notably, the porous shell architecture directed cell alignment and population within the sample. Finally, a prototype of the core module was implanted in a rat tendon lesion model, and histological analysis demonstrated its safety, biocompatibility, and ability to induce tendon regeneration. Overall, our results indicate that such device may have the potential to support and induce in situ tendon regeneration.

  7. Fabrication and Pilot In Vivo Study of a Collagen-BDDGE-Elastin Core-Shell Scaffold for Tendon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Monica; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Savini, Elisa; Sprio, Simone; Cunha, Carla; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Veronesi, Francesca; Fini, Milena; Salvatore, Luca; Sannino, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of bio-devices for complete regeneration of ligament and tendon tissues is presently one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering. Such device must simultaneously possess optimal mechanical performance, suitable porous structure, and biocompatible microenvironment. This study proposes a novel collagen-BDDGE-elastin (CBE)-based device for tendon tissue engineering, by the combination of two different modules: (i) a load-bearing, non-porous, “core scaffold” developed by braiding CBE membranes fabricated via an evaporative process and (ii) a hollow, highly porous, “shell scaffold” obtained by uniaxial freezing followed by freeze-drying of CBE suspension, designed to function as a physical guide and reservoir of cells to promote the regenerative process. Both core and shell materials demonstrated good cytocompatibility in vitro, and notably, the porous shell architecture directed cell alignment and population within the sample. Finally, a prototype of the core module was implanted in a rat tendon lesion model, and histological analysis demonstrated its safety, biocompatibility, and ability to induce tendon regeneration. Overall, our results indicate that such device may have the potential to support and induce in situ tendon regeneration. PMID:27446909

  8. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  9. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to

  10. Ki67 proliferation in core biopsies versus surgical samples - a model for neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing number of neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies are being conducted and a novel model for tumor biological studies, the "window-of-opportunity" model, has revealed several advantages. Change in tumor cell proliferation, estimated by Ki67-expression in pre-therapeutic core biopsies versus post-therapeutic surgical samples is often the primary end-point. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in proliferation scores between core biopsies and surgical samples when patients have not received any intervening anti-cancer treatment. Also, a lack of consensus concerning Ki67 assessment may raise problems in the comparison of neo-adjuvant studies. Thus, the secondary aim was to present a novel model for Ki67 assessment. Methods Fifty consecutive breast cancer cases with both a core biopsy and a surgical sample available, without intervening neo-adjuvant therapy, were collected and tumor proliferation (Ki67, MIB1 antibody) was assessed immunohistochemically. A theoretical model for the assessment of Ki67 was constructed based on sequential testing of the null hypothesis 20% Ki67-positive cells versus the two-sided alternative more or less than 20% positive cells.. Results Assessment of Ki67 in 200 tumor cells showed an absolute average proliferation difference of 3.9% between core biopsies and surgical samples (p = 0.046, paired t-test) with the core biopsies being the more proliferative sample type. A corresponding analysis on the log-scale showed the average relative decrease from the biopsy to the surgical specimen to be 19% (p = 0.063, paired t-test on the log-scale). The difference was significant when using the more robust Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test (p = 0.029). After dichotomization at 20%, 12 of the 50 sample pairs had discrepant proliferation status, 10 showed high Ki67 in the core biopsy compared to two in the surgical specimen (p = 0.039, McNemar's test). None of the corresponding results for 1000

  11. Studies of Deteriorated Heat Transfer in Prismatic Cores Stemming from Irradiation-Induced Geometry Distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian G.; Schultz, Richard R.; McEligot, Don M.; McCreery, Glenn

    2015-08-31

    A reference design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is to use General Atomics Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). For such a configuration in normal operation, the helium coolant flow proceeds from the upper plenum to the lower plenum principally through the core coolant channels and the interstitial gaps (bypass flow) that separate the prismatic blocks from one another. Only the core prismatic blocks have coolant channels. The interstitial gaps are present throughout the core, the inner reflector region, and the out reflector region. The bypass flows in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) are of potential concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels and, thereby, can increase outlet gas temperatures and maximum fuel temperatures. Consequently, it is appropriate to account for bypass flows in reactor thermal gas dynamic analyses. The objectives of this project include the following: fundamentally understand bypass flow and heat transfer at scaled, undistorted conditions and with geometry distortions; develop improved estimates of associated loss coefficients, surface friction and heat transfer for systems and network codes; and obtain related data for validation of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) or system (e.g., RELAP5) codes which can be employed in predictions for a GCR for normal power, reduced power, and residual heat removal operations.

  12. Petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing kinetics determined in soil core, microcosm, and tubing cluster studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.E.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Richards, R.J.; Goodwin, S.

    1996-05-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of vapor-phase petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated in an intact soil core from the site of an aviation gasoline release. An unsaturated zone soil core was subjected to a flow of nitrogen gas, oxygen, water vapor, and vapor-phase hydrocarbons in a configuration analogous to a biofilter or an in situ bioventing or sparging situation. The vertical profiles of vapor-phase hydrocarbon concentration in the soil core were determined by gas chromatography of vapor samples. Biodegradation reduced low influent hydrocarbon concentrations by 45 to 92% over a 0.6-m interval of an intact soil core. The estimated total hydrocarbon concentration was reduced by 75% from 26 to 7 parts per million. Steady-state concentrations were input to a simple analytical model balancing advection and first-order biodegradation of hydrocarbons. First-order rate constants for the major hydrocarbon compounds were used to calibrate the model to the concentration profiles. Rate constants for the seven individual hydrocarbon compounds varied by a factor of 4. Compounds with lower molecular weights, fewer methyl groups, and no quaternary carbons tended to have higher rate constants. The first-order rate constants were consistent with kinetic parameters determined from both microcosm and tubing cluster studies at the field site.

  13. Iron core formation in horse spleen ferritin: magnetic susceptibility, pH, and compositional studies.

    PubMed

    Hilty, S; Webb, B; Frankel, R B; Watt, G D

    1994-11-15

    Horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) reconstituted with small iron cores ranging in size from 8 to 500 iron atoms was studied by magnetic susceptibility and pH measurements to determine when the added Fe3+ begins to aggregate and form antiferromagnetically coupled clusters and also to determine the hydrolytic state of the iron at low iron loading. The Evans NMR magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that at iron loadings as low as 8 Fe3+/HoSF, at least half of the added iron atoms were involved in antiferromagnetic exchange interactions and the other half were present as isolated iron atoms with S = 5/2. As the core size increased to about 24 iron atoms, the antiferromagnetic exchange interactions among the iron atoms increased until reaching the limiting value of 3.8 Bohr magnetons per iron atom, the value present in holo HoSF. HoSF containing eight or more Fe3+ to which eight Fe2+ were added showed that the Fe2+ ions were at sites remote from the Fe3+ and that the resulting HoSF consisted of individual, noninteracting Fe2+ and the partially aggregated Fe3+. pH measurements for core reduction showed that Fe(OH)3 was initially present at all iron loadings but that in the absence of iron chelators the reduced iron core is partially hydrolyzed. Proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy showed that Cl- is transported into the iron core during reduction, forming a stable chlorohydroxy Fe(II) mineral phase.

  14. Generic BWR-4 degraded core in-vessel study. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Original intent of this project was to produce a phenomenological study of the in-vessel degradation which occurs during the TQUX and TQUV sequences for a generic BWR-4 from the initiation of the FSAR Chapter 15 operational transient through core debris bed formation to the failure of the primary pressure boundary. Bounding calculations were to be performed for the two high pressure and low pressure non-LOCA scenarios to assess the uncertainties in the current state of knowledge regarding the source terms for containment integrity studies. Source terms as such were defined in terms of hydrogen generation, unreacted metal, and coolant inventroy, and in terms of the form, sequencing and mode of dispersal through the primary vessel boundary. Fission product release was not to be considered as part of this study. Premature termination of the project, however, led to the dicontinuation of work on an as is basis. Work on the in-core phase from the point of scram to core debris bed formation was largely completed. A preliminary scoping calculation on the debris bed phase had been initiated. This report documents the status of the study at termination.

  15. A study to control chemical reactions using Si:2p core ionization: site-specific fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Prümper, Georg; Takemoto, Mai; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiro; Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Isao H; Harries, James R; Tamenori, Yusuke; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-08-18

    In an aim to create a "sharp" molecular knife, we have studied site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:2p core photoionization of bridged trihalosilyltrimethylsilyl molecules in the vapor phase. Highly site-specific bond dissociation has been found to occur around the core-ionized Si site in some of the molecules studied. The site specificity in fragmentation and the 2p binding energy difference between the two Si sites depend in similar ways on the intersite bridge and the electronegativities of the included halogen atoms. The present experimental and computational results show that for efficient "cutting" the following conditions for the two atomic sites to be separated by the knife should be satisfied. First, the sites should be located far from each other and connected by a chain of saturated bonds so that intersite electron migration can be reduced. Second, the chemical environments of the atomic sites should be as different as possible.

  16. A study of the earth's free core nutation using international deployment of accelerometers gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummins, Phil R.; Wahr, John M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we consider the influence of the earth's free core nutation (FCN) on diurnal tidal admittance estimates for 11 stations of the globally distributed International Deployment of Accelerometers network. The FCN causes a resonant enhancement of the diurnal admittances which can be used to estimate some properties of the FCN. Estimations of the parameters describing the FCN (period, Q, and resonance strength) are made using data from individual stations and many stations simultaneously. These yield a result for the period of 423-452 sidereal days, which is shorter than theory predicts but is in agreement with many previous studies and suggests that the dynamical ellipticity of the core may be greater than its hydrostatic value.

  17. The Common Core State Standards and the Role of Instructional Materials: A Case Study on EdReports.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review research studies investigating the role of instructional materials in relation to the Common Core State Standards and to evaluate whether a new organisation, EdReports.org, founded to evaluate the alignment of instructional materials to the Common Core State Standards, has achieved its objectives. Content…

  18. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion.

  19. Drug release profile in core-shell nanofibrous structures: a study on Peppas equation and artificial neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Mahboubeh; Amani-Tehran, Mohammad; Latifi, Masoud; Mathur, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Release profile of drug constituent encapsulated in electrospun core-shell nanofibrous mats was modeled by Peppas equation and artificial neural network. Core-shell fibers were fabricated by co-axial electrospinning process using tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as the core and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) as the shell materials. The density and hydrophilicity of the shell polymers, feed rates and concentrations of core and shell phases, the contribution of TCH in core material and electrical field were the parameters fed to the perceptron network to predict Peppas constants in order to derive release pattern. This study demonstrated the viability of the prediction tool in determining drug release profile of electrospun core-shell nanofibrous scaffolds.

  20. Effect of Hydrophobic Core Topology and Composition on the Structure and Kinetics of Star Polymers: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amber C; Felberg, Lisa E; Piunova, Victoria A; Rice, Julia E; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Swope, William C

    2017-04-06

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effect of core chemistry on star polymer structural and kinetic properties. This work serves to validate the choice of a model adamantane core used in previous simulations to represent larger star polymeric systems in an aqueous environment, as well as to explore how the choice of size and core chemistry using a dendrimer or nanogel core may affect these polymeric nanoparticle systems, particularly with respect to thermosensitivity and solvation properties that are relevant for applications in drug loading and delivery.

  1. Multi-core performance studies of a Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, A. R.; Smith, K.; Romano, P. K.; Forget, B.; Felker, K. G.

    2013-07-14

    Performance results are presented for a multi-threaded version of the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutronics code using OpenMP in the context of nuclear reactor criticality calculations. Our main interest is production computing, and thus we limit our approach to threading strategies that both require reasonable levels of development effort and preserve the code features necessary for robust application to real-world reactor problems. Several approaches are developed and the results compared on several multi-core platforms using a popular reactor physics benchmark. A broad range of performance studies are distilled into a simple, consistent picture of the empirical performance characteristics of reactor Monte Carlo algorithms on current multi-core architectures.

  2. Trace elements profiles, notably Hg, from a preliminary study of the Apollo 15 deep-drill core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The possible thermal gradient near the surface during a lunation is considered together with the heat flow from the interior, the physical process of Hg migration, the results from core and trench samples from previous missions, and other temperature sensitive phenomena that may help understand the processes. U, Os, and Ru concentrations in the deep drill core samples are of potential interest and are summarized in a table. The Os tends to parallel the Hg profile with depth.

  3. FDTD study of the formation of optical vortices associated with core-shell nanoparticle cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahfuzur; Lu, Jin You; Ni, George; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Zhang, Tiejun; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2015-03-01

    Light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water, or nanofluids have recently been experimentally demonstrated to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. In suspensions, nanoparticles may form clusters due to surface wetting properties, and little work has focused on understanding the optical properties of clusters. In this work, we use the FDTD method to accurately visualize the optical power flow through various plasmonic metal-silica core-shell nanoparticle pairs at different inter-particle separations (10-100 nm). At these separations phase singularities of the power flow can occur, such as vortices of light inside the dielectric core which can enhance the absorption cross-section of the cluster. We study the conditions required to form these vortices. We also consider titanium nitride as shell, other than the widely studied noble metals to visualize the extinction cross-section of a cluster which depends on the separation, and the permittivity of the dielectric core. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable support from Masdar Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the soler thermal project grant.

  4. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  5. Initial experience with a novel EUS-guided core biopsy needle (SharkCore): results of a large North American multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Christopher J.; Kolb, Jennifer M.; Benias, Petros C.; Shah, Hiral; Shah, Shashin; Haluszka, Oleh; Maranki, Jennifer; Sharzehi, Kaveh; Lam, Eric; Gordon, Stuart R.; Hyder, Sarah M.; Kaimakliotis, Pavlos Z.; Allaparthi, Satya B.; Gress, Frank G.; Sethi, Amrita; Shah, Ashish R.; Nieto, Jose; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi; Kothari, Truptesh H.; Ho, Sammy; Izzy, Manhal J.; Sharma, Neil R.; Watson, Rabindra R.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Pleskow, Douglas K.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Sawhney, Mandeep; Aljahdi, Emad; Ryou, Marvin; Wong, Clarence K.; Gupta, Parantap; Yang, Dennis; Gonzalez, Susana; Adler, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The ability to safely and effectively obtain sufficient tissue for pathologic evaluation by using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance remains a challenge. Novel designs in EUS needles may provide for improved ability to obtain such core biopsies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of core biopsy specimens obtained using a novel EUS needle specifically designed to obtain core biopsies. Patients and methods: Multicenter retrospective review of all EUS-guided fine-needle biopsies obtained using a novel biopsy needle (SharkCore FNB needle, Medtronic, Dublin, Ireland). Data regarding patient demographics, lesion type/location, technical parameters, and diagnostic yield was obtained. Results: A total of 250 lesions were biopsied in 226 patients (Median age 66 years; 113 (50 %) male). Median size of all lesions (mm): 26 (2 – 150). Overall, a cytologic diagnosis was rendered in 81 % specimens with a median number of 3 passes. When rapid onsite cytologic evaluation (ROSE) was used, cytologic diagnostic yield was 126/149 (85 %) with a median number of 3 passes; without ROSE, cytologic diagnostic yield was 31/45 (69 %, P = 0.03) with a median number of 3 passes. Overall, a pathologic diagnosis was rendered in 130/147 (88 %) specimens with a median number of 2 passes. Pathologic diagnostic yield for specific lesion types: pancreas 70/81 (86 %), subepithelial lesion 13/15 (87 %), lymph node 26/28 (93 %). Ten patients (10/226, 4 %) experienced adverse events: 4 acute pancreatitis, 5 pain, 1 fever/cholangitis. Conclusions: Initial experience with a novel EUS core biopsy needle demonstrates excellent pathologic diagnostic yield with a minimum number of passes. PMID:27652304

  6. ACT-CCREC Core Research Program: Study Questions and Design. ACT Working Paper Series. WP-2015-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Ty M.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a non-technical overview of the guiding research questions and research design for the ACT-led core research program conducted on behalf of the GEAR UP College and Career Readiness Evaluation Consortium (CCREC). The core research program is a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of 14 GEAR UP state grants on the academic…

  7. Gigawatt, Closed Cycle, Vapor Core-Mhd Space Power System Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Rhee, Hyop S.; Koester, J. Kent; Goodman, Julius; Maya, Issac

    1988-04-01

    A conceptual design study for a closed cycle gigawatt electric space power system has been conducted. The closed cycle static operation reduces power system interaction effects upon the space craft. This system utilizes a very high temperature (5500 K) plasma core reactor and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion subsystem to provide a power density of about 8 kWe/kg (0.13 kg/kWe) for several kilo-seconds. Uranium vapor is the fuel. Candidate working fluids are metal vapors such as lithium or calcium. The system is based on a Rankine cycle to minimize the electromagnetic pumping power requirement. The fission fragment induced nonequilibrium ionization in the plasma in the MHD power duct provides the plasma electric conductivity for gigawatt power generation. Waste heat is rejected utilizing lithium heat pipes at temperatures just below 2000 K, thus minimizing the radiator area requirement. Key technology issues are identified, including the containment of the 5500 K 'sun-liken plasma at 4 to 0 MPa In a reflector moderated, gas/vapor filled cavity core reactor. A promising scheme to protect the refractory metal reactor inner wall is presented, together with a heating load analysis in the wall. This scheme utilizes an ablating film of liquid lithium/calcium that evaporates into the cavity core to become the working fluid of the cycle.

  8. Theoretical investigation of electronic states and spectroscopic properties of tellurium selenide molecule employing relativistic effective core potentials.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyaya, Surya; Nath, Abhijit; Das, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Ab initio based relativistic configuration interaction calculations have been performed to study the electronic states and spectroscopic properties of tellurium selenide (TeSe) - the heaviest heteronuclear diatomic group 16-16 molecule. Potential energy curves of several spin-excluded (Λ-S) electronic states of TeSe have been constructed and spectroscopic constants of low-lying bound Λ-S states within 3.85 eV are reported in the first stage of calculations. The X(3)Σ(-), a(1)Δ and b(1)Σ(+) are found as the ground, first excited and second excited state, respectively, at the Λ-S level and all these three states are mainly dominated by …π(4)π(*2) configuration. The computed ground state dissociation energy is in very good agreement with the experimental results. In the next stage of calculations, effects of spin-orbit coupling on the potential energy curves and spectroscopic properties of the species are investigated in details and compared with the existing experimental results. After inclusion of spin-orbit coupling the X(3)(1)Σ(-)(0(+)) is found as the ground-state spin component of TeSe. The computed spin-orbit splitting between two components of X(3)Σ(-) state is 1285 cm(-1). Also, significant amount of spin-orbit splitting are found between spin-orbit components (Ω-components) of several other excited states. Transition moments of some important spin-allowed and spin-forbidden transitions are calculated from configuration interaction wave functions. The spin-allowed transition B(3)Σ(-)-X(3)Σ(-) and spin-forbidden transition b(1)Σ(+)(0(+))-X(3)(1)Σ(-)(0(+)) are found to be the strongest in their respective categories. Electric dipole moments of all the bound Λ-S states along with those of the two Ω-components of X(3)Σ(-) are also calculated in the present study.

  9. Historical changes in the Columbia River estuary based on sediment cores: feasibility studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Reisenbichler, R.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.; Peterson, C.; Baker, D.; Leavitt, P.R.; Simenstad, C.A.; Prahl, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of the Columbia River estuary to salmon, other fishes, migratory birds, and other species is fairly well established. Relatively little is known, however, about long-term, historic variations in biological processes and conditions within the estuary. For example, have conditions varied greatly with climatic regime shifts and how has dam construction on the Columbia River influenced biological communities over time? We conducted a feasibility study to see if sediment cores from the estuary could be aged and whether biological or contaminant indicators could be identified. Such information could be useful in understanding long-term environmental variation and in restoration studies.

  10. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  11. Fabrication of monodispersive nanoscale alginate-chitosan core-shell particulate systems for controlled release studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körpe, Didem Aksoy; Malekghasemi, Soheil; Aydın, Uğur; Duman, Memed

    2014-12-01

    Biopolymers such as chitosan and alginate are widely used for controlled drug delivery systems. The present work aimed to develop a new protocol for preparation of monodisperse alginate-coated chitosan nanoparticles at nanoscale. Modifications of preparation protocol contain changing the pH of polymer solutions and adding extra centrifugation steps into the procedure. While chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized by ionic gelation method, they were coated with alginate by electrostatic interaction. The size, morphology, charge, and structural characterization of prepared core-shell nanoparticulated system were performed by AFM, Zeta sizer, and FTIR. BSA and DOX were loaded as test biomolecules to core and shell part of the nanoparticle, respectively. Release profiles of BSA and DOX were determined by spectrophotometry. The sizes of both chitosan and alginate-coated chitosan nanoparticles which were prepared by modified protocol were measured to be 50 ± 10 and 60 ± 3 nm, respectively. After loading BSA and DOX, the average size of the particles increased to 80 ± 7 nm. Moreover, while the zeta potential of chitosan nanoparticles was positive value, the value was inverted to negative after alginate coating. Release profile measurements of BSA and DOX were determined during 57 and 2 days, respectively. Our results demonstrated that monodisperse alginate-coated nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded successfully using our modified protocol.

  12. VTST/MT studies of the catalytic mechanism of C-H activation by transition metal complexes with [Cu2(μ-O2)], [Fe2(μ-O2)] and Fe(IV)-O cores based on DFT potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongho; Mai, Binh Khanh; Park, Sumin

    2017-04-01

    High-valent Cu and Fe species, which are generated from dioxygen activation in metalloenzymes, carry out the functionalization of strong C-H bonds. Understanding the atomic details of the catalytic mechanism has long been one of the main objectives of bioinorganic chemistry. Large H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were observed in the C-H activation by high-valent non-heme Cu or Fe complexes in enzymes and their synthetic models. The H/D KIE depends significantly on the transition state properties, such as structure, energies, frequencies, and shape of the potential energy surface, when the tunneling effect is large. Therefore, theoretical predictions of kinetic parameters such as rate constants and KIEs can provide a reliable link between atomic-level quantum mechanical mechanisms and experiments. The accurate prediction of the tunneling effect is essential to reproduce the kinetic parameters. The rate constants and HD/KIE have been calculated using the variational transition-state theory including multidimensional tunneling based on DFT potential energy surfaces along the reaction coordinate. Excellent agreement was observed between the predicted and experimental results, which assures the validity of the DFT potential energy surfaces and, therefore, the proposed atomic-level mechanisms. The [Cu2(μ-O)2], [Fe2(μ-O)2], and Fe(IV)-oxo species were employed for C-H activation, and their role as catalysts was discussed at an atomic level.

  13. Core-shell nanoscale coordination polymers combine chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy to potentiate checkpoint blockade cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbai; Duan, Xiaopin; Guo, Nining; Chan, Christina; Poon, Christopher; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a 5-year survival rate of only 12% for patients with the metastatic disease. Checkpoint inhibitors, such as the antibodies inhibiting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, are among the most promising immunotherapies for patients with advanced colon cancer, but their durable response rate remains low. We herein report the use of immunogenic nanoparticles to augment the antitumour efficacy of PD-L1 antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy. Nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) core-shell nanoparticles carry oxaliplatin in the core and the photosensitizer pyropheophorbide-lipid conjugate (pyrolipid) in the shell (NCP@pyrolipid) for effective chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Synergy between oxaliplatin and pyrolipid-induced PDT kills tumour cells and provokes an immune response, resulting in calreticulin exposure on the cell surface, antitumour vaccination and an abscopal effect. When combined with anti-PD-L1 therapy, NCP@pyrolipid mediates regression of both light-irradiated primary tumours and non-irradiated distant tumours by inducing a strong tumour-specific immune response. PMID:27530650

  14. Core-shell nanoscale coordination polymers combine chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy to potentiate checkpoint blockade cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunbai; Duan, Xiaopin; Guo, Nining; Chan, Christina; Poon, Christopher; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a 5-year survival rate of only 12% for patients with the metastatic disease. Checkpoint inhibitors, such as the antibodies inhibiting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, are among the most promising immunotherapies for patients with advanced colon cancer, but their durable response rate remains low. We herein report the use of immunogenic nanoparticles to augment the antitumour efficacy of PD-L1 antibody-mediated cancer immunotherapy. Nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) core-shell nanoparticles carry oxaliplatin in the core and the photosensitizer pyropheophorbide-lipid conjugate (pyrolipid) in the shell (NCP@pyrolipid) for effective chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Synergy between oxaliplatin and pyrolipid-induced PDT kills tumour cells and provokes an immune response, resulting in calreticulin exposure on the cell surface, antitumour vaccination and an abscopal effect. When combined with anti-PD-L1 therapy, NCP@pyrolipid mediates regression of both light-irradiated primary tumours and non-irradiated distant tumours by inducing a strong tumour-specific immune response.

  15. Influence of polar substituent on central bending unit of bent core mesogens: Synthesis, photophysical, mesomorphism and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoj Kumar; Kalita, Gayatri; Bhattacharya, Barnali; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-09-01

    New five ring bent core mesogens derived from substituted 1,3-phenylenediamine (4-nitro-1,3-phenylenediamine, 4-chloro-1,3-phenylenediamine) were synthesized. Their molecular structures, photophysical properties and mesogenic behaviors were investigated. The molecular structures and the purity of the bent core molecule have been characterized by spectroscopic studies and elemental analysis respectively. Photophysical properties of bent core compounds were investigated in chloroform by using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The phase transition temperatures were detected by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the phases are confirmed by polarizing optical microscopy. The polar substituents on bent core unit of bent shaped molecule influence the mesomorphic behaviors of the bent core mesogens. The polar nitro group at 4-position of the bent core unit displays tilted smectic C phase and unknown smectic X phase whereas chloro group at 4-position exhibits orthogonal smectic A phase. The bent core mesogens are fluorescent in nature. The density functional theory calculation was carried out to obtain the stable molecular conformation and chemical reactivity of the bent core molecules. Orbitals involved in the electronic transitions and their corresponding energies together with oscillator strengths have been reported.

  16. Tracing tephra horizons in the Greenland ice-cores and the potential for integrating disparate proxy records in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. M.; Abbott, P.; Bigler, M.; Cook, E.; Johnsen, S.; Seierstad, I.; Steffensen, J.; Svensson, A.; Pearce, N. J.; Wastegård, S.

    2011-12-01

    Although the millennial-scale climatic events that characterise the last glacial period are well-documented in a large number of disparate proxy records, the causal mechanisms remain poorly understood. Large dating uncertainties associated with conventional approaches severely limit the integration of these records to test the degree of climatic synchroneity in relation to these short-lived oscillations. One technique that has considerable potential for the synchronisation of different records is tephrochronology. Tephra isochrones displaying distinct geochemical fingerprints and deposited instantaneously following an eruption have the unique advantage of representing fixed time-lines between different proxy records. Here we report on the ongoing work to trace tephra horizons in the Greenland ice-cores (NGRIP and GRIP) that have the potential to enhance the synchronisation of records spanning the last glacial period. Several of the tephras identified coincide with rapid climatic jumps imprinted in the Greenland ice-cores and thus, represent independent constraints that hold considerable promise for assessing lead/lag responses between the Earth's climatic components. Major and trace element signatures are used to characterise these horizons and independent ice-core age estimates are presented which can be incorporated into building chronological models for other palaeoarchives in which common tephra horizons can be identified. We also present the latest results from the NEEM record whereby a new tephra screening approach coupled to the Continuous Flow Analysis set-up is adopted. This work falls within the objectives of the SMART (Synchronising MArine and Ice-core Records using Tephrochronology) and the TRACE (Tephra constraints on RApid Cimatic Events) projects.

  17. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  18. Studies of particle wake potentials in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian N.; Graziani, Frank R.; Glosli, James N.; Strozzi, David J.; Surh, Michael P.; Richards, David F.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Mori, Warren B.

    2011-09-01

    A detailed understanding of electron stopping and scattering in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere is still not at hand. Presently, there is some disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Theoretical models assume electrostatic (Coulomb force) interactions between particles and neglect magnetic effects. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle plasma simulations. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and BEPS. In this paper, we compare the wakes observed in these simulations with each other and predictions from collisionless kinetic theory. The relevance of the work to Fast Ignition is discussed.

