Science.gov

Sample records for corevalve aortic valve

  1. Implantation of the CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Denault, André Y; Basmadjian, Arsène; Berry, Colin; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only recommended treatment for significant aortic valve stenosis. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement appears to be a novel option for high-risk patients. We report the implantation of the ReValving system (CoreValve, Paris, France) in a 64-year-old woman who was refused aortic valve replacement surgery for critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular dysfunction because of severe pulmonary fibrosis. After anesthesia, the patient was put on femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass, and underwent a balloon valvuloplasty with subsequent retrograde aortic valve replacement by the ReValving system. Transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of the patient's hemodynamics showed immediate improvements of the valvular area and left ventricular ejection fraction and only traces of paravalvular leaks. The patient was easily weaned from ventilation and resumed activity soon after the surgery. A multidisciplinary approach is presently necessary to offer a reliable and safe procedure.

  2. Percutaneous implantation of CoreValve aortic prostheses in patients with a mechanical mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Frigerio, Maria; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2009-11-01

    Concerns exist in the field of transcatheter aortic valve implantation regarding the treatment of patients with mechanical mitral valve for possible interference between the percutaneous aortic valve and the mechanical mitral prosthesis. We report our experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation in 4 patients with severe aortic stenosis, previously operated on for mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. All patients underwent uneventful percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation (CoreValve Inc, Irvine, CA). No deformation of the nitinol tubing of the prostheses (ie, neither distortion nor malfunction of the mechanical valve in the mitral position) occurred in any of the patients. All patients are alive and asymptomatic at a mean follow-up of 171 days.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2010-03-01

    In recent years percutaneous aortic valve implantation has emerged as an alternative therapy to treat patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis considered to be high-risk surgical candidates. We report our experience of a percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation in a 77-year-old female with aortic bioprosthesis structural degeneration. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in 1999 with the implantation of a 23 mm Carpentier-Edwards; her last echocardiography showed a severe bioprosthesis stenosis. After evaluation by cardiac surgeons and cardiologist, considering the high risk re-do surgical procedure (Logistic Euroscore 30%) and severe comorbidities (severe pulmonary hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma and severe osteoporosis), a percutaneous aortic valve-in-valve replacement was preferred. A successful percutaneous 26 mm CoreValve prosthesis implantation was performed with the patient awake with local anesthesia and mild sedation. The patient was discharged after 10 days of hospitalization and she is in NYHA functional class I at follow-up. Our experience, characterized by a multidisciplinary approach, necessary to offer the safest conditions and care for patients, demonstrates the feasibility of a new, promising indication for the use of a transcatheter valve implantation: percutaneous treatment of a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

  4. Alternative transarterial access for CoreValve transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Modine, Thomas; Botta, Luca; Colombo, Paola; Mauri, Silvia; Cannata, Aldo; Fratto, Pasquale; Klugmann, Silvio

    2015-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is used to treat elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered extremely high-risk surgical candidates. The safety and effectiveness of TAVI have been demonstrated in numerous studies. The self-expanding CoreValve bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) was the first transcatheter aortic valve to be granted the Conformité Européene (CE) mark in May 2007 for retrograde transfemoral implantation. However, TAVI patients are also often affected by severe iliofemoral arteriopathy. In these patients, the retrograde transfemoral approach carries a high risk of vascular injury, making this approach unusable. Alternative arterial access sites, such as the subclavian artery, the ascending aorta, and the carotid artery, have been used for retrograde implantation of the CoreValve bioprosthesis. In the present report, we present the procedural considerations, risks, and benefits of the different types of arterial access used to implant the CoreValve bioprosthesis.

  5. Three-year outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the CoreValve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gotzmann, Michael; Czauderna, Anna; Hehnen, Tobias; Aweimer, Assem; Lind, Alexander; Kloppe, Axel; Bösche, Leif; Mügge, Andreas; Ewers, Aydan

    2014-08-15

    There is little known about the long-term results of the CoreValve prosthesis. The aim of this study was to assess the 3-year clinical and hemodynamic outcomes of the CoreValve prosthesis. One hundred fifty consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis successfully underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the CoreValve prosthesis. The primary study end point was death from any cause after TAVI. The secondary end points were defined as (1) cardiovascular death and (2) prosthesis-related mortality and morbidity. At 1 to 3 years, all-cause mortality rates were 25%, 32%, and 41%, respectively, and cardiovascular mortality rates were 14%, 21%, and 27%, respectively. Before TAVI, 95% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. Of the surviving patients, rates of New York Heart Association class III or IV at 1 to 3 years were 33%, 39%, and 38%, respectively. There was an annual decrease of the valve area of approximately 0.1 cm². Aortic restenosis occurred in 2 patients. Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) occurred in 15% of patients immediately after TAVI. Twenty patients (13%) had a slight worsening of AR within 3 years. New severe AR did not occur. The incidence of prosthesis-related endocarditis was 0.66% per year. Overall, 7 patients (incidence of 1.5% per year) had a clinically relevant problem of the prosthesis. In conclusion, TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis had favorable effects on symptoms and outcomes even after 3 years. These results are clouded by side effects, such as AR and prosthesis-related mortality and morbidity.

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Women Versus Men (from the US CoreValve Trials).

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Deeb, G Michael; Yakubov, Steven J; Hermiller, James B; Huang, Jian; Skelding, Kimberly A; Lansky, Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has changed significantly in recent years due to advances in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Recent studies with the CoreValve prosthesis have demonstrated superior results compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at increased risk for surgery, but there are limited data on gender-related differences in patient characteristics and outcomes with this device. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes in women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis. A total of 3,687 patients (1,708 women and 1,979 men) were included. At baseline, women tended to be slightly older and to have increased frailty, but they had fewer cardiac co-morbidities, higher left ventricular systolic function, less coronary artery disease, and fewer previous strokes. All-cause mortality was 5.9% for women and 5.8% for men at 30 days (p = 0.87) and 24.1% and 21.3%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.08). The incidence of stroke was 5.7% in women and 4.0% in men at 30 days (p = 0.02) and 9.3% and 7.7%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.05). Women had a higher incidence of bleeding, including more life-threatening bleeds, and a greater incidence of major vascular complications than men at 30 days. Device success was achieved in 86.9% of women and 86.1% of men (p = 0.50). In conclusion, although there were significant baseline differences and procedure-related complications between women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis, this analysis found no significant difference in 30-day or 1-year mortality.

  7. Transfemoral implantation of CoreValve Evolut-R aortic prosthesis in patient with prior ball-cage mechanical mitral valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Maluenda, Gabriel; Caorsi, Carlos; Baeza, Cristian

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement remains challenge in patients with ball-cage-type mechanical valve in mitral position. Potential under-expansion of the percutaneous valve and interaction between the mitral ball-cage mechanical valve tilted towards the left ventricular outflow tract and the percutaneous valve adds risk during and after implantation. We report a successful implantation of the novel CoreValve Evolut-R self-expanding in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and a mitral Starr-Edwards mechanical valve implanted 28years ago.

  8. Role of transesophageal echocardiography in percutaneous aortic valve replacement with the CoreValve Revalving system.

    PubMed

    Berry, Colin; Oukerraj, Latifa; Asgar, Anita; Lamarche, Yoan; Marcheix, Bertrand; Denault, André Y; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Cartier, Raymond; Ducharme, Anique; Bonan, Raoul; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2008-09-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) is an emerging therapy for nonsurgical patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). We examined the role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in PAVR. TEE was used initially to assess the native valve and aortic root, and served as a guide during PAVR. Following prosthetic valve deployment, TEE was used to assess valve function. Eleven patients aged 82 +/- 10 years with NYHA III-IV underwent PAVR. Periprocedural TEE gave immediate information on prosthetic position and function, LV function, mitral regurgitation, pericardium, and thoracic aorta anatomy. There was excellent visual agreement between fluoroscopic and TEE images of prosthetic positioning and deployment. TEE facilitated the detection and management of procedure-related complications. Compared with pre-PAVR, AV area (0.56 +/- 0.19 cm(2) vs. 1.3 +/- 0.4 cm(2); P < 0.001) and LVEF (49 +/- 17% vs. 56 +/- 11%; P < 0.001) increased. TEE provides key anatomical and functional information, and serves as a diagnostic guide for complications, which may arise during PAVR.

  9. Compassionate use of the self-expandable medtronic CoreValve prosthesis for the treatment of pure aortic regurgitation in a patient at prohibitive risk for surgical valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, H A; Erbel, R; Kahlert, P

    2013-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a viable treatment option for high- and prohibitive-risk patients with severe, calcified pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis, but not for pure aortic valve regurgitation. In fact, the use of TAVI for this indication is even considered unlikely due to the lack of calcium which appears essential for anchoring the stent-valve and prevents dislocation. We report a case of a patient with severe, symptomatic pure aortic regurgitation, and a history of two previous open-heart surgeries who was successfully treated by compassionate use implantation of an oversized Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis as an ultima ratio treatment option.

  10. Health Status after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis at Increased Surgical Risk. Results from the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Suzanne V.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Wang, Kaijun; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja M.; Reardon, Michael J.; Tadros, Peter N.; Zorn, George L.; Maini, Brij; Mumtaz, Mubashir A.; Brown, John M.; Kipperman, Robert M.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients at increased surgical risk, TAVR with a self-expanding bioprosthesis is associated with improved 1-year survival compared with AVR. However, elderly patients may be just as concerned with quality of life improvement as with prolonged survival as a goal of treatment. Objectives To compare the health status outcomes for patients treated with either self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 795 patients with severe aortic stenosis at increased surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR in the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. Health status was assessed at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), SF-12, and EQ-5D; growth curve models were used to examine changes over time. Results Over the 1-year follow-up period, disease-specific and generic health status improved substantially for both treatment groups. At 1-month, there was a significant interaction between the benefit of TAVR over AVR and access site. Among surviving patients eligible for iliofemoral (IF) access, there was a clinically relevant early benefit with TAVR across all disease-specific and generic health status measures. Among the non-IF cohort; however, most health status measures were similar for TAVR and AVR, although there was a trend toward early benefit with TAVR on the SF-12 physical health scale. There were no consistent differences in health status between TAVR and AVR at the later time points. Conclusions Health status improved substantially in surviving patients with increased surgical risk who were treated with either self-expanding TAVR or AVR. TAVR via the IF route was associated with better early health status compared with AVR, but there was no early health status benefit with non-IF TAVR compared with AVR. PMID:26292584

  11. Percutaneous paravalvular leak closure after CoreValve transcatheter aortic valve implantation using an arterio-arterial loop

    PubMed Central

    Benito-González, Tomás; Gualis, Javier; Pérez de Prado, Armando; Cuellas, Carlos; Fernandez-Vazquez, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Significant periprosthetic aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become a major concern of this technique given its association with impaired survival. We report the successful closure of such defect using a vascular occlusion device with the creation of an arterio-arterial loop to gain enough support to advance the delivery sheath into de the left ventricle. PMID:28275491

  12. Relation Between Clinical Best Practices and 6-Month Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation With CoreValve (from the ADVANCE II Study).

    PubMed

    Sinning, Jan-Malte; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Zucchelli, Giulio; Nickenig, Georg; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Bosmans, Johan; Bedogni, Francesco; Branny, Marian; Stangl, Karl; Kovac, Jan; Nordell, Anna; Schiltgen, Molly; Piazza, Nicolo; de Jaegere, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Best practices for transcatheter aortic valve implantation with CoreValve include patient screening and valve size selection using multislice computed tomography, adherence to manufacturer recommendations for oversizing, control of implant depth to 6 mm or less, and management of conduction disturbances according to international guidelines. The ADVANCE II study implemented these strategies and demonstrated their relation to clinical outcomes. From October 2011 to April 2013, 200 patients with severe aortic stenosis were enrolled, and 194 were implanted. All imaging and electrocardiographic data were analyzed by an independent core laboratory, and adverse events were adjudicated to valve academic research consortium-2 definitions. The mean age was 80.2 ± 6.7 years and the mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality was 7.2 ± 6.8% for the enrolled patients. At 6 months, all-cause mortality was 9.2%, stroke was 2.6%, and permanent pacemaker implantation was 19.2% for class I and II indications. In patients with implant depth ≤6 mm, both mortality and permanent pacemaker implantation were lower than in patients with depth >6 mm (2.5% vs 14.5%, p <0.01 and 18.1% vs 31.7%, p = 0.03, respectively). The rate of moderate and severe paravalvular leak was 9.8% at 7 days after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, decreasing to 4.3% at 6 months (p = 0.02). Valves were significantly more oversized in patients with mild or less paravalvular leak at day 7 compared with those with moderate or severe (15.8 ± 8.0% vs 11.8 ± 4.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, findings from the ADVANCE II study reinforce that adherence to best clinical practices improves patient outcomes.

  13. A prospective, non-randomized comparison of SAPIEN XT and CoreValve implantation in two sequential cohorts of patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kasel, Albert Markus; Cassese, Salvatore; Ischinger, Thomas; Leber, Alexander; Antoni, Diethmar; Riess, Gotthard; Vogel, Jayshree; Kastrati, Adnan; Eichinger, Walter; Hoffmann, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Few data is available comparing Edwards SAPIEN XT - SXT (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) with Medtronic CoreValve - CoV (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Methods: We selected consecutive patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR with SXT or CoV at our Institution. Main outcomes were Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-combined safety endpoints. Results: A total of 100 patients (SXT, n=50 versus CoV, n=50) were analyzed. Both SXT and CoV showed good device success rates (98% versus 90%, p=0.20). SXT versus CoV reduced the occurrence of paravalvular regurgitation after TAVR (26% versus 90%, p<0.0001) though not affecting the rate of moderate/severe regurgitation (p=0.20). SXT versus CoV required less frequently a permanent pacemaker after TAVR (8% versus 38%, p<0.0001). In-hospital major vascular complications (8% versus 4%, p>0.99), life-threatening bleedings (2% versus 4%, p>0.99), stroke (4% versus 6%, p>0.99) and death (6% versus 2%, p>0.99) did not differ between SXT and CoV. However, safety endpoints favored SXT (17% versus 34.6%, p=0.01), due to a numerically higher incidence of ischemic stroke and Acute Kidney Injury Stage 3 after CoV. At multivariate analysis, TAVR with SXT (odds ratio=0.21, 95% confidence intervals [0.05-0.84], p=0.03) was predictive of fewer adverse events. Conclusions: Transcatheter valve implantation with Edwards SAPIEN XT was associated with lower VARC-combined safety endpoints as compared with Medtronic CoreValve. More extensive cohorts are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25006536

  14. An Extreme Case of CoreValve Bioprosthesis Embolization into the Abdominal Aorta and of the Delivery Catheter Cone into the Right Internal Iliac Artery.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Yakup; Bilge, Mehmet; Ali, Sina; Duran, Mustafa; Saatci Yasar, Ayse

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new and hopefully therapeutic option in patients with symptomatic severe calcific aortic valve stenosis and multiple comorbidities who are not eligible for open-heart surgery due to unacceptable conventional surgical risks. Herein is reported the case of a patient who underwent TAVI in whom an unusual CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization occurred into the abdominal aorta. While attempting to retrieve the whole system, the conical tip of the catheter delivery system also became embolized into the right iliac artery. Importantly, this case demonstrated a rare complication of CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization which was managed without surgical intervention. Video 1: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized CoreValve bioprosthesis. Video 2: Fluoroscopy demonstrating completely opened CoreValve bioprosthesis at a level above the iliac artery bifurcation and the mobile conical tip in the valve system. Video 3: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 4: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 5: Aortography demonstrating the successfully implanted second CoreValve bioprosthesis in an optimal aortic position, with no paravalvular leak. Video 6: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow. Video 7: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow.

  15. TAVI for aortic regurgitation - India's first case with Corevalve Evolut R.

    PubMed

    Gopalamurugan, A B; Murali, K; Jyotsana, B; Jacob, A; Bashi, V V

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is a well-described treatment for symptomatic calcific severe aortic stenosis. However, TAVI technology is being increasingly used around the world to treat selected cases of severe aortic regurgitation (AR). One of the main limitations of using TAVI technology for AR is the lack of calcification, which is common in such cases. This makes anchoring of a TAVI prosthesis to the aortic annulus difficult and risks displacement or embolization. However, with the availability of recapturable and repositionable TAVI technologies, these limitations have been overcome to a large extent. This is the first Corevalve Evolut R device that was used in India and the first TAVI to treat AR in India.

  16. Balloon valvuloplasty treatment of an infolded CoreValve.

    PubMed

    Kaple, Ryan K; Salemi, Arash; Wong, S Chiu

    2017-02-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an approved treatment for select patients with severe aortic stenosis. A rare complication of self-expanding transcatheter heart valves (THVs) is infolding of the valve stent frame, which results in a malopposed segment, perivalvular aortic insufficiency, and possibly leaflet dysfunction. We report here a successful case of balloon valvuloplasty treatment for severe infolding of a self-expandable THV in the aortic position, restoring stent frame geometry and leaflet function. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  18. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ventricle Normal Heart Select Disease To Learn More Aortic Stenosis Aortic Insufficiency Aorta The aorta is the main ... the rest of your body. Aortic Valve In aortic stenosis, the aortic valve becomes narrowed and does not ...

  19. Surgical aortic-valve replacement with a transcatheter implant.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Justin L; Dewhurst, Alex; van Besouw, Jean-Pierre; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2011-04-01

    We describe a bailout procedure when surgical aortic-valve replacement was not possible due to severe calcification of the ascending aorta and the root and a very small annulus. A 21-mm CoreValve Revalving prosthesis was inserted via the aortotomy in the presence of a mitral prosthesis.

  20. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Aortic valve stenosis — or aortic stenosis — occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows. This ... pressure may prevent or slow the development of aortic stenosis. Ask your doctor if you need to lower ...

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with mechanical mitral prosthesis: a lesson learned from an intraventricular clash.

    PubMed

    Testa, Luca; Gelpi, Guido; Bedogni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    We hereby present the case of a patient with severe aortic stenosis who underwent in her previous medical history a mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve (Omnicarbon 27), and progressively developed a severe aortic stenosis. This patient was judged inoperable and then scheduled for CoreValve Revalving System implantation. Despite a good positioning of the CoreValve, an acute, severe mitral regurgitation developed soon after implantation as a consequence of the impaired movement of the mitral prosthesis leaflet. A condition of cardiogenic shock quickly developed. A good mitral prosthesis function was restored disengaging the CoreValve from the aortic annulus. After few months, the patients underwent successful Edwards-Sapien valve implantation through the Corevalve. This case strongly demonstrates how much a careful evaluation of the features of the mitral prosthesis and patient anatomy is crucial to select which specific transcatheter bioprosthesis would better perform.