  19. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  20. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 4: Data and performance report for the best stage configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The core compressor exit stage study program develops rear stage blading designs that have lower losses in their endwall boundary layer regions. The test data and performance results for the best stage configuration consisting of Rotor-B running with Stator-B are described. The technical approach in this efficiency improvement program utilizes a low speed research compressor. Tests were conducted in two ways: (1) to use four identical stages of blading to obtain test data in a true multistage environment and (2) to use a single stage of blading to compare with the multistage test results. The effects of increased rotor tip clearances and circumferential groove casing treatment are evaluated.

  1. Detailed study of macrobending effects in a wide transmission bandwidth hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Sandoghchi, S. R.; Numkam, E.; Bradley, T. D.; Hayes, J. R.; Wheeler, N. V.; Jasion, G.; Gray, D. R.; Poletti, F.; Petrovich, M. N.; Richardson, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    We study in detail the macrobending effects in a wide transmission bandwidth (~200nm) 19 cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber operating at 1550nm. Our results indicate low bend sensitivity over a ~130nm wide interval within the transmission window, with negligible loss (<0.1dB) for bending radii down to 5mm. The "red shift" and "blue shift" of the bandgap edge have been observed at the short and long wavelength edges, respectively. The cutoff wavelengths where air-guiding modes stop guiding can be extracted from the bending loss spectra, which matches well with the simulated effective refractive index map of such fiber.

  2. Petrologic studies of drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, F.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Arney, B.; Heiken, G.; Byers, F.; Gooley, R.; Semarge, E.

    1982-07-01

    The tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep geologic site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. This report characterizes tuff retrieved in core from two drill holes, USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, at the Yucca Mountain block. The USW-G2 drill core is from the northernmost extent of the block, whereas UE25b-1H is adjacent to an earlier drill hole, UE25a-1. The drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H bottomed at 6000 and 4200 ft, respectively. Petrographic and x-ray diffraction studies of the two drill cores are presented in this report and indicate that tuffs (composed primarily of variably welded ash flows) are partially recrystallized to secondary minerals. Correlations of stratigraphy are also made with previous drill cores from Yucca Mountain.

  3. Influence of Full Veneer Restoration on Fracture Resistance of Three Different Core Materials: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, P.S; Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Deb, Saikat; Chidambaram, S.; Konchada, Jagadish; Venugopal, Nirupa; Vadivel, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives One of the factor which affects the strength of the tooth restored with core material is the property of the material. In clinical situation all such restored teeth are protected by crowns. This study evaluated the strength of different core materials on a compromised tooth structure after restoration with a crown. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted intact human premolars were collected and mounted within a mould using auto-polymerizing resin. The teeth were divided in-to four groups - A, B, C and D. Each group contained 20 teeth except group A with 10 teeth. All the teeth were prepared for full veneer cast crown. Except for the teeth in group: A) extensive class-I cavities were prepared in the teeth of all the groups and restored with; B) composite resin, 3M EPSE Filtek P60; C) Silver reinforced glass ionomer, SHOFU Hi Dense XP and; (D) Resin reinforced glass ionomer, GC Gold Label light cure GIC. All the teeth were restored with cast-metal alloy and exposed to 1.2 million cycles of cyclic loading in a chewing simulator. Subsequently, the teeth that survived were loaded till fracture in the universal testing machine. Fracture loads and type of fractures were recorded. Results All the specimens survived cyclic loading. The mean fracture strength of the silver reinforced glass ionomer was greater with and without crown (p<0.001). Statistical analysis for the mean fracture load of each specimen showed significant difference between the groups. Conclusion Under the condition of this study, core materials when restored with artificial crown had a significant increase in fracture resistance. PMID:26501004

  4. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study.

  5. Core-shell monodisperse spherical mSiO2/Gd2O3:Eu3+@mSiO2 particles as potential multifunctional theranostic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eurov, Daniil A.; Kurdyukov, Dmitry A.; Kirilenko, Demid A.; Kukushkina, Julia A.; Nashchekin, Alexei V.; Smirnov, Alexander N.; Golubev, Valery G.

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles with diameters in the range 100-500 nm have been synthesized as monodisperse spherical mesoporous (pore diameter 3 nm) silica particles with size deviation of less than 4 %, filled with gadolinium and europium oxides and coated with a mesoporous silica shell. It is shown that the melt technique developed for filling with gadolinium and europium oxides provides a nearly maximum filling of mesopores in a single-run impregnation, with gadolinium and europium uniformly distributed within the particles and forming no bulk oxides on their surface. The coating with a shell does not impair the monodispersity and causes no coagulation. The coating technique enables controlled variation of the shell thickness within the range 5-100 % relative to the core diameter. The thus produced nanoparticles are easily dispersed in water, have large specific surface area (300 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.3 cm3 g-1), and are bright solid phosphor with superior stability in aqueous media. The core-shell structured particles can be potentially used for cancer treatment as a therapeutic agent (gadolinium neutron-capture therapy and drug delivery system) and, simultaneously, as a multimodal diagnostic tool (fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging), thereby serving as a multifunctional theranostic agent.

  6. Identifying core foods for total diet studies: a comparison of four different approaches.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Niamh F C; McNulty, Breige A; Turrini, Aida; Tlustos, Christina; Hearty, Aine P; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Kelleher, Cecily C; Nugent, Anne P

    2014-01-01

    Total diet studies (TDS) are recognised as a cost-effective approach in estimating dietary exposure to chemicals in food. It has been advised that candidate foods for inclusion in TDS analysis should represent a large part of the typical diet to estimate accurately the exposure of a population group. To date a variety of approaches have been used to determine which foods should be included in a core TDS food list, with no agreed method. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare four of these approaches by creating TDS food lists for adult populations in Europe using summary statistics data from the EFSA Comprehensive Food Consumption Database. Both a food group approach and a total diet approach were employed, and foods were selected for inclusion in the TDS food lists if they met the criteria as defined by consumption weight and/or a 5% consumer rate. Using all four approaches the representation of the diet across the TDS food lists was > 85%. The food group approach showed a slight advantage in diet representation, but produced considerably longer TDS food lists in comparison with the total diet approach. The addition of a 5% consumer rate to both approaches had little impact on results. In conclusion, the total diet approach may act as a more cost-effective approach in comparison with the food group approach while still achieving comprehensive results in the creation of core TDS food lists.

  7. [Vitro study on gene transfection efficiency of hyaluronic acid modified core-shell liponanoparticles in human retinal pigment epithelium cells].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Gan, Li; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xi; Jia, Zheng; Gan, Yong; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) modified core-shell liponanoparticles (pHA-LCS-NPs) as gene delivery system and investigate its gene transfection efficiency in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells in vitro. The pHA-LCS-NPs was prepared by firstly hydrating dry lipid film with CS-NPs suspension to get LCS-NPs, then modifying the lipid bilayer with HA by amidation reaction between HA and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Its morphology, particle size and zeta potential were investigated. XTT assay was used to evaluate the cell safety of different vectors in vitro. The gene transfection efficiency of pHA-LCS-NPs modified with different contents of HA was investigated in ARPE-19 cells with green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) as the reporter gene. The results showed that the obtained pHA-LCS-NPs exhibited a clear core-shell structure with the average particles size of (214.9 +/- 7.2) nm and zeta potential of (-35 +/- 3.7) mV. The 24 h cumulative release of gene from pHA-LCS-NPs was less than 30%. After 48 h incubation, gene transfection efficiency of pHA-LCS-NPs/pEGFP was 1.81 times and 3.75 times higher than that of CS-NPs/pEGFP and naked pEGFP, respectively. Also no obvious cytotoxicity was observed on pHA-LCS-NPs. It suggested that the pHA-LCS-NPs might be promising non-viral gene delivery systems with high efficiency and low cytotoxicity.

  8. X-ray studies of Remnants of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) play an essential role in the Universe, and they are detected routinely through dedicated surveys. However, most of these SNe are often too distant (1-100 Mpc) to resolve the SN ejecta and immediate surroundings of the exploded stars. Fortunately, supernova remnants (SNRs), including SN 1987A, offer the means to study explosions and dynamics at sub-pc scales. SNRs are observable for up to 100,000 years after the explosions across the electromagnetic spectrum, and almost 400 SNRs have now been identified in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. In this talk, I will review recent advances in the understanding of core-collapse (CC) SNe based on studies of X-ray studies of SNRs. In particular, I will focus on SN 1987A and other young CC SNRs, highlighting investigations of their explosion (a)symmetries, heavy metal (like iron and titanium) abundances, progenitors, and particle acceleration.

  9. Seismic study of high-temperature engineering test reactor core graphite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Iyoku, T.; Inagaki, Y.; Shiozawa, S. . Oarai Research Establishment); Nishiguchi, I. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper discusses the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) a 30-MW (thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on core support structures. Safety analyses have been made for the seismic design of the HTTR core using a two-dimensional seismic analysis code called SONATINA-2V, which was developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. To evaluate the validity of the SONATINA-2V code and confirm the structural integrity of the core graphite blocks, large-scale seismic tests are conducted using a half-scale vertical section model and a full-scale seven-column model of the core graphite blocks and the core support structures. The test results are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the validity of the analysis code is confirmed. The structural integrity of the core graphite blocks is confirmed by both analytical and test results.

  10. A STUDY OF A FAILED CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORE ASSOCIATED WITH AN ASYMMETRIC FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Uddin, Wahab; Kayshap, Pradeep; Filippov, Boris; Chandra, Ramesh E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2013-07-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of an asymmetric filament eruption and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal downflows on 2012 June 17 and 18 from 20:00-05:00 UT. We use SDO/AIA and STEREO-B/SECCHI observations to understand the filament eruption scenario and its kinematics, while LASCO C2 observations are analyzed to study the kinematics of the CME and associated downflows. SDO/AIA limb observations show that the filament exhibits a whipping-like asymmetric eruption. STEREO/EUVI disk observations reveal a two-ribbon flare underneath the southeastern part of the filament that most probably occurred due to reconnection processes in the coronal magnetic field in the wake of the filament eruption. The whipping-like filament eruption later produces a slow CME in which the leading edge and the core propagate, with an average speed of Almost-Equal-To 540 km s{sup -1} and Almost-Equal-To 126 km s{sup -1}, respectively, as observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph. The CME core formed by the eruptive flux rope shows outer coronal downflows with an average speed of Almost-Equal-To 56 km s{sup -1} after reaching Almost-Equal-To 4.33 R{sub Sun }. Initially, the core decelerates at Almost-Equal-To 48 m s{sup -2}. The plasma first decelerates gradually up to a height of Almost-Equal-To 4.33 R{sub Sun} and then starts accelerating downward. We suggest a self-consistent model of a magnetic flux rope representing the magnetic structure of the CME core formed by an eruptive filament. This rope loses its previous stable equilibrium when it reaches a critical height. With some reasonable parameters, and inherent physical conditions, the model describes the non-radial ascending motion of the flux rope in the corona, its stopping at some height, and thereafter its downward motion. These results are in good agreement with observations.

  11. Ab initio based empirical potential used to study the mechanical properties of molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyoungki; Fellinger, Michael R.; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Tipton, William W.; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Rudin, Sven P.; Woodward, Christopher; Wilkins, John W.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Density-functional theory energies, forces, and elastic constants determine the parametrization of an empirical, modified embedded-atom method potential for molybdenum. The accuracy and transferability of the potential are verified by comparison to experimental and density-functional data for point defects, phonons, thermal expansion, surface and stacking fault energies, and ideal shear strength. Searching the energy landscape predicted by the potential using a genetic algorithm verifies that it reproduces not only the correct bcc ground state of molybdenum but also all low-energy metastable phases. The potential is also applicable to the study of plastic deformation and used to compute energies, core structures, and Peierls stresses of screw and edge dislocations.

  12. The core musculature in male prepubescent tennis players and untrained counterparts: a volumetric MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Álamo-Arce, David; Calbet, José A L; Dorado, Cecilia

    2017-04-01

    The effects of exercise on the core musculature have not been investigated in prepubescents. The main purpose of the present study was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of rectus abdominis, obliques and transversus abdominis, quadratus lumborum, iliopsoas, gluteus and paravertebralis muscles in prepubescent tennis players and in untrained boys. The muscle volume was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 7 male prepubescent tennis players and 10 untrained controls (mean age 11.0 ± 0.8 years, Tanner 1-2). After accounting for height and body weight as covariates, the tennis players had 14-34% greater volume than the controls in all the muscles analysed (P < 0.05) except in paravertebralis, dominant quadratus lumborum and non-dominant gluteus, which had similar volumes in both groups (P = NS). Compared to controls, the tennis players displayed a greater degree of asymmetry in quadratus lumborum and rectus abdominis (3% vs. 15%, P < 0.01 and 8% vs. 17%, P = 0.06, respectively). The level of asymmetry of obliques and transversus abdominis, iliopsoas, gluteus and paravertebralis muscles was similar in both groups (P = NS). In conclusion, tennis playing at prepubertal ages induces a selective hypertrophy of the core musculature and exaggerates the degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum and rectus abdominis compared to untrained boys.

  13. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance.

  14. Potassium as a Radioactive Heat Source in the Core? A High Pressure Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corgne, A.; Keshav, S.; Fei, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The presence of potassium (K) in the core as a significant heat source was suggested over three decades ago. Experimental studies on K partitioning between metal and silicate have provided ambiguous results, because of experimental and analytical artefacts. It has been recognized that polishing of a run product for chemical analysis using water or oil lubricants results in substantial K loss from the metallic phase [Murthy et al., 2003, Nature 423]. Using a dry polishing technique, Murthy et al showed that K enters sulfide-rich metallic liquids with a strong dependence on temperature and silicate melt composition, but without a significant dependence on pressure over the range of their study (1-3 GPa). Extrapolating their data to conditions of pressure, temperature and melt structure, appropriate to core segregation, Murthy et al concluded that K is a substantial radioactive heat source in planetary cores. Their extrapolation technique is debatable, however, notably concerning the effects of composition and pressure on the partitioning. The aim of our study is therefore to reexamine the factors that can affect K partitioning between metallic liquid and silicate melt. We have performed multi-anvil experiments on a relatively wide pressure range, between 3 and 8 GPa, using graphite capsule. In contrast to Murthy et al who used compositions with high S and K contents, we used a CI-chondrite model composition (containing about 4000 ppm K) as starting material in order to obtain partitioning data directly applicable to planetary differentiation processes. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe. Time-series experiments at 8 GPa reveal that equilibrium conditions are reached rapidly, within 10 s. The effect of temperature was investigated at 8 GPa on the 2000-2200 C temperature range. Results shows that over this temperature range, partition coefficients for K (DK) remain almost identical. The influence of pressure was investigated at 2000 C (3-8 GPa range

  15. A comparative study on liquid core formulation on the diameter on the alginate capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hui-Yen; Lee, Boon-Beng; Radzi, AkmalHadi Ma'; Zakaria, Zarina; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2015-08-01

    Liquid core capsule has vast application in biotechnology related industries such as pharmaceutical, medical, agriculture and food. Formulation of different types of capsule was important to determine the performance of the capsule. Generally, the liquid core capsule with different formulations generated different size of capsule.Therefore, the aim of this project is to investigate the effect of different liquid core solution formulations on the diameter of capsule. The capsule produced by extruding liquid core solutions into sodium alginate solution. Three types of liquid core solutions (chitosan, xanthan gum, polyethylene glycol (PEG)) were investigated. The results showed that there is significant change in capsule diameter despite in different types of liquid core solution were used and a series of capsule range in diameter of 3.1 mm to 4.5 mm were produced. Alginate capsule with chitosan formulation appeared to be the largest capsule among all.

  16. Theoretical study of liquid-immersed exposed-core microstructured optical fibers for sensing.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, S C; Afshar, S; Monro, T M

    2008-06-09

    The absorption and fluorescence sensing properties of liquid-immersed exposed-core microstructured optical fibers are explored for the regime where these structures act as supported nanowires with direct access to the sensing environment. For absorption-based sensing we demonstrate that the amount of power propagating in the sensing region of the exposed-core fiber can compete with that of traditional MOFs. For fluorescence-based sensing, we see that in addition to the enhanced fluorescence capture efficiency already predicted for small-core, high refractive index contrast fibers, an improvement of up to 29% can be gained by using liquid-immersed exposed-core fibers. Additionally, calculation of the losses associated with interfaces between filled and unfilled sections predict significant benefit in using high refractive index substrate glasses for liquid-immersed exposed-core fiber sensing. This work demonstrates that, for fiber dimensions of interest, the exposed-core fiber is an attractive new sensor technology.

  17. International perspective on common core competencies for occupational physicians: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Lalloo, Drushca; Demou, Evangelia; Kiran, Sibel; Cloeren, Marianne; Mendes, René; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The competencies required of occupational physicians (OPs) have been the subject of peer-reviewed research in Europe and individual countries around the world. In the European Union (EU), there has been development of guidance on training and common competencies, but little research has extended beyond this. The aim of this study was to obtain consensus on and identify the common core competencies required of OPs around the world. Methods A modified Delphi study was carried out among representative organisations and networks of OPs in a range of countries around the world. It was conducted in 2 rounds using a questionnaire based on the specialist training syllabus of a number of countries, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Responses were received from 51 countries around the world, with the majority from Europe (60%; 59%) and North and South America (24%; 32%) in rounds 1 and 2, respectively. General principles of assessment and management of occupational hazards to health and good clinical care were jointly considered most important in ranking when compared with the other topic areas. Assessment of disability and fitness for work, communication skills and legal and ethical issues completed the top five. In both rounds, research methods and teaching and educational supervision were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established the current priorities among OPs across 51 countries of the common competencies required for occupational health (OH) practice. These findings can serve as a platform for the development of common core competencies/qualifications within specific geographical regions or internationally. This is particularly pertinent with globalisation of commerce and free movement within the EU. PMID:27076063

  18. Structural studies on the lipopolysaccharide core of Proteus OX strains used in Weil-Felix test: a mass spectrometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Lindner, Buko; Knirel, Yuriy A; Amano, Ken-ichi

    2003-11-14

    The core region of the lipopolysaccharides of Proteus group OX bacteria, which are used as antigens in Weil-Felix test for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis, were studied by chemical degradations in combination with ESI FTMS, including infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) MS/MS and capillary skimmer dissociation. Structural variants of the inner core region were found to be the same as in Proteus non-OX strains that have been studied earlier. The outer core region has essentially the same structure in Proteus vulgaris OX19 (serogroup O1) and OX2 (serogroup O2) and a different structure in Proteus mirabilis OXK (serogroup O3). A fragmentation due to the rupture of the linkage between GlcN or GalN and GalA was observed in IRMPD-MS/MS of core oligosaccharides and found to be useful for screening of Proteus strains to assign structures of the relatively conserved inner core region and to select for further studies strains with distinct structures of a more variable outer core region.

  19. Six weeks of core stability training improves landing kinetics among female capoeira athletes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-03-29

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  20. Six Weeks of Core Stability Training Improves Landing Kinetics Among Female Capoeira Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  1. Studies of lunar regolith dynamics using measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides in lunar rocks, soils and cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, J. S.; Reeves, J. H.; Evans, J. C.; Perkins, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with two types of measurements. The first deals with the use of Al-26 to define regolith gardening processes which have occurred in the upper portion of the lunar cores that were collected both by the deep drilling and drive tube operations. The second portion of the study involves the use of Mn-53 and Al-26 concentrations to determine the surface exposure histories of individual rocks over the past ten million years. It is found that during the past two million years, 15011 has had a history of simple gardening with an accumulation rate of 2 cm/m.y. The Apollo 15 Station 2 boulder appears to have been in place for about five million years. The 'shadowed' soil (75237) shows a shielding effect of about 40%. The Apollo 16 Station 9 boulder appears to have been in place for about four million years and thus is apparently not related to the South Ray Crater event.

  2. Density functional theory studies of core-shell semiconductor nanoparticle quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brent; Hendy, Shaun; Tilley, Richard

    2008-03-01

    In going from the macroscale to the nanoscale, quantum-mechanical effects become increasingly important and may mean that nanostructures of a material exhibit very different properties from the corresponding bulk. This is especially noticeable in the case of the optical properties of semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots), which display a number of remarkable features (including very distinct peaks, and tunability across a broad range of wavelengths), due to quantum confinement. Our work involves modeling Si-Ge core-shell nanoparticles using large-scale computer simulations based on the density functional and time-dependent density functional theories. These simulations in particular provide us with predictions of the geometric structures and optical absorption spectra of nanoparticles in an accurate and computationally efficient way, and allow us to study the systematic trends in these properties as the composition and size of the nanoparticle change.

  3. A kinetic theory based numerical study of core collapse supernova dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strother, Terrance T.

    The explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae remains an unsolved problem in astrophysics after many decades of theoretical and numerical study. The complex nature of this problem forces its consideration to rely heavily upon numerical simulations. Current state-of-the-art core collapse supernova simulations typically make use of hydrodynamic codes for the modeling of baryon dynamics coupled to a Boltzmann transport simulation for the neutrinos and other leptons. The results generated by such numerical simulations have given rise to the widely accepted notion that neutrino heating and convection are crucial for the explosion mechanism. However the precise roles that some factors such as neutrinos production and propagation, rotation, three-dimensional effects, the equation of state for asymmetric nuclear matter, general relativity, instabilities, magnetic fields, as well as others play in the explosion mechanism remain to be fully determined. In this work, we review sonic of the current methods used to simulate core collapse supernovae and the various scenarios that have been developed by numerical studies are discussed. Unlike most of the numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae, we employ a kinetic theory based approach that allows us to explicitly model the propagation of neutrinos and a full ensemble of nuclei. Both of these are significant advantages. The ability to explicitly model the propagation of neutrinos puts their treatment on equal footing with the modeling of baryon dynamics. No simplifying assumptions about the nature of neutrino-matter interactions need to be made and consequently our code is capable of producing output about the flow of neutrinos that most other simulations are inherently incapable of. Furthermore, neutrino flavor oscillations are readily incorporated with our approach. The ability to model the propagation of a full ensemble of nuclei is superior to the standard tracking of free baryons, alpha particles, and a

  4. Defect-tuning exchange bias of ferromagnet/antiferromagnet core/shell nanoparticles by numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhongquan; Zhan, Xiaozhi; Chen, Xi

    2012-07-11

    The influence of non-magnetic defects on the exchange bias (EB) of ferromagnet (FM)/antiferromagnet (AFM) core/shell nanoparticles is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the EB can be tuned by defects in different positions. Defects at both the AFM and FM interfaces reduce the EB field while they enhance the coercive field by decreasing the effective interface coupling. However, the EB field and the coercive field show respectively a non-monotonic and a monotonic dependence on the defect concentration when the defects are located inside the AFM shell, indicating a similar microscopic mechanism to that proposed in the domain state model. These results suggest a way to optimize the EB effect for applications.

  5. [Study on the skin-core evolvement of carbon fibers as a function of heat treatment temperature by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-jie; Fan, Li-dong; Wang, Hao-jing; Zhu, Zhen-ping

    2008-08-01

    The skin-core evolvement of the carbon fibers was studied as a function of heat-treatment temperature though the analysis of Raman spectroscopy of the carbon fibers surface and core. It was found that the change of the Raman spectra of the carbon fibers core was similar to that on the surface with the increase in heat-treatment temperature. At 1600 degrees C, the Rs and Rc values were almost equal, indicating that the degrees of the graphitization of the carbon fibers surface and core were almost uniform. The Rs and Rc values decreased dramatically with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, and Rs decreased more. At 2800 degrees C, the Rs value came to 0.429, lowered 77.2%, while the Rc value then came to 1.101, lowered 38.7% only. It implied that the graphitization degree of the carbon fibers was enhanced with increasing the heat treatment temperature, and that of carbon fibers surface was enhanced more. The graphite characters of the carbon of the carbon fibers surface were different from that of the carbon fibers core. The former is close to soft carbon, which is easy to graphitize, while the latter is close to hard carbon, which is difficult to graphitize, and it may be resin carbon Skin-core structure gene Rsc (= Rs/Rc) which denoted the skin-core degree of the carbon fibers was first brought forward and adopted. The Rsc value is between 0 and 1. When the Rsc value is equal to 1, the carbon fibers are homogenous. When the Rsc value is close to zero, there are serious skin-core structures in the carbon fibers. The Rsc value reduced linearly with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, indicating that the homogeneous degrees of the carbon fibers decreased and the skin-core degrees of the carbon fibers increased. The crystallite size of the carbon fibers surface and core increased gradually with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, but the surface's increased more quickly, indicating that the carbon of the carbon fibers surface was easier to

  6. Feasibility of Applying the Extended ICF Core Set for Stroke to Clinical Settings in Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential feasibility of application of the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for stroke. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 40 stroke outpatients (>6 months after onset) admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for comprehensive rehabilitation. Clinical information of the patients were respectively evaluated to link to the 166 second-level categories of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke. Results Clinical information could be linked to 111 different ICF categories, 58 categories of the body functions component, eight categories of the body structures component, 38 categories of the activities and participation component, and seven categories of the environmental factors component. Conclusion The body functions component might be feasible for application of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke to clinical settings. The activities and participation component and environmental factors component may not be directly applied to clinical settings without additional evaluation tools including interview and questionnaire. PMID:25750873

  7. Using Animations to Study the Formation of Gas Giant Planets via the Core Accretion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Lissauer, J. J.; Bodemheimer, P.; D'Angelo, G.

    2009-12-01

    With the ever increasing number of extrasolar planets being discovered (373 as of 8/13/09 quoted by The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia: exoplanet.eu) and the recognition of their diverse nature it is very important to understand the formation processes of the gas giant planets. The core accretion model has successfully explained many features of the formation of gas giant planets in the Solar System (Pollack et al. 1996, Hubickyj et al. 2005) and it has provided an explanation of the characteristics of exoplanets. One example is the observed frequency of planets around stars with a high metal content (e.g. Kornet et al. 2005, Valenti and Fischer 2008). Improvements to the input physics to our computer model have resulted in the very important result that gas giant planets (i.e. Jupiter) can form via the core accretion model on a timescale that agrees with observations of protoplanetary disks (Hillenbrand 2008). These observations set the formation time to about 3 to 5 million years. We will present our recent results (Hubickyj et al. 2005,Lissauer et al. 2009) in the form of animations. Our models generate a substantial amount of data. Having published plots of the important values of our study: mass and radius growth, luminosity, and accretion rates as a function of time, we are now ready to study the second tier of information from our recorded data. We examine the energy profiles within the envelope as it evolves, the location and changes of the convective layers, and the location of the mass deposited by the planetesimals in the envelope as the protoplanet evolves. We find that by animating the data we can study the internal processes in the growing envelope of the protoplanet. The qualitative nature of the processes in the protoplanetary envelope is easily discerned in these animations and a deeper insight to the core accretion processes in the gas giant planets is gained. Hillenbrand, L. A. 2008. Disk-dispersal and planet-formation timescales. Physica

  8. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  9. Burn Survivors' Experience of Core Outcomes during Return to Life: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Lotfi, Mojgan; Salehi, Feridoon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Burn is one of the main and common health problems that face the victims with significant challenges in their lives. The main purpose of caring and rehabilitating these people is returning them to their previous life situation. Thus, the present study was conducted with the purpose of determining the experience of burn survivors with regard to returning to life in order to be able to obtain new concepts of acceptable implications in the present cultural and religious context. Methods: The present study is a qualitative study that was conducted using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 15 burn survivors in 2012 and 2013 in Tabriz. Results: During the process of qualitative analysis, the content of the category "balance", as the core essence of the experience of participants, was extracted according to three sub-categories: a- the physical integration (physiological stability, saving the affected limb), b-connecting to the life stream (self-care, getting accustomed, normalization), and c- return to the existence (sense of inner satisfaction and excellence). Conclusion: The results of this study confirmed the physical, psychological and social scales introduced by other studies. Also proposed the concept "return to the existence", that can be measured by the emergence of a sense of inner satisfaction and excellence in the individual, as one of the key and determinant scales in returning the victims of burn to life. PMID:25717453

  10. Loss of α1,6-Fucosyltransferase Decreases Hippocampal Long Term Potentiation: IMPLICATIONS FOR CORE FUCOSYLATION IN THE REGULATION OF AMPA RECEPTOR HETEROMERIZATION AND CELLULAR SIGNALING.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Isaji, Tomoya; Hang, Qinglei; Lee, Ho-hsun; Sakai, Seiichiro; Morise, Jyoji; Mitoma, Junya; Higashi, Hideyoshi; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Yawo, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo; Gu, Jianguo

    2015-07-10

    Core fucosylation is catalyzed by α1,6-fucosyltransferase (FUT8), which transfers a fucose residue to the innermost GlcNAc residue via α1,6-linkage on N-glycans in mammals. We previously reported that Fut8-knock-out (Fut8(-/-)) mice showed a schizophrenia-like phenotype and a decrease in working memory. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we analyzed early form long term potentiation (E-LTP), which is closely related to learning and memory in the hippocampus. The scale of E-LTP induced by high frequency stimulation was significantly decreased in Fut8(-/-) mice. Tetraethylammonium-induced LTP showed no significant differences, suggesting that the decline in E-LTP was caused by postsynaptic events. Unexpectedly, the phosphorylation levels of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an important mediator of learning and memory in postsynapses, were greatly increased in Fut8(-/-) mice. The expression levels of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPARs) in the postsynaptic density were enhanced in Fut8(-/-) mice, although there were no significant differences in the total expression levels, implicating that AMPARs without core fucosylation might exist in an active state. The activation of AMPARs was further confirmed by Fura-2 calcium imaging using primary cultured neurons. Taken together, loss of core fucosylation on AMPARs enhanced their heteromerization, which increase sensitivity for postsynaptic depolarization and persistently activate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors as well as Ca(2+) influx and CaMKII and then impair LTP.

  11. Study on micro-bend light transmission performance of novel liquid-core optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junyan; Zhao, Zhimin; Wang, Kaisheng; Guo, Linfeng

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing development of material technology and electronic integration technology, optical fiber and its using in smart structure have become hot in the field of material research. And liquid-core optical fiber is a special kind of optical fiber, which is made using liquid material as core and polymer material as optical layer and protective covering, and it has the characteristics of large core diameter, high numerical aperture, large-scope and efficient spectrum transmission and long life for using. So the liquid-core optical fiber is very suitable for spectrum cure, ultraviolet solidification, fluorescence detection, criminal investigation and evidence obtainment, etc, and especially as light transfer element in some new structures for the measurement of some signals, such as concentration, voltage, temperature, light intensity and so on. In this paper, the novel liquid-core optical fiber is self-made, and then through the test of its light transmission performance in free state, the relation between axial micro-bend and light-intensity loss are presented. When the liquid-core optical fiber is micro-bent axially, along with the axial displacement's increase, output power of light is reducing increasingly, and approximately has linear relation to micro-displacement in a range. According to the results liquid-core fiber-optic micro-bend sensor can be designed to measure micro-displacement of the tested objects. Experimental data and analysis provide experimental basis for further application of liquid-core optical fiber.

  12. N10 potential as an antidromic motor evoked potential in a median nerve short-latency somatosensory evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken; Mimori, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Shigenobu

    2002-01-01

    When stimulating the mixed nerve to record evoked potential, both sensory and motor fibers are activated before entering the spinal cord. The N10 potential has been described as an antidromic motor evoked potential based on results obtained by recording at the anterior midneck. In the present study, we examined the changes in latencies of Erb's potential, N10, and N13 by stimulating the median nerve distally at the wrist and proximally at the elbow. The conduction velocity of N10 calculated by the difference between N10 latencies at the two stimulation points was consistent with motor conduction velocity, although N13 conduction velocity estimated by the same method reflected a sensory conduction velocity. A positive relation was also observed between the indirect latency from the stimulation point to the anterior root as calculated using the equation (F - M - 1) / 2 (ms) and the direct latency to the negative peak of the N10 potential. Our data support the notion that N10 represents antidromic motor potential originating in the spinal entry zone of the anterior root.

  13. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yunfeng; Gao, Bin; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  14. Distribution of heavy metals in sediment cores of Lake Pamvotis (Greece): a pollution and potential risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, K; Stamoulis, K; Papachristodoulou, C; Tziamou, E; Markantonaki, C; Tsodoulos, I

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations and vertical distributions of metals in surface sediments of Lake Pamvotis (NW Greece) were assessed using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. A wide range of values was determined, associated with the specific types of contaminating effluents draining into different parts of the lake. Overall, Cr levels ranged from 43 to 3295 mg kg(-1), Ni from 13 to 372 mg kg(-1), Cu from 15 to 24,985 mg kg(-1), Zn from 129 to 22,983 mg kg(-1), Zr from 64 to 4063 mg kg(-1) and Pb from 19 to 2634 mg kg(-1). Principal component analysis revealed distinct elemental fingerprints in each sampling location, while correlation analysis and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provided insight to metal association and pollution sources. Enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices were calculated to quantify sediment contamination, and potential ecotoxic effects were evaluated based on sediment quality guidelines. Moderate to very severe enrichment in Zn, Cu and Pb was evidenced in sediments near the lake's outflow. The proximity of these sampling points to a heavy traffic national road suggests that roadway runoff is the dominant source of elevated metal levels. Contribution from municipal sewage water discharges from the nearby communities should also be accounted for. Moderate to very severe Zn and Pb enrichment was determined in the vicinity on the main lake's inflow, primarily associated with runoff and leaching from agricultural land. Very severe to extremely severe Cr enrichment was detected in the same location, most likely associated with wastewater discharged into the lake over several decades, by nearby-operating leather tanneries. The above two locations were ranked at the highest priority level in terms of potential ecological risk.

  15. Photoluminescence study of high density Si quantum dots with Ge core

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K. Makihara, K.; Ikeda, M.; Miyazaki, S.

    2016-01-21

    Si quantum dots (Si-QDs) with Ge core were self-assembled on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} from alternate thermal decomposition of pure SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} diluted with He. When the sample was excited by the 979 nm line of a semiconductor laser, fairly broad photoluminescence (PL) spectra in the region of 0.6–0.8 eV were observed at room temperature. The observed PL spectra suggested that radiative recombination of photo-generated carriers through quantized states of Ge core is the dominant pathway for the emission from the dots, reflecting the type II energy band discontinuity between the Si clad and Ge core. We also found that P-δ doping to Ge core plays an important role in recombination through the quantized states in the valence band of Ge core and P donor levels.

  16. Theoretical study of geometry relaxation following core excitation: H2O, NH3, and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kunitake, Naoto; Takaki, Saya

    2015-10-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole excited state molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for neutral and cationic H2O, NH3, and CH4 have been performed to examine geometry relaxation after core excitation. We observed faster X-H (X = C, N, O) bond elongation for the core-ionized state produced from the valence cationic molecule and the double-core-ionized state produced from the ground and valence cationic molecules than for the first resonant SCH state. Using the results of SCH MD simulations of the ground and valence cationic molecules, Auger decay spectra calculations were performed. We found that fast bond scission leads to peak broadening of the spectra.

  17. Getting to the Core: Using Digital Resources to Enhance Content-Based Literacy in the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Ilene R.; Berson, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, teachers across the United States are expanding their integrated approach to social studies instruction and literacy studies. They are challenged to infuse text and narratives linked to…

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  19. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  2. Mineral Physics and SEM Study of KTB Rock Indicates Carbon Present in Cores Was Deposited During Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duba, Al; Karner, Stephen; Kronenberg, Andreas; Mathez, Edmond; Nover, Georg; Roberts, Jeffery; Shankland, Thomas; Winter, Helmuth

    2013-04-01

    The Kontinentales Tiefbohrprogramm (KTB) Project in Windischeschenbach, Germany, began drilling in September 1987 reaching an approximate depth of 9.1 km in October, 1994 in the Variscides: rocks that resulted from continent-continent collision about 400-300Ma. The region was later reworked by further collision, rifting, and graben formation, with associated magmatism and hydrothermal alteration, which produced a very heterogeneous, steeply dipping crust. The entire Vorbohrung was cored, and the Hauptbohrung was cored at 35 selected depth intervals. Core was thoroughly documented and characterized in the field, and quickly distributed to various teams of scientists for studies. Electrical conductivity measurements of the core from various depths showed that conductivity increased with pressure, unlike other rocks whose conductivity decreases with pressure as conductive pore fluids are expelled as porosity decreases. Originally, we attributed the increased conductivity to closure of cracks in the core that had opened upon exhumation from depth, allowing reconnection of the conductive ilmenite, which made up about 8 percent, and sometimes more, of the cores. However, extensive modeling subsequently showed that there had to be some other good conductor present as well. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy indicated that carbon was decorating the cleavage of amphiboles in the rocks and that this carbon was a strong contributor to the conductivity increase. We then fractured standard rock cores with no carbon in them in two different high-pressure rigs at temperatures of ~400 C—one series unjacketed in CO2-CO atmospheres of ~200 MPa and the other jacketed at hydrostatic pressures of ~290 MPa and piston-loaded to failure with CO2-CO pore pressure. Both series of experiments showed carbon deposition and increased conductivity of core remnants. We conclude that fracturing related to earthquakes likely produced carbon in KTB rocks. If deposition of carbon occurs

  3. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  4. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma’mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  5. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  6. Experimental terrestrial soil-core microcosm test protocol. A method for measuring the potential ecological effects, fate, and transport of chemicals in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Tolle, D.A.; Arthur, M.F.

    1985-06-01

    In order to protect the environment properly and have a realistic appraisal of how a chemical will act in the environment, tests of ecological effects and chemical fate must be performed on complex assemblages of biotic and abiotic components (i.e., microcosms) as well as single species. This protocol is one which could be added to a series of tests recently developed as guidelines for Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (P.L. 94-469; U.S.C., Section 2601-2629). The terrestrial soil-core microcosm is designed to supply site-specific and possibly regional information on the probable chemical fate and ecological effects resulting from release of a chemical substance to a terrestrial ecosystem. The EPA will use the data resulting from this test system to compare the potential hazards of a chemical with others that have been previously evaluated.

  7. Two-component relativistic density-functional calculations of the dimers of the halogens from bromine through element 117 using effective core potential and all-electron methods.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Alexander V; van Wüllen, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    A two-component quasirelativistic Hamiltonian based on spin-dependent effective core potentials is used to calculate ionization energies and electron affinities of the heavy halogen atom bromine through the superheavy element 117 (eka-astatine) as well as spectroscopic constants of the homonuclear dimers of these atoms. We describe a two-component Hartree-Fock and density-functional program that treats spin-orbit coupling self-consistently within the orbital optimization procedure. A comparison with results from high-order Douglas-Kroll calculations--for the superheavy systems also with zeroth-order regular approximation and four-component Dirac results--demonstrates the validity of the pseudopotential approximation. The density-functional (but not the Hartree-Fock) results show very satisfactory agreement with theoretical coupled cluster as well as experimental data where available, such that the theoretical results can serve as an estimate for the hitherto unknown properties of astatine, element 117, and their dimers.

  8. Stability of a Bifunctional Cu-Based Core@Zeolite Shell Catalyst for Dimethyl Ether Synthesis Under Redox Conditions Studied by Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy and In Situ X-Ray Ptychography.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Klumpp, Michael; Reinhardt, Juliane; Sheppard, Thomas; Balogh, Zoltan; Kasama, Takeshi; Benzi, Federico; Wagner, Jakob B; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2017-04-05

    When using bifunctional core@shell catalysts, the stability of both the shell and core-shell interface is crucial for catalytic applications. In the present study, we elucidate the stability of a CuO/ZnO/Al2O3@ZSM-5 core@shell material, used for one-stage synthesis of dimethyl ether from synthesis gas. The catalyst stability was studied in a hierarchical manner by complementary environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ hard X-ray ptychography with a specially designed in situ cell. Both reductive activation and reoxidation were applied. The core-shell interface was found to be stable during reducing and oxidizing treatment at 250°C as observed by ETEM and in situ X-ray ptychography, although strong changes occurred in the core on a 10 nm scale due to the reduction of copper oxide to metallic copper particles. At 350°C, in situ X-ray ptychography indicated the occurrence of structural changes also on the µm scale, i.e. the core material and parts of the shell undergo restructuring. Nevertheless, the crucial core-shell interface required for full bifunctionality appeared to remain stable. This study demonstrates the potential of these correlative in situ microscopy techniques for hierarchically designed catalysts.

  9. Study of optical nonlinearity of CdSe and CdSe@ZnO core-shell quantum dots in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepika; Dhar, Rakesh; Mohan, Devendra

    2015-12-01

    Thioglycolic acid capped cadmium selenide (CdSe) and CdSe@ZnO core-shell quantum dots have been synthesized in aqueous phase. The sample was characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometer, TEM and Z-scan technique. The nonlinear optical parameters viz. nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n2) and third-order nonlinear susceptibilities (χ3) of quantum dots have been estimated using second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. The study predicts that CdSe@ZnO quantum dots exhibits strong nonlinearity as compared to core CdSe quantum dots. The nonlinearity in quantum dots is attributed to the presence of resonant excitation and free optical processes. The presence of RSA in these nanoparticles makes them a potential material for the development of optical limiter.

  10. Paleomagnetic studies of Carboniferous and Permian in the U. K. Southern North Sea: Core orientation, paleocurrent analysis, and diagenetic application

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P. ); Hartley, A.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The U.K. southern North Sea is a major gas province with production from Carboniferous and Permian reservoirs. It was a foreland basin in Carboniferous times uplifted to form a Lower Permian desert basin and subsequently deeply buried during the Mesozoic. Paleomagnetic methods have been used for burial analysis, core orientation, and paleocurrent studies. VRM is shown to be of only limited value for core orientation; problems relating to drilling effects and deflection by ChRM will be discussed. Detailed thermal demagnetization studies are most valuable. Blocking temperature spectra can be related to burial history curves, and ChRM directions isolated and compared with Carboniferous and Permian reference directions. ChRM is a valuable parameter for core orientation and thus paleocurrent studies. Examples will be shown from the Carboniferous and Lower Permian.

  11. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  12. Exploring the 'aggregation-prone' core of human Cystatin C: A structural study.

    PubMed

    Tsiolaki, Paraskevi L; Louros, Nikolaos N; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A

    2015-09-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins like human Cystatin C (hCC) have been shown to form dimers and oligomers by exchange of subdomains of the monomeric proteins. Normally, the hCC monomer, a low molecular type 2 Cystatin, consists of 120 amino acid residues and functions as an inhibitor of cysteine proteases. The oligomerization of hCC is involved in the pathophysiology of a rare form of amyloidosis namely Icelandic hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which an L68Q mutant is deposited as amyloid in brain arteries of young adults. In order to find the shortest stretch responsible to drive the fibril formation of hCC, we have previously demonstrated that the LQVVR peptide forms amyloid fibrils, in vitro (Tsiolaki et al., 2015). Predictions by AMYLPRED, an amyloidogenic determinant prediction algorithm developed in our lab, led us to synthesize and experimentally study two additional predicted peptides derived from hCC. Along with our previous findings, in this work, we reveal that these peptides self-assemble, in a similar way, into amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, as electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy and Congo red staining studies have shown. Further to our experimental results, all three peptides seem to have a fundamental contribution in forming the "aggregation-prone" core of human Cystatin C.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical study of a new liquid crystal compound with an oxazepine core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, AbdulKarim-Talaq; Yeap, Guan-Yeow; Osman, Hasnah

    2015-05-01

    A novel synthesis of heterocyclic liquid crystal compounds containing a seven-membered 1,3-oxazepine with terminal alkyloxy chains has been carried out. The molecular structures of these compounds were substantiated by FT-IR NMR elemental analysis. The relationship between the structures and the mesomorphic behaviours of their derivatives were investigated. The results showed that the formation of mesophases is strongly dependent on the type of core moiety. All compounds with oxazepinediones and oxazepanediones are non-mesogenic and only exhibit Cr1sbnd Cr2 upon cooling and heating. However, the SmA and N phases were observed in the 5,6-benzo [1,3] oxazepine-4,7-diones series of compounds. The study also revealed that the length of the alkyl chain has a significant effect on the liquid crystalline properties; the nematic phase can only observed in long-chain derivatives of 5,6-benzo [1,3] oxazepine-4,7-diones. Theoretical studies are in agreement with our result.

  14. Resonant X-ray Scattering Studies of Smectic and Columnar Bent-Core Liquid Crystal Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindak, Ronald; Barois, Philippe; Ponsinet, Virginie; Folcia, Cesar; Ortega, Josu; Pan, Lidong; Wang, Shun; Wang, Suntao; Huang, Cheng-Cher

    2012-02-01

    Resonant X-ray scattering provides a direct probe of orientational structures in liquid crystals with periodicities that range from molecular dimensions (0.1 nm) to dimensions that can be observed with visible light (1.0 micron). We have recently applied this technique to study the orientational ordering of bent-core molecules in the smectic B2 phase and the columnar B1 phase. Using resonant scattering ``forbidden'' reflections due to glide or screw symmetry elements can be measured and an analysis of their polarization state enabled us to identify a chiral anticlinic antiferroelecrtic B2 phase (Smectic CAPA) coexisting with an achiral synclinic antiferroelectric B2 phase (Smectic CSPA) [1]. We were also able to determine the structure of a columnar B1 phase and study the transition mechanism between the B1 and B2 phases [2]. [4pt] [1] V. Ponsinet, et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 011706 (2011).[0pt] [2] C. Folcia, et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 010701R (2011).

  15. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Dosovitz Fox, Ori; Lau, Ryan M.; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert E.; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel A.; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert D.; Johansson, Joel; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Masci, Frank J.; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Thomas Allen; SPIRITS

    2017-01-01

    Late-time mid-infrared emission from core-collpase supernovae tells stories of circumstellar interaction and dust formation. We present a systematic study of mid-infrared emission from 141 nearby supernovae observed with Spitzer/IRAC as part of the ongoing SPIRITS survey. We detect 8 Type Ia and 36 core-collapse SNe. While all SNe-Ia fade away within 3 years post explosion, about 20% of SNe-II remain detectable. Five SNe-II are detected two decades after discovery (SN 1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J). From the two-band photometry, we can fit for IR luminosity and temperature, and the inferred dust mass assuming that all mid-IR emission comes from an optically thin shell of warm dust. We derive warm dust masses between 10-6 and 10-2 \\msol and dust color temperatures between 200 and 1280 K. This observed warm dust could be pre-existing or newly created. We note that either case represents a lower limit to the dust mass because cooler dust may be present. We present three case studies of extreme SNe. SN 2011ja (II-P) was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion with increasing hot dust mass, suggesting either an episode of dust formation or intensifying CSM interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi (II-P) showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month suggesting either dust destruction or reduced dust heating. The IR luminosity of SN 2014C (Ib) stays constant over 800 days, possibly due to strong CSM interaction with H rich shell, which is rare among stripped-envelope SNe. The observations suggest that this CSM shell originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years pre-explosion. The observed diversity demonstrates the power of mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe.

  16. Preliminary Results of a Multi-Proxy Lake Sediment Core Study in East-Central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misner, T.; Meyers, S.; Rosenmeier, M.; Strano, S.; Straffin, E.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a multi-proxy study of natural and human-induced changes in the Burgundian environment, as recorded in the sediment geochemistry of three small freshwater basins within the Arroux River Valley, east-central France. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates constrain the age of core material collected from the basins, and indicate that these mill and farm ponds were constructed by at least 1200 A.D. The pond sediments are predominantly massive, organic-rich muds that contain discrete sand and gravel lenses likely related to episodic flooding and/or basin drainage. In this study, continuous X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning is used to quantify bulk geochemical variability throughout the lake sediment cores, and to investigate specific elemental proxies for paleoenvironmental change (detrital flux, biogenic flux, and redox state). The high-resolution XRF data are supplemented by sediment magnetic susceptibility measurements, and organic matter concentration as determined by loss on ignition. These records demonstrate a general increase in detrital sediment input from 1200 to 1300 A.D., during a period of known regional agricultural expansion. We infer these changes to be the consequence of increased catchment soil erosion and material flux to the water bodies. The data also suggest changes in mill and farm pond primary productivity, also related to soil erosion and changing transport of soil nutrients to the basins. Near the onset of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1500 A.D.) pond productivity reductions are apparent, likely indicating colder climates. These mill and farm pond sedimentary archives, in conjunction with historic records, can be used to better understand past land management strategies. Furthermore, historically documented landscape changes can be examined within the context of prevailing climatic conditions over the last ~800 years in an effort to establish future best management practices and the most

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  19. First studies directed towards the diastereoselective synthesis of the BCD tricyclic core of brownin F.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Fabien; Parrain, Jean-Luc; Chouraqui, Gaëlle; Commeiras, Laurent

    2013-07-07

    The BCD tricyclic core of brownin F was prepared in eight synthetic operations for the first time. Our synthesis features a diastereo-, chemo- and regioselective intramolecular [3 + 2] cycloaddition between a cyclic carbonyl ylide and a γ-alkylidenebutenolide.

  20. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-04

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  1. A first-principles core-level XPS study on the boron impurities in germanium crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigated the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level shifts and formation energies of boron defects in germanium crystals and compared the results to those in silicon crystals. Both for XPS core-level shifts and formation energies, relationship between defects in Si and Ge is roughly linear. From the similarity in the formation energy, it is expected that the exotic clusters like icosahedral B12 exist in Ge as well as in Si.

  2. Lunar core detection using data from a single orbiting magnetometer - A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.; Hartdegen, K.

    1997-03-01

    An investigation is conducted of the detectability of a lunar core in the presence of a realistic magnetic field and plasma disturbances in the geomagnetic tail, at distances comparable to the lunar orbit radius of 60 Earth radii. The magnetometer and plasma data employed are from ISEE-3, for the period from October 1982 to April 1983. A single orbiting magnetometer is projected to render the core detectable if it is larger than 400 km in radius.

  3. Dislocation core properties of β-tin: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. A.; Azarnoush, M.; Adlakha, I.; Lu, G.; Solanki, K. N.

    2017-02-01

    Dislocation core properties of tin (β-Sn) were investigated using the semi-discrete variational Peierls–Nabarro (SVPN) model. The SVPN model, which connects the continuum elasticity treatment of the long-range strain field around a dislocation with an approximate treatment of the dislocation core, was employed to calculate various core properties, including the core energetics, widths, and Peierls stresses for different dislocation structures. The role of core energetics and properties on dislocation character and subsequent slip behavior in β-Sn was investigated. For instance, this work shows that a widely spread dislocation core on the {110} plane as compared to dislocations on the {100} and {101} planes. Physically, the narrowing or widening of the core will significantly affect the mobility of dislocations as the Peierls stress is exponentially related to the dislocation core width in β-Sn. In general, the Peierls stress for the screw dislocation was found to be orders of magnitude higher than the edge dislocation, i.e., the more the edge component of a mixed dislocation, the greater the dislocation mobility (lower the Peierls stress). The largest Peierls stress observed was 365 MPa for the dislocation on the {101} plane. Furthermore, from the density plot, we see a double peak for the 0° (screw) and 30° dislocations which suggests the dissociation of dislocations along these planes. Thus, for the {101} < \\bar{1}01> slip system, we observed dislocation dissociation into three partials with metastable states. Overall, this work provides qualitative insights that aid in understanding the plastic deformation in β-Sn.

  4. Potential of E.coli O157:H7 to grow on field-cored lettuce as impacted by postharvest storage time and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent development in iceberg lettuce production is field coring where the outer leaves and the cores of the lettuce heads are removed at the time of harvesting in order to reduce shipping waste and maximize production yield. Using a coring knife contaminated with 2 x 105 cells of E. coli O157:H7,...

  5. A Numerical Study on the Effect of Facesheet-Core Disbonds on the Buckling Load of Curved Honeycomb Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study on the effect of facesheet-core disbonds on the post-buckling response of curved honeycomb sandwich panels is presented herein. This work was conducted as part of the development of a damage tolerance approach for the next-generation Space Launch System heavy lift vehicle payload fairing. As such, the study utilized full-scale fairing barrel segments as the structure of interest. The panels were composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The panels were analyzed numerically using the finite element method. Facesheet and core nodes in a predetermined circular region were detached to simulate a disbond induced via low-speed impact between the outer mold line facesheet and honeycomb core. Surface-to-surface contact in the disbonded region was invoked to prevent interpenetration of the facesheet and core elements. The diameter of this disbonded region was varied and the effect of the size of the disbond on the post-buckling response was observed. A significant change in the slope of the edge load-deflection response was used to determine the onset of global buckling and corresponding buckling load.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Model Studies on Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of FBR Internal Core Catcher Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjay Kumar Das; Anil Kumar Sharma; Jasmin Sudha, A.; Punitha, G.; Lydia, G.; Somayajulu, P.A.; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Harvey, J.; Kasinathan, N.; Rajan, M.

    2006-07-01

    Core Catcher is provided as an in-vessel core debris retention device to collect, support, cool and maintain in sub-critical configuration, the generated core debris from fuel melting due to certain postulated Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) for Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). This also acts as a barrier to prevent settling of debris on main vessel and keeps its maximum temperature within acceptable creep range. Heat transfer by natural convection in the core catcher assembly has been assessed numerically and through water experiments using geometrically similar configuration. Resistive heating elements are used in experiment as heat source to simulate debris decay heat on core catcher. Series of experiments were carried out for two configurations referred as geometry A and geometry B. The later configuration showed enhanced natural convective heat transfer from the lower plenum of the vessel. Temperatures were monitored at critical positions and compared with numerical evaluation. Numerically evaluated flow fields and isotherms are compared with experimental data for specific steady state temperatures on heat source plate. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with that obtained from experiments. The combined efforts of numerical and experimental work conclude core catcher assembly with geometry B to be more suitable. (authors)

  7. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  8. Penetration of normal, damaged and diseased skin--an in vitro study on dendritic core-multishell nanotransporters.

    PubMed

    Alnasif, Nesrin; Zoschke, Christian; Fleige, Emanuel; Brodwolf, Robert; Boreham, Alexander; Rühl, Eckart; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Merk, Hans-Friedrich; Hennies, Hans Christian; Alexiev, Ulrike; Haag, Rainer; Küchler, Sarah; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2014-07-10

    A growing intended or accidental exposure to nanoparticles asks for the elucidation of potential toxicity linked to the penetration of normal and lesional skin. We studied the skin penetration of dye-tagged dendritic core-multishell (CMS) nanotransporters and of Nile red loaded CMS nanotransporters using fluorescence microscopy. Normal and stripped human skin ex vivo as well as normal reconstructed human skin and in vitro skin disease models served as test platforms. Nile red was delivered rapidly into the viable epidermis and dermis of normal skin, whereas the highly flexible CMS nanotransporters remained solely in the stratum corneum after 6h but penetrated into deeper skin layers after 24h exposure. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy proved a stable dye-tag and revealed striking nanotransporter-skin interactions. The viable layers of stripped skin were penetrated more efficiently by dye-tagged CMS nanotransporters and the cargo compared to normal skin. Normal reconstructed human skin reflected the penetration of Nile red and CMS nanotransporters in human skin and both, the non-hyperkeratotic non-melanoma skin cancer and hyperkeratotic peeling skin disease models come along with altered absorption in the skin diseases.

  9. Ice-cored moraine degradation mapped and quantified using an unmanned aerial vehicle: A case study from a polythermal glacier in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, T. N.; Midgley, N. G.; Cook, S. J.; Graham, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ice-cored lateral-frontal moraines are common at the margins of receding high-Arctic valley glaciers, but the preservation potential of these features within the landform record is unclear. Recent climatic amelioration provides an opportunity to study the morphological evolution of these landforms as they de-ice. This is important because high-Arctic glacial landsystems have been used as analogues for formerly glaciated areas in the mid-latitudes. This study uses SfM (Structure-from-Motion) photogrammetry and a combination of archive aerial and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) derived imagery to investigate the degradation of an ice-cored lateral-frontal moraine at Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard. Across the study area as a whole, over an 11-year period, the average depth of surface lowering was - 1.75 ± 0.89 m. The frontal sections of the moraine showed low or undetectable rates of change. Spatially variable rates of surface lowering are associated with differences in the quantity of buried ice within the structure of the moraine. Morphological change was dominated by surface lowering, with limited field evidence of degradation via back-wastage. This permits the moraine a greater degree of stability than previously observed at other sites in Svalbard. It is unclear whether the end point will be a fully stabilised ice-cored moraine, in equilibrium with its environment, or an ice-free lateral-frontal moraine complex. Controls on geomorphological change (e.g. topography and climate) and the preservation potential of the lateral-frontal moraine are discussed. The methods used by this research also demonstrate the potential value of SfM photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring environmental change and are likely to have wider applications in other geoscientific sub-disciplines.