  2. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    severe aortic stenosis . Figure 1F. Oblique axial cine bright blood imaging through the valve plane of the aorta, demonstrates the aortic valve to...the ascending aorta. This moderate to large jet is consistent with moderate to severe aortic stenosis . No diastolic jet to suggest aortic ...conditions. Functional impairment of the aortic valve—namely aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation—is the most common complication (in up to 68-85% of

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: design, clinical application, and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K

    2012-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a new technology that recently has been shown to improve survival and quality of life in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not surgical candidates. The development and design of transcatheter valves has been ongoing for the past 20 years, and TAVR has now been approved by the FDA as a treatment for aortic stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates. In the United States, there are currently two transcatheter valves available: the Edwards Sapien Valve and the Medtronic CoreValve. While similar in some design elements, they also have characteristic differences that affect both the mechanism of delivery as well as performance in patients. This review aims to take a closer look at the development of this new technology, review the published clinical results, and look toward the future of transcatheter valve therapeutics and the challenges therein.

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve repair for management of aortic insufficiency in patients supported with left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jay D; McCabe, James M; Dardas, Todd; Aldea, Gabriel S; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2016-10-01

    The development of new aortic insufficiency after a period of support with a left ventricular assist device can result in progressive heart failure symptoms. Transcatheter aortic valve repair can be an effective treatment in selected patients, but the lack of aortic valve calcification can result in unstable prostheses or paravalvular leak. We describe a technique of deploying a self-expanding CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) into the aortic annulus, followed by a balloon-expandable SAPIEN-3 (Edwards, Irvine, CA, USA).

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  7. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  8. Prediction of paravalvular leakage after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Luigi F M; Vletter, Wim B; Ren, Ben; Schultz, Carl; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Soliman, Osama I I; Di Biase, Matteo; de Jaegere, Peter P; Geleijnse, Marcel L

    2015-10-01

    Significant paravalvular leakage (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is related to patient mortality. Predicting the development of PVL has focused on computed tomography (CT) derived variables but literature targeting CoreValve devices is limited, controversial, and did not make use of standardized echocardiographic methods. The study included 164 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis that underwent TAVI with a Medtronic CoreValve system©, with available pre-TAVI CT and pre-discharge transthoracic echocardiography. The predictive value for significant PVL of the CT-derived Agatston score, aortic annulus size and eccentricity, and "cover index" was assessed, according to both echocardiographic Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) criteria and angiographic Sellers criteria. Univariate predictors for more than mild PVL were the maximal diameter of the aortic annulus size (for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL), cover index (for echocardiographic assessment of PVL only), and Agatston score (for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL). The aortic annulus eccentricity index was not predicting PVL. At multivariate analysis, Agatston score was the only independent predictor for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL. Agatston score is the only independent predictor of PVL regardless of the used imaging technique for the definition of PVL.

  9. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiff and not open up. This is called aortic stenosis , which causes the heart to pump harder than usual to get blood through the valve. The aorta may become enlarged with this condition. BAV is ...

  10. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  11. A Review of Most Relevant Complications of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged for treating aortic stenosis in patients who are poor candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Currently, the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien valve—which is usually implanted via a transfemoral or transapical approach—and the self-expanding CoreValve ReValving system—which is designed for retrograde application—are the most widely implanted valves worldwide. Although a promising approach for high-risk patients, the indication may be expanded to intermediate- and eventually low-risk patients in the future; however, doing so will require a better understanding of potential complications, risk factors for these complications, and strategies to individualize each patient to a different access route and a specific valve. This paper reviews the most relevant complications that may occur in patients who undergo catheter-based aortic valve implantation. PMID:23844292

  12. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves.

  13. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  14. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve.

  15. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  17. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  18. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  19. Evolut R Implantation to Treat Severe Pure Aortic Regurgitation in a Patient With Mitral Bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Nava, Stefano; Musca, Francesco; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Soriano, Francesco; Botta, Luca; De Caria, Danile; Giannattasio, Cristina; Russo, Claudio F

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves have been designed to treat high-risk surgical candidates affected by severe aortic stenosis, but little is known about the use of transcatheter valves in patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation. We describe the implantation of Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) to treat an 82-year-old patient affected by severe pure aortic regurgitation who underwent prior mitral valve replacement with a biological valve protruding into the left ventricular outflow tract.

  20. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  1. Aortic valve replacement with the De Bakey valve.

    PubMed

    Paton, B C; Pine, M B

    1976-10-01

    De Bakey prostheses were inserted in 29 patients with aortic valve disease between October, 1970, and May, 1972. Ten patients have died, but all but one of the remaining 19 have beel followed for a minimum of 19 months. Evaluation of the results in these subjects indicates that the function of the De Bakey valve compares favorably with that of other aortic valve prostheses.

  2. Improved technique of transapical aortic valve implantation: "the Berlin addition".

    PubMed

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Drews, Thorsten; Buz, Semih; Unbehaun, Axel; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexandar; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation carries some degree of uncertainty regarding the definitive valve position. We added angiographic visualization of the aortic root while the prosthetic valve is being slowly deployed. It enables easy correction of the position of the valve so that perfect alignment can be achieved of the relationships between the prosthetic valve, aortic valve annulus, aortic cusps, and the coronary arteries.

  3. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  4. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otton CM, Bowow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  5. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  6. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  7. Aortic Valve Calcification in Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Walker, Marcella Donovan; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Hyodo, Eiichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is unclear whether cardiovascular disease is present in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective: Aortic valve structure and function were compared in PHPT patients and population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: We studied 51 patients with PHPT and 49 controls. Outcome Measures: We measured the aortic valve calcification area and the transaortic pressure gradient. Results: Aortic valve calcification area was significantly higher in PHPT (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 cm2, p<0.01), although there was no difference in the peak transaortic pressure gradient, a functional measure of valvular calcification (5.6 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 0.3 mm Hg, P = 0.39). Aortic valve calcification area was positively associated with PTH (r = 0.34; P < 0.05) but not with serum calcium, phosphorus, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or with calcium-phosphate product. Serum PTH level remained an independent predictor of aortic valve calcification area after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical aortic valve calcification. PTH, but not serum calcium concentration, predicted aortic valve calcification. PTH was a more important predictor of aortic valve calcification than well-accepted cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22031523

  8. Intermittent stuck valve after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenzong; Wang, Xinxin; Li, Jing; Mu, Yun; Ni, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intermittent stuck valve after mechanical valve replacement surgery is a very rare and severe complication. Case summary: We present 1 case of a 53-year-old woman after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic valve stenosis combined with hypertrophy septum. She was diagnosed with intermittent stuck valve only 1 day after surgery by clinical symptoms, intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiogram, and intraoperative findings. Conclusions: Although indications for concomitant myectomy during aortic valve replacement are not clear, we recommend myectomy to prevent stuck valve after St Jude Medical Regent prosthesis replacement for severe aortic valve stenosis combined with hypertrophy septum. PMID:28248877

  9. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  10. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  11. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  12. Bacillus licheniformis prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Santini, F; Borghetti, V; Amalfitano, G; Mazzucco, A

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year old man developed an acute prosthetic aortic valve dehiscence for which emergent operation was undertaken. The intraoperative evidence of an aortic annular disruption and of a subannular abscess led to the hypothesis that an endocarditis process was involved. The aortic valve was replaced with a stentless porcine bioprosthesis. Cultures taken intraoperatively from the aortic area had a pure growth of aerobic, spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The patient responded to specific antibiotic therapy with no relapse at a 20-month follow-up. The potentiality of B. licheniformis as a pathogen should be reconsidered. PMID:8576381

  13. The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can be offered with improved safety and similar effectiveness in a population including low-risk patients has yet to be examined in a randomised setting. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the benefits and risks of TAVI using the transarterial CoreValve System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) (intervention group) compared with SAVR (control group) in patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Randomisation ratio is 1:1, enrolling a total of 280 patients aged 70 years or older without significant coronary artery disease and with a low, moderate, or high surgical risk profile. Trial outcomes include a primary composite outcome of myocardial infarction, stroke, or all-cause mortality within the first year after intervention (expected rates 5% for TAVI, 15% for SAVR). Exploratory safety outcomes include procedure complications, valve re-intervention, and cardiovascular death, as well as cardiac, cerebral, pulmonary, renal, and vascular complications. Exploratory efficacy outcomes include New York Heart Association functional status, quality of life, and valve prosthesis and cardiac performance. Enrolment began in December 2009, and 269 patients have been enrolled up to December 2012. Discussion The trial is designed to evaluate the performance of TAVI in comparison with SAVR. The trial results may influence the choice of treatment modality for patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01057173 PMID:23302232

  14. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2009-11-01

    In this work we employ a coupled FSI scheme using an immersed boundary method to simulate flow through a realistic deformable, 3D aortic valve model. This data was used to compute Lagrangian coherent structures, which revealed flow separation from the valve leaflets during systole, and correspondingly, the boundary between the jet of ejected fluid and the regions of separated, recirculating flow. Advantages of computing LCS in multi-dimensional FSI models of the aortic valve are twofold. For one, the quality and effectiveness of existing clinical indices used to measure aortic jet size can be tested by taking advantage of the accurate measure of the jet area derived from LCS. Secondly, as an ultimate goal, a reliable computational framework for the assessment of the aortic valve stenosis could be developed.

  15. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  16. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  17. Role of Cardiac CT Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-based aortic valve implantation is increasingly being performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. For successful planning of the procedure, CT has been shown to provide crucial information concerning the aortic root as well as the peripheral access vessels. This article illustrates the increasing role of CT before transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  18. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  19. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  20. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  1. Heritable retinoblastoma and accelerated aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Abeyratne, L R; Kingston, J E; Onadim, Z; Dubrey, S W

    2013-01-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is associated with a germline mutation in the tumour suppressor gene RBI. The Rb protein (pRb) arises from the RB1 gene, which was the first demonstrated cancer susceptibility gene in humans. 1 Second primary malignancies are recognised complications of retinoblastoma. Furthermore, pRb is implicated in valve remodelling in calcific aortic valve disease. 2 3 We report a family with hereditary retinoblastoma and associated secondary primary malignancies. There are two interesting aspects to this family. The first is the concept of ‘cancer susceptibility genes’; the RBI gene being the first reported in humans. A further feature of note is that two family members also have bicuspid aortic valves. We discuss a potential association between the gene defect responsible for retinoblastoma (with its associated propensity for further malignancies) and accelerated deterioration of the bicuspid aortic valve in the proband carrying this gene defect. PMID:23595191

  2. Aortic valve stenosis after previous coronary bypass: Transcatheter valve implantation or aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a prospective comparison between transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI, n = 13) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR, n = 10) in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and previous coronary bypass surgery (CABG). All patients had at least bilateral patent internal thoracic arteries bypass without indication of repeat revascularization. After a similar post-procedure outcome, despite one early death in TAVI group, the 1-year survival was 100% in surgical group and in transfemoral TAVI group, and 73% in transapical TAVI group. When previous CABG is the lone surgical risk factor, indications for a TAVI procedure have to be cautious, specially if transfemoral approach is not possible. PMID:22642844

  3. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  4. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  5. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  6. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Schoen, Frederick J; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease of the elderly is the most prevalent hemodynamically-significant valvular disease, and the most common lesion requiring valve replacement in industrialized countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a less invasive alternative to classical aortic valve replacement that can provide a therapeutic option for high-risk or inoperable patients with aortic stenosis. These devices must be biocompatible, have excellent hemodynamic performance, be easy to insert, be securely anchored without sutures, and be durable, without increased risk of thrombosis or infection. To date, complications are related to the site of entry for insertion, the site of implantation (aorta, coronary ostia, base of left ventricle), and to the structure and design of the inserted device. However, as with any novel technology unanticipated complications will develop. Goals for future development will be to make the devices more effective, more durable, safer, and easier to implant, so as to further improve outcome for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The pathologist participating in research and development, and examination of excised devices will have a critical role in improving outcome for these patients.

  8. Aortic Valve Calcification is Mediated by a Differential Response of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Venardos, Neil; Nadlonek, Nicole A.; Zhan, Qiong; Weyant, Michael J.; Reece, T. Brett; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While calcific aortic stenosis is common, calcification of the other three heart valves is not. The aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Pro-inflammatory stimulation of aortic VICs induces an osteogenic and inflammatory phenotypic change. We hypothesized that the VICs of the other heart valves do not undergo these changes. Using isolated human VICs from normal aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, our purpose was to compare the osteogenic response to pro-inflammatory stimulation via TLR-4. Materials And Methods Aortic, pulmonic, mitral, and tricuspid (n=4 for each valve type) VICs were isolated from hearts valves explanted from patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Cells were cultured and grown to confluence in passage 2-6 before treatment with LPS (100-200ng/mL) for 24 or 48 hours. Cells were characterized by immunofluorescent staining. TLR-4 expression was analyzed (immunoblotting, flow cytometry). BMP-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) production were determined (immunoblotting). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were determined by ELISA. Statistics were by Mann-Whitney U test. Results TLR-4 stimulation induced BMP-2 production only in aortic VICs (p<0.05). ICAM-1 production and MCP-1 secretion increased in a similar fashion among TLR4-stimulated VICs from all four valves. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory stimulation induces an osteogenic phenotype in aortic VICs but not mitral, pulmonic, or tricuspid VICs. We conclude that this differential osteogenic response of aortic VICs contributes to the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. PMID:24746950

  9. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  10. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution.

  11. Winged scapula after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Christoph; Sodian, Ralf; Witt, Thomas N; Juchem, Gerd; Lang, Nora; Bruegger, Christian; Kowalski, Christian; Reichart, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    Iatrogenic nerve lesions affecting the long thoracic nerve are very rare after a median sternotomy. Here we report on a patient who developed clinical signs of a so-called "winged scapula" after an uneventful aortic valve replacement for infective endocarditis.

  12. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): Current perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gaede, Luise; Möllmann, Helge

    2015-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved as the treatment modality of choice for elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgery. More than 10,000 TAVI procedures were undertaken in Germany during 2014.A mortality benefit has been shown for TAVI compared with conservative treatment in patients deemed inoperable, and the procedure was proven to be at least non-inferior to surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. Through improvements in preprocedural imaging and in valve technology as well as increasing operator and surgical team experience, TAVI has developed rapidly in the past few years. Complication rates declinded considerably and the latest study results even suggest a superiority of TAVI to surgical valve replacement in patients at intermediate operative risk. Nevertheless, the challenge to avoid procedure-specific complications influencing the outcome still remains. Therefore, making an individual decision about the approach and the valve prosthesis in an interdisciplinary heart team consisting of a cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon is indispensable for guaranteeing the best therapy for the patient.Considering the rapid developments and procedural improvements in this field, randomized trials are required to assess whether the indication for TAVI may be extended to patients at lower perioperative risk in the future.

  13. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  14. Basic mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patrick; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé

    2014-09-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disorder. There is no medical treatment to prevent and/or promote the regression of CAVD. Hence, it is of foremost importance to delineate and understand the key basic underlying mechanisms involved in CAVD. In the past decade our comprehension of the underpinning processes leading to CAVD has expanded at a fast pace. Hence, our understanding of the basic pathobiological processes implicated in CAVD might lead eventually to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapies for CAVD. In this review, we discuss molecular processes that are implicated in fibrosis and mineralization of the aortic valve. Specifically, we address the role of lipid retention, inflammation, phosphate signalling and osteogenic transition in the development of CAVD. Interplays between these different processes and the key regulation pathways are discussed along with their clinical relevance.

  15. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  16. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for aortic bioprosthetic valve failure with cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Fudim, Marat; Markley, Roshanak R; Robbins, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Acutely failing bioprosthetic valves represent a clinical emergency and are exceedingly challenging given the paucity of therapeutic options. Oftentimes, these patients are not re-operative candidates due to clinical instability. We present 2 cases of acute degenerative aortic bioprosthetic valve failure with cardiogenic shock treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). These cases were characterized by hemodynamic instability with vasopressor dependence and (multiple) organ failure. These 2 cases demonstrate that TAVR should be considered as a treatment option for unstable patients with bioprosthetic failure.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: transapical resection of the aortic valve in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bombien Quaden, René; Leester-Schaedel, Monika; Lozonschi, Lucian; Lutter, Georg

    2012-09-01

    The resection of pulmonary valves has already been demonstrated in an experimental beating-heart model. The aim of this study was to analyse the transapical laser-assisted resection of aortic valves in an in vivo porcine model in a non-beating heart. The resection was performed in a porcine model (n = 10) using a Thullium:YAG laser. After establishing a standard extracorporeal circulatory support, the aortic valve isolation chamber (AVIC) system was inserted transapically. The resection of the aortic leaflets was carried out step-by-step in the arrested heart. The AVIC implantation, the resection process, and the gross anatomy of intracardiac lesions were analysed. The procedure for installing the AVIC took 5.8 ± 1.5 min. A sealed chamber was achieved in 9/10 cases. The resection of the valves was performed in 8/10 and completed in 7/10 cases. The resection took, on average, 7.4 ± 2.7 min/cusp. In 9/10 cases, the sealing was sufficient. Gross anatomy and histological analysis demonstrated only superficial damage to the surrounding tissue. In this study, the in vivo on-pump isolation of the left ventricular outflow tract and the laser resection of the native aortic valve could be demonstrated successfully. Nevertheless, this model is the next step towards a beating-heart resection of the aortic valve using the isolation chamber.