  10. Observational Studies of Pre-Stellar Cores and Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Paola

    2011-12-01

    Stars like our Sun and planets like our Earth form in dense regions within interstellar molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs). PSCs provide the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation. In the past 15 years, detailed observations of (low-mass) PSCs in nearby molecular cloud complexes have allowed us to find that they are cold (T < 10K) and quiescent (molecular line widths are close to thermal), with a chemistry profoundly affected by molecular freeze-out onto dust grains. In these conditions, deuterated molecules flourish, becoming the best tools to unveil the PSC physical and chemical structure. Despite their apparent simplicity, PSCs still offer puzzles to solve and they are far from being completely understood. For example, what is happening to the gas and dust in their nuclei (the future stellar cradles) is still a mystery that awaits for ALMA. Other important questions are: how do different environments and external conditions affect the PSC physical/chemical structure? Are PSCs in high-mass star forming regions similar to the well-known low-mass PSCs? Here I review observational and theoretical work on PSCs in nearby molecular cloud complexes and the ongoing search and study of massive PSCs embedded in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), which host the initial conditions for stellar cluster and high-mass star formation.

  11. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  12. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  13. Taxonomic characterization, adaptation strategies and biotechnological potential of cryophilic yeasts from ice cores of Midre Lovénbreen glacier, Svalbard, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Tsuji, Masaharu; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Roy, Utpal; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-04-01

    Ten strains of cryophilic yeast were studied from glacier ice cores of Svalbard, Arctic. The ice melt samples contained about 3×10(3) - 1×10(4) colony forming unit (CFUs) per ml. Sequence analysis of the isolates, using D1/D2 domain identified five species of yeasts: Cryptococcus adeliensis (MLB-18 JX192655), Cryptococcus albidosimilis (MLB-19 JX192656), Cryptococcus saitoi (MLB-22 JX192659), Rhodosporidium lusitaniae (MLB-20 JX192657), and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (MLB-27 JX192664). Effect of temperature on growth of these isolates was studied. The strains are able to grow at temperatures ranging between 1 and 20°C. Screening of the cultures for amylase, cellulase, protease, lipase, urease and catalase activity were carried out indicating varying amounts of enzyme production at different temperatures. Characterization of lipase in strain Cryptococcus sp. MLB-24 was performed. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis of the cultures grown at four different temperatures (1, 4, 15, and 20°C) was also done. Decrease in temperature was reported to cause increase in concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. High amount of oleic acid accumulated with increase in temperature. These fatty acids possibly help the strains to survive in glacial ice core cold environment. The extracellular and intracellular filtrate of the cultures showed negative antifreeze protein (AFP) activity. The observations indicate that probably the isolates in the present undertaking adapt to low temperatures, by enzyme and PUFA secretion rather than by antifreeze protein secretion.

  14. Learning Potential Among the Moderately and Severely Retarded. Studies in Learning Potential, Volume 3, Number 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James L.; Budoff, Milton

    The study investigated the feasibility of M. Budoff and M. Friedman's (1964) learning potential paradigm as an assessment approach with 40 moderately and severely mentally retarded persons (aged 12 to 22 years). Ss were tested three times: initially, after one week, and after one month with a match-to-sample block design test. Twenty of the Ss…

  15. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT ˜ 1 keV in the core to kT ˜ 9 keV at r ˜ 30 kpc. Beyond r ˜ 30 kpc, the intracluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing-induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r ˜ 280 kpc. The cluster also harbours a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ˜100 km s-1. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r ˜ 120 kpc to the south-east of the cluster centre. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  16. Ice core isotopic studies and paleoclimatic reconstuction in the Caucasus mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozachek, Anna; Ekaykin, Alexey; Mikhalenko, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of isotopic investigations of several ice cores obtained in the Caucasus mountains in southern Russia, Mount Elbrus and Mount Kazbek. We also discuss the isotopic composition of the upper part (106 m) of the Elbrus deep ice core (182 m) obtained in 2009. According to our estimates, this core covers the last 400 years. There is a distinct seasonal cycle in the isotopic composition record of these cores that allows the dating of the cores based on the annual layers counting. The age scale was corrected using ammonium concentration data and information on precisely dated layers of dust. The mean year and mean seasonal values of the isotopic composition and accumulation rate were calculated over a period of 89 years (1924-2012). These values were compared with available meteorological records from 13 weather stations in the region, and also with atmosphere circulation characteristics, back-trajectories calculations and GNIP data. We worked out the possible mechanisms of the formation of the isotopic composition of precipitation and of ice cores in the Caucasus region. It was shown that in the summer season, the isotopic composition depends on the local temperature, while in winter, it depends on the atmospheric circulation. The snow accumulation rate correlates well with the precipitation rate in the region all year round. We also reconstructed the precipitation rate from 1924. These results will be used to interpret the isotopic composition data from the bottom part of the Elbrus deep ice core. The research was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 14-05-31102 mol_a.

  17. A finite element study of teeth restored with post and core: Effect of design, material, and ferrule

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Viram; Bhargava, Akshay; Parkash, Hari; Chittaranjan, B.; Kumar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different postdesigns and materials are available; however, no consensus exists regarding superiority for stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of design and material of post with or without ferrule on stress distribution using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 three-dimensional (3D) axisymmetric models of postretained central incisors were made: Six with ferrule design and six without it. Three of these six models had tapered posts, and three had parallel posts. The materials tested were titanium post with a composite resin core, nickel chromium cast post and core, and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) post with a composite resin core. The stress analysis was done using ANSYS software. The load of 100 N at an angle of 45΀ was applied 2 mm cervical to incisal edge on the palatal surface and results were analyzed using 3D von Mises criteria. Results: The highest amount of stress was in the cervical region. Overall, the stress in the tapered postsystem was more than the parallel one. FRC post and composite resin core recorded minimal stresses within the post but the stresses transmitted to cervical dentin were more as compared to other systems. Minimal stresses in cervical dentine were observed where the remaining coronal dentin was strengthen by ferrule. Conclusion: A rigid material with high modulus of elasticity for post and core system creates most uniform stress distribution pattern. Ferrule provides uniform distribution of stresses and decreases the cervical stresses. PMID:27274343

  18. Parametric studies on heterogeneous cores for fast breeder reactors: The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Humbert, G.; Kappler, F.; Martini, M.; Norvez, G.; Rimpault, G.; Ruelle, B.; Scholtyssek, W.; Stanculescu, A.

    1984-07-01

    The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs, which have been performed on the Masurca critical assembly at Cadarache since 1976, were designed for the study of the neutron physics characteristics of heterogeneous fast reactor cores. Geometrically simple configurations were chosen in which parameters, being typical for heterogeneous cores, were varied in a systematic manner while the basic fissile composition was kept the same. Measurements were made especially of the critical mass, the distributions of reaction rates and the spectral indices, the reactivity of sodium voiding, and control rod worths. Analyses were made independently by Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and DEBENE using their own calculational techniques and cross sections. No bias for core heterogeneity was found on critical mass predictions. The CEA calculations for void reactivities are consistent in heterogeneous and homogeneous configurations. For the calculation of local parameters, e.g., reaction rates and spectral indices, more sophisticated methods must be applied in heterogeneous cores, as transport effects also become more important in fissile zones with increasing fertile volume fraction. It was found at CEA that the ratio of the calculated reactivity of a central control rod to the experimental value does not change with the core size or with the presence of internal breeder zones.

  19. An X-ray and Neutron Scattering Study of the Formation of Core-Shell Type Polyoxometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Mamontov, Eugene; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Tao; Seifert, Soenke; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.

    2016-03-02

    A typical type of core-shell polyoxometalates can be obtained through the Keggin-type polyoxometalatetemplated growth of a layer of spherical shell structure of {Mo72Fe30}. Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the structural features and stability of the core-shell structures in aqueous solutions. Timeresolved small angle X-ray scattering is applied to monitor the synthetic reactions and a three-stage formation mechanism is proposed to describe the synthesis of the core-shell polyoxometalates based on the monitoring results. New protocols have been developed by fitting the X-ray data with customed physical models, which provide more convincing, objective, and completed data interpretation. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering are used to probe the dynamics of water molecules in the core-shell structures and two different types of water molecules, the confined and structured water, are observed. These water molecules play an important role in bridging core and shell structures and stabilizing the cluster structures.

  20. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  1. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of CdS/ZnS core/shell nanowires: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo Seok; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Carrying out density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we studied the relative effects of quantum confinement and strain on the electronic structures of II-IV semiconductor compounds with a large lattice-mismatch, CdS and ZnS, in the core/shell nanowire geometry. We considered different core radii and shell thickness of the CdS/ZnS core/shell nanowire, different surface facets, and various defects in the core/shell interface and surface regions. To properly describe the band level alignment at the core/shell boundary, we adopted the self-interaction correction (SIC)-DFT scheme. Implications of our findings in the context of device applications will be also discussed. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Grant (No. 2012R1A1A2044793), Global Frontier Program (No. 2013-073298), and Nano-Material Technology Development Program (2012M3A7B4049888) of the National Research Foundation funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of Korea. Corresponding author

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength between zirconia core and ceramic veneers fabricated by pressing and layering techniques: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Subash, M.; Vijitha, D.; Deb, Saikat; Satish, A.; Mahendirakumar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Although ceramic veneered on to zirconia core have been in use for quite some time, information regarding the comparative evaluation of the Shear bond strength of Pressable & Layered ceramic veneered on to zirconia core is limited. Purpose of study: To evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia core and ceramic veneer fabricated by two different techniques, Layering (Noritake CZR) and Pressing (Noritake, CZR Press). Materials and Method: 20 samples of zirconia blocks were fabricated and the samples were divided into group A & B. Group A - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by pressing using Noritake CZR Press. Group B - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by layering using Noritake CZR. The veneered specimens were mounted on to the center of a PVC tube using self-cure acrylic resin leaving 3 mm of the veneered surface exposed as cantilever. Using a Universal testing machine the blocks were loaded up to failure. Result: The results were tabulated by using independent samples t-test. The mean shear bond strength for Pressed specimens was 12.458 ± 1.63(S.D) MPa and for layered specimens was 8.458 ± 0.845(S.D) MPa. Conclusion: Pressed specimens performed significantly better than the layered specimen with a P value 0.001. Clinicians and dental laboratory technicians should consider the use of pressed ceramics as an alternative to traditional layering procedures to reduce the chances of chipping or de-lamination of ceramics PMID:26538929

  4. Protecting core networks with dual-homing: A study on enhanced network availability, resource efficiency, and energy-savings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywickrama, Sandu; Furdek, Marija; Monti, Paolo; Wosinska, Lena; Wong, Elaine

    2016-12-01

    Core network survivability affects the reliability performance of telecommunication networks and remains one of the most important network design considerations. This paper critically examines the benefits arising from utilizing dual-homing in the optical access networks to provide resource-efficient protection against link and node failures in the optical core segment. Four novel, heuristic-based RWA algorithms that provide dedicated path protection in networks with dual-homing are proposed and studied. These algorithms protect against different failure scenarios (i.e. single link or node failures) and are implemented with different optimization objectives (i.e., minimization of wavelength usage and path length). Results obtained through simulations and comparison with baseline architectures indicate that exploiting dual-homed architecture in the access segment can bring significant improvements in terms of core network resource usage, connection availability, and power consumption.

  5. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES FOR TANK 241-AN-107 CORE 309 SEGMENTS 21R1 & 21R2

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-11-13

    Liquid waste in tank 241-AN-107 is below Technical Safety Requirements Administrative Control 5.16 (AC 5.16) limits. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2, to provide information on the conductivity and corrosive tendencies of the tank saltcake and interstitial liquid. This report describes data obtained under the execution of RPP-PLAN-29001, 'Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Tank 241-AN-107 Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2'. Analytical results are presented that show supernatant was within the limits while the interstitial liquid remained below the limits for the analytical cores. Applicable AC 5.16 chemistry control limits for AN-107 are presented.

  6. Models of molecular cloud cores. II - Multitransition study of CS-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, L. G.; Evans, N. J., II; Snell, R. L.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bally, J.

    1986-07-01

    The dense cores embedded in the M17, S140 and NGC 2024 molecular clouds are mapped in the J = 5-4, J = 3-2, and J = 2-1 transitions of CS-34, and these lines are found to be a factor of 3-4 weaker, and 25 percent narrower, than the CS lines mapped in these cores by Snell et al. (1984). The data are well fitted by spherical LGV models for the excitation, and the excellent correlation between the CS-34 and CS column densities corroborates the absence of a systematic increase in the gas density with decreasing core radius found by Snell et al. Though the CS/CS-34 column density ratio is 9-17, rather than the terrestrial value of 22.5, the column density relationship is linear. The data support of a clump model in which the column density distribution in the core is determined by the volume filling factor of clumps with high, fairly uniform gas density, and it is suggested that the dense gas in the data represents the dominant component of the core gas.

  7. An experimental and theoretical study of core-valence double ionisation of acetaldehyde (ethanal).

    PubMed

    Zagorodskikh, S; Vapa, M; Vahtras, O; Zhaunerchyk, V; Mucke, M; Eland, J H D; Squibb, R J; Linusson, P; Jänkälä, K; Ågren, H; Feifel, R

    2016-01-28

    Core-valence double ionisation spectra of acetaldehyde (ethanal) are presented at photon energies above the carbon and oxygen 1s ionisation edges, measured by a versatile multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy technique. We use this molecule as a testbed for analyzing core-valence spectra by means of quantum chemical calculations of transition energies. These theoretical approaches range from two simple models, one based on orbital energies corrected by core valence interaction and one based on the equivalent core approximation, to a systematic series of quantum chemical electronic structure methods of increasing sophistication. The two simple models are found to provide a fast orbital interpretation of the spectra, in particular in the low energy parts, while the coverage of the full spectrum is best fulfilled by correlated models. CASPT2 is the most sophisticated model applied, but considering precision as well as computational costs, the single and double excitation configuration interaction model seems to provide the best option to analyze core-valence double hole spectra.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Core-Shell Acrylate Based Latex and Study of Its Reactive Blends

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Fan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Feng; Nie, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Techniques in resin blending are simple and efficient method for improving the properties of polymers, and have been used widely in polymer modification field. However, polymer latex blends such as the combination of latexes, especially the latexes with water-soluble polymers, were rarely reported. Here, we report a core-shell composite latex synthesized using methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA), 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as monomers and ammonium persulfate and sodium bisulfite redox system as the initiator. Two stages seeded semi-continuous emulsion polymerization were employed for constructing a core-shell structure with P(MMA-co-BA) component as the core and P(EHA-co-GMA) component as the shell. Results of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamics Light Scattering (DLS) tests confirmed that the particles obtained are indeed possessing a desired core-shell structural character. Stable reactive latex blends were prepared by adding the latex with waterborne melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) or urea-formaldehyde resin (UF). It was found that the glass transition temperature, the mechanical strength and the hygroscopic property of films cast from the latex blends present marked enhancements under higher thermal treatment temperature. It was revealed that the physical properties of chemically reactive latexes with core-shell structure could be altered via the change of crosslinking density both from the addition of crosslinkers and the thermal treatment. PMID:19325753

  9. A Numerical Study on the Edgewise Compression Strength of Sandwich Structures with Facesheet-Core Disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Damage tolerant design approaches require determination of critical damage modes and flaw sizes in order to establish nondestructive evaluation detection requirements. A finite element model is developed to assess the effect of circular facesheet-core disbonds on the strength of sandwich specimens subjected to edgewise compressive loads for the purpose of predicting the critical flaw size for a variety of design parameters. Postbuckling analyses are conducted in which an initial imperfection is seeded using results from a linear buckling analysis. Both the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) and cohesive elements are considered for modeling disbond growth. Predictions from analyses using the VCCT and analyses using cohesive elements are in good correlation. A series of parametric analyses are conducted to investigate the effect of core thickness and material, facesheet layup, facesheet-core interface properties, and curvature on the criticality of facesheet-core disbonds of various sizes. The results from these analyses provide a basis for determining the critical flaw size for facesheet-core disbonds subjected to edgewise compression loads and, therefore, nondestructive evaluation flaw detection requirements for this configuration.

  10. A Systematic Study of Mid-infrared Emission from Core-collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Fox, Ori D.; Lau, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert; Johansson, Joel; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Masci, Frank; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with Spitzer/IRAC as part of the ongoing SPIRITS survey. We detect 8 Type Ia and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type Ia/Ibc SNe become undetectable within three years of explosion, whereas 22 ± 11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected. Five Type II SNe are detected even two decades after discovery (SN 1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J). Warm dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower limit on mass are obtained by fitting the two IRAC bands, assuming an optically thin dust shell. We derive warm dust masses between 10-6 and 10-2 M ⊙ and dust color temperatures between 200 and 1280 K. This observed warm dust could be pre-existing or newly created, but in either case represents a lower limit to the dust mass because cooler dust may be present. We present three case studies of extreme SNe. SN 2011ja (II-P) was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post explosion with increasing hot dust mass, suggesting either an episode of dust formation or intensifying circumstellar material (CSM) interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi (II-P) showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month, suggesting either dust destruction or reduced dust heating. The IR luminosity of SN 2014C (Ib) stayed constant over 800 days, possibly due to strong CSM interaction with an H-rich shell, which is rare among stripped-envelope SNe. The observations suggest that this CSM shell originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years pre-explosion. The observed diversity demonstrates the power of mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe.

  11. Core to Atmosphere Exploration of Ice Giants: A Uranus Mission Concept Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensema, R. J.; Arias-Young, T. M.; Wilkins, A. N.; Ermakov, A.; Bennett, C.; Dietrich, A.; Hemingway, D.; Klein, V.; Mane, P.; Marr, K. D.; Masterson, J.; Siegel, V.; Stober, K. J.; Talpe, M.; Vines, S. K.; Wetteland, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice giants remain largely unexplored, as their large distance from the Sun limits both Earth-based observations and spacecraft visits. The significant occurrence of ice giant-sized planets among detected exoplanets presents an impetus to study Uranus to understand planetary formation, dynamics, and evolution. In addition, Uranus is also uniquely interesting, given the large inclination of its rotation axis and magnetospheric configuration. In this work, we design a mission concept that aims to maximize scientific return by measuring Uranus' chemical composition, internal structure, and magnetosphere, the first two being primary indicators of ice giant formation mechanisms. For this study, we analyze the trade space for a Uranus mission constrained by a cost cap of $1B. We discuss the decision making processes behind our choices of the science priorities, instrument suite and orbital configuration. Trade space decisions include a strong onboard instrument suite in lieu of a descent probe, an orbiter instead of a flyby mission, and design constraints on the power and propulsion systems. The mission, CAELUS (Core and Atmospheric Evolution Laboratory for Uranus Science), is designed for an August 2023 launch. Following a 14-year cruise with multiple planetary gravity assists, the spacecraft would begin its science mission, which consists of a series of ten 30-day near-polar orbits around Uranus. The instrument suite would consist of a microwave radiometer, Doppler seismometer, magnetometer, and UV spectrometer. These four instruments, along with a high-gain antenna capable of gravity science, would provide a comprehensive science return that meets the bulk of the scientific objectives of the 2013 NRC Planetary Science Decadal Survey for ice giants, most notably those regarding the chemical composition, interior structure, and dynamo of Uranus. This mission concept was created as part of an educational exercise for the 2014 Planetary Science Summer School at the Jet

  12. Professional Development for Promoting 21st Century Skills and Common Core State Standards in Foreign Language and Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriswill, Joanne Elizabeth; Bracey, Pamela Scott; Sherman-Morris, Kathleen; Huang, Kun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    To help satisfy the pressing need for technology-related professional development for in-service teachers, the Global Academic Essentials Teacher Institute (GAETI) was implemented to provide in-service foreign language and social studies teachers with content, pedagogy, and technology explorations centered on the teaching of the Common Core State…

  13. The Common Core State Standards: An Opportunity to Enhance Formative Assessment in History/Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.; Wyngowski, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the opportunity that the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) present for enhancing formative assessment (FA) in history and social studies classrooms. There is evidence that FA can enhance learning for students if implemented well. Unfortunately, teachers continue to be challenged in implementing FA in their classrooms. We…

  14. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ("the Standards") are the culmination of an extended, broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K-12 standards in order to help ensure that all students…

  15. Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Mixed Methods Study of Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swars, Susan Lee; Chestnutt, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored elementary teachers' (n = 73) experiences with and perspectives on the recently implemented Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-Mathematics) at a high-needs, urban school. Analysis of the survey, questionnaire, and interview data reveals the findings cluster around: familiarity with and preparation…

  16. State of Colorado Consumer & Family Studies CORE Curriculums of Life Management & Relationships Crosswalk with the Colorado Academic Content Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Community Coll. and Occupational Education System, Denver.

    This document cross-references Colorado's consumer and family studies core curriculums in life management and relationships with Colorado's academic content standards. Colorado's academic standards for students in grades 9-12 in the areas of reading and writing, geography, science, history, and mathematics are cross-referenced with student…

  17. Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Luciana C., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This volume in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Learners series was designed to deepen teacher's knowledge and provides instructional approaches and practices for supporting grades 6-12 ELLs as they meet the ambitious expectations of the CCSS for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. This…

  18. Which Microbial Communities are Present? Application of PCR-DGGE: Case Study on an Oilfield Core Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kraan, Geert M.; Buijzen, Floris; Kuijvenhoven, Cor A. T.; Muyzer, Gerard

    In this case study a PCR-DGGE analysis has been performed on an oilfield core sample. In many scientific articles PCR-DGGE analysis is often referred to as one analysis technique, but in fact it is a combination of the PCR and DGGE techniques performed in succession (Muyzer et al., 1993).

  19. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T.; Williams, K. A.; Moses, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 μm is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457μm. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  20. A statistical VLBI study of milli-arcsecond cores in extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Morabito, D. D.; Jauncey, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    VLBI observations at 2.3 GHz with a baseline of approximately 8 x 10 to the 7th wavelengths were performed on a complete sample of 103 sources from the Parkes + or - 4 deg catalog. Compact milli-arcsec cores were found in 35 percent of all sources: in 80 percent of quasars, in 10 percent of galaxies, and in 20 percent of empty field sources. It is shown that for quasars the percentage of the source flux density coming from milli-arcsec cores increased with increasing radio spectral index, radio variability, and optical redness. It is noted that quasars with extended radio structure (not less than approximately 10 arcsec) seem more likely to have a detectable milli-arcsec core than do extended radio galaxies. The absence of a strong correlation between quasar milli-arcsec structure and redshift is found to be evidence for a lack of strong physical evolution in quasars.

  1. [Progress in the study of core-crosslinked polymeric micelles in drug delivery system].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Mou; Wu, Jia-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Shi; Jin, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The core-crosslinked polymeric micelles were used as a new drug delivery system, which can decrease the premature drug release in blood circulation, improve the stability of the micelles, and effectively transport the drug into the therapy sites. Then the drug bioavailability increased further, while the side effect reduced. Most drugs were physically entrapped or chemically covalent with the polymer in the internals of micelles. Based on the various constitutions and properties of polymeric micelles as well as the special characteristics of body microenvironment, the environment-responsive or active targeting core-crosslinked micelles were designed and prepared. As a result, the drug controlled release behavior was obtained. In the present paper, the research progress of all kinds of core-crosslinked micelles which were published in recent years is introduced. Moreover, the characteristic and application prospect of these micelles in drug delivery system are analyzed and summarized.

  2. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  3. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  4. Structural Flexibility of the Nucleosome Core Particle at Atomic Resolution studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Roccatano, Danilo; Barthel, Andre; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-01-24

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Comparative explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a complete nucleosome core particle with and without N-terminal histone tails for more than 20 ns. Main purpose of the simulations was to study the dynamics of mobile elements such as histone N-terminal tails and how packing and DNA-bending influences the fine structure and dynamics of DNA. Except for the tails, histone and DNA molecules stayed on average close to the crystallographic start structure supporting the quality of the current force field approach. Despite the packing strain, no increase of transitions to noncanonical nucleic acid backbone conformations compared to regular B-DNA was observed. The pattern of kinks and bends along the DNA remained close to the experiment overall. In addition to the local dynamics, the simulations allowed the analysis of the superhelical mobility indicating a limited relative mobility of DNA segments separated by one superhelical turn (mean relative displacement of approximately 60.2 nm, mainly along the superhelical axis). An even higher rigidity was found for relative motions (distance fluctuations) of segments separated by half a superhelical turn (approximately 60.1 nm). The N-terminal tails underwent dramatic conformational rearrangements on the nanosecond time scale toward partially and transiently wrapped states around the DNA. Many of the histone tail changes corresponded to coupled association and folding events from fully solvent-exposed states toward complexes with the major and minor grooves of DNA. The simulations indicate that the rapid conformational changes of the tails can modulate the DNA accessibility within a few nanoseconds. # 2007

  5. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction No worldwide, standardised definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data from severely injured trauma patients. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting the data variables of the international consensus-derived Utstein Trauma Template. Methods Trauma centres from three different continents were invited to submit Utstein Trauma Template core data during a defined period, for up to 50 consecutive trauma patients. Directly admitted patients with a New Injury Severity Score (NISS) equal to or above 16 were included. Main outcome variables were data completeness, data differences and data collection difficulty. Results Centres from Europe (n = 20), North America (n = 3) and Australia (n = 1) submitted data on 965 patients, of whom 783 were included. Median age was 41 years (interquartile range (IQR) 24 to 60), and 73.1% were male. Median NISS was 27 (IQR 20 to 38), and blunt trauma predominated (91.1%). Of the 36 Utstein variables, 13 (36%) were collected by all participating centres. Eleven (46%) centres applied definitions of the survival outcome variable that were different from those of the template. Seventeen (71%) centres used the recommended version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Three variables (age, gender and AIS) were documented in all patients. Completeness > 80% was achieved for 28 variables, and 20 variables were > 90% complete. Conclusions The Utstein Template was feasible across international trauma centres for the majority of its data variables, with the exception of certain physiological and time variables. Major differences were found in the definition of survival and in AIS coding. The current results give a clear indication of the attainability of information and may serve as a stepping-stone towards creation of a European trauma registry. PMID:21992236

  6. An experimental study of counter-rotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Roelofs, G. R.; Smith, B. F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observational studies (Franx and Illingworth 1987; Jedrzejewski and Schechter 1988; Bender 1988; Illingworth and Franx 1989) have shown that some elliptical galaxies have a small region near the center that rotates in the opposite direction from the outer parts of the galaxy. Often the rotation in the central part is much faster than that in the outer part. A few other galaxies show a small region near the center that rotates in the same direction as the rest of the galaxy, but much faster. Either way, the part near the center that shows a strange pattern of rotation (the 'core') has been interpreted as a distinct dynamical subsystem. Very briefly, the observational data seem to be that anomalies show up in rotation curves near the centers of some elliptical galaxies and that galaxies with these strange rotational properties do not show a photometric signature: there are no noticeable bumps in the brightness profile and no unusual shapes of isophotal contours that would suggest an excess of matter concentrated near the center. No strong color variations have been reported. The puzzle is to learn what we can about elliptical galaxies in general, and about galaxies with strange central regions in particular, from these observational facts. The authors' approach is experimental. They make a guess about the form of the dynamically distinct subsystem, and then build a galaxy model to test experimental consequences such as the amount of matter required to produce observable effects and the length of time over which these effects would remain observable. They sidestep questions about how the galaxy might have gotten to be that way in the first place. That gives them more freedom to explore a variety of suggestions about what kind of dynamical system might give rise to the observed rotational patterns.

  7. High-Pressure Studies on Iron Analogs with Application to Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Raju, S.; Geballe, Z.; Jeanloz, R.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals at high pressures are of geophysical interest because hcp Fe is likely to be the primary constituent of Earth's inner core. Zinc and cadmium crystallize in a distorted hcp structure, and undergo electronic topological transitions at high pressures manifested through anomalous values of the c/a crystal-axis ratio, compressibility and electron transport properties. There is renewed interest in such electronic transitions due to their recent association with anomalies in c/a, Debye velocity and Mössbauer center shift in Fe and Fe-Ni alloy near 40 GPa. Past high-pressure studies have shown that the c/a anomaly is larger in Cd as compared to Zn. Nonhydrostatic measurements on Cd reveal texture development, which is used in identifying deformation mechanisms in Os and Fe. Angular x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, with argon as pressure medium, were carried out on Cd up to 25 GPa at room temperature. We minimized nonhydrostatic conditions by thermally annealing the sample at each pressure by heating it to 100° C, which resulted in sharpening of diffraction peaks. Variations of c/a with pressure revealed anomalies near 2, 7, 15 and 22 GPa, with corresponding anomalies in compression at similar pressures. We associate these anomalies with electronic topological transitions, based on results of first-principles electronic structure calculations at high pressures. Our data are in good agreement with independent measurements using helium as a pressure medium, so the anomalies cannot be ascribed to nonhydrostaticity. Also, in-situ x-ray powder-diffraction shows that the melting curve of Cd deviates from the Lindemann law above 1 GPa, consistent with the occurrence of electronic transitions.

  8. Cu-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-02-01

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu-Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu12@Ni42 is more stable than two-shell Cu13@Ni42, while two-shell Ni13@Cu42 is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni12@Cu42. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu-Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core-shell catalysts.

  9. DFT study of structure, IR and Raman spectra of the first generation dendron built from cyclotriphosphazene core with terminal carbamate and ester groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the first generation dendron built from the cyclotriphosphazene core, five arms sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd P(S)rbond2 with ten carbamate terminal groups and one ester function Gv1 have been recorded. The IR and Raman spectra of the zero generation dendron Gv0 and first generation dendrimer G1 with the same core and terminal groups were also examined. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for dendron Gv1 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that Gv1 has a concave lens structure with planar sbnd Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd P(S)rbond2 fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The carbamate groups attached to different arms show significant deviations from a symmetrical arrangement relative to the local planes of repeating units. The experimental IR spectrum of Gv1 dendron was interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. The strong band 1604 cm-1 shows marked changes of the optical density in dependence of the carbamate, ester or azomethyne substituents in the aromatic ring. The frequencies of ν(Nsbnd H) and ν(Cdbnd O) bands in the IR spectra reveal the presence of the different types of H-bonds in the studied dendrimers.

  10. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  11. Apps-olutely Perfect! Apps to Support Common Core in the History/Social Studies Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Stewart; Kenna, Joshua; Bruce, Darrian

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of technology in the classroom is an increasingly important feature of effective instruction. The implementation of Common Core Standards in many states also requires teachers to consider new pedagogical strategies to support meaningful learning. This article explores the intersection between technology demands and curricular change…

  12. The University of Utah's Integrated Core: A Case Study from a "Commuter Campus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paisley, Karen; Spencer, Callie; Wells, Mary Sarah; Schwab, Keri

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Integrated Core (IC), the University of Utah's version of integrated curricula. We begin with a rationale for the IC, providing a background on the unique student demographics, and University-wide requirements that propelled our design. Our IC focuses specifically on active living, sustainability, and social justice as…

  13. Producing Multimodal Picture Books and Dramatic Performances in a Core French Classroom: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Margaret; Yeung, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    In a Grade 9 core French class, the teacher designed a multi-stage project in which students composed original children's stories in French; illustrated their stories to produce picture books; then, in groups, adapted one group member's story into a play script; and, finally, dramatized the scripts for children from the local French immersion…

  14. Expected contribution of the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) to studies of liquid core fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Finding satisfactory models of the fluid motions at the top of the core is important for delineating what kind of dynamo is in operation, for estimating the heat flux into the base of the mantle, and for forecasting the magnetic field forward in time. Each of these aspects will be discussed.

  15. Preservice Teacher Preparation for Common Core Standards and Assessments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Holly; Freeman, Greta G.; Wash, Pamela D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs face great challenges in ensuring their graduates are prepared for the demands of today's classrooms. The authors explore how teacher accountability has evolved based upon federal legislation leading to adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Recognizing that future teachers will be held accountable for…

  16. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  17. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Human Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducing junior high…

  18. Elementary Core Curriculum Standards, Levels K-6. Social Studies. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    These Utah core standards are designed to help prepare students for the changing times that will require knowledge and skills for living and competition in the information age. Six qualities are emphasized (1) higher level thinking and process skills; (2) citizenship/character practices and principles; (3) basic U.S. values; (4) economic literacy;…

  19. A Case Study of Common Core Implementation in a Linked Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biolchino, Erin Broun

    2016-01-01

    California is in the midst of significant educational reform initiatives, especially at the secondary level. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were adopted in 2010, and these new standards contain significant changes in the areas of math, English, and literacy across all subjects. Many districts are also implementing new initiatives to engage…

  20. The Hollow Core: Failure of the General Education Curriculum. A Fifty College Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzer, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This report provides empirical proof of a disturbing trend in higher education. Over the last several decades colleges and universities have substituted so-called "distribution requirements" for a solid core curriculum. Distribution requirements enable students freely to choose their general education courses, the courses outside their…

  1. Common Core Implementation: Units of Study in Sacramento City. Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Joel

    2014-01-01

    As district leaders search for the best ways to improve student learning with the Common Core State Standards, California districts are leading the way as early implementers of the new standards. The ideas and lessons emerging from their work can help other educators maximize the effectiveness of their own implementation efforts. This brief…

  2. Study of Core Competency Elements and Factors Affecting Performance Efficiency of Government Teachers in Northeastern Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the core competency elements and the factors affecting the performance efficiency of the civil service teachers in the northeastern region, Thailand. The research procedure consisted of two steps. In the first step, the data were collected using a questionnaire with the reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) of 0.90. The…

  3. The influence of various core designs on stress distribution in the veneered zirconia crown: a finite element analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seung-Ryong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Se-Chul; Lee, Jai-Bong; Yeo, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate various core designs on stress distribution within zirconia crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three-dimensional finite element models, representing mandibular molars, comprising a prepared tooth, cement layer, zirconia core, and veneer porcelain were designed by computer software. The shoulder (1 mm in width) variations in core were incremental increases of 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm in proximal and lingual height, and buccal height respectively. To simulate masticatory force, loads of 280 N were applied from three directions (vertical, at a 45° angle, and horizontal). To simulate maximum bite force, a load of 700 N was applied vertically to the crowns. Maximum principal stress (MPS) was determined for each model, loading condition, and position. RESULTS In the maximum bite force simulation test, the MPSs on all crowns observed around the shoulder region and loading points. The compressive stresses were located in the shoulder region of the veneer-zirconia interface and at the occlusal region. In the test simulating masticatory force, the MPS was concentrated around the loading points, and the compressive stresses were located at the 3 mm height lingual shoulder region, when the load was applied horizontally. MPS increased in the shoulder region as the shoulder height increased. CONCLUSION This study suggested that reinforced shoulder play an essential role in the success of the zirconia restoration, and veneer fracture due to occlusal loading can be prevented by proper core design, such as shoulder. PMID:23755346

  4. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  5. Bovine adenovirus 3 core protein precursor pVII localizes to mitochondria, and modulates ATP synthesis, mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev K; Gaba, Amit; Singh, Jaswant; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2014-02-01

    Viruses modulate the functions of mitochondria by translocating viral proteins to the mitochondria. Subcellular fractionation and sensitivity to proteinase K/Triton X-100 treatment of mitochondrial fractions of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3-infected/transfected cells suggested that core protein pVII localizes to the mitochondria and contains a functional mitochondrial localization signal. Moreover, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII appears to help in the retention of mitochondrial Ca(2+), inducing a significant increase in the levels of ATP and maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in transfected cells. In contrast, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII has no significant effect on the levels of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production in the transfected cells. Consistent with these results, expression of pVII in transfected cells treated with staurosporine decreased significantly the activation of caspase-3. Our results suggested that BAdV-3 pVII localizes to mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis by inhibiting loss of the MMP and by increasing mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ATP production.

  6. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    -grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  7. Implementation of Potential of the Transdisciplinary Approaches in Economic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepanova, Tatiana E.; Manokhina, Nadeghda V.; Konovalova, Maria E.; Kuzmina, Olga Y.; Andryukhina, Lyudmila M.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the researched problem is caused by the increasing interest in using potential of transdisciplinary approaches, and mathematical methods, which include the game theory in analysis of public and economic processes. The aim of the article is studying a possibility of implementation of the transdisciplinary approaches in economic…

  8. Flickr's Potential as an Academic Image Resource: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Emma; Stuart, David; Thelwall, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Many web 2.0 sites are extremely popular and contain vast amounts of content, but how much of this content is useful in academia? This exploratory paper investigates the potential use of the popular web 2.0 image site Flickr as an academic image resource. The study identified images tagged with any one of 12 subject names derived from recognized…

  9. Investigation of structural and surface potential studies of CZTS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Navnita; Varandani, Deepak; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2017-04-01

    Copper zinc tin sulphide (Cu2ZnSnS4) known as CZTS is a potential absorber layer due to its non toxicity and earth abundant availability of its constituent elements. CZTS nanorods are successfully synthesized using hydrothermal route and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, raman spectroscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) techniques. XRD and Raman it confirm that the synthesized CZTS samples are in keseterite phase without any impurities. From FESEM and EDAX, the elemental ratio is observed to 1.81:0.90:0.85:3.71. Raman study shows the peak position at 287, 339, and 372 cm-1 which corresponds to CZTS pure phase without any impurity peak. Surface potential and work function of CZTS nanorods (NRs) has been derived by KPFM data. KPFM shows that with an increase in diameter of CZTS nanorods surface potential decreases indicating enhancement of p-type conductivity with decrease in NR diameter. The value of surface potential is found to be 496 and 486 mV NRs with diameter 40 and 60 nm, respectively. The results are explained on the basis of Oxygen induced passivation of surface states in NRs diameter. The results of the study are important for potential applications of CZTS NRs in the field of optoelectronic and solar cells.

  10. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-10-12

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research.

  11. [Nationwide questionnaire study in "the Model Core Curriculum" and current status for the undergraduate education in neurology].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Kwak, Shin; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nakashima, Kenji; Amano, Takahiro; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Uozumi, Takenori; Kohara, Nobuo; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Tamagawa, Akira; Toyoshima, Itaru; Mizutani, Tomohiko; Yoshii, Fumihito; Sobue, Gen; Shimizu, Teruo

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the current state of education for undergraduates, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology for undergraduate education sent a questionnaire on the 2001-version of Model Core Curriculum to the department of neurology in 80 medical universities and their 7 associate medical institutes throughout Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of those 87 institutes (64.4%). According to the answers, the Core Curriculum was introduced to the program of undergraduate education in 93% of those 56 universities. For the revision of neurology part in the current Core Curriculum, there are number of requests for improving the description on the neurological examination, list of common symptoms and disorders, and addition of therapeutics. Despite application of the Model Core Curriculum in medical education, the present study disclosed that there were considerable difference in the number and content of the lectures, and the duration of clinical clerkship in neurology ward. These differences of the curriculum and training program depends on not only the number of staffs, but also whether they are working as staffs in a department of neurology or as a small group of neurologists within a department other than neurology.

  12. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF SHOCK REVIVAL AND THE SUBSEQUENT EVOLUTIONS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE WITH PARAMETRIC PROGENITOR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-02-20

    We conducted one-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of post-shock revival evolutions in core-collapse supernovae, employing the simple neutrino light bulb approximation to produce explosions rather easily. In order to estimate the explosion energy, we took into proper account nuclear recombinations and fusions consistently with the equation of state for matter not in statistical equilibrium in general. The methodology is similar to our previous work, but is somehow improved. In this paper, we studied the influence of the progenitor structure on the dynamics systematically. In order to expedite our understanding of the systematics, we constructed six parametric progenitor models, which are different in masses of Fe iron core and Si+S layer, instead of employing realistic models provided by stellar evolution calculations, which are sometimes of stochastic nature as a function of stellar mass on the main sequence. We found that the explosion energy is tightly correlated with the mass accretion rate at shock revival irrespective of dimension and the progenitors with light iron cores but with rather high entropies, which have yet to be produced by realistic stellar evolution calculations, may reproduce the canonical values of explosion energy and nickel mass. The mass of the Si+S layer is also important in the mass accretion history after bounce, on the other hand; the higher mass accretion rates and resultant heavier cores tend to hamper strong explosions.

  13. Feasibility Study: Comparison of Frontal Cortex Needle Core Versus Open Biopsy For Detection of Characteristic Proteinopathies of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Geidy E.; Intorcia, Anthony; Carew, Jeremiah; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Hidalgo, Jose A.; Sue, Lucia. I.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Saxon-LaBelle, Megan; Filon, Jessica; Scroggins, Alex; Pullen, Joel; Fornwalt, Brandon E.; Scott, Sarah; Sabbagh, Marwan M.; Adler, Charles H.; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative diseases based on clinical examination or available biomarkers are currently insufficiently accurate. Although histological examination is considered the gold standard for diagnosis, brain biopsies have been avoided because of the high risk-benefit ratio. However, brain biopsies have previously been performed with a craniotomy and excision of approximately 1 cc of cerebral cortex tissue, and it is possible that needle core brain biopsies would have a lower morbidity and mortality risk. Here, we compared the ability of simulated needle core biopsy versus simulated open biopsy to detect the frontal cortex histopathology associated with common neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly using 144 autopsy-proven cases. Simulated needle core biopsy, as compared to simulated open biopsy, gave close to 90% sensitivity and specificity for identifying graded densities of β-amyloid and neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, phosphorylated α-synuclein, and phosphorylated TDP-43 pathology. This study shows that the presence and densities of the most common molecular pathologies may be histopathologically assessed in simulated frontal cortex needle biopsies with accuracy very close to that obtained by open cortical biopsy. An accurate estimation of the morbidity and mortality risk associated with cortical needle core biopsy will require specifically designed clinical trials in appropriate subjects. PMID:26230581

  14. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  15. Compensation temperature in a dendrimer nano-system with a core-shell structure: Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhaj, A.; Jabar, A.; Labrim, H.; Ziti, S.; Bahmad, L.; Laânab, L.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the magnetic properties of a nanostructure based on an hexagonal core-shell geometry. The model is formed with core spins σ =3/2 and surface spins S=2. More precisely, we investigate the effect of the coupling exchange interactions in the absence/presence of both an external magnetic and crystal fields. In a first step, we elaborate the ground state phase diagrams, and then we discuss the stable phases. At different non null temperatures, we explore Monte Carlo to study computation and the magnetic properties. Among others, we find a compensation temperature between the spins σ and S. To close this study, we examine the hysteresis loop behaviors.

  16. Potential drug interactions with statins: Estonian register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Daisy; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In Estonia, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are widely used to modify lipid levels but there are no current data on additional medicines prescribed alongside the statins. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential clinically relevant interactions at a national level among an outpatient population treated with statins between January and June 2008, based on the prescription database of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. This retrospective prevalence study included 203,646 outpatients aged 50 years or older, of whom 29,367 received statin therapy. The study analysed individuals who had used at least one prescription medicine for a minimum of 7 days concomitantly with statins. Potential drug interactions were analysed using Epocrates online, Stockley’s Drug Interactions, and the drug interaction database developed in Estonia. Statins metabolised by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme were prescribed to 64% of all statin users. Medicines known to have potentially clinically significant interactions with statins were prescribed to 4.6% of patients. The drugs prescribed concomitantly most often with simvastatin were warfarin (5.7%) and amiodarone (3.9%), whereas digoxin (1.2%) and ethinylestradiol (2%) were prescribed with atorvastatin. Potential interactions were not detected in the treatment regimens of rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin users. PMID:28352703

  17. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... proposed study plan and study plan meetings. 5.11 Section 5.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan..., including information and study requests, the potential applicant must file with the Commission a...

  18. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... proposed study plan and study plan meetings. 5.11 Section 5.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan..., including information and study requests, the potential applicant must file with the Commission a...

  19. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... proposed study plan and study plan meetings. 5.11 Section 5.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan..., including information and study requests, the potential applicant must file with the Commission a...

  20. Core and valence level photoemission and photoabsorption study of icosahedral Al Pd Mn quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, K.; Theis, W.; Paggel, J. J.; Barman, S. R.; Rotenberg, E.; Ebert, Ph; Urban, K.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of quasicrystalline Al-Pd-Mn is investigated by means of valence and core level photoelectron spectroscopy. Variations of the photoionization cross section in the constituents' valence electronic levels as a function of photon energy are used to identify contributions from the different atomic species, in particular near the Pd 4d Cooper minimum. Resonant photoemission at the Mn 2p absorption edge shows the contribution of the Mn 3d states to the density of states in a region near the Fermi level. The asymmetry of Pd 3d and Mn 2p core level photoemission lines, and its difference for emission from metallic and quasicrystalline phases, are utilized to infer the contributions of the different constituents to the density of states at the Fermi level.

  1. A Study of the Economic Benefit Potential of Intermodal Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. M.; Kawai, R. T.; Gregg, R. D.; McKinley, Robert E., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A conceptual study was conducted to determine the benefit potential of an Intermodal Transport in which quick change payload modules are used to reduce the cost of air travel by increasing daily utilization. Three basic concepts varying the degree of modularity were investigated for a 122,000 pounds payload 3,000 NM range regional wide body transport. The profit potential for operating as a passenger transport during the day and as a freighter at night was assessed. Assuming current levels of profitability, Intermodal operations could offer an operating cost reduction potential up to 20%. Enabling technology needs are identified as very quiet aircraft for expanded night operations, distributed load carrying quick disconnect latching, and configuration dependent safety issues. Recommendations are made to explore if additional benefits are possible from alternative mission and usage modules.

  2. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  3. A high-resolution study of complex organic molecules in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcutt, Hannah; Viti, Serena; Codella, Claudio; Beltrán, Maria T.; Fontani, Francesco; Woods, Paul M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a line identification analysis using data from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Plateau de Bure Interferometer, focusing on six massive star-forming hot cores: G31.41+0.31, G29.96-0.02, G19.61-0.23, G10.62-0.38, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2. We identify several transitions of vibrationally excited methyl formate (HCOOCH3) for the first time in these objects as well as transitions of other complex molecules, including ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN), and isocyanic acid (HNCO). We also postulate a detection of one transition of glycolaldehyde (CH2(OH)CHO) in two new hot cores. We find G29.96-0.02, G19.61-0.23, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2 to be chemically very similar. G31.41+0.31, however, is chemically different: it manifests a larger chemical inventory and has significantly larger column densities. We suggest that it may represent a different evolutionary stage to the other hot cores in the sample, or it may surround a star with a higher mass. We derive column densities for methyl formate in G31.41+0.31, using the rotation diagram method, of 4 × 1017 cm-2 and a Trot of ˜170 K. For G29.96-0.02, G24.78+0.08A1 and G24.78+0.08A2, glycolaldehyde, methyl formate and methyl cyanide, all seem to trace the same material and peak at roughly the same position towards the dust emission peak. For G31.41+0.31, however, glycolaldehyde shows a different distribution to methyl formate and methyl cyanide and seems to trace the densest, most compact inner part of hot cores.

  4. Spray-dried powders containing tretinoin-loaded engineered lipid-core nanocapsules: development and photostability study.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, M C L; Ourique, A F; da Silva, C de B; Raffin, R P; Pohlmann, A R; Guterres, S S; Beck, R C R

    2012-03-01

    The influence of the spray-drying process on the ability of engineered lipid-core nanocapsules to protect tretinoin against UV degradation was evaluated. This approach represents a technological alternative to improve the microbiological stability, storage and transport properties of such formulations. Tretinoin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules or tretinoin-loaded nanoemulsion were dispersed in lactose (10% w/v) and fed in the spray-drier to obtain a solid product (spray-dried powder containing tretinoin-loaded nanocapsules or nanoemulsion--SD-TTN-NCL or SD-TTN-NE, respectively). SD-TTN-NE showed a lower (p < or = 0.05) percentage of encapsulation (89 +/- 1%) compared to SD-TTN-NCL (94 +/- 2%). Redispersed SD-TTN-NCL and SD-TTN-NE showed z-average sizes of 204 +/- 2 nm and 251 +/- 9 nm, which were close to those of the original suspensions (220 +/- 3 nm and 239 +/- 14 nm, respectively). Similar percentage of photodegradation were determined for tretinoin loaded in nanocapsules (26.15 +/- 4.34%) or in the respective redispersed spray-dried powder (28.73 +/- 6.19 min) after 60 min of UVA radiation exposure (p > 0.05). Our experimental design showed for the first time that spray-dried lipid-core nanocapsules are able to protect tretinoin against UVA radiation, suggesting that the drying process did not alter the supramolecular structure of the lipid-core nanocapsules. Such powders are potential intermediate products for the development of nanomedicines containing tretinoin.

  5. Streptococcus thermophilus core genome: comparative genome hybridization study of 47 strains.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Morten; Valina, Ondrej; Garrigues, Christel; Johansen, Eric; Pedersen, Martin Bastian

    2008-08-01

    A DNA microarray platform based on 2,200 genes from publicly available sequences was designed for Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined how single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 65- to 75-mer oligonucleotide probe sequences affect the hybridization signals. The microarrays were then used for comparative genome hybridization (CGH) of 47 dairy S. thermophilus strains. An analysis of the exopolysaccharide genes in each strain confirmed previous findings that this class of genes is indeed highly variable. A phylogenetic tree based on the CGH data showed similar distances for most strains, indicating frequent recombination or gene transfer within S. thermophilus. By comparing genome sizes estimated from the microarrays and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the amount of unknown DNA in each strain was estimated. A core genome comprised of 1,271 genes detected in all 47 strains was identified. Likewise, a set of noncore genes detected in only some strains was identified. The concept of an industrial core genome is proposed. This is comprised of the genes in the core genome plus genes that are necessary in an applied industrial context.

  6. Simulation study of core heating properties for recent FIREX-I experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Kai, Yusuke; Endo, Takuma; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    The demonstration of efficient core heating is the main purpose of FIREX-I project, where Au cone-attached solid ball CD target is used. For the guiding of fast electron beam generated by relativistic laser plasma interactions, the kilo-Tesla-class longitudinal magnetic field is applied by a capacitor-coil target and kJ-class ns-durration high power laser. In addition, to reduce the collisional effect (energy loss and scattering of fast electrons) during propagation in the Au cone tip, we introduced opened-tip cone (tipless cone). To evaluate the core heating properties, we carried out the integrated simulations, which shows the enhancement of core heating efficiency due to the magnetic guiding and opened-tip cone by a factor of three. These simulation results will be shown and be compared with the experimental results. JSPS KAKENHI (26400532, 15H03758, 16H02245, 15K21767), NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK05, NIFS14KNSS054), and FIREX project.

  7. Shell thickness matters! Energy transfer and rectification study of Au/ZnO core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Sen, Tapasi

    2016-12-15

    In the present study we report the influence of shell thickness on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between Au/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles and Rhodamine 6G dye by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy and rectification behaviours. Au/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles with different shell thickness were synthesized in aqueous solution by chemically depositing zinc oxide on gold nanoparticles surface. A pronounced effect on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and shortening of the decay time of the dye in presence of Au/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles is observed. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies from dye to Au/ZnO are 62.5%, 79.2%, 53.6% and 46.7% for 1.5nm, 3nm, 5nm and 8nm thickness of shell, respectively. Using FRET process, the calculated distances (r) are 117.8, 113.2Å 129.9Å and 136.7Å for 1.5nm, 3nm, 5nm and 8nm thick Au/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles, respectively. The distances (d) between the donor and acceptor are 71.0, 57.8, 76.2 and 81.6Å for 1.5nm, 3nm, 5nm and 8nm thick core-shell Au/ZnO nanoparticles, respectively, using the efficiency of surface energy transfer (SET). The current-voltage (I-V) curve of hybrid Au/ZnO clearly exhibits a rectifying nature and represents the n-type Schottky diode characteristics with a typical turn-on voltage of between 0.6 and 1.3V. It was found that the rectifying ratio increases from 20 to 90 with decreasing the thickness of the shell from 5nm to 3nm and with shell thickness of 8nm, electrical transport through the core-shell is similar to what is observed with pure ZnO samples nanoparticles. The results indicated that the Au/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles with an average shell thickness of 3nm exhibited the maximum energy transfer efficiencies (79.2%) and rectification (rectifying ratio 90).

  8. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments. PMID:28096727

  9. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  10. Variational Studies of Nucleon Matter with Realistic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmal, Arya

    We study cold, symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter at densities up to six times nuclear saturation density, with realistic interactions fitted to nucleon-nucleon scattering data, using variational methods and correlated wave functions. The expectation value of the nuclear Hamiltonian is expanded in terms of cluster contributions, and re-summed via chain summation methods. Included in the calculation are a number of new, momentum-dependent cluster diagrams, which make significant contributions to the energy. These include relativistic boost corrections, heretofore neglected in studies of infinite matter. The boost corrections, partially mocked up by the three-nucleon interaction in previous studies, must be treated explicitly to obtain accurate predictions of the energy of matter at densities above saturation. We find that matter exhibits structure on the femtometer scale at saturation density, and undergoes a phase transition at about twice saturation density. The new phase is marked by a significant increase in the length of tensor correlations. The nature of the transition is further elucidated using the spin-isospin structure function, which points to long-range order in the new phase. We argue that this new phase contains a neutral pion condensate, as evidenced by enhancement of the pionic interactions and the pion field. In addition to symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter, we present an equation of state for beta-stable matter, used to predict properties of spherical, non-rotating neutron stars by integrating the relativistic equation governing gravitational equilibrium. The interaction models presented here, with relativistic boost corrections, predict the existence of neutron stars with masses up to 2.0 to 2.2 solar masses. We also investigate the possibility of a deconfined quark phase in neuron star cores, and argue that such a phase, should it be present, will have only a small effect on the predictions of maximum masses.

  11. Facing a real person: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Pönkänen, Laura M; Hietanen, Jari K; Peltola, Mikko J; Kauppinen, Pasi K; Haapalainen, Antti; Leppänen, Jukka M

    2008-03-05

    Although faces are typically perceived in the context of human interaction, face processing is commonly studied by displaying faces on a computer screen. This study on event-related potential examined whether the processing of faces differs depending on whether participants are viewing faces live or on a computer screen. In both the conditions, the participants were shown a real face, a dummy face, and a control object. N170 and early posterior negativity discriminated between faces and control object in both the conditions. Interestingly, early posterior negativity differentiated between the real face and the dummy face only in the live condition. The results indicate that a live face, as a potentially interacting stimulus, is processed differently than an inanimate face already at the early processing stages.

  12. Study on the antibacterial potential of physalis minima linn.

    PubMed

    Patel, T; Shah, K; Jiwan, K; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima is an important medicinal plant of Indian System of Medicine. This plant is reported for its diuretic, laxative and antiinflammatory activities. However, the plant is not well scrutinized for its antimicrobial potential. The major chemical constituents reported from the plant are phenolics and alkaloids, which suggest that the plant may turn out to be a potent antiinfective agent. The aim of the study was to find out the antibacterial potential of mature berries of P. minima using streak plate, well diffusion, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and bioautographic methods against a battery of Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. Results of the study showed that methanol and chloroform extracts of P. minima exhibited potent inhibitory activity against all the bacterial strains tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration found out was 100 μg in both the extracts. Bioautography assay showed polar compounds present in the crude extract are responsible for the antimicrobial action.