  19. Biomechanics of the pulmonary autograft valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, A; Trenkner, M; Anisimowicz, L; Gutkowski, R; Drapella, A; Kwiatkowska, E; Dobke, M

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary autograft valve replacement has been simulated by implanting the pulmonary valve into the aortic position of the same cadaver heart from both human and porcine sources. The forces acting on the pulmonary valve leaflets have been calculated on the basis of a triaxial ellipsoid mathematical model. These forces on the pulmonary autograft valve were shown to be essentially similar to those previously reported for aortic valve leaflets. Biomechanical measurements have been made on the simulated autograft valves and on the isolated pulmonary valve cusps. The tensile strengths of the pulmonary valve cusps in both circumferential and radial directions were roughly three times greater than those of aortic valve cusps. This indicated the ability of the pulmonary valves to accept, ab initio, aortic valve closing pressures. Pressure-induced changes in dimension, calculated on the basis of diameters of the simulated pulmonary autograft root, also indicated that the distensibility of the autograft valve was limited. It reached a maximum at 30 mm Hg (4 kPa) without any suggestion of further distension to the point of distortion and incompetence. The combination of the calculated forces acting on the valve and the biomechanical measurements have shown that pulmonary valves used as autograft aortic valve replacements are able to tolerate aortic pressures from the time of implantation. These experimental results from simulated autografts support the clinical use of this valve over the past 13 years. PMID:7135295

  20. Major dehiscence of a prosthetic aortic valve: detection by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Salem, B I; Pechacek, L W; Leachman, R D

    1979-04-01

    A 21-year-old man had acute aortic insufficiency three months after insertion of an aortic valve prosthesis. Chest roentgenography demonstrated abnormal orientation of the prosthesis. M-mode echocardiography showed dense, linear echoes from the prosthetic valve between the interventricular septum and the mitral valve, along with loss of normal poppet motion within the aortic root. At surgery, the prosthesis was found to be extensively disrupted, resulting in prolapse into the left ventricular outflow tract. Another valve replacement was performed with patient survival. Echocardiography appears to be a useful adjunct to established roentgenographic procedures in the diagnosis of major dehiscence of prosthetic aortic valves.

  1. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Hans, Chetan P; Koenig, Sara N; Nichols, Haley A; Galindo, Cristi L; Garner, Harold R; Merrill, Walter H; Hinton, Robert B; Garg, Vidu

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs). We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  2. Prosthetic aortic heart valves: modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret

    2011-03-01

    Although heart valve replacement is among the most common cardiovascular surgical procedures, their outcome is often difficult to predict. One of the reasons is the design and choice of the materials used for the fabrication of the prostheses. This review paper describes the use of modeling techniques in prosthetic heart valve (HV) design and aims at the justification and development of a polymer based trileaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV). The closing/opening phase behavior of the bileaflet MHV was investigated. The potential problem of valve failure due to crack propagation in the brittle pyrolytic carbon leaflet was also discussed. These studies suggest that although bileaflet MHV performs satisfactorily, there are justifications for improvement. Since the native aortic HV is trileaflet and made of anisotropic and hyperelastic tissue, one possible approach to a better MHV design is based on our ability to closely mimic the natural geometry and biomaterial properties.

  3. [Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves].

    PubMed

    Chain, Sergio; Luciardi, Hector; Feldman, Gabriela; Berman, Sofia; Estrella, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Nocardia endocarditis in native valve is an uncommon infection that usually arises in immunodepressed patients. We report a 51-year-old man diagnosed as having Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves, which received antimicrobial therapy and required aortic valve replacement. In 6 month follow up the patient remained asymptomatic with good clinical evolution.

  4. Notch-dependent EMT is attenuated in patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Kostina, Aleksandra S; Uspensky, Vladimir Е; Irtyuga, Olga B; Ignatieva, Elena V; Freylikhman, Olga; Gavriliuk, Natalia D; Moiseeva, Olga M; Zhuk, Sergey; Tomilin, Alexey; Kostareva, Аnna А; Malashicheva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation and the reasons for the aortopathies associated with bicuspid aortic valve remain unclear. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with bicuspid aortic valve and have been found in individuals with various left ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. Notch is a key signaling during cardiac valve formation that promotes the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We address the role of Notch signaling in human aortic endothelial cells from patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aortic aneurysm. Aortic endothelial cells were isolated from tissue fragments of bicuspid aortic valve-associated thoracic aortic aneurysm patients and from healthy donors. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition was induced by activation of Notch signaling. Effectiveness of the transition was estimated by loss of endothelial and gain of mesenchymal markers by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. We show that aortic endothelial cells from the patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve have down regulated Notch signaling and fail to activate Notch-dependent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response to its stimulation by different Notch ligands. Our findings support the idea that bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic aneurysm is associated with dysregulation of the entire Notch signaling pathway independently on the specific gene mutation.

  5. Aortic valve replacement with the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure 12 years after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kazama, S; Kurata, A; Yamashita, Y

    1999-10-01

    An aortic valve replacement was successfully performed employing the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure in a case of aortic valve stenosis with small annulus 12 years after mitral valve replacement. Previous mitral valve replacement does not preclude feasibility of the Nicks procedure.

  6. Giant fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Michele; Iezzi, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Fibroelastomas account for less than 10% of all cardiac tumours, representing the most common valvular and the second most common cardiac benign tumour, following myxomas. Fibroelastomas are histologically benign; they can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke, acute valvular dysfunction, embolism, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Surgical resection should be offered to all patients who have symptoms and to asymptomatic patients who have pedunculated lesions or tumors larger than 1 cm in diameter. Valve-sparing excision produces good long-term results in most instances. We report our surgical experience of a giant fibroelastoma in the aortic valve.

  7. Homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pine, M; Hahn, G; Paton, B; Pappas, G; Davies, H; Steele, P; Pryor, R; Blount, S G

    1976-12-01

    Homograft aortic valve replacement was done in 103 patients and prosthetic aortic valve replacement in 106 between January 1962 and December 1973. Patients who received homograft and prosthetic valves were compared with respect to age, sex, preoperative functional impairment, infection, dyspnea, angina, hemodynamics, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, associated operations, early and late mortality, and valve failure. Combined total mortality was 28% (12% operative, 8% first postoperative year, 8% late). Ten percent of valve required replacement. One year after operation, 70% of survivors were asymptomatic, 27% were improved, and 3% were unchanged or between homograft and prosthetic valve replacement. Valve-related failure and infections were more common after homograft aortic valve replacement. Emboli, hemorrhage, and hemolysis were commoner after prosthetic valve replacement. Fungal infections occurred in five homograft patients but in no patient with a prosthetic aortic valve. Severe properative symptoms or recent endocarditis was associated with greater mortality and valve failure in both the homograft and the prosthetic series. Increased mortality and failure was also seen in patients with either preoperative aortic regurgitation with high left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and low cardiac index, or aortic stenosis with cardiomegaly or roentgenographic evidence of congestive heart failure. Therefore, in two series of patients at equal risk, mortality and valve failure were similar for homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement.

  8. Absent Aortic Valve in DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Elizabeth C; Minturn, Lucy; Gotteiner, Nina L; Ernst, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    A 20-week-old fetus with the 22q11.2 deletion characteristic of DiGeorge syndrome is described with vertebral segmentation abnormalities and complex cardiovascular anomalies including an absent aortic valve. This is only the second known case of absent aortic valve in association with DiGeorge syndrome. We discuss the association of absent aortic valve with other conotruncal defects and the utility of fetal echocardiography in the diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome.

  9. Portico Sheathless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation via Distal Axillary Artery.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Botta, Luca; Nava, Stefano; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Musca, Francesco; Soriano, Francesco; Russo, Claudio F; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat older patients affected by severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-risk surgical candidates because of multiple comorbidities. The least invasive approach for transcatheter aortic valves implantation should be considered the transfemoral retrograde route, because it is minimally invasive and is feasible with local anesthesia and mild sedation. Despite significant technical improvements in recent years, the transfemoral approach is contraindicated in cases of severe peripheral artery disease. We describe the first case of a Portico transcatheter aortic valve implantation system (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) made through the distal axillary artery in a 90-year-old patient affected by severe aortic stenosis.

  10. Proposed modification for valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Deville, Claude; Nashef, Samer

    2014-05-01

    Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (ARR) is the procedure of choice in young patients with aortic root aneurysm and preserved aortic valve leaflets; however, coronary ostial anastomoses remain an issue. Troublesome bleeding sometimes occurs during surgery, and in the long term, there is a risk of aneurysmal formation in the residual aortic wall of the ostial "button." We describe a technique of valve-sparing ARR wherein each coronary button along with its flange of aortic tissue is implanted within the prosthetic graft used for ARR, thereby eliminating the risk of both immediate surgical bleeding and late coronary button aneurysms.

  11. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  13. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ashok; Rastogi, Vishal; Kumar, Vijay; Maqbool, Syed; Mustaqueem, Arif; Sekar, V. Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR) by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc.) implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012. PMID:23993000

  15. Bicuspid aortic valve disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical aortic valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Naci, Huseyin; Pender, Sarah; Kuehne, Titus; Kelm, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve repair is still emerging, and its role in the treatment of bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAVD) is not yet fully understood. Our objective is to synthesise available evidence on outcomes after surgical aortic valve repair in patients with BAVD. We conducted a systematic review of clinical studies using prespecified methods for searching, identifying and selecting eligible studies in 4 databases, and synthesising results (PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014014415). 2 researchers independently reviewed full-text articles and extracted data. The results of included studies were quantitatively synthesised in frequentist meta-analyses. We included 11 aortic valve repair studies or study arms with a total of 2010 participants. Pooled estimates for the proportion of patients surviving at 30 days, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 0.995 (95% CI 0.991 to 0.995), 0.994 (0.989 to 0.999), 0.945 (0.898 to 0.993) and 0.912 (0.845 to 0.979), respectively. The pooled proportion of late deaths from valve-related causes was 0.008 (0.000 to 0.019) at a mean follow-up of 3.5 years. Proportion of patients with valve-related reinterventions was 0.075 (0.037 to 0.113) at a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, and the linearised reintervention rate was 1.3 (0.7 to 1.9) per 100 patient-years. Outcome reporting was insufficient to pool the results for a number of predefined outcomes. In conclusion, existing evidence on aortic valve repair in BAVD is limited to mostly small case series, case–control and small retrospective cohort studies. Despite the low quality, available evidence suggests favourable survival outcomes after aortic valve repair in selected patients with BAVD. Valve-related reinterventions at follow-up are common in all patients undergoing repair surgery. PMID:28008357

  16. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  17. Assessing the risk of aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in the transcatheter valve era.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Verghese; Greason, Kevin L; Suri, Rakesh M; Leon, Martin B; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Mack, Michael J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Holmes, David R

    2014-10-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement had been the only definitive treatment of severe aortic stenosis before the availability of transcatheter valve technology. Historically, many patients with severe aortic stenosis had not been offered surgery, largely related to professional and patient perception regarding the risks of operation relative to anticipated benefits. Such patients have been labeled as "high risk" or "inoperable" with respect to their suitability for surgery. The availability of transcatheter aortic valve replacement affords a new treatment option for patients previously not felt to be optimal candidates for surgical valve replacement and allows for the opportunity to reexamine the methods for assessing operative risk in the context of more than 1 available treatment. Standardized risk assessment can be challenging because of both the imprecision of current risk scoring methods and the variability in ascertaining risk related to operator experience as well as local factors and practice patterns at treating facilities. Operative risk in actuality is not an absolute but represents a spectrum from very low to extreme, and the conventional labels of high risk and inoperable are incomplete with respect to their utility in clinical decision making. Moving forward, the emphasis should be on developing an individual assessment that takes into account procedure risk as well as long-term outcomes evaluated in a multidisciplinary fashion, and incorporating patient preferences and goals in a model of shared decision making.

  18. Aortic root abscess presenting as alternating bundle branch block: Infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh; Kader, Muneer; Sajeev, C.G.; Krishnan, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1%–2% of the population. Among various complications, incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in the bicuspid aortic valve population is high with higher rate of periannular extension resulting in conduction disturbances. Here we are reporting a rare case of infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve presented with alternating bundle branch block. PMID:26138186

  19. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  20. Early-onset Streptomyces endocarditis in a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Shehatha, Jaffar S; Taha, Abdulsalam Y

    2017-02-01

    A 66-year-old Australian man underwent elective replacement of a severely stenotic aortic valve with a 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with worsening dyspnea, fever, and mild anemia. Investigations confirmed pulmonary edema and moderate periprosthetic aortic regurgitation. The pulmonary edema was managed conservatively, and a second 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve was implanted. Infective endocarditis was suspected in the aortic annulus below the orifice of the right coronary artery. A bacteriological study revealed a rare bacteria of Streptomyces species. The patient received intensive antibiotic therapy over a 6-week period of hospitalization, and the aortic regurgitation disappeared one week postoperatively.

  1. [From FRANCE 2 to FRANCE TAVI: are indications, technique and results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement the same?].

    PubMed

    Auffret, Vincent; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Verhoye, Jean Philippe; Ruggieri, Vito Giovanni; Koning, René; Laskar, Marc; Van Belle, Éric; Leprince, Pascal; Collet, Jean Philippe; Iung, Bernard; Lefèvre, Thierry; Eltchaninoff, Helene; Gilard, Martine; Le Breton, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not suitable for surgery or should be considered when there is a high surgical risk as assessed by a heart team. There is a decrease in mean logistic EuroSCORE since January 2010, which translates a gradual evolution in patients' selection. Expertise of geriatricians to further assess frailty is a key step in the risk stratification process of this elderly population (mean age: 83.4±7.3 years). Femoral access is used in 80% of cases with a procedural success rate higher than 95%. In-hospital mortality rate is 5.9%. The main complications of the procedure are aortic annulus rupture (0.9% in FRANCE TAVI), tamponade (2.3%), stroke (2.2%), severe paravalvular leak (1.3%) and permanent pacemaker implantation (15%). The awaited results of PARTNER II and SURTAVI may lead to expand the indications to lower-risk patients if it is shown that TAVI is non-inferior to surgery in this population which has been suggested by the recent randomized NOTION Trial while the CoreValve Pivotal Trial even points in the direction of a possible superiority of the percutaneous technique over surgery.

  2. Prognostic value of the ratio between prosthesis area and indexed annulus area measured by MultiSlice-CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures

    PubMed Central

    Debry, Nicolas; Sudre, Arnaud; Elquodeimat, Ibrahim; Delhaye, Cédric; Schurtz, Guillaume; Bical, Antoine; Koussa, Mohamad; Fattouch, Khalil; Modine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprocedural aortic regurgitations following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures remain an issue. Benefit of oversizing strategies to prevent them isn't well established. We compared different level of oversizing in our cohort of consecutive patients to address if severe oversizing compared to normal sizing had an impact on post-procedural outcomes. Methods From January 2010 to August 2013, consecutive patients were referred for TAVI with preoperative Multislice-CT (MSCT) and the procedures were achieved using Edwards Sapien® or Corevalve devices®. Retrospectively, according to pre-procedural MSCT and the valve size, patients were classified into three groups: normal, moderate and severe oversizing; depending on the ratio between the prosthesis area and the annulus area indexed and measured on MSCT. Main endpoint was mid-term mortality and secondary endpoints were the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) endpoints. Results Two hundred and sixty eight patients had a MSCT and underwent TAVI procedure, with mainly Corevalve®. While all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were similar in all groups, post-procedural new pacemaker (PM) implantation rate was significantly higher in the severe oversizing group (P = 0.03), while we observed more in-hospital congestive heart-failure (P = 0.02) in the normal sizing group. There was a trend toward more moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (AR) in the normal sizing group (P = 0.07). Conclusions Despite a higher rate of PM implantation, oversizing based on this ratio reduces aortic leak with lower rates of post-procedural complications and a similar mid-term survival. PMID:27582762

  3. Aortic Calcification: An Early Sign of Heart Valve Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rekha Mankad, M.D. References AskMayoExpert. Valvular disease – aortic stenosis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/aortic-stenosis/expert-answers/aortic-valve-calcification/FAQ-20058525 . Mayo ...

  4. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  5. Aortic valve replacement within an unexpected porcelain aorta: the sutureless valve option.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Giuseppe; Benussi, Bernardo; Camerini, Fulvio; Pappalardo, Aniello

    2014-03-01

    Four patients referred for surgical treatment of aortic stenosis presented an unexpected extremely calcified (porcelain) ascending aorta at the intraoperative epiaortic ultrasonography scanning. In each patient, replacement of the aortic valve was successfully performed using a sutureless implantable bioprosthesis during a short period of hypothermic circulatory arrest. In the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures, the sutureless valve may be a valuable option for surgical units that do not dispose of transcatheter technology or a hybrid operative theatre.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: techniques, complications, and bailout strategies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Macon, Conrad J; Scot Shaw, Eric; Londoño, Juan C; Martinez, Claudia A

    2013-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an alternative option for inoperable or very high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis-however, there are serious complications associated with the procedure, such as patient mortality, stroke, conduction disturbances, paravalvular regurgitation, and vascular concerns. Our review focuses on the most common complications related to transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures and potential bailout strategies and techniques.

  7. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  8. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future? †

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient–prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. METHODS Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. RESULTS The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series

  9. Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Calcific Aortic Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patrick; Bouchareb, Rihab; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disorder. CAVD is a chronic process characterized by a pathologic mineralization of valve leaflets. Ectopic mineralization of the aortic valve involves complex relationships with immunity. Studies have highlighted that both innate and adaptive immunity play a role in the development of CAVD. In this regard, accumulating evidence indicates that fibrocalcific remodelling of the aortic valve is associated with activation of the NF-κB pathway. The expression of TNF-α and IL-6 is increased in human mineralized aortic valves and promotes an osteogenic program as well as the mineralization of valve interstitial cells (VICs), the main cellular component of the aortic valve. Different factors, including oxidized lipid species, activate the innate immune response through the Toll-like receptors. Moreover, VICs express 5-lipoxygenase and therefore produce leukotrienes, which may amplify the inflammatory response in the aortic valve. More recently, studies have emphasized that an adaptive immune response is triggered during CAVD. Herein, we are reviewing the link between the immune response and the development of CAVD and we have tried, whenever possible, to keep a translational approach.

  10. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  11. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W L; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2016-08-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature.

  12. Regional structure-function relationships in mouse aortic valve tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Varun K.; Guilak, Farshid; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific biomechanical properties of the aortic valve play an important role in native valve function, and alterations in these properties may reflect mechanisms of degeneration and disease. Small animals such as targeted mutagenesis mice provide a powerful approach to model human valve disease pathogenesis; however, physical mechanical testing in small animals is limited by valve tissue size. Aortic valves are comprised of highly organized extracellular matrix compartmentalized in cusp and annulus regions, which have different functions. The objective of this study was to measure regional mechanical properties of mouse aortic valve tissue using a modified micropipette aspiration technique. Aortic valves were isolated from juvenile, adult and aged adult C57BL/6 wild type mice. Tissue tensile stiffness was determined for annulus and cusp regions using a half-space punch model. Stiffness for the annulus region was significantly higher compared to the cusp region at all stages. Further, aged adult valve tissue had decreased stiffness in both the cusp and annulus. Quantitative histochemical analysis revealed a collagen-rich annulus and a proteoglycan-rich cusp at all stages. In aged adult valves, there was proteoglycan infiltration of the annulus hinge, consistent with observed mechanical differences over time. These findings indicate that valve tissue biomechanical properties vary in wild type mice in a region-specific and age-related manner. The micropipette aspiration technique provides a promising approach for studies of valve structure and function in small animal models, such as transgenic mouse models of valve disease. PMID:20863504

  13. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  14. Early aortic valve cusp rupture in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A

    1992-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp rupture with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp rupture with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1575597

  15. Aortic valve replacement in familial hypercholesterolemia: not an ordinary procedure.

    PubMed

    Muretti, Mirko; Massi, Francesco; Coradduzza, Enrico; Portoghese, Michele

    2015-04-28

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited disorder with incidences of approximately 1:500 and 1:1,000,000 in heterozygous and homozygous form respectively. Affected patients usually show early coronary artery disease and severe aortic root calcification, despite optimization of therapy. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia which presented dyspnea and anginal symptoms due to a severely calcified aortic root causing valve stenosis and narrowed sinotubular junction. Aortic valve replacement and aortic root enlargement were performed using the Manougian procedure. Even for experiences surgeons, this surgery could prove challenging for this group of patients due to aggressive degenerative tissue calcification of the aortic root, which often presents an extremely calcified aortic valve with a small annulus associated to a narrowed sinotubular junction.

  16. Mitral valve repair versus replacement in simultaneous aortic and mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Marian; Pirk, Jan; Szarszoi, Ondrej; Skalsky, Ivo; Maly, Jiri; Netuka, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Double valve replacement for concomitant aortic and mitral valve disease is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Excellent results with valve repair in isolated mitral valve lesions have been reported; therefore, whether its potential benefits would translate into better outcomes in patients with combined mitral-aortic disease was investigated. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed involving 341 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with either mitral valve repair (n=42) or double valve replacement (n=299). Data were analyzed for early mortality, late valve-related complications and survival. RESULTS: The early mortality rate was 11.9% for valve repair and 11.0% for replacement (P=0.797). Survival (± SD) was 67±11% in mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 81±3% in double valve replacement at five years of follow-up (P=0.187). The percentage of patients who did not experience major adverse valve-related events at five years of follow-up was 83±9% in those who underwent mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 89±2% in patients who underwent double valve replacement (P=0.412). Age >70 years (HR 2.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 4.9]; P=0.023) and renal dysfunction (HR 1.9 [95% CI 1.2 to 3.7]; P=0.01) were independent predictors of decreased survival. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with double valve disease, both mitral valve repair and replacement provided comparable early outcomes. There were no significant differences in valve-related reoperations, anticoagulation-related complications or prosthetic valve endocarditis. Patient-related factors appear to be the major determinant of late survival, irrespective of the type of operation. PMID:24294032

  17. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Han; Kim, Ji Seong; Choi, Jae-Woong; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Na, Kwon Joong; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27), tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) group (n=4). The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%), right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%), and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%). We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2. Results Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV)= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV)=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N) group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081). Conclusion Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy. PMID:27965921

  18. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  19. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  20. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Treatment of Aortic Valve Stenosis: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Tu, Hong-Anh; Holubowich, Corinne; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the gold standard for treating aortic valve stenosis. It is a major operation that requires sternotomy and the use of a heart-lung bypass machine, but in appropriately selected patients with symptomatic, severe aortic valve stenosis, the benefits of SAVR usually outweigh the harms. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive procedure that allows an artificial valve to be implanted over the poorly functioning valve. Methods We identified and analyzed randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of TAVI compared with SAVR or balloon aortic valvuloplasty and were published before September 2015. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. The overall quality was determined to be high, moderate, low, or very low using a step-wise, structural methodology. We also developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of TAVI compared with SAVR over a 5-year time horizon, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Results Rates of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were similar for the TAVI and SAVR groups in all studies except one, which reported significantly lower all-cause mortality in the TAVI group and a higher rate of stroke in the SAVR group. Trials of high-risk patients who were not suitable candidates for SAVR showed significantly better survival with TAVI than with balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Median survival in the TAVI group was 31 months, compared with 11.7 months in the balloon aortic valvuloplasty group. Compared with SAVR, TAVI was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke, major vascular complications, paravalvular aortic regurgitation, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. SAVR was associated with a higher risk of bleeding. Transapical TAVI was associated with higher

  2. Simultaneous transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement and transcatheter mitral valve replacement for native valvular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elkharbotly, Ali; Delago, Augustin; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is well established for patients who cannot undergo surgery (Leon et al., N Engl J Med 2010;363:1597) or are high risk for surgery (Smith et al., N Engl J Med 2011;364:2187-2198). Experience with the TAVR procedure has led to recent reports of successful transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures (Cheung et al., J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;64:1814; Seiffert et al., J Am Coll Cardiol Interv 2012;5:341-349) separately or simultaneously with the TAVR. However, these reports were of simultaneous valve-in-valve procedures (Cheung Anson, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;61:1759-1766). A recent report from Portugal also reported simultaneous transpical implantation of an inverted transcatheter aortic valve-in-ring in the mitral position and transcatheter aortic valve (Hasan et al., Circulation 2013;128:e74-e76). There has been an experience of TMVR only in native mitral valve for mitral valve stenosis, but none in both aortic and mitral valves. We report the first in human case of simultaneous transapical TAVR and TMVR in native valves secondary to valvular stenosis. Our patient was not a candidate for percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty secondary to a high Wilkins Score. Sizing of the aortic valve was based on the transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), whereas sizing of the mitral valve was based on TEE measurements and balloon inflation during left ventriculography. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  4. Implantation of a SAPIEN 3 Valve in a Patient with Pure Aortic Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Minol, Jan-Philipp; Veulemans, Verena; Zeus, Tobias; Blehm, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging treatment for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Aortic regurgitation is considered to be a relative contraindication for transcatheter procedures, as a non-calcified aortic annulus poses the risk of an insufficient anchoring of the transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis. Herein is described the case of a patient who suffered from recurrent aortic valve regurgitation after valve-sparing repair, and which was successfully treated by the transcatheter implantation of an Edwards SAPIEN 3™ prosthesis. This case report demonstrated the suitability of this prosthesis to treat pure aortic valve regurgitation, without excessive oversizing of the valve.

  5. Concomitant aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Craver, J M; Jones, E L; Hatcher, C R; Farmer, J H

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive patients underwent combined aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization at the Emory University Affiliated Hospitals between May, 1973 and March, 1976. Acute myocardial infarction resulted in two operative deaths (8%). There have been four late deaths, all Class IV preoperative. The age range was 37 to 79 years with an average age of 60. Preoperatively all patients were Class IV or late Class III. Twenty-three patients had symptoms of angina pectoris; congestive heart failure was evident in 56%. Postoperatively, 70% are now Class 1 or II. Single coronary bypass was performed in 16 patients, double in 6, and triple in three. Double bypass plus mitral valve replacement was required in two with aneurysmectomy in one. The rate of intraoperative infarction was 27% for the series but only 7% in the last year. The methods of intraoperative myocardial preservation and the technical approach for the operative procedures were variable. Results with each method are correlated, and currently preferred techniques are presented and discussed. Best results were obtained in patients who presented early in their symptomatic course with isolated proximal coronary lesions and good renoff vessels. Excellent results could be achieved despite advanced age of patients, requirement for multiple bypass grafts, and correction of other associated cardiac lesions. Poorest results were obtained when long-standing ventricular failure was combined with poor vessels distal to coronary stenoses. PMID:860881

  6. Mitral annular calcification in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Limited data exis t on clinical relevance of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and mitral annular calcification (MAC), although with similar pathophysiologic basis. We sought to reveal the prevalence of MAC and its clinical features in the patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AVS. We reviewed 106 consecutive patients who underwent isolated AVR from 2004 to 2010. Before AVR, CT scans were performed to identify MAC, whose severity was graded on a scale of 0-4, with grade 0 denoting no MAC and grade 4 indicating severe MAC. Echocardiography was performed before AVR and at follow-up over 2 years after AVR. MAC was identified in 56 patients with grade 1 (30 %), 2 (39 %), 3 (18 %), and 4 (13 %), respectively. Patients with MAC presented older age (72 ± 8 versus 66 ± 11 years), higher rate of dialysis-dependent renal failure (43 versus 4 %), and less frequency of bicuspid aortic valve (9 versus 36 %), when compared to those without MAC. No significant differences were seen in short- and mid-term mortality after AVR between the groups. In patients with MAC, progression of neither mitral regurgitation nor stenosis was observed at follow-up of 53 ± 23 months for 102 survivors, although the transmitral flow velocities were higher than in those without MAC. In conclusion, MAC represented 53 % of the patients undergoing isolated AVR for AVS, usually appeared in dialysis-dependent elder patients with tricuspid AVS. MAC does not affect adversely upon the survival, without progression of mitral valve disease, at least within 2 years after AVR.

  7. Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Valve Implantation in the Non-Aortic Position

    PubMed Central

    Ranney, David N.; Williams, Judson B.; Wang, Andrew; Gaca, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) procedures are an alternative to standard surgical valve replacement in high risk patients. Methods Cases in which a commercially approved transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) device was used for a non-aortic VIV procedure between November 2013 and September 2015 are reviewed. Clinical, echocardiographic, and procedural details, patient survival, and symptom severity by NYHA class at follow-up were assessed. Results All patients were heart-team determined high-risk for conventional redo surgery (mean STS PROM = 6.8 ± 2.2%). Five patients underwent VIV replacement in the non-aortic position, 4 for bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction and one for bioprosthetic tricuspid valve dysfunction. Bioprosthetic failure was due to stenosis in 3 patients and regurgitation in 2 others. A balloon-expandable device was used for all patients (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). Transcatheter VIV replacement was accomplished by the transapical (mitral) and transfemoral venous (tricuspid) approaches. Median post-operative length of stay was 5 days (range 3-12). No deaths occurred at a mean follow-up of 21 months. NYHA class at follow-up decreased from class IV at baseline to class I or II for all patients. No paravalvular leaks greater than trivial were encountered. Median mean gradient following mitral replacement was 6.5 mmHg (range 6-13 mmHg), and following tricuspid replacement was 4 mmHg. Post-operative complications included hematuria, epistaxis, acute kidney injury, and atrial fibrillation. Conclusions Transcatheter VIV implantation in the non-aortic position for dysfunctional bioprostheses can be performed safely with favorable clinical outcomes using a balloon expandable TAVR device. PMID:27059552

  8. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation-diagnostic and surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Klaaborg, Kaj Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Terp, Kim Allan; Andersen, Gratien; Hvitfeldt, Steen; Andersen, Henning Rud

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is a potential life threatening complication. Better understanding of the incidence, predictors, clinical presentation, diagnostic measures, complications and management of PVE may help improve TAVI long-term outcome. We report a case of TAVI-PVE in an 80-year-old high risk patient in whom SAVR was successfully performed. We have reviewed literature regarding TAVI-PVE. PMID:27867590

  9. Cusp tear in bicuspid aortic valve possibly caused by phentermine.

    PubMed

    Yosefy, Chaim; Berman, Michael; Beeri, Ronen

    2006-01-13

    A 28 year old woman underwent echocardiography following an incidental finding of a diastolic murmur. She has been taking phentermine for weight reduction for 8 months. Trans-esophageal echocardiography revealed a tear of the posterior cusp of the aortic valve causing severe regurgitation. Phentermine is known to cause valvular disease with prolonged use, but aortic valve rupture was not previously reported as a complication of phentermine valvulopathy.

  10. Prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ottervanger, J.P.; Thomas, K.; Sie, T.H.; Haalebos, M.M.P.; Zijlstra, F.

    2002-01-01

    Background Because of a high prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve disease, coronary angiography is recommended before aortic valve replacement. However, during the last three decades, a decline in mortality due to coronary heart disease has been observed in the general population in both Western Europe and the United States. It is unknown whether preoperative angiography is still mandatory in all patients. Aim To assess the prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve replacement and trends during a ten-year period. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement between 1988 and 1998 in our institution. Patients with a history of coronary artery disease and patients younger than 25 years were excluded. Coronary atherosclerosis was defined as one or more coronary artery luminal stenosis of 50% or more on preoperative coronary angiography. Results During the study period 1339 patients had aortic valve replacement in our institution, data on 1322 (98%) were available for analysis. Previous coronary artery disease was documented in 124 patients (10%). After exclusion of 17 patients (no angiography), data on a total of 1181 patients were analysed. Coronary atherosclerosis was present in 472 patients (40%) on preoperative coronary angiography. Several well-known risk factors of ischaemic heart disease were associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary atherosclerosis varied between 30% and 50% per year. There was, however, no significant trend during the study period. Multivariate analyses, to adjust for potential differences in risk factors during the observation period, did not change this conclusion. Conclusions The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients scheduled for aortic valve replacement is still high. From 1988 to 1998, no significant change

  11. Percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal myocardial ablation after aortic valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, M.; Kapadia, S.; Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.; Tuzcu, M. E.; Lever, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    When left ventricular outflow tract obstruction develops after aortic valve replacement, few treatment choices have been available until now. We present a patient with prior aortic valve replacement who developed left ventricle outflow tract obstruction that was successfully treated with a percutaneous transcoronary myocardial septal alcohol ablation. This technique is a useful tool for the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially in those patients with prior heart surgery. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The living aortic valve: From molecules to function

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Adrian H.; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Latif, Najma; Bertazzo, Sergio; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve lies in a unique hemodynamic environment, one characterized by a range of stresses (shear stress, bending forces, loading forces and strain) that vary in intensity and direction throughout the cardiac cycle. Yet, despite its changing environment, the aortic valve opens and closes over 100,000 times a day and, in the majority of human beings, will function normally over a lifespan of 70–90 years. Until relatively recently heart valves were considered passive structures that play no active role in the functioning of a valve, or in the maintenance of its integrity and durability. However, through clinical experience and basic research the aortic valve can now be characterized as a living, dynamic organ with the capacity to adapt to its complex mechanical and biomechanical environment through active and passive communication between its constituent parts. The clinical relevance of a living valve substitute in patients requiring aortic valve replacement has been confirmed. This highlights the importance of using tissue engineering to develop heart valve substitutes containing living cells which have the ability to assume the complex functioning of the native valve. PMID:25054122

  13. Echocardiographic features of aortic ball valve prosthesis malfunction.

    PubMed

    Weisburst, M R; Singh, A K; Riley, R S

    1982-11-01

    A case of aortic ball valve prosthesis malfunction is described in which the poppet became alternately stuck in the open and closed position. The patient experienced chest pain followed by pulmonary edema and cardiac arrest. Malfunction of prosthetic valve was diagnosed on echocardiogram and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was carried out until a Bjork-Shiley valve could be inserted in place of the faulty prosthesis. At the time of the operation, poppet migration had occurred and the poppet could not be found. Subsequent Bjork-Shiley aortic valve prosthesis dysfunction was suggested by variation in the intensity of the aortic opening sound and in the duration of the systolic ejection period. Fluoroscopy revealed the missing poppet in the left ventricle. Following surgical removal of the poppet, "normal" Bjork-Shiley valve function was restored.

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Despite Challenging Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Azpurua, Federico; Livesay, James J.; Fish, R. David

    2015-01-01

    We describe transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient who had severe peripheral artery disease. The patient's vascular condition required additional preliminary peripheral intervention to enable adequate vascular access. A 78-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, substantial comorbidities, and severe heart failure symptoms was referred for aortic valve replacement. The patient's 20-mm aortic annulus necessitated the use of a 23-mm Edwards Sapien valve inserted through a 22F sheath, which itself needed a vessel diameter of at least 7 mm for percutaneous delivery. The left common femoral artery was selected for valve delivery. The left iliac artery and infrarenal aorta underwent extensive intervention to achieve an intraluminal diameter larger than 7 mm. After aortic valvuloplasty, valve deployment was successful, and the transaortic gradient decreased from 40 mmHg to less than 5 mmHg. The patient was discharged from the hospital 4 days postoperatively. We conclude that transcatheter aortic valve implantation can be successfully performed in patients with obstructed vascular access, including stenosis of the infrarenal aorta and the subclavian and coronary arteries. PMID:25873826

  15. Aortic valve homograft for revision surgery - transesophageal echocardiography considerations

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arindam; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Rajashekar, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic root surgical anatomy and knowledge of the various homograft implantation techniques is of paramount importance to the attending anesthesiologist for echocardiographic correlation, estimation and accurately predicting aortic annular dimensions for the valve replacement in a case of diseased homograft. PMID:27716714

  16. Sutureless aortic valve and mitral valve repair in redo cases – really an off-label approach?

    PubMed Central

    Mokráček, Aleš; Kurfirst, Vojtěch

    2016-01-01

    Sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) was developed as an alternative treatment option to conventional open-heart surgery and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for “gray zone” patients. The need for concurrent mitral valve surgery is generally viewed as a contraindication to sutureless AVR. The purpose of this brief paper is to report our experiences with sutureless valves in patients after previous cardiac procedures with degenerated aortic bioprostheses and concomitant mitral valve disease. PMID:28096837

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in the Elderly: Who to Refer?

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. PMID:25216621

  18. Systolic closure of aortic valve in patients with prosthetic mitral valves.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, M; Motro, M; Rath, S; Schy, N; Neufeld, H N

    1982-01-01

    Systolic closure of the aortic valve was found in 10 of 36 patients who underwent mitral valve replacement. Eight patients had early systolic closure, and two had mid-systolic closure. The left ventricular outflow tract dimension on M-mode and two dimensional echocardiograms, left ventricular posterior wall and septal thickness, left ventricular dimensions in systole and diastole, aortic valve opening, and mitral to aortic valve distance were not significantly different between patients with and without systolic closure of the aortic valve. Two of the 10 patients with systolic aortic valve closure were catheterised and in neither was there a gradient between the left ventricle and the aorta. The two patients with mid-systolic closure, however, were the patients who had the narrowest left ventricular outflow tract which could cause significant distortion of blood flow. Systolic closure of the aortic valve in patients with mitral valve replacement is probably not caused by left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, though abnormalities in laminar flow from the left ventricular outflow tract may be involved. Images PMID:7082513

  19. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve replacement: first transfemoral implant in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chiam, P T; Koh, T H; Chao, V T; Lee, C Y; See Tho, V Y; Tan, S Y; Lim, S T; Hwang, N C; Sin, Y K; Chua, Y L

    2009-05-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS), providing relief of symptoms and prolonging survival. However, many patients are either denied or not offered surgery due to high surgical risk or non-operability for open AVR. The technology of percutaneous aortic valve implantation emerged in 2002, and has since evolved rapidly with satisfactory results. Currently, almost all the procedures are performed predominantly in Europe and North America. The first-in-Asia percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route is described. A 77-year-old man with symptomatic severe AS and at high surgical risk was successfully treated, with sustained clinical improvement and satisfactory haemodynamic results at 30-day follow-up.