  13. Study on the Antibacterial Potential of Physalis Minima Linn

    PubMed Central

    Patel, T.; Shah, K.; Jiwan, K.; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima is an important medicinal plant of Indian System of Medicine. This plant is reported for its diuretic, laxative and antiinflammatory activities. However, the plant is not well scrutinized for its antimicrobial potential. The major chemical constituents reported from the plant are phenolics and alkaloids, which suggest that the plant may turn out to be a potent antiinfective agent. The aim of the study was to find out the antibacterial potential of mature berries of P. minima using streak plate, well diffusion, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and bioautographic methods against a battery of Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. Results of the study showed that methanol and chloroform extracts of P. minima exhibited potent inhibitory activity against all the bacterial strains tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration found out was 100 μg in both the extracts. Bioautography assay showed polar compounds present in the crude extract are responsible for the antimicrobial action. PMID:22131635

  14. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  15. Genome-wide annotation, expression profiling, and protein interaction studies of the core cell-cycle genes in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju; Lien, Yi-Chen; Li, Huang-Hsien; Ko, Swee-Suak; Liu, Zin-Huang; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2014-01-01

    Orchidaceae is one of the most abundant and diverse families in the plant kingdom and its unique developmental patterns have drawn the attention of many evolutionary biologists. Particular areas of interest have included the co-evolution of pollinators and distinct floral structures, and symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal flora. However, comprehensive studies to decipher the molecular basis of growth and development in orchids remain scarce. Cell proliferation governed by cell-cycle regulation is fundamental to growth and development of the plant body. We took advantage of recently released transcriptome information to systematically isolate and annotate the core cell-cycle regulators in the moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Our data verified that Phalaenopsis cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA) is an evolutionarily conserved CDK. Expression profiling studies suggested that core cell-cycle genes functioning during the G1/S, S, and G2/M stages were preferentially enriched in the meristematic tissues that have high proliferation activity. In addition, subcellular localization and pairwise interaction analyses of various combinations of CDKs and cyclins, and of E2 promoter-binding factors and dimerization partners confirmed interactions of the functional units. Furthermore, our data showed that expression of the core cell-cycle genes was coordinately regulated during pollination-induced reproductive development. The data obtained establish a fundamental framework for study of the cell-cycle machinery in Phalaenopsis orchids.

  16. Neural correlates of mental state decoding in human adults: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Mark A; Moulson, Margaret C; Harkness, Kate L

    2004-04-01

    Successful negotiation of human social interactions rests on having a theory of mind - an understanding of how others' behaviors can be understood in terms of internal mental states, such as beliefs, desires, intentions, and emotions. A core theory-of-mind skill is the ability to decode others' mental states on the basis of observable information, such as facial expressions. Although several recent studies have focused on the neural correlates of reasoning about mental states, no research has addressed the question of what neural systems underlie mental state decoding. We used dense-array event-related potentials (ERP) to show that decoding mental states from pictures of eyes is associated with an N270-400 component over inferior frontal and anterior temporal regions of the right hemisphere. Source estimation procedures suggest that orbitofrontal and medial temporal regions may underlie this ERP effect. These findings suggest that different components of everyday theory-of-mind skills may rely on dissociable neural mechanisms.

  17. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify

  18. NMR studies of electrostatic potential distribution around biologically important molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Likhtenshtein, G I; Adin, I; Novoselsky, A; Shames, A; Vaisbuch, I; Glaser, R

    1999-01-01

    A new experimental approach has been developed to study the distribution of local electrostatic potential around specific protons in biologically important molecules. The approach is the development of a method denoted as "spin label/spin probe," which was proposed by one of us (. Mol. Biol. 6:498-507). The proposed method is based upon the quantitative measurement of the contribution of differently charged nitroxide probes to the spin lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) of protons in the molecule of interest, followed by calculation of local electrostatic potential using the classical Debye equation. In parallel, the theoretical calculation of potential distribution with the use of the MacSpartan Plus 1.0 program has been performed. Application of the method to solutions of simple organic molecules (aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, aliphatic carboxylates (propionate anion), and protonated ethyl amine and imidazole) allowed us to estimate the effective potential around the molecules under investigation. These were found to be in good agreement with theoretically expected values. This technique was then applied to zwitterionic amino acids bearing neutral and charged side chains (glycine, lysine, histidine, and aspartic acid). The reliability of the general approach is proved by the data presented in this paper. Application of this new methodology can afford insight into the biochemical significance of electrostatic effects in biological systems. PMID:10388770

  19. Biogas Potential on Long Island, New York: A Quantification Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, D.; Patel, S.; Tonjes, D.

    2011-08-25

    Biogas is the product of anaerobic digestion of waste, whether occurring spontaneously in landfills or under controlled conditions in digesters. Biogas is viewed as an important energy source in current efforts to reduce the use of fossil fuels and dependency on imported resources. Several studies on the assessment of biogas potential have been made at regional, national, and global scales. However, because it is not economically feasible to transport biogas feedstock over long distances, it is more appropriate to consider local waste sources for their potential to produce biogas. An assessment of the biogas potential on Long Island, based on the review of local landfills, wastewater treatment plants, solid waste generation and management, and agricultural waste, found that 234 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of methane (CH{sub 4}) from biogas might be harvestable, although substantial barriers for complete exploitation exist. This number is equivalent to 2.52 TW-h of electricity, approximately 12% of fossil fuel power generation on Long Island. This work can serve as a template for other areas to rapidly create or approximate biogas potentials, especially for suburban U.S. locations that are not usually thought of as sources of renewable energy.

  20. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE STAR-FORMING CORE AHEAD OF HH 80N

    SciTech Connect

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Garay, Guido; Calvet, Nuria; Beltran, Maria T.

    2011-09-01

    We present observations of continuum emission in the mid-infrared to millimeter wavelength range, complemented with ammonia observations, of the dense core ahead of the radio Herbig-Haro (HH) object HH 80N, found in the GGD 27 region. The continuum emission in all the observed bands peaks at the same position, consistent with the presence of an embedded object, HH 80N-IRS1, within the core. The distribution of the Very Large Array ammonia emission is well correlated with that of the dust, suggesting that photochemical effects caused by the nearby HH object do not play an important role in shaping this particular molecular emission. In order to unveil the nature of HH 80N-IRS1, we analyzed the continuum data of this source, using self-consistent models of protostellar collapse. We find that a young protostar surrounded by a slowly rotating collapsing envelope of radius {approx}0.08 pc and 20 M{sub sun} plus a circumstellar disk of radius {approx}300 AU and 0.6 M{sub sun} provide a good fit to the observed spectral energy distribution and to the maps at 350 {mu}m, 1.2 mm, and 3.5 mm of HH 80N-IRS1. Besides, the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment and Plateau de Bure Interferometer continuum maps at 350 {mu}m and 3.5 mm, respectively, reveal additional clumps in the continuum emission. Given the modeling results and the observed morphology of the emission, we propose a scenario consisting of a central embedded Class 0 object, HH 80N-IRS1, with the rest of the material of the HH 80N core possibly undergoing fragmentation that may lead to the formation of several protostars.

  1. Spectroscopic study of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2008-10-22

    New techniques of x-ray spectroscopy have been developed to extract the temperature and density spatial structure of implosion cores. Results from an emissivity analysis, which neglects optical depth effects, compare well with the independent results of an intensity analysis used in the low optical depth limit. The intensity analysis has also been applied in its full form, in which case density spatial profiles demonstrate significant opacity effects. The emissivity and intensity analyses were combined to infer the spatial profile of mixing between shell and fuel material. This experimentally-derived information on mix is compared with predictions from two standard theoretical mix models.

  2. A comparative photophysicochemical study of phthalocyanines encapsulated in core-shell silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fashina, Adedayo; Amuhaya, Edith; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-02-25

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a new zinc phthalocyanine complex tetrasubstituted with 3-carboxyphenoxy in the peripheral position. The photophysical properties of the new complex are compared with those of phthalocyanines tetra substituted with 3-carboxyphenoxy or 4-carboxyphenoxy at non-peripheral positions. Three phthalocyanine complexes were encapsulated within silica matrix to form a core shell and the hybrid nanoparticles particles obtained were spherical and mono dispersed. When encapsulated within the silica shell nanoparticles, phthalocyanines showed improved triplet quantum yields and singlet oxygen quantum yields than surface grafted derivatives. The improvements observed could be attributed to the protection provided for the phthalocyanine complexes by the silica matrix.

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  5. An evaluation of the clinical potential of tissue diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, R.; Abuchi, S.; Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.

    2015-09-01

    Medical imaging is a long established part of patient management in the treatment of disease. However, in most cases it only provides anatomical detail and does not provide any form of tissue characterisation. This is particularly true for X-ray imaging. Recent studies on tissue diffraction have shown that true molecular signatures can be derived for different tissue types. Breast cancer samples and liver tissue have been studied. It has been shown that diffraction profiles can be traced away from the primary tumour in excised breast tissue samples and that potentially 3mm fat nodules in liver tissue can be identified in patients at acceptable doses.

  6. Structure Optimization of 21, 23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    21,23-core-modified porphyrins and the phototoxicity therapy ; Mitochondria; Cytochrom c oxidase. * Corresponding authors. Tel.: +1 716 645 6800x2197; fax...process by PDT, there might be a taraet site inside the cell to trigger 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Photodynamic therapy , breast cancer, core...6 Introduction The objectives of this project are two fold: one is to train the PI, Dr. Youngjae You, as an photodynamic cancer therapy expert in

  7. Design study of an air pump and integral lift engine ALF-504 using the Lycoming 502 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, D.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies were conducted for an integral lift fan engine utilizing the Lycoming 502 fan core with the final MQT power turbine. The fan is designed for a 12.5 bypass ratio and 1.25:1 pressure ratio, and provides supercharging for the core. Maximum sea level static thrust is 8370 pounds with a specific fuel consumption of 0.302 lb/hr-lb. The dry engine weight without starter is 1419 pounds including full-length duct and sound-attenuating rings. The engine envelope including duct treatment but not localized accessory protrusion is 53.25 inches in diameter and 59.2 inches long from exhaust nozzle exit to fan inlet flange. Detailed analyses include fan aerodynamics, fan and reduction gear mechanical design, fan dynamic analysis, engine noise analysis, engine performance, and weight analysis.

  8. Study of neutral hydrogen transport in LHD core plasmas based on high dynamic-range Balmer-α spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-06-01

    The radial distributions of the neutral hydrogen atom density and pressure in the large helical device (LHD) and their electron density (ne) dependence were studied. The atom density distribution was determined from a detailed analysis of the intensity-calibrated Balmer-α line profile while the pressure distribution was obtained with a simple one-dimensional analytical model. We determined for the first time the atom density at the centre of a fusion-oriented plasma, which is more than three orders smaller than that at the edge. On the contrary, the atom pressure changes only by a factor of 10 from the edge to core regions. Both the atom density and pressure in the core region have negative ne dependence. The smaller drop of the atom pressure profile and the ne dependence of the atom density were discussed based on the diffusion theory.

  9. An ac susceptibility study in capped Ni/Ni(OH)2 core-shell nanoassemblies: dual peak observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsell, Jeffrey F.; Bala, Tanushree; Ryan, Kevin M.; Roy, Saibal

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the ac susceptibility (χ' and χ'') variation with temperature (10-100 K) for oleic acid (OA) capped Ni/Ni(OH)2 core-shell nanoparticle assemblies are reported at frequencies varying from 0.1 to 1000 Hz. Nanoparticle assemblies, with two average particle diameters of ~34 nm and ~14 nm, were synthesized using a wet chemical synthesis approach. Two peaks in the ac susceptibility versus temperature curves are clearly discernable for each of the samples. The first, occurring at ~22 K was attributed to the paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic transition of the Ni(OH)2 present in the shell. The second higher temperature peak was attributed to the superparamagnetic blocking of the pure Ni situated at the core of the nanoparticles. The higher temperature peaks in both the χ' and χ'' curves were observed to increase with increasing frequency. Thus the Néel and the blocking temperatures for such core-shell nanoassemblies were clearly identified from the ac analysis, whereas they were not discernible (superimposed) even from very low dc (FC/ZFC) field measurements. Interparticle interactions within the assemblies were studied through the fitting of phenomenological laws to the experimental datasets. It is observed that even with an OA capping layer, larger Ni/Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles experience a greater degree of sub-capping layer oxidation thus producing lower magnetic interaction strengths.

  10. Molecular dynamics study on microstructures of diblock copolymer melts with soft potential and potential recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ji Ho; Wee, Han Sol; Lee, Won Bo

    2016-09-01

    Various microstructures are obtained through the self-assembly of block copolymers on the basis of the compositional fractions and repulsive interactions among different types of beads. The inhomogeneity of block copolymers can be studied by molecular dynamics. However, preparing initial configurations of various self-assembled structures directly by molecular dynamics requires extensive computational time because of topological constraints. Furthermore, manual preparation often becomes a complicated and time-consuming procedure even for the simplest structures, such as a lamellar phase, not to mention three-dimensional bicontinuous cubic phases such as a gyroid phase. In this paper, this difficulty is overcome by using a soft potential, which allows the system to reach a self-assembled state quickly (within 3 τd ). Once a self-assembled microstructure is obtained, the normal potential is restored and equilibration steps are performed to enable the calculation of various properties of the microstructures. Various equilibrated phase structures—including S (spherical), H (hexagonal), G (gyroid), and L (lamellar) phases—are obtained by this approach. To verify our method, static and dynamic properties of the lamellar phase are examined and compared with previous results.

  11. gC1qR expression in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic infection: Potential role of HCV core/gC1qR-mediated T cell suppression in the outcome of HCV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zhiqang; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Tricoche, Nancy; Shan, M.M.; Brotman, Betsy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Hahn, Young S. . E-mail: ysh5e@virginia.edu; Prince, Alfred M.

    2006-03-15

    Chimpanzee is a unique animal model for HCV infection, in which about 50% of infections resolve spontaneously. It has been reported that the magnitude of T cell responses to HCV core in recovered chimpanzees is greater than that in chronically infected ones. However, the mechanism(s) by which the chimpanzees with resolved infection overcome core-mediated immunosuppression remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of HCV core on T cell responsiveness in chimpanzees with resolved and chronic HCV infection. We found that core protein strongly inhibited T cell activation and proliferation in chimpanzees with chronic infection, while this inhibition was limited in chimpanzees with resolved infection. Notably, the level of gC1qR, as well as the binding of core protein, on the surface of T cells was lower in recovered chimpanzees when compared to chimpanzees with chronic HCV infection. Intriguingly, the observed differences in gC1qR expression levels and susceptibility to core-induced suppression amongst HCV-chronically infected and recovered chimpanzees were observed prior to HCV challenge, suggesting a possible genetic determination of the outcome of infection. These findings suggest that gC1qR expression on the surface of T cells is crucial for HCV core-mediated T cell suppression and viral clearance, and that represents a novel mechanism by which a virus usurps host machinery for persistence.

  12. Source tracing of rare earth elements: A case study of core 07 on the southern coast of Laizhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Guo; Maosheng, Gao; Guohua, Hou; Sen, Liu; Jing, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have proven to be useful indicators of sediment sources. To identify the group of elements most suitable for provenance identification, coastal sediment samples collected from core 07 in Laizhou Bay were analyzed for the presence of REEs. In addition, a corresponding analysis of contributions that different source made to multi-source sedimentary system and provenance discrimination study were undertaken, with the twofold purpose of assessing the effectiveness of REEs as source indicators, and evaluating relative inputs to the sedimentary system on the southern coast of Laizhou Bay from near source and distant origin rivers (i.e. the Bailang River and Yellow River, respectively). The study revealed that various REEs displayed similar cyclic variation in the vertical direction in core 07, with obvious changes at marine-continental stratigraphic boundaries, which could be used as stratigraphic division index. According to chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns, the Bailang River and Yellow River comprise the main provenance of sediments in core 07. REE discrimination diagrams and the Provenance Index (PI) reveal that the sediments in early stage (Qp33 Qp31, 49.15-80.00 m) were primarily derived from Yellow River, and the sediments in late stage (Qh3 Qp33,5.80-49.15 m) were stemmed from Bailang River. Following extensive analysis, it was concluded that the main provenance of core 07 was the Bailang River, which has played an important role in the sedimentary system of the southern coast of Laizhou Bay since the early Late Pleistocene. Sediment from the Yellow River, rechannelled frequently in geological history, had limited influence in this area.

  13. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2016-01-07

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability.

  15. Studies of meiosis disclose distinct roles of cohesion in the core centromere and pericentromeric regions.

    PubMed

    Sakuno, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    During meiosis, a single round of genome duplication is followed by two sequential rounds of chromosome segregation. Through this process, a diploid parent cell generates gametes with a haploid set of chromosomes. A characteristic of meiotic chromosome segregation is a stepwise loss of sister chromatid cohesion along chromosomal arms and at centromeres. Whereas arm cohesion plays an important role in ensuring homologue disjunction at meiosis I, persisting cohesion at pericentromeric regions throughout meiosis I is essential for the faithful equational segregation of sisters in the following meiosis II, similar to mitosis. A widely conserved pericentromeric protein called shugoshin, which associates with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), plays a critical role in this protection of cohesin. Another key aspect of meiosis I is the establishment of monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to spindle microtubules. Cohesion or physical linkage at the core centromeres, where kinetochores assemble, may conjoin sister kinetochores, leading to monopolar attachment. A meiosis-specific kinetochore factor such as fission yeast Moa1 or budding yeast monopolin contributes to this regulation. We propose that cohesion at the core centromere and pericentromeric regions plays distinct roles, especially in defining the orientation of kinetochores.

  16. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcore proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of manBcore gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcore proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-

  17. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides fromBrucella melitensismutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcoreproteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption ofwbkDgives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcpresidues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS fromB. melitensisEP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption ofmanBcoregives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcpresidue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcoreproteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion ofB. melitensis wadCremoves the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential inB. melitensisvirulence, the core deficiency in thewadCmutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5) structure

  18. Study for the Pentaquark Potential in SU(3) Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okiharu, Fumiko; Suganuma, Hideo; Takahashi, Toru T.

    2005-05-20

    We perform the first study of the static pentaquark (5Q) potential V{sub 5Q} in SU(3) quenched lattice QCD with 16{sup 3}x32 and {beta}=6.0. From the 5Q Wilson loop, V{sub 5Q} is calculated in a gauge-invariant manner, with the smearing method to enhance the ground-state component. V{sub 5Q} is well described by the OGE-plus-multi-Y ansatz: a sum of the one-gluon-exchange (OGE) Coulomb term and the multi-Y-type linear term proportional to the minimal total length of the flux tube linking the five quarks. Comparing with QQ and 3Q potentials, we find a universality of the string tension, {sigma}{sub QQ}{approx_equal}{sigma}{sub 3Q}{approx_equal}{sigma}{sub 5Q}, and the OGE result for Coulomb coefficients.

  19. Trace element fluxes and natural potential risks from 210Pb-dated sediment cores in lacustrine environments at the Central Mexican Plateau.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Cuadras, J F; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pérez-Bernal, L H; Sericano, J L; Preda, M; Wee Kwong, L Liong; Páez-Osuna, F

    2014-01-15

    The accumulation, enrichment and provenance of selected trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) were studied in sediment cores collected from three lakes located in the Central Mexican Plateau, selected on the basis of their contrasting degree of urbanization: Santa Elena Lake, in a rural and remote area; El Tule Lake, in a rural and slightly urbanized area; and Chapala Lake, in a highly urbanized area. Grain size, magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary constituents such as organic carbon, calcium carbonate, as well as major (Al, Fe, Mn) and minor (Ca, Li, Rb, Sr, Th) elements were analyzed to explain the concentration trends of trace metals. Factor analysis (FA) was used to assess the provenance of the trace elements. The highest metal enrichment factor (EF) above natural concentration levels was found at Chapala Lake for Ag (EF = 3.9), although other trace element EF in all lakes was <2.0, indicating slight contamination. However, the concentration levels of Cr and Ni in all lakes, Hg and Zn in Chapala Lake, Cu in El Tule Lake and As in Santa Elena Lake were above international benchmarks for which adverse effects are expected to occur frequently, even for those metals only slightly enriched (e.g. As, Cr). Through FA, the terrigenous contribution was identified as the most important source of trace metals to the three lakes, most likely related to deforestation and erosion of the surrounding areas, followed by atmospheric transport of volcanic ashes, rather than to direct sources.

  20. A bimodal neurophysiological study of motor control in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a step towards core mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hartmut; Hoegl, Thomas; Moll, Gunther H; Kratz, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge about the core neural mechanisms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, a pathophysiologically heterogeneous psychiatric disorder starting in childhood, is still limited. Progress may be achieved by combining different methods and levels of investigation. In the present study, we investigated neural mechanisms of motor control in 19 children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (aged 9-14 years) and 21 age-matched typically developing children by relating neural markers of attention and response control (using event-related potentials) and measures of motor excitability/inhibition (evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation). Thus, an interplay of processes at a subsecond scale could be studied. Using a monetary incentives-based cued Go/No-Go task, parameters that are well-known to be reduced in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were analysed: event-related potential components P3 (following cue stimuli; in Go and No-Go trials) and contingent negative variation as well as the transcranial magnetic stimulation-based short-interval intracortical inhibition measured at different latencies in Go and No-Go trials. For patient and control groups, different associations were obtained between performance, event-related potential and transcranial magnetic stimulation measures. In children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the P3 amplitude in Go trials was not correlated with reaction time measures but with short-interval intracortical inhibition at rest (r=0.56, P=0.01). In No-Go trials, P3 and short-interval intracortical inhibition after inhibiting the response (at 500 ms post-stimulus) were correlated in these children only (r=0.62; P=0.008). A classification rate of 90% was achieved when using short-interval intracortical inhibition (measured shortly before the occurrence of a Go or No-Go stimulus) and the amplitude of the P3 in cue trials as input features in a linear discriminant analysis. Findings indicate deviant neural

  1. The Nature of Fault Creep and Weakening in the San Andreas System Deduced from Studies of SAFOD Core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Rymer, M. J.; Lockner, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the processes operative at depth in fault zones is severely hampered by the general inability to study the actively deforming fault rocks in situ. One of the main goals of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), a key component of Earthscope, was the recovery of core to allow petrographic, chemical, and physical examination of an active, plate-boundary fault at seismogenic depths, something that had never before been attempted. The SAFOD drill site is located 14 km northwest of Parkfield in central California, along a portion of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) that is characterized by a combination of aseismic slip and microseismicity. Innovations in the design and implementation of SAFOD (summarized in Zoback, Hickman and Ellsworth, Scientific Drilling, No. 11, March 2011) led to the identification of two actively creeping fault traces at 2.65 and 2.70 km vertical depth (~112°C). Subsequent multilateral coring operations successfully sampled the two zones of foliated gouge where creep is localized: the 2.6-m-wide central deforming zone (CDZ) and the 1.6-m-wide southwest deforming zone (SDZ). The two gouge zones are closely similar in character, consisting of porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock dispersed in a fine-grained, foliated matrix of Mg-rich smectitic clays (saponite × corrensite). The boundaries of the CDZ and SDZ with adjoining sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley Group are mineralogically, chemically, and texturally sharp. The Mg-rich clay minerals in the gouge zones are interpreted to be the product of fluid-assisted, shear-enhanced metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite that was tectonically entrained in the SAF from a source in the Coast Range ophiolite. Laboratory friction tests indicate that gouge from the CDZ and SDZ deforms stably (i.e., creeps) at anomalously low levels of shear stress (coefficient of friction, μ ~ 0.15), which is sufficient to explain the

  2. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-li; Yang, Guo-hua; Yang, Chao-he; Que, Guo-he

    2016-01-01

    The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR), Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR), TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR), and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period. PMID:27274729

  3. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  4. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation.

  5. Magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles for studies of quinolones binding to protein by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Song, Daqian; Xiong, Huixia; Ai, Lisha; Ma, Pinyi; Sun, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles were used in the determination of drug binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) using a fluorescence spectroscopic method. The binding constants and number of binding sites for protein with drugs were calculated using the Scatchard equation. Because of their superparamagnetic and biocompatible characteristics, magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles served as carrier proteins for fixing proteins. After binding of the protein to a drug, the magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles-protein-drug complex was separated from the free drug using an applied magnetic field. The free drug concentration was obtained directly by fluorescence spectrometry and the proteins did not influence the drug determination. So, the achieved number of binding sites should be reliable. The binding constant and site number for ciprofloxacin (CPFX) binding to BSA were 2.055 × 10(5) L/mol and 31.7, and the corresponding values for norfloxacin (NOR) binding to BSA were 1.383 × 10(5) L/mol and 38.8. Based on the achieved results, a suitable method was proposed for the determination of binding constants and the site number for molecular interactions. The method was especially suitable for studies on the interactions of serum albumin with the active ingredients of Chinese medicine.

  6. Material combinations and parametric study of thermal and mechanical performance of pyramidal core sandwich panels used for hypersonic aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Lorenzini, Giulio; Xie, Gongnan

    2016-11-01

    A novel kind of lightweight integrated thermal protection system, named pyramidal core sandwich panel, is proposed to be a good safeguard for hypersonic aircrafts in the current study. Such system is considered as not only an insulation structure but also a load-bearing structure. In the context of design for hypersonic aircrafts, an efficient optimization should be paid enough attention. This paper concerns with the homogenization of the proposed pyramidal sandwich core panel using two-dimensional model in subsequent research for material selection. According to the required insulation performance and thermal-mechanical properties, several suitable material combinations are chosen as candidates for the pyramidal core sandwich panel by adopting finite element analysis and approximate response surface. To obtain lightweight structure with an excellent capability of heat insulation and load-bearing, an investigation on some specific design variables, which are significant for thermal-mechanical properties of the structure, is performed. Finally, a good balance between the insulation performance, the capability of load-bearing and the lightweight has attained.

  7. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  8. Evoked potential application to study of echolocation in cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supin, Alexander Ya.; Nactigall, Paul E.; Pawloski, Jeffrey; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2002-05-01

    The evoked-potential (EP) method is effective in studies of hearing capabilities of cetaceans. However, until now EP studies in cetaceans were performed only in conditions of passive hearing by recording EP to external stimuli. Can this method be applied to study active echolocation in odontocetes? To answer this question, auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR) were recorded in a false killer whale while the animal echolocated a target within an experiment in which the animal reported the target present or absent. The ABR collection was triggered by echolocation clicks. In these conditions, the recorded ABR pattern contained a duplicate set of waves. A comparison of ABR wave delays recorded during echolocation with those recorded during regular external stimulation has shown that the first set of waves is a response to the emitted click whereas the second one is a response to the echo. Both responses, to the emitted click and to the echo, were of comparable amplitude in spite of the intensity difference of these two sounds of more than 40 dB near the animal's head. This finding indicates some mechanisms releasing responses to echoes from masking by loud emitted clicks. The evoked-potential method may be productive to investigate these mechanisms.

  9. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  10. Feasibility Study: Potential Enhancements for the LLNL Renewables Website

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, F; Krawchuk, M; Moritz, M; Stephens, S; Goldstein, N

    2008-01-25

    This feasibility study investigates additional improvements/extensions to the LLNL Renewables Website. Currently, the Renewables Website focuses on wind energy in California. Future enhancements will include other renewable energy sources. The extensions described below are focused along two separate yet related avenues: (1) Forecasting wildfire risk in the regions of California where new development may occur, as a part of the 'Million Solar Roofs' program. (2) Gaining a better understanding of the ecological components and potential of biofuels from forests in California. These two avenues are further described in the report. Following is a technical description of the Center for Fire Research and Outreach computing and web service capabilities.

  11. Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study on Decay Processes of Core-Excited States of NaNO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Masao; Azuma, Junpei; Ueda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Isamu; Imamura, Masaki; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2015-05-01

    The absorption and resonant photoelectron spectra of NaNO2 films have been measured at Na-L, N-K, and O-K core levels. The complete understanding of the electronic structures of NaNO2 in a wide energy region is proposed in a band scheme. Resonant photoelectron spectra indicate that the lowest excited states of N-K and O-K excitations (NK-LES and OK-LES) decay predominantly through participator and spectator Auger processes, whereas the normal Auger decay process is negligibly small. The decay probabilities of the NK-LES and OK-LES through the participator Auger process are estimated to be about 47 and 54%, respectively. The delocalization lifetimes of the NK-LES and OK-LES are also estimated to be more than 40 and 28 fs, respectively.