  20. Superimposition of a Mechanical Valve on an Impacted Aortic Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Hassan; Al-Ibrahim, K.; Sorefan, A. Aniff; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    1991-01-01

    During reoperation for replacement of a regurgitant aortic bioprosthesis (a 23-mm bovine pericardial valve), it was judged that total removal of the valve would be difficult, and hazardous to the patient. Therefore, its leaflets were excised and its sewing ring left in situ. A 21-mm Carbomedics bileaflet mechanical valve was sutured to the bioprosthetic sewing ring and implanted in the orifice of the bioprosthesis, resulting in excellent hemodynamic performance. We report this new technique to illustrate its feasibility, safety, and efficiency, as an alternative to complete removal of defective prostheses in the aortic position. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:199-201) Images PMID:15227480

  1. Treatment of mechanical aortic valve thrombosis with heparin and eptifibatide.

    PubMed

    Vora, Amit N; Gehrig, Thomas; Bashore, Thomas M; Kiefer, Todd L

    2014-07-01

    A 75-year old woman with a history of coronary disease status post 3-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) 8 years ago and a repeat one-vessel CABG 2 years ago in the setting of aortic valve replacement with a #19 mm St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve for severe aortic stenosis presented with two to three weeks of progressive dyspnea and increasing substernal chest discomfort. Echocardiography revealed a gradient to 31 mmHg across her aortic valve, increased from a baseline of 13 mmHg five months previously. Fluoroscopy revealed thrombosis of her mechanical aortic valve. She was not a candidate for surgery given her multiple comorbidities, and fibrinolysis was contraindicated given a recent subdural hematoma 1 year prior to presentation. She was treated with heparin and eptifibatide and subsequently demonstrated resolution of her aortic valve thrombosis. We report the first described successful use of eptifibatide in addition to unfractionated heparin for the management of subacute valve thrombosis in a patient at high risk for repeat surgery or fibrinolysis.

  2. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  3. Fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Marasovic-Krstulovic, Daniela; Jurisic, Zrinka; Perkovic, Dijana; Aljinovic, Jure; Martinovic-Kaliterna, Dusanka

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) developed after the aortic valve replacement followed by fatal congestive heart failure within the 6 months from the initial symptoms. A 61-year-old male developed rapidly progressive diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement due to stenosis of bicuspid aortic valve. He presented with diarrhoea, weight loss, mialgia and arthralgia after cardiac surgery. Heart failure, due to myocardial fibrosis, was noted as a cause of death. We hypothesize that artificial materials like the ones used in mechanical valves or silicon materials in breast implants may induce fulminant course of pre-existing systemic sclerosis or create a new onset in predisposed individual.

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) for Treatment of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Doble, B; Xie, F; Blackhouse, G; Campbell, K; Kaulback, K; Chandra, K; Goeree, R

    2013-01-01

    Background One-year mortality outcomes in the PARTNER trial showed that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was noninferior to surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) in patients who were eligible for sAVR (cohort A), and superior to standard treatment in patients who were ineligible for sAVR (cohort B). Objective To update a previous report on the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of TAVI, published in 2012. Data Sources A literature search was performed on September 11, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2011, until September 11, 2012. Review Methods Randomized controlled trials investigating TAVI in comparison to sAVR or standard treatment were included for analysis. Results were summarized descriptively. Results At 2-year follow-up, mortality in cohort A was similar between the TAVI and sAVR groups. Rates of stroke/transient ischemic attack, major vascular complications, and moderate/severe paravalvular aortic regurgitation were significantly higher in the TAVI group, but rate of major bleeding was significantly higher in the sAVR group. Mortality in cohort B was significantly lower with transfemoral (TF) TAVI than with standard treatment, but rate of stroke was significantly higher with TF TAVI. TF TAVI resulted in a more rapid improvement in quality of life scores than sAVR, but this difference was not sustained at 6 and 12 months. Patients who underwent transapical TAVI did not have a greater early improvement in quality of life compared to sAVR patients. Compared to standard treatment, TF TAVI resulted in a greater improvement in quality of life scores at all time points. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were in favour of TAVI for inoperable patients in the base-case analysis

  5. The pathology of human aortic valve homografts

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith C.

    1967-01-01

    Beta-propiolactone sterilized, freeze-dried aortic valve homografts offer a dead framework which is accepted by the host and is capable of immediate and full function. The survival time of such grafts as fully functional units may be limited by physical and chemical alterations produced in the tissues by sterilization and freeze-drying. The organizing reaction of the host in covering the grafts or using them as a scaffolding may also be affected by these processes. It is possible that better long-term results may be achieved by using fresh grafts. There is no difference in host cellular response to fresh and sterilized and/or freeze-dried grafts. There is a possibility that heterogeneous reactions to polypeptides in the graft may occur in some individuals. Organization and covering of the graft by host tissue occurs from host tissues contiguous to the graft. Cells circulating in the bloodstream play no part in this by seeding on the surface. Thrombosis, in the absence of infection, is a rare complication. (Anticoagulants were not used in these patients.) Calcification occurs as only a late complication in persisting `dead' tissue. Unsuspected, and often extensive, myocardial ischaemia occurs frequently under bypass conditions with coronary artery perfusion and substantially contributes to immediate post-operative mortality and morbidity. Images PMID:6033379

  6. Aortic insufficiency. A result of intermittent migration of aortic valve prosthesis poppet.

    PubMed

    Kunstadt, D; Adeyemo, A; Clauss, R H

    1976-06-28

    A bizarre mechanism of aortic valve incompetence was observed when the occluder of a Braunwald-Cutter aortic valve prosthesis decreased in diameter, volume, and weight, and from time to time fell into the left ventricle. The patient's symptoms were palpitation, coughing, chocking sensations, and fright. An operation disclosed a small, smooth ball with disrupted cloth on all the struts. The residual torn mesh was removed, and the ball was replaced.

  7. [Evaluation of aortic valve replacement involving small severely calcified aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, M; Nishimura, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Komori, S; Shibata, M; Yuzaki, M; Okamura, Y

    2006-04-01

    We performed aortic valve replacement in 24 patients aged over 70 with small calcified valves. The surgical management of such patients remains controversial as the extensive calcification compromises implantation. Hence, we used an ultrasonic debridement instrument to remove calcium and selected a small prosthesis with the largest possible orifice without enlargement of the aortic annulus. Echocardiography showed significant reductions in left ventricular mass index compared with preoperative values. Early and mid-term prognosis has been relatively good.

  8. A Remnant Mitral Subvalvular Apparatus Mimicking Aortic Valve Vegetation after Mitral Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jun-Sung; Kim, Myung-A

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of the subvalvular apparatus has the merits of postoperative outcomes during mitral valve replacement for mitral regurgitation. We performed mitral valve replacement with anterior and posterior leaflet chordal preservation in a 65-year-old woman. On the 2nd postoperative day, routine postoperative trans-thoracic echocardiography showed an unknown aortic subvalvular mobile mass. We report a case of a remnant mitral subvalvular apparatus detected by echocardiography after chordal preserving mitral valve replacement which was confused with postoperative aortic valve vegetation. PMID:22509443

  9. Ventricular Septal Defect from Aortic Regurgitation Jet Lesion in Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Darabant, Sergiu; Oberton, Shelby B; Roldan, Luis P; Roldan, Carlos A

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve infective endocarditis (IE) can be complicated with severe aortic regurgitation (AR) jet-related lesions such as vegetations, pseudoaneurysms, aneurysms or perforations on the anterior mitral leaflet. Herein is reported the case of a 69-year-old male with culture-negative aortic valve endocarditis complicated with aortic valve perforations resulting in severe and eccentric AR and an AR jet-related ventricular septal defect (VSD). Neither transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) nor two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE) were unable to clearly discriminate an aorto-right ventricular fistula from a VSD. By contrast, three-dimensional TEE (3D-TEE) demonstrated multiple aortic valve vegetations, aortic valve perforations, severe AR, and an AR jet-related VSD. The 3D-TEE findings were confirmed at surgery, the aortic valve was replaced with a bioprosthetic valve, and the VSD was repaired with a pericardial patch. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a VSD resulting from an AR jet lesion to be detected and characterized using 3D-TEE. The accurate preoperative diagnosis and characterization of the VSD with 3D-TEE contributed to successful surgery and the patient's short- and long-term survival. Video 1A: This four-chamber transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) view with color Doppler shows a color-Doppler jet traversing the basal interventricular septum (IVS) into the right ventricle, predominantly during systole. However, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot be determined. A mild to moderate degree of tricuspid regurgitation is also noted. Video 1B: Close-up view of the basal IVS demonstrates a color Doppler jet traversing the IVS, predominantly during systole and apparently originating in the left ventricular outflow tract side, as illustrated by a color Doppler acceleration zone. However, and as in Fig. 1A, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot

  10. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  11. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  12. Computerized intraoperative calculation of instantaneous prosthetic aortic valve area.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J; Lachman, P; Collins, J J; Cohn, L H

    1988-01-01

    Improved assessment of valve area is essential to understanding the performance of prosthetic valves. The authors studied six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using mechanical (ME) or porcine (PO) prostheses. Instantaneous cardiac output (CO) (L/min) was measured in the aorta using an ultrasonic flow probe. Left ventricular and aortic pressures (mmHg) were measured using Millar catheters. Data were analyzed using an IBM PC-AT. Valve area (cm2) was determined using Gorlin's formula (AG) and a new formula for instantaneous area derived mathematically and using a theoretic constant. AG, mean (AI) and peak (Apk) instantaneous areas were compared to geometric measures of area (Aactual) in vitro. Peak instantaneous area correlates best with measured area. Intraoperative assessment using the ultrasonic flow probe and computer analysis is helpful in understanding the dynamic properties of prosthetic valves in vivo.

  13. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  14. Impact of Ejection Fraction and Aortic Valve Gradient on Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Suzanne J.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Holmes, David; Szeto, Wilson Y.; Allen, Keith B.; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K.; Vemulapali, Sreekaanth; O’Brien, Sean; Dai, Dadi; Cohen, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background In patients with aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), prior studies have suggested that reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and low aortic valve gradient (AVG) are associated with worse long-term outcomes. Since these conditions commonly coexist, the extent to which they are independently associated with outcomes after TAVR is unknown. Objectives To evaluate the impact of LVEF and AVG on clinical outcomes after TAVR and to determine whether the effect of AVG on outcomes is modified by LVEF. Methods Using data from 11,292 patients who underwent TAVR as part of the TVT Registry, we examined rates of 1-year mortality and recurrent heart failure in patients with varying levels of LV dysfunction (LVEF < 30% vs. 30–50% vs. > 50%) and AVG (< 40mmHg vs. ≥ 40mmHg). Multivariable models were used to estimate the independent effect of AVG and LVEF on outcomes. Results Over the first year of follow-up after TAVR, patients with LV dysfunction and low AVG had higher rates of death and recurrent heart failure. After adjustment for other clinical factors, only low AVG was associated with higher mortality (HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11–1.32; p < 0.001) and higher rates of heart failure (HR 1.52; 95% CI 1.36–1.69; p < 0.001), whereas the effect of LVEF was no longer significant. There was no evidence of effect modification between AVG and LVEF with respect to either endpoint. Conclusion In this large series of real world patients undergoing TAVR, low AVG, but not LV dysfunction, was associated with higher rates of mortality and recurrent heart failure. Although these findings suggest that AVG should be considered when evaluating the risks and benefits of TAVR for individual patients, neither severe LV dysfunction nor low AVG alone or in combination provide sufficient prognostic discrimination to preclude treatment with TAVR. PMID:27199058

  15. Transapical aortic valve and mitral valve in ring prosthesis implantation - a new advance in transcatheter procedures.

    PubMed

    Neves, Paulo C; Paulo, Nelson Santos; Gama, Vasco; Vouga, Luís

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation offers a new treatment modality to those patients whose general condition makes conventional surgery very risky. However, the transcatheter option has only been available for the aortic valve. We describe a case of a successful implantation of two Edwards SAPIEN(®) 26 and 29 mm transapical valves, respectively, in aortic and mitral positions, on a 74-year-old patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis. The procedure progressed uneventfully. Predischarge echocardiogram showed a peak aortic gradient of 20 mmHg, mild periprosthetic regurgitation, peak and mean mitral gradients of 12 and 4, respectively, and moderate (II/IV) periprosthetic regurgitation. Indications for transapical valve implantation will rapidly increase in the near future. It is essential to individualize the treatment be applied for each patient, in order to optimize the success of the procedure.

  16. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  17. Clinical outcome, valve dysfunction, and progressive aortic dilation in a pediatric population with isolated bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Spaziani, Gaia; Ballo, Piercarlo; Favilli, Silvia; Fibbi, Veronica; Buonincontri, Lorenzo; Pollini, Iva; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Chiappa, Enrico

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the medium-term clinical outcome and the risk of progression of aortic valve disease and aortic dilation in pediatric patients with isolated bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). 179 pediatric patients with isolated BAV were prospectively followed from January 1995 to December 2010. Patients with severe valve dysfunction at baseline were excluded. Clinical outcome included cardiac death, infective endocarditis, aortic complications, cardiac surgery and percutaneous valvuloplasty. Echocardiographic endpoints were: progression of aortic stenosis (AS) or regurgitation (AR) and progressive aortic enlargement at different levels of the aortic root, evaluated as z-score. The median age at diagnosis was 7.8 [2.7-12.0] years. After a median followup of 5.4 [2.3-9.2] years, all patients were alive. The clinical endpoint occurred in 4 (2.2 %) patients (0.41 events per 100 patient-years). A progression of AS and AR was observed in 9 (5.0 %) and 29 (16.2 %) patients, respectively. The z-scores at the end of follow-up were not significantly different from baseline at the annulus, Valsalva sinuses and sinotubular junction, whereas a slight increase was observed at the level of the ascending aorta (1.9 vs 1.5, p = 0.046). Significant progressive aortic dilation occurred in a minority of patients (10.6, 5.6, 9.5, and 19.0 % respectively). The clinical outcome in pediatric patients with isolated BAV is favourable and the progression of aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation is relatively slow. These findings may be taken into account to better guide risk assessment and clinical follow-up in these patients.

  18. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis—Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Seeger, Julia; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California) system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications. Methods and Results 235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77), 26mm (N = 91) or 29mm (N = 67) valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6%) and stroke (2.1%) were low. Conclusions In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069 PMID:27003573

  19. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models. PMID:23125924

  20. The expanding indications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Paul T L; Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), also known as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, is increasingly performed worldwide and is a technology that is here to stay. It has become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and an alternative option for patients at high surgical risk with severe aortic stenosis. Early results of TAVI in intermediate-risk patients appear promising although larger randomized trial results are awaited before the widespread adoption of this technology in this big pool of patients. In patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis and degenerated surgical bioprostheses, TAVI has been shown to be feasible and relatively safe, though certain important considerations remain. Indications for TAVI are likely to grow as newer generation and improved devices and delivery systems become available.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Fremes, Stephen; Pibarot, Philippe; Ruel, Marc; Ibrahim, Reda; Welsh, Robert; Feindel, Christopher; Lichtenstein, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with medical management alone, and balloon aortic valvuloplasty has failed to provide durable clinical benefit. Open surgical replacement of the aortic valve can improve symptoms and survival. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to improve survival, quality of life, and functional status in nonoperable patients and to be a viable option for patients in whom the risk of open surgical morbidity or mortality is high. This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement represents the consensus of a representative group of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons as to the current, but evolving, role of this less-invasive new therapy. Specific recommendations are provided for selection of patients for TAVI vs surgical aortic valve replacement for native valves and for bioprostheses, approaches to patient evaluation for TAVI, appropriate constitution of multidisciplinary teams involved in performing TAVI, essential facilities that are needed to perform TAVI safely and effectively, and training/qualifications for TAVI operators. Cost considerations, complication rates, and the quality of the available evidence are also discussed. It is hoped that this consensus document will prove to be a useful resource for health professionals, institutions, departments, and decision-making bodies dealing with this important and rapidly evolving therapy.

  2. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the ‘therapeutic response’ of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era. PMID:28008354

  3. Normal echocardiographic mitral and aortic valve thickness in children

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Rachel H; Culliford-Semmens, Nicola; Sidhu, Karishma; Wilson, Nigel J

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the normal range of aortic and mitral valve thickness in healthy schoolchildren from a high prevalence rheumatic heart disease (RHD) region, using a standardised protocol for imaging and measurement. Methods Measurements were performed in 288 children without RHD. Anterior mitral valve leaflet (AMVL) thickness measurements were performed at the midpoint and tip of the leaflet in the parasternal long axis (PSLA) in diastole, when the AMVL was approximately parallel to the ventricular septum. Thickness of the aortic valve was measured from PSLA imaging in systole when the leaflets were at maximum excursion. The right coronary and non-coronary closure lines of the aortic valve were measured in diastole in parasternal short axis (PSSA) imaging. Results were compared with 51 children with RHD classified by World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria. Results In normal children, median AMVL tip thickness was 2.0 mm (IQR 1.7–2.4) and median AMVL midpoint thickness 2.0 mm (IQR 1.7–2.4). The median aortic valve thickness was 1.5 mm (IQR 1.3–1.6) in the PSLA view and 1.4 mm (IQR 1.2–1.6) in the PSSA view. The interclass correlation coefficient for the AMVL tip was 0.85 (0.71 to 0.92) and for the AMVL midpoint was 0.77 (0.54 to 0.87). Conclusions We have described a standardised method for mitral and aortic valve measurement in children which is objective and reproducible. Normal ranges of left heart valve thickness in a high prevalence RHD population are established. These results provide a reference range for school-age children in high prevalence RHD regions undergoing echocardiographic screening.

  4. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  5. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750695

  6. Ascending aortic wall cohesion: comparison of bicuspid and tricuspid valves.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Wendt, Daniel; Indruch, Jiri; Flek, Radek; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Alaeddine, Savvas; Jakob, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV) represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n = 44) or a tricuspid (group 2, n = 146) AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the "dissectometer" resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC). Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P < 0.001), and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04 ± 0.42 mm versus 2.24 ± 0.41 mm, P = 0.008). Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction) were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P = 0.003, P = 0.02, P = 0.01). We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P = 0.72, P = 0.40, P = 0.41). Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  7. Carotid artery access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Thourani, Vinod H; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2013-10-01

    We report three patients who had successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) via carotid artery access. None were candidates for thoracotomy (including minimal access incisions) and had no other vascular access sites that would accommodate the transcatheter valve sheath. Antegrade carotid perfusion and retrograde insertion of the delivery sheath maintained cerebral blood flow without sequelae. Carotid access for TAVR is an option for unusual patients without other access.