  12. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project: Leg 10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, Frank T.; Sayles, Fred L.; Waterman, Lee S.

    1973-01-01

    Leg 10 interstitial water analyses provide new indications of the distribution of rock salt beneath the floor of the Gulf of Mexico, both confirming areas previously indicated to be underlain by salt bodies and extending evidence of salt distribution to seismically featureless areas in the Sigsbee Knolls trend and Isthmian Embayment. The criterion for presence of salt at depth is a consistent increase in interstitial salinity and chlorinity with depth. Site 86, on the northern margin of the Yucatan Platform, provided no evidence of salt at depth. Thus, our data tend to rule out the suggestion of Antoine and Bryant (1969) that the Sigsbee Knolls salt was squeezed out from beneath the Yucatan Scarp. Cores from Sites 90 and 91, in the central Sigsbee Deep, were not obtained from a great enough depth to yield definite evidence for the presence of buried salt.

  13. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Sayles, F.L.

    1971-01-01

    Leg 8 sites are dominated by siliceous-calcareous biogenic oozes having depositional rates of 0.1 to 1.5 cm/1000 years. Conservative constituents of pore fluids showed, as have cores from other pelagic areas of the Pacific, insignificant or marginally significant changes with depth and location. However, in Sites 70 and 71, calcium, magnesium and strontium showed major shifts in concentration with depth. These changes appear to be related to recrystallization phenomena in skeletal debris of nannoplankton and to the relative accumulation rate of the sediments. The chemical anomalies increase relatively smoothly with depth, demonstrating the effectiveness of vertical diffusional communication, and apparent lack of bulk fluid movement, as noted in Leg 7 and other sites.

  14. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  15. 18 CFR 5.11 - Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study plan meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potential Applicant's... FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION PROCESS § 5.11 Potential Applicant's proposed study plan and study...

  16. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Properties of a soft-core model of methanol: An integral equation theory and computer simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Huš, Matej; Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a coarse-grained model of methanol are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation theory. Methanol particles are described as dimers formed from an apolar Lennard-Jones sphere, mimicking the methyl group, and a sphere with a core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Different closure approximations of the RISM theory are compared and discussed. The liquid structure of methanol is investigated by calculating site-site radial distribution functions and static structure factors for a wide range of temperatures and densities. Results obtained show a good agreement between RISM and Monte Carlo simulations. The phase behavior of methanol is investigated by employing different thermodynamic routes for the calculation of the RISM free energy, drawing gas-liquid coexistence curves that match the simulation data. Preliminary indications for a putative second critical point between two different liquid phases of methanol are also discussed. PMID:25362323

  18. Properties of a soft-core model of methanol: An integral equation theory and computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz; Munaò, Gianmarco

    2014-10-28

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a coarse-grained model of methanol are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation theory. Methanol particles are described as dimers formed from an apolar Lennard-Jones sphere, mimicking the methyl group, and a sphere with a core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Different closure approximations of the RISM theory are compared and discussed. The liquid structure of methanol is investigated by calculating site-site radial distribution functions and static structure factors for a wide range of temperatures and densities. Results obtained show a good agreement between RISM and Monte Carlo simulations. The phase behavior of methanol is investigated by employing different thermodynamic routes for the calculation of the RISM free energy, drawing gas-liquid coexistence curves that match the simulation data. Preliminary indications for a putative second critical point between two different liquid phases of methanol are also discussed.

  19. Constraints on core formation from systematic study of metal-silicate partitioning on a great number of siderophile elements

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, J; Ryerson, F J

    2008-10-27

    The abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle are the result of core formation in the early Earth. Many variables are involved in the prediction of metal/silicate siderophile partition coefficients during core segregation: pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, silicate and metal compositions. Despite publications of numerous results of metal-silicate experiments, the experimental database and predictive expressions for elements partitioning are hampered by a lack of systematic study to separate and evaluate the effects of each variable. Only a relatively complete experimental database that describes Ni and Co partitioning now exists but is not sufficient to unambiguously decide between the most popular model for core formation with a single stage core-mantle equilibration at the bottom of a deep magma ocean (e.g. Li and Agee, 2001) and more recent alternative models (e.g. Wade and Wood, 2005; Rubie et al., 2007). In this experimental work, systematic study of metal silicate partitioning is presented for elements normally regarded as moderately siderophile (Mo, As, Ge, W, P, Ni, Co), slightly siderophile (Zn, Ga, Mn, V, Cr) and refractory lithophile (Nb, Ta). Using a new piston-cylinder design assembly allows us to present a suite of isobaric partitioning experiments at 3 GPa within a temperature range from 1600 to 2600 C and over a range of relative oxygen fugacity from IW-1.5 to IW-3.5. Silicate melts range from basaltic to peridotite in composition. The individual effect of pressure is also investigated through a combination of piston cylinder and multi anvil isothermal experiments from 0.5 to 18 GPa at 1900 C. Absolute measurements of partitioning coefficients combining EMP and LA-ICPMS analytical methods are provided. New results are obtained for elements whose partitioning behavior is usually poorly constrained and not integrated into any accretion or core formation models. We find notably that Ge, As, Mo become less siderophile with

  20. Preliminary Results from a Late Pleistocene to Holocene Paleoclimate Study of the Lake Sediment Cores, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedillo, D. N.; Brister, A. R.; LoPresti, C. A.; Maldonado, M.; Pitrucha, R. M.; West, C.; Martinez, E.; Lineline, J.; Petronis, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    We present the preliminary results from an integrated, paleoclimatic study of sediment cores collected from the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge (LVNWR) and surrounding region that bear on the late Pleistocene to Holocene paleoclimatic variations in northeastern NM. We collected sedimentologic, midge fossil, and rock magnetic data from sediment cores to characterize the materials, identify stratigraphic changes, document shifting lake levels, assess temperature changes, and infer paleoclimate conditions. Data from McAllister and Wallace Lake are encouraging and reveal depth dependent changes in fossil assemblages, grain size, and rock magnetic properties that we interpret to reflect climatic driven variations impacting the depositional system. We recognize three different types of chironomid subfamilies (Chironomini, Tanypodinae, and Orthocladiinae). Based on the fossil results, the water has been warm in the most recent years. Grain size distribution from the lower to upper core levels reveal that the amount of fine sand-sized sediment (0.125 mm diameter) increases while the amount of medium (0.25) to coarse (0.50) sand-sized sediment decreases implying that there may have been a reduction in stream energy and hence precipitation over the time period represented by the core. Bulk low-field magnetic susceptibility decreases by an order of magnitude from the surface to the base of the measured core suggesting a change in detrital magnetic influx into the lacustrian system. Curie point estimates indicate that the dominant magnetic mineral in all samples is cubic, low-Ti titanomagnetite phase. We postulate that concurrent with alpine glacial activity during the Pleistocene, the LVNWR and the transitional Great Plains region to the northeast was an expansive single lake or interconnected lake system, analogous to the Pleistocene lakes of the Estancia Basin (Lake Estancia) and the Tularosa Basin (Lake Otero) of central and southern NM. Following the end of glacial

  1. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  2. Intercomparison of radiocarbon bomb pulse and 210Pb age models. A study in a peat bog core from North Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, Natalia; De Vleeschouwer, François; Sikorski, Jarosław; Pawlyta, Jacek; Fagel, Nathalie; Le Roux, Gaël; Pazdur, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon and 210Pb were measured on the uppermost 40 cm of a Wardenaar peat core retrieved from a Baltic raised bog at Słowińskie Błota (Pomerania, North Poland). This site is the subject of ongoing multiproxy studies covering the last 1300 years. Radiocarbon age model was constructed on the basis of 14 AMS dates obtained on selected Sphagnum spp. fragments, with use of P_Sequence tool. We present here a comparison of this model with the age model obtained using CRS model classically applied to 210Pb measurements.

  3. Study of laser-induced damage to large core silica fiber by Nd:YAG and Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Hokansson, Adam; Whelan, Dan; Clancy, Michael

    2009-02-01

    As a continuation of our earlier study at 2.1 μm wavelength, we have investigated the laser damage to several types of step-index, large core (1500 μm) silica fibers at two new wavelengths by high power long pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Alexandrite (755 nm) lasers. It was observed that fibers with different designs showed a significant difference in performance at these wavelengths. We will also report a correlation of damage to the fibers between the two laser wavelengths. The performance analyses of different fiber types under the given test conditions will enable optimization of fiber design for specific applications.

  4. Lead phytoremediation potential of Vetiver grass: a hydroponic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachanoor, D. S.; Andra, S. P.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal that is released into the environment from a variety of sources. Sources of Pb contamination in soils can be divided into three broad categories: industrial activities, such as mining and smelting processes, agricultural activities, such as application of insecticide and municipal sewage sludge, and urban activities, such as use of Pb in gasoline, paints, and other materials. Severe Pb contamination of soils may cause a variety of environmental problems, including loss of vegetation, groundwater contamination and Pb toxicity in plants, animals and humans. The use of plants to remove toxic metals from soils (phytoremediation) is fast emerging as an acceptable strategy for cost-effective and environmentally sound remediation of contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the lead uptake potential and biochemical stress response mechanism in vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) upon exposure to Pb in contaminated soils. We investigated the effect of increasing concentrations of Pb on vetiver grass grown in a hydroponic system. Plant response to the addition of phosphate in the presence of Pb was also studied. Biochemical stress response was studied by monitoring the activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymes. The results indicated that exposure to Pb in the range of 0 ppm -1200 ppm had no significant negative effects on the growth of vetiver grass. There was no considerable decrease in vetiver biomass, implying the potential of this grass for Pb phytoremediation. The translocation of Pb from the root to the shoot was up to 20%. The SOD activity was in positive correlation with Pb concentrations in the solution, but no such trend was observed with GPx. In systems containing phosphate fertilizer, lead precipitated out immediately, thereby decreasing the soluble concentration of lead, resulting in less availability of Pb to the grass.

  5. Concurrent fine needle aspirations and core needle biopsies: a comparative study of substrates for next-generation sequencing in solid organ malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Chen, Hui; Singh, Rajesh R; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Manekia, Jawad; Barkoh, Bedia A; Yao, Hui; Sabir, Sharjeel; Broaddus, Russell R; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Staerkel, Gregg; Stewart, John; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2017-01-13

    Minimally invasive procedures, such as fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy, are commonly used for the diagnosis in solid organ malignancies. In the era of targeted therapy, it is crucial for molecular testing to be performed on these limited volume specimens. Although several recent studies have demonstrated the utility of small biopsy specimens for molecular testing, there remains debate as to whether core needle biopsy specimens are more reliable than fine needle aspiration for molecular studies. In this study, we reviewed concurrently acquired fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples (n=24), and compared overall cellularity, tumor fraction, and the results of next-generation sequencing. All somatic mutations detected in core needle biopsy samples were also detected in fine needle aspiration samples. The estimated tumor fraction was significantly higher in fine needle aspiration smears than core needle biopsy samples (P=0.003), whereas the overall DNA yield from smears was significantly lower than that obtained from the core needle biopsy specimens (P=0.01). The normalized average amplicon coverage for the genes analyzed was significantly higher in cytology smears than paired core needle biopsy samples, with lower numbers of failed amplicons and higher overall mutation allelic frequencies seen in the former. We further evaluated 100 malignant fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples, acquired concurrently, for overall cellularity and tumor fraction. Overall cellularity and tumor fraction of fine needle aspiration samples was significantly higher than concurrently acquired core needle biopsy samples (P<0.001). In conclusion, we show that fine needle aspiration samples frequently provide better cellularity, higher tumor fraction, and superior sequencing metrics than concurrently acquired core needle biopsy samples. Cytologic specimens, therefore, should be better integrated into routine molecular diagnostics workflow to maximize

  6. Study on synthesis of ultrafine Cu-Ag core-shell powders with high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-hsien; Yang, Chih-hao; Chen, Kuan-ting; Popuri, Srinivasa R.; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Tang, Bo-Shin

    2012-12-01

    Cu-Ag composite powders with high electrical conductivity were synthesized by electroless plating of silver sulfate, copper powders with eco-friendly sodium citrate as reducing agent, dispersant and chelating agent in an aqueous system. The influences of sodium citrate/Ag ratio on Ag coatings of Cu powders were investigated. Ag was formed a dense coating on the surface of Cu powders at a molar ratio of sodium citrate/Ag = 0.07/1. SEM showed an uniformity of Ag coatings on Cu powders. SEM-EDX also revealed that Cu cores were covered by Ag shells on the whole. The surface composition analysis by XPS indicated that without Cu or Ag atoms in the surface were oxidized. The resistivity measurements of Cu-Ag paste shows that they have closer resistivity as the pure silver paste's after 250 °C for 30 min heat-treatment (2.55 × 10-4 Ω cm) and 350 °C for 30 min heat-treatment (1.425 × 10-4 Ω cm).

  7. Study of Fast, Near-Infrared Photodetectors for the ITER Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Alfier, A.; Beurskens, M.; Kempenaars, M.; Walsh, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    A key component for the ITER core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic would be a detector with good sensitivity in the 850-1060 nm near infrared (NIR) spectral region. Covering this spectral region becomes necessary if a Nd:YAG laser system operating at λ = 1.06 μm is used as the laser source, which is a very attractive choice in terms of available energy, repetition rate, reliability and cost. In this paper we review the state of the art of two types of detectors available for the above spectral range: the transferred electron (TE) InGaAs/InP hybrid photodiode and the InxGa1-xAs microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and we describe the advancements necessary for a possible application in the ITER LIDAR TS. In addition we describe the preliminary characterization of new GaAsP fast MCP photomultipliers (PMTs) suitable for the detection of the visible part of the LIDAR TS spectrum in JET and ITER.

  8. Diagenesis of bank margin carbonates monitors glacio-eustacy: modeling and core study results

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.K.; Al-Saqri, K.; Frohlich, C.

    1985-01-01

    Subsiding bank margin carbonates provide a monitoring system for high frequency sea level fluctuations. When sea level rises, new reefs and skeletal sands accumulate to near high-stand sea level. When sea level falls, subaerial exposure and related meteoric and mixed water diagenesis rapidly impart their mineralogic, isotopic, chemical, and petrographic signature on the strata. The authors model the interaction of fluctuating sea level (Milankovitch frequencies) and subsiding bank margin carbonates. Characteristic diagenetic lithologies occur seemingly randomly interbedded and unrelatable to specific subaerial exposure surfaces. This is similar to the pattern observed in Eocene bank margin skeletal sands of Kirkuk Field, Iraq. Meteoric diagenesis dominates the upper 35 meters of the authors core. The next 85 meters contain randomly alternating beds of meteoric limestone, mixed water dolomite, and limestone with well-preserved skeletal grains. This sequence is consistent with rapid glacio-eustatic fluctuations of Late Eocene sea level followed by a 35 to 50 meter glacio-eustatic lowering of average sea level at or near Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  9. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment.

  10. Comparative studies for different proximity potentials applied to α decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y. J.; Zhang, G. L.; Qu, W. W.; Qian, J. Q.

    2015-09-01

    Half-lives of α decay of even-even nuclei calculated by using fourteen different versions of proximity potentials are compared to experimental data. The results show that the results of the generalized proximity potential 1977 are very much in agreement with the experimental data. In comparison with the distributions of nuclear potentials at small distances and the distributions of total potentials above the released energy Q α , it is found that at small distances the distributions of nuclear potentials have large difference and the distributions of total potentials are different among the listed proximity potentials. The different potential distributions affect the penetration probability of α, which is related to the half-life of the α decay for each nucleus. The generalized proximity potential 1977 is also used to calculate the half-lives of α decay of nuclei with odd mass numbers. The results show that the generalized proximity potential 1977 can calculate the half-lives of the α decay of almost all nuclei, which underlines and supports the use of the generalized proximity potential 1977 by Santhosh et al. in the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) and the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN).

  11. Luminescence, lifetime, and quantum yield studies of redispersible Eu3+-doped GdPO4 crystalline nanoneedles: Core-shell and concentration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaiphaba, N.; Ningthoujam, R. S.; Singh, N. Shanta; Vatsa, R. K.; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N. L.; Tewari, R.

    2010-02-01

    Crystalline nanoneedles of Eu3+-doped GdPO4 and Eu3+-doped GdPO4 covered with GdPO4 shell (core shell) have been prepared at relatively low temperature of 150 °C in ethylene glycol medium. From luminescence study, asymmetric ratio of Eu3+ emission at 612 nm (electric dipole transition) to 592 nm (magnetic dipole transition) is found to be less than one. Maximum luminescence was observed from the nanoparticles with Eu3+ concentration of 5 at. %. For a fixed concentration of Eu3+ doping, there is an improvement in emission intensity for core-shell nanoparticles compared to that for core. This has been attributed to effective removal of surface inhomogeneities around Eu3+ ions present on the surface of core as well as the passivation of inevitable surface states, defects or capping ligand (ethylene glycol) of core nanoparticles by bonding to the shell. Lifetime for D50 level of Eu3+ was found to increase three times for core-shell nanoparticles compared to that for core confirming the more Eu3+ ions with symmetry environment in core shell. For 5 at. % Eu3+-doped GdPO4, quantum yield of 19% is obtained. These nanoparticles are redispersible in water, ethanol, or chloroform and thus will be useful in biological labeling. The dispersed particles are incorporated in polymer-based films that will be useful in display devices.

  12. Studies of Potential Mars Surveyor 1998 Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 lander payload consists of a descent imager, the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) instruments (lander stereo camera, arm-mounted close-up imager, meteorology package, thermal and evolved gas analyzer), and a LIDAR instrument. The mission focuses on assessment of near-surface water ice in the south polar region, and the volatile and climate history of Mars. In order to achieve these objectives, the landing site must allow access to polar layered deposits by the robotic arm, which may be able to dig as much as 0.5 m below the surface. Hence, the presence of recent aeolian debris at the landing site may adversely affect the ability of the MVACS instruments to gather the samples and acquire data needed to properly address the science objectives. The studies described here include mapping surface units in the landing region (73S - 77S, 140W - 230W) to infer the distribution of aeolian debris and to identify potential landing sites where mantling is minimal. Because the '98 lander will not be able to survive very low temperature conditions, this study also includes mapping of south polar seasonal frost retreat based on Viking Orbiter images. The results of this work, in conjunction with complementary studies by other investigators, will facilitate the selection of the Mars Surveyor 1998 landing site (and backup) by the summer of 1998.

  13. An epidemiological study of workers potentially exposed to ethylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wong, O; Trent, L S

    1993-04-01

    This epidemiological study was of 18,728 employees at 14 United States facilities producing sterilised medical supplies and spices, who were potentially exposed to ethylene oxide (EO) for at least 90 days. The mortality of the cohort was studied to the end of 1988. A total of 1353 deaths was identified. The cohort had a significantly lower mortality than the general population from all causes, all cancers, and non-malignant diseases. In the entire cohort, mortality was not significantly increased from any of the cancer sites examined. In particular, no significant increase in mortality was found in the cancer sites of interest based on previous studies--namely, stomach, leukaemia (including major specific cell types), pancreas, and brain. The lack of an increased mortality for these cancer sites was further strengthened by the lack of a dose-response relation with duration of employment and latency. Among the men, a statistically significant increase in mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found. There was no indication for a dose-response relation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and no specific job categories seemed to be responsible for the increase. Among the women, a deficit of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found, which was not consistent with the finding in the men. Therefore, the increase among the men did not seem to be related to exposure to EO.

  14. An epidemiological study of workers potentially exposed to ethylene oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O; Trent, L S

    1993-01-01

    This epidemiological study was of 18,728 employees at 14 United States facilities producing sterilised medical supplies and spices, who were potentially exposed to ethylene oxide (EO) for at least 90 days. The mortality of the cohort was studied to the end of 1988. A total of 1353 deaths was identified. The cohort had a significantly lower mortality than the general population from all causes, all cancers, and non-malignant diseases. In the entire cohort, mortality was not significantly increased from any of the cancer sites examined. In particular, no significant increase in mortality was found in the cancer sites of interest based on previous studies--namely, stomach, leukaemia (including major specific cell types), pancreas, and brain. The lack of an increased mortality for these cancer sites was further strengthened by the lack of a dose-response relation with duration of employment and latency. Among the men, a statistically significant increase in mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found. There was no indication for a dose-response relation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and no specific job categories seemed to be responsible for the increase. Among the women, a deficit of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found, which was not consistent with the finding in the men. Therefore, the increase among the men did not seem to be related to exposure to EO. PMID:8494770

  15. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  16. A study of core Thomson scattering measurements in ITER using a multi-laser approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurskiev, G. S.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Bassan, M.; Andrew, P.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Mukhin, E. E.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kajita, S.; Masyukevich, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    The electron component is the main channel for anomalous power loss and the main indicator of transient processes in the tokamak plasma. The electron temperature and density profiles mainly determine the operational mode of the machine. This imposes demanding requirements on the precision and on the spatial and temporal resolution of the Thomson scattering (TS) measurements. Measurements of such high electron temperature with good accuracy in a large fusion device such as ITER using TS encounter a number of physical problems. The 40 keV TS spectrum has a significant blue shift. Due to the transmission functions of the fibres and to their darkening that can occur under a strong neutron irradiation, the operational wavelength range is bounded on the blue side. For example, high temperature measurements become impossible with the 1064 nm probing wavelength since the TS signal within the boundaries of the operational window weakly depends on Te. The second problem is connected with the TS calibration. The TS system for a large fusion machine like ITER will have a set of optical components inaccessible for maintenance, and their spectral characteristics may change with time. Since the present concept of the TS system for ITER relies on the classical approach to measuring the shape of the scattered spectra using wide spectral channels, the diagnostic will be very sensitive to the changes in the optical transmission. The third complication is connected with the deviation of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian that can happen under a strong ECRH/ECCD, and it may additionally hamper the measurements. This paper analyses the advantages of a ‘multi-laser approach’ implementation for the current design of the core TS system. Such an approach assumes simultaneous plasma probing with different wavelengths that allows the measurement accuracy to be improved significantly and to perform the spectral calibration of the TS system. Comparative analysis

  17. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  18. Core-shell structured square mixed-spin-2 and 3/2 Ising nanowire on the Bethe lattice: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic properties of square Ising nanowire on the Bethe lattice with core-shell structure consisting of spin-2 at the center and four spin-3/2 at the corners are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The core-shell structured model is studied using exchange interactions between surface spins (Jss ), between core spins (J σσ ) and between surface and core spins (J S σ ) and crystal field interaction (Δ) at the sites of spin-2 and spin-3/2. The critical temperature is deduced for different layers (N) and different shell-shell exchange interactions. The variation of magnetization with the reduced crystal field and exchange interactions on square Ising nanowire on the Bethe lattice has been studied with effect of other physical parameters. The magnetic hysteresis cycle is studied with different parameters such as: temperature, crystal field and shell-shell exchange interactions. The multiple hysteresis cycles are found.

  19. A Two-Year Study of Hard-Core Unemployed Clerical Workers: Effects of Scholastic Achievement, Clerical Skill, and Self-Esteem on Job Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to longitudinally assess the predictive validity and the nature of the relationships of scholastic achievement, clerical skill, and social self-esteem with the job success of hard-core unemployed clerical workers. (Author/RK)

  20. A case study of full integration of the arts into core subject area instruction in one East Texas secondary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leysath, Maggie

    This exploratory phenomenological case study investigated the influence the full integration of the arts into core subject instruction has on classroom environment, student academic achievement, and student engagement as perceived by administrators, teachers, and students in one East Texas secondary school. Participant interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2012) six-step method for analyzing phenomenological studies. The researcher implemented three learning activities in which ceramics learning objectives were fully integrated with chemistry learning objectives. The first activity combined clay properties and pottery wheel throwing with significant numbers. The second activity combined glaze formulation with moles. The third combined stoichiometry with the increased glaze formula for students to glaze the bowls they made. Findings suggest the full integration of art in core subject area instruction has numerous positive effects. Participants reported improved academic achievement for all students including reluctant learners. Students, teachers, and the administrator reported greater participation in the art integrated activities. Participants perceived a need for further training for teachers and administrators for greater success.

  1. Importance of assessing CK19 immunostaining in core biopsies in patients subjected to sentinel node study by OSNA.

    PubMed

    Vilardell, Felip; Novell, Anna; Martin, Javier; Santacana, Maria; Velasco, Ana; Díez-Castro, M J; Cuevas, Dolors; Panadés, M Jose; González, Serafin; Llombart, Antonio; Iglesias, Edelmiro; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of sentinel lymph node (SLN) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is being used increasingly as a very sensitive and quick method for intraoperative axillary staging in patients with breast cancer. This molecular diagnostic assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19), a luminal epithelial cell marker broadly expressed in most breast carcinomas and not normally found in lymph nodes. Almost all breast cancers express this cytoskeleton protein, but some breast tumors have been found to lose the expression of CK19. CK19 immunostaining in core biopsies has been recommended in selecting patients eligible for OSNA analysis because SLNs with metastatic involvement by CK19-negative breast cancers may result in a false negative result by OSNA. However, the real frequency of CK19-negative breast cancer has to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the frequency and molecular profile of CK19-negative breast carcinomas in three series of cases. The first is a prospective series of 197 breast carcinomas, 111 of which were subjected to SLN evaluation by OSNA. The second is a retrospective series of 41 triple-negative (TN) breast carcinomas, and the third is a retrospective series of 68 breast cancer patients (matched core biopsies and metastatic lymph nodes) that had been evaluated by conventional procedures before the OSNA methodology was adopted in our institution. Our results not only demonstrate that lack of expression of CK19 is infrequent in breast cancers but also that performing CK19 immunohistochemical staining is important on diagnostic core biopsies in taking the decision of using OSNA methodology in the evaluation of sentinel nodes in breast cancer patients.

  2. Development of the Pressure-core Nondestructive Analysis Tools (PNATs) for Methane Hydrate Sedimentary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Jiro; Yoneda, Jun; Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke

    2015-04-01

    Potential of methane hydrate reservoir as a methane gas resource depends on the physical and chemical properties of geological structure. Seismic, logging and coring are very important information and data to understand these properties. Pressure core analysis is an advanced way to characterize reservoir properties such as the porosity, methane hydrate saturation, permeability, mechanical properties and so on. However, the quality of core samples should be guaranteed, which will be confirmed from the seismic and logging data in advance. Pressure core can be minimalized the dissociation of methane hydrate. The AIST introduced the Pressure-core Nondestructive Analysis Tools (PNATs), in which pressure core is handled without depressurizing the pore pressure until setting up core samples into the tools. The PNATs can evaluate the permeability, hydrate saturation, X-ray CT image, p-wave response, mechanical properties and so on, under the full pressurized operation and provide essential reservoir parameters. In this presentation, we will introduce the details of developed PNATs and several results for pressured cores obtained in the eastern Nankai Trough off Japan. This study is financially supported by METI and Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (the MH21 Research Consortium).

  3. Studies of the electrical potential difference in rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Seely, J F; Chirito, E

    1975-07-01

    The electrical potential difference (PD) in the rat proximal convoluted tubule was investigated in vivo as a function of distance from the glomerulus. The PD was found to be invariably negative (up to -4.5 mV) in the earliest segments (less than 0.5 mm from the glomerulus) and rose to positive values (+2 to +4) in the later segments (1 mm beyond the glomerulus). This change in PD correlated with the bubule fluid-to-plasma (TF/P) chloride ratios, which rose from unity in the early segments to approximately 1.3 in the late. Corresponding changes in PD and chloride ratios could be elicited by single-nephron stop-flow techniques in the early segments. Luminal perfusion techniques demonstrated a direct relationship between PD and tubule fluid chloride concentration. Acetazolamide was found to significantly reduce both late proximal PD (less than +2 mV) and TF/P chloride ratios (less than 1.06). Split-drop studies demonstrated that the negative PD in the early proximal tubule was dependent on the presence of glucose and alanine and the absence of a chloride gradient, whereas in the late proximal tubule under the same conditions the PD was not significantly different from zero. In this segment of the nephron the positive PD in free flow appeared to result from the chloride diffusion potential generated by preferential HCO3 reabsorption. These results provide further demonstration of intrinsic differences in the transport properties along the length of the proximal convoluted tubule.