  8. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  9. Aortic valve regurgitation in a patient affected by KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Francesco; Beghi, Cesare; Gherli, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    The KBG syndrome is a very rare condition characterized by developmental delay, short stature, distinct facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors and skeletal abnormalities. Associated congenital heart defects have been described in 9% of patients. Herein is described a case of aortic root dilatation with significant regurgitation in a young patient affected by KBG syndrome. Surgical inspection showed a dilated aortic annulus, slightly dilated aortic sinuses, a tricuspid valvb with slightly thickened cuspal margins and central regurgitation. Histological examination showed a fibrous hyaline involution of the valvular leaflets. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of KBG syndrome affected by aortic root dilatation with severe regurgitation. Morphology of the aortic valve leaflets was relatively normal, but the annulus was dilated in the absence of any history of rheumatic fever, hypertension, connective tissue or rheumatic systemic diseases. The unusual findings in this young patient raised questions regarding the as-yet unexplained etiopathogenesis of the KBG syndrome.

  10. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  11. Dissection of Ascending Aorta After Aortic Valve Replacement and Reduction Aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Maria; Dar, Mudasser Iqbal; Khan, Asad Ullah; Khan, Farhan; Khan, Abdul Bari

    2015-12-01

    A case of Debakey type-II (Stanford type-A) dissecting aortic aneurysm, after aortic valve replacement and reduction aortoplasty, is reported. The patient was 35 years male who was diagnosed of severe aortic regurgitation along with aortic root dilatation of 7 cm. He underwent aortic valve replacement with 27-ASt Jude's mechanical aortic valve along with reduction aortoplasty. Nine months later, he was admitted to our hospital with complaint of severe sudden anterior chest pain. Computed tomography with aortic enhancement showed dilatation and dissection of ascending aorta. Successful operation of aortic root replacement with composite graft was performed and patient was discharged without any postoperative complication. The aortic diameter at the time of aortic valve replacement is an independent risk factor for the late aortic dissection.

  12. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405).

  13. The effect of the aortic valve orientation on cavitation.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Travis, Brandon R; Smerup, Morten; Decker Christensen, Thomas; Funder, Jonas; Nyboe, Camilla; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2016-08-01

    When implanting a mechanical aortic valve the annulus orientation is important with respect to turbulence. However, the effect on cavitation has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate how cavitation is influenced hereof in vivo. Three pigs were included in the study. An Omnicarbon 21mm valve equipped with a rotating mechanism enabling controlled rotation of the valve was implanted in aortic position. Under stable hemodynamic conditions, measurements were performed using a hydrophone positioned at the aortic root. The valve was rotated from 0-360° in increments of 30°. From the pressure fluctuations recorded by the hydrophone the root mean square of the 50 kHz high pass filtered signal as well as the non-deterministic signal energy was calculated as indirect measures of cavitation. Various degrees of cavitation were measured but no relationship was found between either of the two cavitation measures and the valve orientation. Hemodynamics varied during the experiments for all pigs (3.9-5.7 l/min; 5.0-7.2 l/min; 3.1-7.5 l/min). Changes in cavitation quantities seemed to be caused by changes in hemodynamics rather than valve angular position. In conclusion, these results do not favor any position over another in terms of cavitation potential.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena; Moazzami, Kasra; Cocke, Thomas P; Elmann, Elie; Vaidya, Pranay; Ng, Arthur F; Satya, Kumar; Narayan, Rajeev L

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement can experience severe perioperative complications leading to hemodynamic instability and death. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be used to provide cardiorespiratory support during this time. Methods From 2012 to 2015, of 247 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement, 6 (2.42%) required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Their mean age was 82 ± 7.4 years, mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 9.4 ± 6.6, and mean aortic gradient was 28.3 ± 12 mm Hg. Rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was required for hemodynamic instability due to ventricular fibrillation ( n = 1), respiratory failure ( n = 1), left ventricular wall rupture ( n = 2), and aortic annulus rupture ( n = 1). In one patient, prophylactic extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was required due to advanced heart failure. Additional procedures included valve-in-valve implantation ( n = 1), conversion to an open procedure ( n = 3), and intraaortic balloon pump insertion ( n = 1). Results The median hospital stay was 20 days. There were 2 hospital deaths in patients whose hospital course was complicated by left ventricular wall rupture or aortic annulus rupture with resulting tamponade. Among the 4 survivors, one required continuous ventilator support following discharge, and 3 experienced no major complications during the first month after discharge. Conclusions Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be considered a viable option for high-risk patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement and those who develop cardiac complications following this procedure and require cardiorespiratory support.

  15. A stepwise aortic clamp procedure to treat porcelain aorta associated with aortic valve stenosis and hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Susumu; Osako, Motohiko; Kimura, Tamizo; Nishimura, Kenji; Yamanaka, Nozomu; Nakamura, Shingo; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was referred for an aortic-valve surgery because of severe aortic stenosis. Thirty years ago, he had undergone a mitral valve commissurotomy and after 9 years, the valve had been replaced by a mechanical valve. He had been undergoing hemodialysis for the past 8 years. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen showed a dense circumferential calcification in the wall of the entire thoracic and abdominal aorta, pulmonary artery, and left and right atrium. A conventional aortic-valve replacement was performed. To avoid an embolic event, a "stepwise aortic clamp" procedure was attempted and involved the following: (1) brief circulatory arrest and aortotomy during moderate hypothermia; (2) balloon occlusion at the ascending aorta during low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); (3) endoarterectomy by using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator to enable aortic cross-clamping; and (4) a cross-clamp reinforced with felt and full-flow CPB. The patient recovered without any thromboembolic events. Using this procedure to treat a porcelain aorta seemed to reduce the time limit and reduced the risk of brain injury during cardiac surgery.

  16. Computed tomography evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): imaging of the aortic root and iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Halliburton, Sandra S; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2011-01-01

    For patients with severe aortic stenosis, open-heart surgical valve replacement remains the current clinical standard with documented, excellent long-term outcome. Over the past few years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has developed into a treatment alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Because transcatheter valvular procedures are characterized by lack of exposure of the operative field, image guidance is critical. This Pictorial Essay describes the role of 3-dimensional imaging with multidetector row computed tomography for detailed reconstructions of the aortic valve, aortic root, and iliac arteries in the context of TAVI.

  17. Tropheryma whipplei aortic valve endocarditis, cured without surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culture-negative endocarditis due to Tropheryma whipplei is a rare disease. Mostly the diagnosis is made by histologic examination of resected heart valve tissue. Case presentation In this case report, we described a patient with a classical Whipple’s disease. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed a vegetation on noncoronary cusp of the aortic valve. Whipple’s disease was confirmed by positive Tropheryma whipplei polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in EDTA blood and a duodenal biopsy with positive periodic acid-Schiff stain (PAS) macrophages. Conclusion Due to timely diagnosis, our patient was treated with antibiotics without valve replacement. PMID:23110725

  18. Left ventricular guidewire pacing for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Guérios, Enio E; Wenaweser, Peter; Meier, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Previous reports prove the safety and efficacy of cardiac pacing employing a guidewire in the left ventricle as unipolar pacing electrode. We describe the use of left ventricular guidewire pacing as an alternative to conventional transvenous temporary right ventricular pacing in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  19. Cerebral events and protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Melanie; Barbanti, Marco; Wood, David A; Ye, Jian; Webb, John G

    2014-11-15

    Stroke has emerged as one of the most concerning complications following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), associated with high morbidity and mortality. We discuss the potential mechanisms of stroke following TAVR, as well as the newly developed embolic protection devices aimed to reduce the risk of stroke.

  20. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  1. Ruptured aortic valve cusp: a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J H; Menapace, F J; Howell, R R

    1983-07-01

    A case of traumatic rupture of the aortic valve as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver is presented. Conformation was made by comparative echocardiographic studies available from three months before and immediately following the incident. The patient refused surgical intervention and died one month later with severe congestive heart failure despite vigorous medical therapy.

  2. Quadricuspid aortic valves in Syrian hamsters and their formation according to current knowledge on valvulogenesis.

    PubMed

    López-García, Alejandro; Carmen Fernández, M; Durán, Ana Carmen; Sans-Coma, Valentín; Fernández, Borja

    2015-02-01

    Occurrence of quadricuspid aortic valves has been reported in humans, in nine dogs and in a greater white-toothed shrew. Moreover, two cases of developing aortic valves with four anticipated leaflets have been described in Syrian hamster embryos. Currently, however, no case of quadricuspid aortic valve in adult hamsters has been recorded. The aim here is to present four adults of this rodent species, two of them with unequivocally quadricuspid aortic valves and the other two with quadricuspid-like aortic valves. The four anomalous aortic valves were detected among 4,190 Syrian hamsters examined in our laboratory, representing an incidence of 0.09%. None of the affected hamsters showed apparent signs of disease. The present findings are considered on the light of current empirical knowledge about the morphogenesis of quadricuspid and bicuspid aortic and pulmonary valves. Quadricuspid aortic valves result from the partition of one of the normal mesenchymal cushions which normally give rise to normal (tricuspid) valves, while quadricuspid-like valves might be the product of a combined mechanism of fusion and partition of the cushions at the onset of the valvulogenesis. The presence of aortic valves with four leaflets in ancient mammalian lineages such as insectivors and rodents suggest that quadricuspid aortic valves, although showing almost certainly a low incidence, may be widespread among the different groups of mammals, including domestic animals.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): access planning and strategies.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has proven to be a viable tool for the high-surgical-risk population with severe aortic valve stenosis. Vascular access complications are not uncommon with TAVR and may increase early and late mortality. Avoiding these serious complications is the goal. With experience and careful screening, we are now able to risk-stratify patients who may be at increased risk of vascular complications. While the traditional iliofemoral access site remains the most common for TAVR, alternate access sites that have proven to be viable and safe alternatives include the transapical, direct-aortic, and subclavian techniques. TAVR teams should be familiar and comfortable with these approaches as each of them has its own advantages and weaknesses. The best option is usually one in which the procedure is tailored to the patient. The present review examines our current access planning and strategies for TAVR.

  4. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  5. Raloxifene attenuates Gas6 and apoptosis in experimental aortic valve disease in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Abedat, Suzan; Beeri, Ronen; Valitsky, Michael; Daher, Sameh; Kott-Gutkowski, Miriam; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sosna, Jacob; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Lotan, Chaim

    2011-01-01

    Renal failure is associated with aortic valve calcification. Using our rat model of uremia-induced reversible aortic valve calcification, we assessed the role of apoptosis and survival pathways in that disease. We also explored the effects of raloxifene, an estrogen receptor modulator, on valvular calcification. Gene array analysis was performed in aortic valves obtained from three groups of rats (n = 7 rats/group): calcified valves obtained from rats fed with uremic diet, valves after calcification resolution following diet cessation, and control. In addition, four groups of rats (n = 10 rats/group) were used to evaluate the effect of raloxifene in aortic valve calcification: three groups as mentioned above and a fourth group fed with the uremic diet that also received daily raloxifene. Evaluation included imaging, histology, and antigen expression analysis. Gene array results showed that the majority of the altered expressed genes were in diet group valves. Most apoptosis-related genes were changed in a proapoptotic direction in calcified valves. Apoptosis and decreases in several survival pathways were confirmed in calcified valves. Resolution of aortic valve calcification was accompanied by decreased apoptosis and upregulation of survival pathways. Imaging and histology demonstrated that raloxifene significantly decreased aortic valve calcification. In conclusion, downregulation of several survival pathways and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification. The beneficial effect of raloxifene in valve calcification is related to apoptosis modulation. This novel observation is important for developing remedies for aortic valve calcification in patients with renal failure. PMID:21335463

  6. Replacement of the quadricuspid aortic valve: strategy to avoid complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Pirundini, Paul A; Balaguer, Jorge M; Lilly, Kevin J; Gorsuch, William Brian; Taft, Margaret Byrne; Cohn, Lawrence H; Rizzo, Robert J

    2006-06-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valves are rarely encountered by the cardiac surgeon during aortic valve replacement. The most common location for the supranumerary cusp is between the noncoronary and the right coronary cusp, located over the membranous septum, which can potentially increase the risk of complete heart block after valve replacement. We present three quadricuspid aortic valve replacements, one of which was complicated by complete heart block postoperatively. We suggest a strategy to possibly avoid this complication.

  7. Aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve: how big? How much?

    PubMed

    Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-02-01

    Despite more than a decade of intense investigation, controversy persists regarding appropriate triggers for aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve. The difficulty is that the data are inescapably imperfect. Although we can count individuals with bicuspid valve who suffer dissection, we have an insufficient understanding of the true denominator of individuals at risk to calculate the probability of dissection for an individual patient. In addition, our own decision-making process is subject to "denominator neglect" or focus on the fact of the occurrence of the event rather than on the risk of the occurrence. Furthermore, the data are inherently incomplete given the asymmetric nature of outcomes information. Specifically, although we can see those who did or did not dissect among the patients not undergoing surgery, the converse is not true; the tragedy of prophylactic surgery is that one cannot distinguish those who have benefited through prevention of dissection from those who paid the price of surgery but in whom dissection would never have occurred. Finally, we have data for only some of the critical determinants of dissection. Structural failure occurs when stresses exceed strengths. Aortic diameter gives us some insight into stress but we have little information on the material strength of the aorta. Early indications that patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for bicuspid valve had a significant risk of aortic dissection were followed by laboratory data showing histologic, biochemical, and mechanical abnormalities supporting an aggressive approach to resection; however, more recent clinical studies call this into question.

  8. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

  9. Postoperative analysis of the mechanical interaction between stent and host tissue in patients after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Raoul; Sündermann, Simon H; Born, Silvia; Ruiz, Carlos E; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; de Jaegere, Peter P; Maisano, Francesco; Falk, Volkmar; Mazza, Edoardo

    2017-02-28

    The analysis is based on a finite element procedure to extract the contact forces between an implanted Nitinol stent and the surrounding host tissue using postoperative CT images. The methodology was applied for patients (N=46) which have undergone a TAVI procedure with the Medtronic CoreValve Revalving System (MCRS) to obtain corresponding deformation and force maps. The postoperative CT data were recorded for each patient in both systolic and diastolic phase of the heart cycle. Scalar parameters were defined, which map deformed geometry and contact force field to mechanically relevant quantities: radial dilatation, radial shape distortion, non-convex points, mean force, a force deviation measure and a pressure equivalent. The latter demonstrates that in the area of the aortic root, the added circumferential loading is of the same order as the baseline average blood pressure, thus leading to a doubling of the local mechanical load. Generally the force distribution along the stent is non-homogeneous. A comparison of systolic and diastolic data revealed slightly higher contact forces during the diastole, indicating that the stent has to carry more load in this phase. The geometrical and mechanical parameters were compared for two types of clinical complication: para-valvular leakage (PVL) and permanent pacemaker requirement (PPM). It was found that an increase in mean force can be associated with both complications; significantly for PVL and as a trend for PPM.

  10. [Ascending-descending Aortic Bypass and Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Coarctation with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryota; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Kodera, Kojiro; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kataoka, Go; Tatsuishi, Wataru; Kubota, Sayaka; Namiki, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Seiya

    2015-08-01

    A 53-year-old woman was developed congestive heart failure. She was diagnosed as having aortic coarctation, incompetent bicuspid aortic valve and an aberrant right subclavian artery by using echocardiography and enhanced computed tomography. Ankle brachial pressure index(ABI)in the right was 0.71 and 0.69 in the left. Blood pressure of the right arm was 60 mmHg lower than that of the left arm. To avoid perioperative adverse cardiac events due to a 2-staged operation, we performed ascending-descending aortic bypass and aortic valve replacement simultaneously through a median sternotomy. The heart was retracted cranially, and a vascular prosthesis was anastomosed to the descending aorta just above the diaphragm in an end-to-side manner. Then the graft was placed curvilinearly around the right atrium and was anastomosed to the ascending aorta. After the operation, the right and left ABI increased to 0.90 and 0.98 respectively. There was no pressure difference between the arms. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: establishing a comprehensive program model for hybrid cardiac catheterization laboratories in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Bernadette; Dutra-Brice, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve disease, especially aortic stenosis, becomes progressively debilitating and carries a high mortality risk if it is categorized as severe and symptomatic (J Thorac Cardiovas Surg. 2012;144(3):e29-e84). In the past, the only treatment for aortic stenosis was surgical aortic valve replacement. Surgical treatment may require several hours of cardioplegia, and if the patient has comorbidities, such as renal failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, their operative mortality percentage increases.In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure for patients who were deemed high risk or inoperative for the routine surgical aortic valve replacement surgery. More than 20, 000 TAVRs have been performed in patients worldwide since 2002 when Dr Alain Cribier performed the first-in-man TAVR (Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2012;105(3):145-152). The Edwards Lifesciences SAPIEN XT valve and the Medtronic CoreValve are commercially available.The clinical findings and economic statistic have supported the expansion of the TAVR procedure. However, there has been considerable controversy over where the procedure is to occur and who is directly responsible for directing the TAVR care. This debate has identified barriers to the implementation of a TAVR program. The operating rooms and a cardiac catheterization laboratory are underprepared for the hybrid valve replacement therapy. Because of the barriers identified, the Department of Veterans Affairs determined a need for a systematic approach to review the programs that applied for this structural heart disease program. A centralized team was developed to ensure room readiness and staff competency. The use of the Health Failure Mode and Effects Analysis can define high-risk clinical processes and conduct a hazard analysis. Worksheets can show potential failure modes and their probabilities, along with actions and outcome measures, team collaboration

  12. Biomechanical characterization of ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve and bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Pham, T; Martin, C; Elefteriades, J; Sun, W

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown that patients harboring bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) or bovine aortic arch (BAA) are more likely than the general population to develop ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA). A thorough quantification of the AsAA tissue properties for these patient groups may offer insights into the underlying mechanisms of AsAA development. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate and compare the mechanical and microstructural properties of aortic tissues from AsAA patients with and without concomitant BAV or BAA. AsAA (n=20), BAV (n=20) and BAA (n=15) human tissues were obtained from patients who underwent elective AsAA surgery. Planar biaxial and uniaxial failure tests were used to characterize the mechanical and failure properties of the tissues, respectively. Histological analysis was performed to detect medial degenerative characteristics of aortic aneurysm. Individual layer thickness and composition were quantified for each patient group. The circumferential stress-strain response of the BAV samples was stiffer than both AsAA (p=0.473) and BAA (p=0.152) tissues at a low load. The BAV samples were nearly isotropic, while AsAA and BAA samples were anisotropic. The areal strain of BAV samples was significantly less than that of AsAA (p=0.041) and BAA (p=0.004) samples at a low load. The BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples in both mechanical and failure properties. On the microstructural level, all samples displayed moderate medial degeneration, characterized by elastin fragmentation, cell loss, mucoid accumulation and fibrosis. The ultimate tensile strength of BAV and BAA sampleswere also found to decrease with age. Overall, the BAV samples were stiffer than both AsAA and BAA samples, and the BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples. The BAV samples were thinnest, with less elastin than AsAA and BAA samples, which may be attributed to the loss of extensibility of these tissues at a low load. No apparent difference in failure mechanics among

  13. Bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a newborn exposed to carbamazapine during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Zehra; Karataş, Ahmet; Özlü, Tülay; Goksugur, Sevil B.; Varan, Birgül

    2014-01-01

    The use of antiepileptic drugs increases the risk of major congenital malformations during pregnancy. Here, we report an infant who had a history of in-utero carbamazepine exposure and who was born with a cardiac malformation. The infant was born at 39 weeks of gestation vaginally to an epileptic mother who had been treated with carbamazepine throughout her pregnancy. He was referred due to cardiac murmur in the second week of his life. The mother had not received folic acid supplementation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, patent foramen ovale and the renal ultrasound revealed mild left hydronephrosis. Follow-up echocardiography performed 14 weeks later showed increased severity of aortic stenosis and percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed. To our knowledge, there is only one case report in the literature mentioning the association of a bicuspid aortic valve and aortic stenosis with oxcarbazepine exposure, which is a structural derivative of carbamazepine. However, there are no reports for association with carbamazepine itself. Bicuspid aorta and aortic stenosis may be among the cardiac malformations that result from the teratogenic effect of carbamazepine. PMID:25584038

  14. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  15. Planimetry of aortic valve area using multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography is not a reliable method for assessing severity of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Y.; Meneveau, N.; Vuillemenot, A.; Magnin, D.; Anguenot, T.; Schiele, F.; Bassand, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of aortic valve area planimetry by multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) in aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Study of the diagnostic value of aortic valve area planimetry using multiplane TOE, compared with catheterisation and the continuity equation, both being considered as criterion standards. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 49 consecutive patients (29 male, 20 female, aged 44 to 82 years, average 66.6 (SD 8.5)), referred for haemodynamic evaluation of an aortic stenosis, were enrolled in a prospective study. From this sample, 37 patients were eligible for the final analysis. METHODS: Transthoracic and multiplane transoesophageal echocardiograms were performed within 24 hours before catheterisation. At transthoracic echo, aortic valve area was calculated by the continuity equation. At TOE, the image of the aortic valve opening was obtained with a 30-65 degrees rotation of the transducer. Numerical dynamic images were stored on optical discs for off-line analysis and were reviewed by two blinded observers. Catheterisation was performed in all cases and aortic valve area was calculated by the Gorlin formula. RESULTS: Feasibility of the method was 92% (48/52). The agreement between aortic valve area measured at TOE (mean 0.88 (SD 0.35) cm2) and at catheterisation (0.79 (0.24) cm2) was very poor. The same discrepancies were found between TOE and the continuity equation (0.72 (0.26) cm2). TOE planimetry overestimated aortic valve area determined by the two other methods. Predictive positive and negative values of planimetry to detect aortic valve area < 0.75 cm2 were 62% (10/16) and 43% (9/21) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Planimetry of aortic valve area by TOE is difficult and less accurate than the continuity equation for assessing the severity of aortic stenosis. Images PMID:9290405

  16. Simulations of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Implications for Aortic Root Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kodali, Susheel; Primiano, Charles; Sun, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic root rupture is one of the most severe complications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The mechanism of this adverse event remains mostly unknown. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the biomechanical interaction between the tissue and stent for patients with a high risk of aortic rupture. Methods We simulated the stent deployment process of three TAVI patients with high aortic rupture risk using finite element method. The first case was a retrospective analysis of an aortic rupture case, while the other two cases were prospective studies, which ended with one cancelled procedure and one successful TAVI. Simulation results were evaluated for the risk of aortic root rupture, as well as coronary artery occlusion, and paravalvular leak. Results For Case 1, the simulated aortic rupture location was the same as clinical observations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the large calcified spot on the interior of the left coronary sinus between coronary ostium and the aortic annulus was pushed by the stent, causing the aortic rupture. For Case 2 and Case 3, predicated results from the simulations were presented to the clinicians at pre-procedure meetings; and they were in agreement with clinician’s observations and decisions. Conclusions Our results indicated that the engineering analysis could provide additional information to help clinicians evaluate complicated, high risk aortic rupture cases. Since a systematic study of a large patient cohort of aortic rupture is currently not available (due to the low occurrence rate) to clearly understand underlying rupture mechanisms, case by case engineering analysis is recommended for evaluating patient-specific aortic rupture risk. PMID:24736808

  17. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans

    PubMed Central

    Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks. PMID:27127436

  18. Do all Critical Aortic Stenosis with Chest Pain Need Aortic Valve Replacement? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Munish; Mascarenhas, Daniel A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the cornerstone of treatment for symptomatic critical aortic stenosis (AS). It is a Class I indication that symptomatic patients with critical AS undergo either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present a patient with critical AS and new angina that was managed successfully with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the Right coronary artery. Physicians should consider that not all patients with critical AS and angina necessarily require AVR. Concomitant pathology leading to the symptoms should be carefully ruled out. This leads to a less invasive, cost effective care plan especially in patients with advanced age and comorbidities for which any type of surgical valvular intervention may pose high risk. PMID:27994841

  19. Species-specific effects of aortic valve decellularization.

    PubMed

    VeDepo, Mitchell C; Buse, Eric E; Quinn, Rachael W; Williams, Todd D; Detamore, Michael S; Hopkins, Richard A; Converse, Gabriel L

    2017-03-01

    Decellularized heart valves have great potential as a stand-alone valve replacement or as a scaffold for tissue engineering heart valves. Before decellularized valves can be widely used clinically, regulatory standards require pre-clinical testing in an animal model, often sheep. Numerous decellularization protocols have been applied to both human and ovine valves; however, the ways in which a specific process may affect valves of these species differently have not been reported. In the current study, the comparative effects of decellularization were evaluated for human and ovine aortic valves by measuring mechanical and biochemical properties. Cell removal was equally effective for both species. The initial cell density of the ovine valve leaflets (2036±673cells/mm(2)) was almost triple the cell density of human leaflets (760±386cells/mm(2); p<0.001). Interestingly, post-decellularization ovine leaflets exhibited significant increases in biaxial areal strain (p<0.001) and circumferential peak stretch (p<0.001); however, this effect was not observed in the human counterparts (p>0.10). This species-dependent difference in the effect of decellularization was likely due to the higher initial cellularity in ovine valves, as well as a significant decrease in collagen crosslinking following the decellularization of ovine leaflets that was not observed in the human leaflet. Decellularization also caused a significant decrease in the circumferential relaxation of ovine leaflets (p<0.05), but not human leaflets (p>0.30), which was credited to a greater reduction of glycosaminoglycans in the ovine tissue post-decellularization. These results indicate that an identical decellularization process can have differing species-specific effects on heart valves.

  20. Robotic resection of an aortic valve papillary fibroelastoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Grand, Todd J; Weiss, Stuart J

    2005-09-01

    Robotic technology has been applied to multiple cardiac surgical procedures. Purported benefits include decreased tissue trauma, reduced postoperative bleeding, fewer blood product transfusions, and shorter lengths of stay. We describe the case of a 50-year-old man with an incidentally discovered 1-cm mobile mass on the edge of the aortic valve noncoronary leaflet. The patient underwent robotic minimally invasive resection. The pathologic examination revealed papillary fibroelastoma.

  1. Early Stabilization of Traumatic Aortic Transection and Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, David L.; Wellens, Francis; Vercoutere, Rik A.; De Geest, Raf

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening aortic transection with concomitant mitral papillary muscle rupture and severe lung contusion caused by a failed parachute jump. This blunt thoracic injury was treated by early stabilization with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by successful delayed graft repair of the descending aorta and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:65–7) PMID:12638675

  2. Antithrombotic treatment in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Vincent J; Bennaghmouch, Naoual; van Kuijk, Jan-Peter; Capodanno, Davide; ten Berg, Jurriën M

    2015-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment option for symptomatic patients with severe aortic valvular disease who are not suitable for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. Despite improving experience and techniques, ischaemic and bleeding complications after TAVI remain prevalent and impair survival in this generally old and comorbid-rich population. Due to changing aetiology of complications over time, antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy after TAVI should be carefully balanced. Empirically, a dual antiplatelet strategy is generally used after TAVI for patients without an indication for oral anticoagulation (OAC; e. g. atrial fibrillation, mechanical mitral valve prosthesis), including aspirin and a thienopyridine. For patients on OAC, a combination of OAC and aspirin or thienopyridine is generally used. This review shows that current registries are unfit to directly compare antithrombotic regimens. Small exploring studies suggest that additional clopidogrel after TAVI only affects bleeding and not ischemic complications. However, these studies are lack in quality in terms of Cochrane criteria. Currently, three randomised controlled trials are recruiting to gather more knowledge about the effects of clopidogrel after TAVI.

  3. The performance of the Braunwald-Cutter aortic prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, E H; Kirklin, J W; Pluth, J R; Turner, M E; Parr, G V

    1977-04-01

    Four hundred seventy-five patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Braunwald-Cutter ball-valve prosthesis at two institutions. The early (30-day) hospital mortality was 4.7% for those with isolated aortic valve replacement and 6.9% for the entire group. For the former, 5-year actuarial survival of the hospital survivors was 72 +/- 5.7%; for the latter group it was 71 +/- 4.4%. Eleven patients (5 since the date of follow-up inquiry) have suffered poppet escape, 9 of whom died. The actuarial incidence of known poppet escape is 4 +/- 2.6% at 47 months; when the 5 patients suffering poppet escape since the date of follow-up inquiry are included, with certain assumptions, the incidence is 3.7 +/- 1.14%. The projected probability of poppet escape using all 11 patients is 12.2% at 5 years; the 70% confidence bands of projected probability of poppet escape separate from those of the risk of re-replacement at 61 months. This and other analyses indicate that in general, patients with the Braunwald-Cutter aortic prosthesis should have it replaced 4 1/2 to 5 years after its insertion.

  4. Prosthetic aortic valves. Indications for and results of reoperation.

    PubMed

    Shemin, R J; Guadiani, V A; Conkle, D M; Morrow, A G

    1979-01-01

    During a 15-year period from January 1962 through December 1976, 42 patients who had undergone a previous aortic valve replacement underwent reoperation. The mean interval between operations was 4.4 years. The indications for reoperation were aortic regurgitation resulting from mechanical malfunction (12 patients), ball variance (15 patients), perivalvular leaks (five patients), prosthetic stenosis (eight patients), anemia (one patient), and recurrent emboli (one patient). The indications were characteristic of a specific valve series. The most common reoperation was aortic valve replacement (29/42), which had a 10.3% operative mortality. Poppet change (10/42) carried a 10% operative mortality and no operative deaths followed suture closure of perivalvular leaks. Eighty-eight percent of patients alive six months after reoperation were New York Heart Association functional class 1 or 2. At last follow-up, 95% of surviving patients were still functional class 1 or 2, with a mean cumulative survival of 4.7 years after reoperation. This experience demonstrates that those patients surviving long enough to undergo reoperation can expect a reasonable operative risk, long-term survival, and excellent clinical improvement.

  5. Hemodynamic Changes following Aortic Valve Bypass: A Mathematical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Benevento, Emilia; Djebbari, Abdelghani; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Cecere, Renzo; Kadem, Lyes

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been shown to be a viable solution for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Under this circumstance, the left ventricle (LV) has a double outlet. The objective was to develop a mathematical model capable of evaluating the hemodynamic performance following the AVB surgery. A mathematical model that captures the interaction between LV, AS, arterial system, and AVB was developed. This model uses a limited number of parameters that all can be non-invasively measured using patient data. The model was validated using in vivo data from the literature. The model was used to determine the effect of different AVB and AS configurations on flow proportion and pressure of the aortic valve and the AVB. Results showed that the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradient. The percentage of flow through the AVB can range from 55.47% to 69.43% following AVB with a severe AS. LV stroke work was also significantly reduced following the AVB surgery and reached a value of around 1.2 J for several AS severities. Findings of this study suggest: 1) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradients; 2) flow distribution between the AS and the AVB is significantly affected by the conduit valve size; 3) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in LV stroke work; and 4) hemodynamic performance variations can be estimated using the model. PMID:25881082

  6. Interleukin-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses of human aortic valve interstitial cells in vitro and alleviates valve lesions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingchun; Song, Rui; Fullerton, David A.; Ao, Lihua; Zhai, Yufeng; Li, Suzhao; Ballak, Dov B.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Reece, T. Brett; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Xu, Dingli; Dinarello, Charles A.; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process, and aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) from diseased aortic valves express greater levels of osteogenic factors in response to proinflammatory stimulation. Here, we report that lower cellular levels of IL-37 in AVICs of diseased human aortic valves likely account for augmented expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) following stimulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or 4. Treatment of diseased AVICs with recombinant human IL-37 suppresses the levels of BMP-2 and ALP as well as calcium deposit formation. In mice, aortic valve thickening is observed when exposed to a TLR4 agonist or a high fat diet for a prolonged period; however, mice expressing human IL-37 exhibit significantly lower BMP-2 levels and less aortic valve thickening when subjected to the same regimens. A high fat diet in mice results in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) deposition in aortic valve leaflets. Moreover, the osteogenic responses in human AVICs induced by oxLDL are suppressed by recombinant IL-37. Mechanistically, reduced osteogenic responses to oxLDL in human AVICs are associated with the ability of IL-37 to inhibit NF-κB and ERK1/2. These findings suggest that augmented expression of osteogenic factors in AVICs of diseased aortic valves from humans is at least partly due to a relative IL-37 deficiency. Because recombinant IL-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses in human AVICs and alleviates aortic valve lesions in mice exposed to high fat diet or a proinflammatory stimulus, IL-37 has therapeutic potential for progressive calcific aortic valve disease. PMID:28137840

  7. Tsutsugamushi disease presenting with aortic valve endocarditis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shujie; Yu, Xianguan; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Dinghui; Wang, Min; Zhang, Hui; Qian, Xiaoxian

    2016-01-01

    Tsutsugamushi disease is a zoonotic disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi in which humans are accidental hosts. Infective endocarditis associated with Tsutsugamushi disease has not been previously reported. We are describing a case of Tsutsugamushi disease presenting with aortic valve endocarditis. The clinical data of a 67-year-old female with O. tsutsugamushi-induced aortic valve endocarditis was summarized retrospectively and analyzed with a literature review. Treatment of O. tsutsugamushi-induced aortic valve endocarditis with chloramphenicol is recommended. PMID:28078179

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus sutureless aortic valve replacement (SUAVR) for aortic stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of matched studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin; Niles, Natasha; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background With improving technologies and an increasingly elderly populations, there have been an increasing number of therapeutic options available for patients requiring aortic valve replacement. Recent evidence suggests that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is one suitable option for high risk inoperable patients, as well as high risk operable patients. Sutureless valve technology has also been developed concurrently, with facilitates surgical aortic valve replacement (SUAVR) by allow resection and replacement of the native aortic valve with minimal sutures and prosthesis anchoring required. For patients amenable for both TAVI and SUAVR, the evidence is unclear with regards to the benefits and risks of either approach. The objectives are to compare the perioperative outcomes and intermediate-term survival rates of TAVI and SUAVR in matched or propensity score matched studies. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to include all matched or propensity score matched studies comparing SUAVR versus TAVI for severe aortic stenosis. A meta-analysis with odds ratios (OR) and mean differences were performed to compare key outcomes including paravalvular regurgitation and short and intermediate term mortality. Results Six studies met our inclusion criteria giving a total of 741 patients in both the SUAVR and TAVI arm of the study. Compared to TAVI, SUAVR had a lower incidence of paravalvular leak (OR =0.06; 95% CI: 0.03–0.12, P<0.01). There was no difference in perioperative mortality, however SUAVR patients had significantly better survival rates at 1 (OR =2.40; 95% CI: 1.40–4.11, P<0.01) and 2 years (OR =4.62; 95% CI: 2.62–8.12, P<0.01). Conclusions The present study supports the use of minimally invasive SUAVR as an alternative to TAVI in high risk patients requiring aortic replacement. The presented results require further validation in prospective, randomized controlled studies. PMID:28066608

  9. Reverse U aortotomy (Kırali incision) for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kırali, Kaan

    2016-06-01

    The presence of patent vein grafts on the proximal aorta may cause technical difficulties during reoperations for aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass surgery. A 65-year-old man underwent reoperation for aortic valve replacement two years after his first open heart surgery (valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aorta-right coronary artery saphenous vein graft). The aortotomy incision was started approximately 2 cm above the proximal anastomosis and continued down at both sides until the prosthetic graft. The reverse U aortotomy prevents unnecessary and risky manipulations of proximal anastomoses, provides perfect exposure, and can be used securely during reoperative aortic valve surgery.

  10. The Perceval S Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Porcelain Aorta; is this Ideal Option?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Prappa, Efstathia; Argiriou, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    We would like to present in this paper a patient with severe aortic valve stenosis referred to our department for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this patient, it was intraoperatively detected an unexpected heavily calcified porcelain ascending aorta. We present the treatment options in this situation, the difficulties affronted intraoperatively, the significance of the preoperative chest computed tomography scan and the use of the Perceval S aortic valve as ideal bioprosthesis implantation. This is a self-expanding, self-anchoring, and sutureless valve with a wide indication in all patients requiring aortic bioprosthesis. PMID:28074827

  11. The perceval S aortic valve implantation in patients with porcelain aorta; is this ideal option?

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Prappa, Efstathia; Argiriou, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    We would like to present in this paper a patient with severe aortic valve stenosis referred to our department for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this patient, it was intraoperatively detected an unexpected heavily calcified porcelain ascending aorta. We present the treatment options in this situation, the difficulties affronted intraoperatively, the significance of the preoperative chest computed tomography scan and the use of the Perceval S aortic valve as ideal bioprosthesis implantation. This is a self-expanding, self-anchoring, and sutureless valve with a wide indication in all patients requiring aortic bioprosthesis.