  4. Study of morbidity of personnel with potential exposure to vinclozolin.

    PubMed Central

    Zober, A; Hoffmann, G; Ott, M G; Will, W; Germann, C; van Ravenzwaay, B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine internal exposure and targeted health outcomes of employees exposed to 3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-vinyl-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione; chemical abstracts service (CAS) number: 50471-44-8 (vinclozolin). METHODS--A cross sectional study of 67 men exposed to vinclozolin for one to 13 years during synthesis and formulation operations and 52 controls. Biomonitoring was based on determination of urinary metabolites that contained a 3,5-dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) moiety. Targeted health endpoints were the same as in previous subchronic and chronic animal studies--namely, reversible changes in the concentrations of hormones of the adrenocorticotrophic and gonadotrophic feedback systems, signs of liver injury, haemolytic anaemia, cataract formation (uniquely in rats), and hormonally induced hyperplasia and tumours at high doses. The clinical investigation consisted of a medical and occupational history questionnaire, physical examination, laboratory determinations (including testosterone, LH, and FSH measurements), ultrasonography of the liver and prostate, a detailed eye examination, and routine spirometry. RESULTS--The mean 3,5-DCA concentration for two thirds of the study group exceeded an equivalent of the vinclozolin acceptable daily intake (ADI) used for consumer regulatory purposes. Even the highest concentrations were, however, at least 10 times below the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) based on animal studies. Analysis of physical examination and laboratory data provided no evidence of hormonal responses induced by vinclozolin. Furthermore, no evidence of liver injury, prostate changes, cataract formation, or haemolytic anaemia was found. CONCLUSION--There was no evidence of any health effects induced by vinclozolin among employees with potential long term exposure. In particular, no antiandrogenic effects were found. PMID:7795738

  5. Exploding massive stars in real time: highlights from iPTF studies of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate explosions of massive stars as core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are an extremely diverse phenomenon, not well understood theoretically. iPTF has provided interesting contributions to this field in several aspects. I will highlight mainly two of these: studies of the early emission from SNe, including the rising part of the light curve and very early flash spectroscopy, which are quite unique to iPTF due to its high cadence; and studies of rare and unusual objects. These span a range of properties from rapidly evolving events to the most extended SNe we know of, events in the luminous and faint ends of the SN luminosity range, and events with complex temporal behavior, such as multiple light-curve bumps. Prospects for future studies with the upcoming ZTF will be briefly presented.

  6. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Ilas, Germina; Miller, James Henry; Primm, Trent; Sease, John D; Guida, Tracey; Jolly, Brian C

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  7. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  8. Tephrostratigraphic studies on a sediment core from Lake Prespa in the Balkans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaschke, M.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Wagner, B.; Böhm, A.; Nowaczyk, N.; Rethemeyer, J.; Hilgers, A.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed tephrostratigraphic record, which dates back to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5b (ca. 91 kyr), has been established from a 17.76 m long core (Co1215) from Lake Prespa (Macedonia, Albania and Greece). A total of eleven tephra and cryptotephra layers (PT0915-1 to PT0915-11) were identified, using XRF scanning, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and macro- and microscopic inspection of the sediments. The major element composition of glass shards and/or micro-pumice fragments indicates that the tephras and cryptotephras originate from the explosive volcanism of Italy. Eight tephra and cryptotephra layers were correlated with specific volcanic eruptions: the AD 512 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (1438 cal yr BP), the Mercato eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (8890 ± 90 cal yr BP), the Tufi Biancastri/LN1-LN2 eruption of the Campi Flegrei (14 749 ± 523 cal yr BP and 15 551 ± 621 cal yr BP), the SMP1-e/Y-3 eruption of the Campi Flegrei (30 000-31 000 cal yr BP), the Campanian Ignimbrite/Y-5 eruption of the Campi Flegrei (39 280 ± 110 cal yr BP), the SMP1-a event of Ischia Island (around 44 000 cal yr BP) and the Green Tuff/Y-6 eruption of Pantelleria Island (around 45 000 cal yr BP). One tephra could be attributed to the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, but probably represents an unknown eruption at ca. 60 000 cal yr BP. Cryptotephras PT0915-6 and PT0915-10 remain unclassified so far, but according to the presented age-depth model these would have been deposited around 35 000 and 48 500 cal yr BP, respectively. Some of the tephras and cryptotephras are recognised for the first time in the Balkan region. The tephrostratigraphic work provides important information about ash dispersal and explosion patterns of source volcanoes and can be used to correlate and date geographically distant paleoenvironmental and archaeological archives in the central Mediterranean region. Moreover, the tephrostratigraphic work in combination with radiocarbon and electron spin resonance (ESR

  9. Tephrostratigraphic studies on a sediment core from Lake Prespa in the Balkans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaschke, M.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Wagner, B.; Böhm, A.; Nowaczyk, N.; Rethemeyer, J.; Hilgers, A.

    2012-09-01

    A detailed tephrostratigraphic record, which dates back to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, has been established from a 17.76 m long core (Co1215) from Lake Prespa (Macedonia, Albania and Greece). A total of eleven tephra and cryptotephra layers (PT0915-1 to PT0915-11) were identified, using XRF scanning, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and macro- and microscopic inspection of the sediments. The major element composition of glass shards and/or micro-pumice fragments indicates that the tephras and cryptotephras originate from the explosive volcanism of Italy. Eight tephra and cryptotephra layers were correlated with specific volcanic eruptions: cryptotephra PT0915-1 with the 512 AD eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (1438 cal yr BP), tephra PT0915-2 with the Mercato eruption of Somma-Vesuvius (8890 ± 90 cal yr BP), cryptotephras PT0915-3 and PT0915-4 with Tufi Biancastri/LN1-LN2 of the Campi Flegrei (14 749 ± 523 cal yr BP and 15 551 ± 621 cal yr BP), tephra PT0915-5 with the SMP1-e/Y-3 eruption of the Campi Flegrei (30 000-31 000 cal yr BP), tephra PT0915-7 with the Campanian Ignimbrite/Y-5 of the Campi Flegrei (39 280 ± 110 cal yr BP), cryptotephra PT0915-8 with the SMP1-a event of Ischia Island (around 44 000 cal yr BP) and tephra PT0915-9 with the Green Tuff/Y-6 eruption of Pantelleria Island (around 45 000 cal yr BP). Tephra PT0915-11 could be attributed to the volcanic activity of Mount Etna, but probably represents a hitherto unknown eruption at ca. 60 000 cal yr BP. Cryptotephras PT0915-6 and PT0915-10 remain unclassified so far, but according to the presented age-depth model these would have been deposited around 35 000 and 48 500 cal yr BP, respectively. Some of the tephras and cryptotephras are recognised for the first time in the Balkan region. The tephrostratigraphic work provides important information about ash dispersal and explosion patterns of source volcanoes and can be used to correlate and date geographically distant paleoenvironmental and

  10. Analysis of Autophagy Genes in Microalgae: Chlorella as a Potential Model to Study Mechanism of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiao; Zhao, Li; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae, with the ability to mitigate CO2 emission and produce carbohydrates and lipids, are considered one of the most promising resources for producing bioenergy. Recently, we discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the metabolism of photosynthetic system and lipids production. So far, more than 30-autophagy related (ATG) genes in all subtypes of autophagy have been identified. However, compared with yeast and mammals, in silico and experimental research of autophagy pathways in microalgae remained limited and fragmentary. Principal Findings In this article, we performed a genome-wide analysis of ATG genes in 7 microalgae species and explored their distributions, domain structures and evolution. Eighteen “core autophagy machinery” proteins, four mammalian-specific ATG proteins and more than 30 additional proteins (including “receptor-adaptor” complexes) in all subtypes of autophagy were analyzed. Data revealed that receptor proteins in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting and mitophagy seem to be absent in microalgae. However, most of the “core autophagy machinery” and mammalian-specific proteins are conserved among microalgae, except for the ATG9-cycling system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the second ubiquitin-like protein conjugation complex in several algal species. The catalytic and binding residues in ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, ATG8, ATG10 and ATG12 are also conserved and the phylogenetic tree of ATG8 coincides well with the phylogenies. Chlorella contains the entire set of the core autophagy machinery. In addition, RT-PCR analysis verified that all crucial ATG genes tested are expressed during autophagy in both Chlorella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Finally, we discovered that addition of 3-Methyladenine (a PI3K specific inhibitor) could suppress the formation of autophagic vacuoles in Chlorella. Conclusions Taken together, Chlorella may represent a potential model organism to investigate autophagy pathways in photosynthetic

  11. Childhood Trauma and Adult Interpersonal Functioning: A Study Using the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme Method (CCRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, M.; Perry, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the long-term correlates of childhood trauma in regard to interpersonal functioning in adulthood. Method: One hundred and nineteen (N=119) subjects from the Austen Riggs Follow-along Study were included in the study. The Traumatic Antecedent Interview scoring method was used to assess 10 types of childhood…

  12. Characteristic of core materials in polymeric micelles effect on their micellar properties studied by experimental and dpd simulation methods.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Furong; Guan, Xuewa; Cao, Huan; Su, Ting; Cao, Jun; Chen, Yuanwei; Cai, Mengtan; He, Bin; Gu, Zhongwei; Luo, Xianglin

    2015-08-15

    Polymeric micelles are one important class of nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery, but the impact of hydrophobic segments on drug encapsulation and release is unclear, which deters the rationalization of drug encapsulation into polymeric micelles. This paper focused on studying the correlation between the characteristics of hydrophobic segments and encapsulation of structurally different drugs (DOX and β-carotene). Poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) or poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) were used as hydrophobic segments to synthesize micelle-forming amphiphilic block copolymers with the hydrophilic methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG). Both blank and drug loaded micelles were spherical in shape with sizes lower than 50 nm. PCL-based micelles exhibited higher drug loading capacity than their PLLA-based counterparts. Higher encapsulation efficiency of β-carotene was achieved compared with DOX. In addition, both doxorubicin and β-carotene were released much faster from PCL-based polymeric micelles. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation revealed that the two drugs tended to aggregate in the core of the PCL-based micelles but disperse in the core of PLLA based micelles. In vitro cytotoxicity investigation of DOX loaded micelles demonstrated that a faster drug release warranted a more efficient cancer-killing effect. This research could serve as a guideline for the rational design of polymeric micelles for drug delivery.

  13. Occupied and unoccupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film studied by core-absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, M.; Hideshima, T.; Azuma, J.; Yamamoto, I.; Imamura, M.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-04-01

    Unoccupied and occupied electronic structures of an L-cysteine film have been studied by absorption and resonant photoelectron spectroscopies. Core absorptions at S-L, C-K, N-K, and O-K levels indicate that the lower unoccupied states are predominantly composed of oxygen-2p, carbon-2p, and sulfur-4s+3d orbitals, while higher unoccupied states may be attributed dominantly to nitrogen-np (n ≥ 3), oxygen-np (n ≥ 3), and sulfur-ns+md (n ≥ 4, m ≥ 3) orbitals. Resonant photoelectron spectra at S-L23 and O-K levels indicate that the highest occupied state is originated from sulfur-3sp orbitals, while oxygen-2sp orbitals contribute to the deeper valence states. The delocalization lifetimes of the oxygen-1s and sulfur-2p excited states are estimated from a core-hole clock method to be about 9 ± 1 and 125 ± 25 fs, respectively.

  14. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  15. Single-molecule studies reveal reciprocating of WRN helicase core along ssDNA during DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Qiang; Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Bo; Fossé, Philippe; René, Brigitte; Mauffret, Olivier; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-03-07

    Werner syndrome is caused by mutations in the WRN gene encoding WRN helicase. A knowledge of WRN helicase's DNA unwinding mechanism in vitro is helpful for predicting its behaviors in vivo, and then understanding their biological functions. In the present study, for deeply understanding the DNA unwinding mechanism of WRN, we comprehensively characterized the DNA unwinding properties of chicken WRN helicase core in details, by taking advantages of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) method. We showed that WRN exhibits repetitive DNA unwinding and translocation behaviors on different DNA structures, including forked, overhanging and G-quadruplex-containing DNAs with an apparently limited unwinding processivity. It was further revealed that the repetitive behaviors were caused by reciprocating of WRN along the same ssDNA, rather than by complete dissociation from and rebinding to substrates or by strand switching. The present study sheds new light on the mechanism for WRN functioning.

  16. Structural study of a bent-core liquid crystal showing the B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Folcia, Cesar Luis; Etxebarria, J.; Ortega, J.; Ros, M. B.

    2006-09-15

    An experimental study of the B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition is carried out in a bent-core liquid crystal. The study is essentially based on x-ray measurements as a function of temperature. The B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition is extremely unusual and implies a deep structural change from a columnar phase to a lamellar phase. We have found that the B{sub 1} phase in our compound is similar to the so-called B{sub 1} reversed phase, with an additional splay of the polarization in the columns. On approaching the B{sub 2} phase the width of the cross section of the columns increases. The transition is clearly first order, with a large hysteresis though the enthalpy content is very small. A possible mechanism for the transition is briefly sketched.

  17. Single-molecule studies reveal reciprocating of WRN helicase core along ssDNA during DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Qiang; Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Bo; Fossé, Philippe; René, Brigitte; Mauffret, Olivier; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome is caused by mutations in the WRN gene encoding WRN helicase. A knowledge of WRN helicase’s DNA unwinding mechanism in vitro is helpful for predicting its behaviors in vivo, and then understanding their biological functions. In the present study, for deeply understanding the DNA unwinding mechanism of WRN, we comprehensively characterized the DNA unwinding properties of chicken WRN helicase core in details, by taking advantages of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) method. We showed that WRN exhibits repetitive DNA unwinding and translocation behaviors on different DNA structures, including forked, overhanging and G-quadruplex-containing DNAs with an apparently limited unwinding processivity. It was further revealed that the repetitive behaviors were caused by reciprocating of WRN along the same ssDNA, rather than by complete dissociation from and rebinding to substrates or by strand switching. The present study sheds new light on the mechanism for WRN functioning. PMID:28266653

  18. Influence of dimensionality and interface type on optical and electronic properties of CdS/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals—A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, V. E-mail: vancho.kocevski@physics.uu.se; Eriksson, O.; Gerard, C.; Rusz, J.; Sarma, D. D.

    2015-10-28

    Semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) have become one of the leading materials in a variety of applications, mainly due to their size tunable band gap and high intensity emission. Their photoluminescence (PL) properties can be notably improved by capping the nanocrystals with a shell of another semiconductor, making core-shell structures. We focus our study on the CdS/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals that are closely related to extensively studied CdSe/CdS NCs, albeit exhibiting rather different photoluminescence properties. We employ density functional theory to investigate the changes in the electronic and optical properties of these nanocrystals with size, core/shell ratio, and interface structure between the core and the shell. We have found that both the lowest unoccupied eigenstate (LUES) and the highest occupied eigenstate (HOES) wavefunction (WF) are localized in the core of the NCs, with the distribution of the LUES WF being more sensitive to the size and the core/shell ratio. We show that the radiative lifetimes are increasing, and the Coulomb interaction energies decrease with increasing NC size. Furthermore, we investigated the electronic and optical properties of the NCs with different interfaces between the core and the shell and different core types. We find that the different interfaces and core types have rather small influence on the band gaps and the absorption indexes, as well as on the confinement of the HOES and LUES WFs. Also the radiative lifetimes are found to be only slightly influenced by the different structural models. In addition, we compare these results with the previous results for CdSe/CdS NCs, reflecting the different PL properties of these two types of NCs. We argue that the difference in their Coulomb interaction energies is one of the main reasons for their distinct PL properties.

  19. Neogene deformation in the West Antarctic Rift in the McMurdo Sound region from studies of the ANDRILL and Cape Roberts drill cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, T. S.; Wilson, T. J.; Jarrard, R. D.; Millan, C.; Saddler, D.; Läufer, A.; Pierdominici, S.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic studies indicate that the West Antarctic rift system records at least two distinct periods of Cenozoic rifting (Paleogene and Neogene) within the western Ross Sea. Natural fracture data from ANDRILL and Cape Roberts drill cores are revealing a picture of the geodynamic patterns associated with these rifting episodes. Kinematic indicators along faults recovered in drill cores document dominant normal faulting, although reverse and strike-slip faults are also present. Ongoing studies of mechanically twinned calcite in veins recovered in the drill cores yield predominantly vertical shortening strains with horizontal extension, consistent with a normal fault regime. In the Cape Roberts Project drill core, faults of inferred Oligocene age document a dominant NNE maximum horizontal stress associated with Paleogene rifting within the Victoria Land Basin. The NNE maximum horizontal stress at Cape Roberts is at an oblique angle to Transantarctic Mountain front, and consistent with previous interpretations invoking Cenozoic dextral transtensional shear along the boundary. In the ANDRILL SMS (AND-2A) drill core, faults and veins presumably associated with Neogene rifting document a dominant NNW to NE faulting of an expanded Lower Miocene section, although subsidiary WNW faulting is also present within the upper sections of oriented core. In the ANDRILL MIS (AND-1B) drill core, natural fractures are consistently present through the core below c. 450 mbsf, the estimated depth of the ‘B-clino’ seismic reflector. This is consistent with the presence of seismically-detectable faults below this horizon, which record the major faulting episode associated with Neogene rifting in the Terror Rift. Sedimentary intrusions and steep veins folded by compaction indicate that deformation occurred prior to complete lithification of the strata, suggesting that deformation was at least in part coeval with deposition. Faults and associated veins intersected in the AND-1B drill core

  20. Synthesis and in vitro studies on a potential dopamine prodrug.

    PubMed

    Giannola, L I; De Caro, V; Giandalia, G; Siragusa, M G; Lamartina, L

    2008-10-01

    Dopamine delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) undergoes the permeability limitations of blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is a selective interface that excludes most water-soluble molecules from entering the brain. Neutral amino acids permeate the BBB by specific transport systems. Condensation of dopamine with neutral amino acids could afford potential prodrugs able to interact with the BBB endogenous transporters and easily enter the brain. The synthesis and characterization of the dopamine derivative 2-amino-N-[2-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-propionamide (7) is described. The chemical and enzymatic stability of 7 was evaluated. The molecular weight (300 Da) and Log Papp (0.76) indicated that the physico-chemical characteristics of compound 7 are adequate to cross biological membranes. Compound 7 was enzymatically cleaved to free dopamine in rat brain homogenate (t1/2 = 460 min). In human plasma, the t1/2 of 7 was estimated comparable to that reported for L-DOPA. In view of a possible oral administration of 7, studies of its chemical behavior under conditions simulating those of the gastrointestinal tract showed that no dopamine production occurred; furthermore, 7 is able to permeate through a simulated intestinal mucosal membrane. The collected data suggest that compound 7 could beconsidered a very valuable candidate for subsequent in vivo evaluation.

  1. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy: Study 1

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1995-04-01

    Limited feasible options exist when considering the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. These options are rail or truck; because of the weight associated with transportation casks (68.0 to 113.4 tonnes/75 to 125 tons), heavy-haul trucks are also considered. Yucca Mountain currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way for rail; it also lacks a dedicated highway suitable for heavy-haul trucks. Approximately 11,230 shipments by rail are planned from waste producer sites to Nevada, with an additional 1,041 shipments by legal-weight truck from four reactor sites not capable of upgrading for rail shipment. This study identifies the reasonable alternatives for waste transport to the potential repository site, describes the evaluation process performed to identify those alternatives, and discusses the reasons for elimination of transportation routes deemed to be not reasonable. The study concluded that heavy haul truck transportation is feasible-cost is very favorable when compared to rail-but route restrictions must be further evaluated. In addition to restrictions due to seasonal weather conditions, specific routes have additional restrictions, including no travel on holidays or weekends, and travel during daylight hours only. Further restrictions will be imposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation based on routing of radioactive materials by highway. Operation and maintenance costs for heavy-haul over a 24-year period, based on preliminary information, were calculated on an estimated operational cost of $15,000 per trip, with an estimated 468 trips per year average (11,230 total trips), for an estimated cost of $171 million to $173 million, depending on the route used. Because the initial costs and the total system life cycle costs of heavy-haul are approximately 50 percent lower than the lowest rail cost, this option will continue to be evaluated.

  2. Effect of three different core materials on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated deciduous mandibular second molars: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Preetam; Gugwad, Sachin C; Bhat, Chetan; Lodaya, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Endodontic treatment makes the tooth brittle due to loss of bulk of tooth structure, decrease in the moisture content of dentin and dentin elasticity. The following study was carried out to evaluate the effect of endodontic treatment on the fracture resistance of the tooth and reinforcing ability of three different core materials. The following study comprised of sample size of 30 deciduous second molars divided into control group (6) and test group (24). Access opening was done in 24 and 18th teeth with access opening were restored with three different core materials namely IRM (6), silver amalgam (6), GIC (6). All the 30 were subjected to fracture test using UTM (Universal testing machine)- Instron 95. Result showed a drastic reduction in the fracture resistance of the tooth on access opening (1/3rd) and out of the three core materials glass ionomer was shown to be the best core material giving the highest fracture registrance followed by silver amalgam and IRM.

  3. What controls the oxidative ratio of UK peats? A multi-site study of elemental CHNO concentrations in peat cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Gareth; Worrall, Fred; Masiello, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.82 and 1.27 with a median value of 1.08 which is within the range of world soils. There were significant differences in OR of the peat between sites with the data falling into two broad groupings - Group 1: Forsinard, Auchencorth, Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor; Group 2: Moor House, Thorne Moor, Westhay Moor, Whixhall Moss. Whilst there were significant changes (p < 0.05) in elemental ratios with increasing peat depth (increasing C:N ratio and decreasing O:C ratio) there was no significant difference overall in OR with depth. This paper will explore some of the possible controlling factors on these ratios. Local

  4. A Unit of Study Approach for Teaching Common Core State Standards for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytash, Kristine E.; Morgan, Denise N.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an overview of the unit of study framework for teaching writing and explain how it sets the stage for developing "academic momentum" in students (Strahan, 2008, p. 4). To help readers understand the unit of study framework in action, the authors describe how a unit unfolds in one subject area,…

  5. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  6. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  7. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  8. Lewis Mumford's Influence on Core Curriculum Development: A Case Study of Ursuline College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Timothy K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the course "Introduction to Culture" that is a part of the Ursuline Studies Program at Ursuline College. Explains that the course is derived from the ideas of urban philosopher, Lewis Mumford, and discusses his ideas in detail. Reviews the academic goals of the course and the examines the broader Ursuline Studies Program. (CMK)

  9. Getting at the Core of Literacy Improvement: A Case Study of an Urban Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francois, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Although national trends of urban adolescent reading underachievement suggest that schools are unable to adequately support this population's reading development, some studies have demonstrated that urban schools can operate to raise student achievement, thereby disrupting national trends. In this study, the author investigates one such school…

  10. The microstructural character and evolution of fault rocks from the SAFOD core and potential weakening mechanisms along the San Andreas Fault (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, R. E.; van Diggelen, E.; Spiers, C.; de Bresser, J. H.; Smith, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the region of the SAFOD borehole, the San Andreas Fault (SAF) separates two very different geological terranes referred to here as the Salinian and Great Valley blocks (SB, GVB). The three sections of core preserve a diverse range of fault rocks and pass through the two currently active, highly localised slipping sections, the so-called ‘10480’ and ‘10830’ fault zones . These coincide with a broader region - perhaps as much as 100m wide - of high strain fault rocks formed at some time in the geological past, but now currently inactive. Both the slipping segments and older high strain zone(s) are developed in the GVB located NE of the terrane boundary. This is likely influenced by the phyllosilicate-rich protolith of the GVB and the large volume of trapped fluid known to exist NE and below the SAF in this region. Microstructurally, lower strain domains (most of Core 1 cutting the SB, significant parts of Core 3 cutting the GVB) preserve clear evidence for classic upper crustal cataclastic brittle faulting processes and associated fluid flow. The GVB in particular shows clear geological evidence for both fluid pressure and differential stress cycling (variable modes of hydrofacture associated with faults) during seismicity. There is also some evidence in all minor faults for the operation of limited amounts of solution-precipitation creep. High strain domains (much of Core 2 cutting the GVB, parts of Core 3 adjacent to the 10830 fault) are characterised by the development of foliated cataclasites and gouge largely due to the new growth of fine-grained phyllosilicate networks (predominantly smectite-bearing mixed layer clays, locally serpentinite, but not talc). The most deformed sections are characterised by the development of shear band fabrics and asymmetric folds. Reworking and reactivation is widespread manifested by: i) the preservation of one or more earlier generations of gouge preserved as clasts; and ii) by the development of later interconnected

  11. Palaeoclimatic changes during the Upper Cretaceous of eastern Denmark: a study based on the Stevns-2 chalk core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, M.; Stemmerik, L.; Thibault, N.

    2013-12-01

    Cretaceous Danish Basin (Surlyk and Lykke-Andersen, 2007). Acknowledgments: Funding for this study was provided by Maersk Oil, the Danish Natural Science Research Foundation and the University of Copenhagen. REFERENCES Stemmerik, L., Surlyk, F., Klitten, K., Rasmussen, S. L., Schovsbo, N., 2006. Shallow core drilling of the Upper Cretaceous Chalk at Stevns Klint, Denmark. GEUS, 2006. Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin 10, 13-16. Surlyk, F., Lykker-Andersen, H., 2007. Contourite drifts, moats and channels in the Upper Cretaceous chalk of the Danish Basin. Sedimentology 54, 405-42. Thibault, N., & Gardin, S., 2006. Maastrichtian calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and paleoecology in the Equatorial Atlantic (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207 Hole 1258A). Revue de micropaléontologie 49, 199-214. Thibault, N., Schovsbo, N., Harlou, R., Stemmerik, L., Surlyk, F., 2011. An age-calibrated record of upper Campanian - Maastrichtian climate change in the Boreal Realm. AGU Fall meeting 2011, San Francisco, USA, 05-12-11.

  12. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  13. Using Faculty Learning Communities to Link FYE and High-Risk Core Courses: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Mo; Campbell, Kendra; Lowery-Hart, Russell D.; Mallard, Jessica; Andersen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Can success rates in a gateway course be improved by linking it to a college success course? This article describes the results of a pilot study that linked a first-year biology course that had a high drop-out and failure rate to a college success course that included study skills. The proposal to link courses came from the work of a faculty…

  14. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  15. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  16. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  17. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners’ experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360ms and 410-460ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music. PMID:26161561

  18. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liman; Huang, Ping; Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners' experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360 ms and 410-460 ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music.

  19. Study of chirally motivated low-energy K - optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2001-12-01

    The K - optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K -N t matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy K¯N data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data plus the K - atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive K - optical potentials are relatively 'shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with χ2/ N≈2.2. Relatively 'deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with χ2/ N≈1.5, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep K - optical potentials. The (K -stop, π) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potentials. Finally, forward (K -,p) differential cross sections for the production of relatively narrow deeply bound K -nuclear states are evaluated for deep K - optical potentials, yielding values considerably lower than those estimated before.

  20. Study of microbes having potentiality for biodegradation of plastics.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Swapan Kumar; Pal, Sujoy; Ray, Sumanta

    2013-07-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to the different types of organic polymers having high molecular weight and is commonly derived from different petrochemicals. Plastics are generally not biodegradable or few are degradable but in a very slow rate. Day by day, the global demand of these polymers is sharply increasing; however, considering their abundance and potentiality in causing different environmental hazards, there is a great concern in the possible methods of degradation of plastics. Recently, there have been some debates at the world stage about the potential degradation procedures of these synthetic polymers and microbial degradation has emerged as one of the potential alternative ways of degradation of plastics. Alternatively, some scientists have also reported many adverse effects of these polymers in human health, and thus, there is an immediate need of a potential screening of some potential microbes to degrade these synthetic polymers. In this review, we have taken an attempt to accumulate all information regarding the chemical nature along with some potential microbes and their enzymatic nature of biodegradation of plastics along with some key factors that affect their biodegradability.