  12. Late Paravalvular Aortic Regurgitation: Migration of the Valve or Late Recoil?

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Park, Ki E; Choi, Calvin Y; Mogali, Kiran; Stinson, Wade W; Manning, Eddie W; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-01-02

    A 79-year-old man underwent trans-catheter aortic valve replacement for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with a 26-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. Immediately after valve deployment there was moderate amount of paravalvular leak. Post-dilation was performed with an additional 2 cc of volume, and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. Nine months later, trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed moderate to severe paravalvular leak and possible aortic migration of the valve. The patient was brought back for the treatment of the paravalvular leak which was suspected to be due to valve migration. However, fluoroscopy and trans-esophageal echocardiography showed good valve position. Measurement of late valve recoil in the Coplanar view using cine-angiographic analysis software showed that the lower third of the valve had the greatest late recoil (-1.74 mm, 6.55%), which presumably accounted for the progression of the paravalvular leak. Valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was performed with a 26-mm SAPIEN 3 valve and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. This case displays late recoil as a likely mechanism for development of paravalvular leak after SAPIEN XT valve implantation. Our case illustrates that late recoil needs to be systematically evaluated in future studies, especially when trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is being expanded to lower risk and younger patients for whom the longevity and long-term performance of these valves is of critical importance.

  13. Asymptomatic Strut Fracture in DeBakey-Surgitool Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Von Der Emde, Jürgen; Eberlein, Ulrich; Breme, Jürgen

    1990-01-01

    From August 1971 through November 1972, we implanted 62 Model 2 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses in 62 patients, 4 of whom later had clinically asymptomatic strut fractures. In 1 case, the patient died suddenly, and autopsy revealed detachment of the ball-cage; in each of the other 3 cases, fractures of 2 struts close to the base of the prosthesis were diagnosed fluoroscopically, and the patients underwent successful reoperation. The interval between implantation and reoperation ranged from 11 months to 16 years, 9 months. In 1 patient, retrospective study of chest radiographs revealed that the fracture had been present for 2½ years. Larger valves (≥ A6) were affected significantly more often than smaller ones. We performed metallurgic analysis of 1 prosthesis: results revealed strut wear from fatigue cracking and secondary abrasion. Strut fracture was also promoted by suspension of the cage at right angles to the prosthetic ring and by use of a pyrolytic carbon ball in a titanium cage (i.e., an occluder harder than its holder). Patients with DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses should undergo annual radiologic examinations to enable early detection of strut fractures. Prophylactic valve replacement is not indicated. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:223-7) Images PMID:15227175

  14. Injuries to the Aorta, Aortic Annulus, and Left Ventricle During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Management and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Langer, Nathaniel B; Hamid, Nadira B; Nazif, Tamim M; Khalique, Omar K; Vahl, Torsten P; White, Jonathon; Terre, Juan; Hastings, Ramin; Leung, Diana; Hahn, Rebecca T; Leon, Martin; Kodali, Susheel; George, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    The experience with transcatheter aortic valve replacement is increasing worldwide; however, the incidence of potentially catastrophic cardiac or aortic complications has not decreased. In most cases, significant injuries to the aorta, aortic valve annulus, and left ventricle require open surgical repair. However, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement patient presents a unique challenge as many patients are at high or prohibitive surgical risk and, therefore, an open surgical procedure may not be feasible or appropriate. Consequently, prevention of these potentially catastrophic injuries is vital, and practitioners need to understand when open surgical repair is required and when alternative management strategies can be used. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of current management and prevention strategies for major complications involving the aorta, aortic valve annulus, and left ventricle.

  15. Enlargement of the aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Uberto; Celiento, Michele; Milano, Aldo D

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of aortic valve replacement (AVR) is to obtain relief from the fixed left ventricular (LV) obstruction by replacing the aortic valve with a prosthesis, either mechanical or biological, of adequate size. Most currently available prostheses provide satisfactory hemodynamic performance, but small-sized prostheses may be associated with high transvalvular gradients and suboptimal effective orifice area that result in prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), and thus are far from ideal for use in young, active patients. The avoidance of PPM is advisable as it has been repeatedly associated with increased mortality, decreased exercise tolerance and an impaired regression of LV hypertrophy after AVR for severe aortic stenosis. Enlargement of the aortic annulus (EAA) has proved to be a valuable method to prevent PPM in the presence of a diminutive aortic root. This review outlines the various techniques described for EAA, presenting technical details, long-term results and major procedure-related complications, and discussing the current role of EAA in patients requiring AVR.

  16. Implantation of mitral, aortic, and tricuspid bioprostheses due to infective endocarditis with necessary reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Danielecki, Cezary; Bugajski, Paweł; Olszewski, Roman; Greberski, Krzysztof; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    The patient was admitted to the Department of Cardiac Surgery of the J. Struś City Hospital in Poznan due to infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Implantation of three biological valve prostheses proceeded without complications. Starting on day 23, the patient's general condition deteriorated, with high fever. Despite postoperative antibiotic therapy, transesophageal echocardiography revealed the presence of vegetation on the bioprosthetic aortic valve. On the 46(th) day after the initial surgery, the patient required replacement of the aortic bioprosthesis, which exhibited the presence of numerous vegetations. The bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valves were not affected by the degenerative process. On the 12(th) day after the reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve, the patient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition.

  17. Implantation of mitral, aortic, and tricuspid bioprostheses due to infective endocarditis with necessary reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Bugajski, Paweł; Olszewski, Roman; Greberski, Krzysztof; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The patient was admitted to the Department of Cardiac Surgery of the J. Struś City Hospital in Poznan due to infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Implantation of three biological valve prostheses proceeded without complications. Starting on day 23, the patient's general condition deteriorated, with high fever. Despite postoperative antibiotic therapy, transesophageal echocardiography revealed the presence of vegetation on the bioprosthetic aortic valve. On the 46th day after the initial surgery, the patient required replacement of the aortic bioprosthesis, which exhibited the presence of numerous vegetations. The bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valves were not affected by the degenerative process. On the 12th day after the reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve, the patient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition. PMID:27785140

  18. Aortic valve orifice equation independent of valvular flow intervals: application to aortic valve area computation in aortic stenosis and comparison with the Gorlin formula.

    PubMed

    Seitz, W; Oppenheimer, L; McIlroy, M; Nelson, D; Operschall, J

    1986-12-01

    An orifice equation is derived relating the effective aortic valve area, A, the average aortic valve pressure gradient, dP, the stroke volume, SV, and the heart frequency, FH, through considerations of momentum conservation across the aortic valve. This leads to a formula consistent with Newton's second law of motion. The form of the new equation is A = (7.5 X 10(-5)) SV FH2/Pd, where A, VS, FH and Pd are expressed in cm2, ml, s-1 and mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve areas computed with the new orifice equation are found to correlate with those computed by the Gorlin formula in conditions of resting haemodynamic states at a level of r = 0.86, SE = 0.25 cm2, N = 120. The results suggest that the new formula may be considered as an independent orifice equation having a similar domain of validity as the Gorlin formula. The new equation offers the possibility of deriving additional useful haemodynamic relationships through combination with established cardiological formulas and applying it in a noninvasive Doppler ultrasonic or echocardiographic context.

  19. Clinical and morphologic observations after simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Roberts, W C

    1986-10-01

    Clinical and morphologic observations are described in 12 patients who underwent simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. All 12 patients had mitral stenosis, 10 aortic valve stenosis and 2 pure aortic valve regurgitation; 5 had tricuspid valve stenosis and 7 pure tricuspid valve regurgitation. Of the 10 patients who died within 60 days of triple valve replacement, 7 had the low cardiac output syndrome, which in 4, and possibly 5, of the 7 was attributed to prosthetic aortic valve stenosis. In none of the 12 patients was the ascending aorta dilated, and in the 4 (possibly 5) patients with low cardiac output, the space between the surface of the caged poppet (4 patients) or margins of the tilting disc (1 patient) in the aortic valve position and the aortic endothelium appeared inadequate to allow unobstructed flow despite small-sized prostheses in all but 1 patient. Thus, aortic valve replacement in the setting of triple valve dysfunction is hazardous or potentially so. The relative small sizes of the hearts in these patients also make valve replacement more difficult (and hazardous) compared to hearts with larger ventricles and aortas.

  20. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-01-01

    Summary In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR). Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. PMID:27249815

  1. [Aortic valve replacement and hemiarch replacement in a patient with a porcelain aorta].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Sakakibara, K; Inoue, H; Suzuki, S; Shindo, S; Matsumoto, M

    2009-07-01

    We report a case of aortic valve replacement and hemiarch replacement with reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery in a patient with a porcelain aorta. A 65-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for aortic stenosis. Computed tomography demonstrated severe aortic calcification and extensive calcification covering a wide area of the aorta. The echocardiography showed a highly calcified aortic valve and a pressure gradient of 109 mmHg across the aortic valve. At surgery, calcification of the ascending aorta was severe and involved its entire circumference. Therefore, 2 cannulae were inserted to the right axillary and right femoral arteries for extracorporeal circulation. We performed replacement of the ascending aorta and hemiarch with reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery under circulatory arrest and antegrade cerebral perfusion, as well as aortic valve replacement with a 21 mm St. Jude Medical mechanical valve. He had no major cardiac complications during the postoperative course, and was discharged on postoperative day 33.

  2. Restitution of the aortic valve: what is new, what is proven, and what is obsolete?

    PubMed

    Albes, Johannes M; Stock, Ulrich A; Hartrumpf, Martin

    2005-10-01

    Restitution strategies of the insufficient aortic valve belong to the clinical armamentarium. To date, the accumulated body of evidence comprises 126 articles dealing with restitution strategies on the insufficient aortic valve with concomitant aortic surgery. In a cumulative analysis an almost identical number of reimplantation (506) and remodeling (489) procedures were found in the literature, whereas 357 patients underwent aortic valve resuspension. The cumulative results tend to favor the reimplantation technique in terms of longevity of the reconstruction, particularly in congenital degenerative disorders of the aortic wall, whereas remodeling appears to exhibit a more physiologic behavior of the reconstructed valve and re-suspension serves as a simplified approach particularly in acute type A dissection. Although restitution of the native aortic valve has its place in current treatment options, the accumulated worldwide numbers indicate that it is not yet routinely implemented in the vast majority of cardiac institutions.

  3. Simulation of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in patient-specific aortic roots: Effect of crimping and positioning on device performance.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matteo; Ghosh, Ram P; Marom, Gil; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a cardiovascular condition that causes the progressive narrowing of the aortic valve (AV) opening, due to the growth of bone-like deposits all over the aortic root (AR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a minimally invasive procedure, has recently become the only lifesaving solution for patients that cannot tolerate the standard surgical valve replacement. However, adverse effects, such as AR injury or paravalvular leakage (PVL), may occur as a consequence of a sub-optimal procedure, due to the presence of calcifications in situ. Additionally, the crimping required for delivering the valve via stenting may damage the valve. The aim of the present study is to comparatively assess the crimping mechanics of the commercialized Edwards SAPIEN valve and an alternative polymeric valve (Polynova, Inc) and to evaluate the effect of different TAVR deployment positions using patient-specific numerical models. The optimal deployment location for achieving better patient outcomes was calculated and based on the interactions between the TAVR stent and the native AR. Results demonstrated that the Polynova valve withstands the crimping process better than the SAPIEN valve. Furthermore, deployment simulations showed the role that calcifications deposits may play in the TAVR sub-optimal valve anchoring to the AV wall, leading to the presence of gaps that result in PVL.

  4. [Hemodynamic sequelae following valve replacement in patients with aortic regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Onishi, S; Handa, S; Ikeda, F; Hosokawa, M; Yoshino, H; Ogawa, S; Nakamura, Y; Soma, Y; Inoue, T

    1989-06-01

    Serial echocardiographic analyses of the left ventricle (LV) were performed in 61 patients with aortic regurgitation before, one-six months, and six years after aortic valve replacement (AVR). There was no significant difference in the preoperative hemodynamic and echocardiographic data between 54 survivors and six deceased patients. There was a linear correlation (r = 0.69) between LV end-diastolic volume (EDV) by cineangiography and LV end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) by echocardiography. In patients with LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) less than 12 mmHg, the LV was markedly dilated before surgery, and LVDd was not normalized until half a year after surgery in half the cases. In 20 patients with LVEDP greater than 12 mmHg, LVDd was normalized in 17 patients up to half a year after surgery. In 11 patients with LV end-systolic dimension (LVDs) greater than 5.2 cm, LVDs was not normalized until six years post surgery in three patients. LVDd was improved six years after surgery in patients with LVDs less than 5.2 cm. Echocardiographically-determined LVDs less than 5.2 cm is recommended for preservation of LV function following aortic valve replacement.

  5. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  6. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  7. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45 mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50 mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ≥45 mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ≥50 mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5 mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  8. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  9. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant annular enlargement for small aortic annulus of less than 19 mm.

    PubMed

    Takakura, H; Sasaki, T; Hashimoto, K; Hachiya, T; Onoguchi, K; Oshiumi, M; Takeuchi, S

    2000-06-01

    Three female patients with aortic stenosis associated with a severely small annulus underwent aortic valve replacement. In intraoperative measurements, a 19-mm obtulator could not pass through the aortic annulus in each case. We therefore concluded that it would be difficult to implant an appropriate-sized prosthesis in a routine fashion, so we performed an annular enlargement in a modified Nicks procedure. By using a wide teardrop-shaped patch for enlargement and slightly tilting insertion of a prosthesis, a 21 mm bileaflet mechanical prosthesis could be inserted into the enlarged annulus. Despite being a simpler method than other enlarging procedures, a two- or three-sizes larger prosthesis than the native annulus can be inserted with relative ease. Thus, the use of a 19 mm mechanical prosthesis may be avoidable in most adult cases.

  10. International Expert Consensus on Sutureless and Rapid Deployment Valves in Aortic Valve Replacement Using Minimally Invasive Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Mattia; Moten, Simon C.; Quaini, Eugenio; Solinas, Marco; Folliguet, Thierry A.; Meuris, Bart; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Teoh, Kevin H. T.; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A.; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Ferrarini, Matteo; Fischlein, Theodor J. M.; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Suri, Rakesh M.; Troise, Giovanni; Gersak, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define the benefit of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in current minimally invasive approaches in isolated aortic valve replacement. Methods A panel of 28 international experts with expertise in both minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and rapid deployment valves was constituted. After thorough literature review, the experts rated evidence-based recommendations in a modified Delphi approach. Results No guideline could be retrieved. Thirty-three clinical trials and 9 systematic reviews could be identified for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 24 recommendations. After rating by the experts 12, final recommendations were identified: preoperative computed tomographic scan as well as intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography are highly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19 to 27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves reduces extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamp time and leads to less early complications as prolonged ventilation, blood transfusion, atrial fibrillation, pleural effusions, paravalvular leakages and aortic regurgitation, and renal replacement therapy, respectively. These clinical outcomes result in reduced intensive care unit and hospital stay and reduced costs. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves will lead to a higher adoption rate of minimally invasive approaches in aortic valve replacement. Respect should be taken to a necessary short learning curve for both sutureless and minimally invasive programs. Conclusions Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement together with minimally invasive approaches offers an attractive option in aortic valve placement for patients requiring biological valve replacement. PMID:27540996

  11. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  12. Genotype–phenotype correlation in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Kathleen C.; Crenshaw, Melissa L.; Goh, Denise L. M.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality, occurring in 1% to 2% of the population, and often associates with ascending aortic aneurysm. Based on familial studies, bicuspid aortic valve with aneurysm segregates in an autosomal dominant manner with incomplete penetrance. NOTCH1 mutations have been reported in 6 families with prominent valve calcification and dysfunction and low penetrance of aneurysm. We sought to determine the contribution of NOTCH1 mutations to the more common phenotype of highly penetrant aneurysms with low penetrance of bicuspid aortic valve and with rare valve calcification or dysfunction. Methods All exons and splice junctions of NOTCH1 were sequenced in probands from 13 affected families presenting with bicuspid aortic valve with ascending aortic aneurysm in the absence of valve calcification. In addition, mutation analysis was performed on a single individual with aneurysm and calcified tricuspid aortic valve. Sequences were aligned and compared with the reference genomic sequence. Results Corroborating previous studies, analysis of the single sporadic patient with calcified aortic valve in the presence of ascending aortic aneurysm revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation in NOTCH1 resulting in a nonsynonymous amino acid substitution (p.T1090S, c.C3269G) of an evolutionarily conserved residue. This change was not observed in controls. In contrast, we did not identify any pathologic NOTCH1 mutations in the 13 families segregating noncalcified bicuspid aortic valve with highly penetrant aortic aneurysm. Conclusions These data suggest that there are phenotypic differences that distinguish families with and without NOTCH1 mutations, indicating a genotype–phenotype correlation with potential implications for patient diagnosis, counseling, and management. PMID:23102684

  13. QT dispersion is reduced after valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Darbar, D; Cherry, C; Kerins, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether QT dispersion is a reliable index of the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular hypertrophy in the setting of aortic stenosis.
DESIGN—A retrospective analysis of the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography before and after aortic valve replacement.
SETTING—Tertiary centre.
PATIENTS—36 men (30 white and six black) with symptomatic aortic stenosis requiring valve replacement.
RESULTS—All patients had significant aortic stenosis (mean (SD) aortic valve area 0.68 (0.18) cm2) and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index (LVMI): 267 (90) g/m2). Before aortic valve replacement, QT dispersion was correlated with mean aortic valve area and LVMI (r = 0.697, p < 0.001, and r = 0.59, p < 2.4 × 10−6, respectively). QT dispersion and QT corrected for heart rate dispersion decreased from 133 (54) to 71 (33) ms and from 151 (64) to 94 (76) ms, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). LVMI regressed after aortic valve replacement to 190 (79) g/m2, p < 0.01.
CONCLUSIONS—QT dispersion is increased in association with LVMI in patients with significant symptomatic aortic stenosis. Aortic valve replacement reduces QT dispersion and LVMI. QT dispersion could be a useful indicator of risk and risk reduction in patients with significant symptomatic aortic stenosis.


Keywords: QT dispersion; left ventricular hypertrophy; aortic valve replacement PMID:10377301

  14. A modified technique of Konno aortoventriculoplasty for redo aortic valve replacement procedures.

    PubMed

    Bobylev, Dmitry; Breymann, Thomas; Ono, Masamichi

    2014-04-01

    This article puts forward a modified technique of Konno aortoventriculoplasty for repeat procedures. After incision of the ventricular septum, this approach involves aortic valve replacement using a mechanical valved conduit, reimplantation of the coronary arteries, and graft replacement of the ascending aorta. This modification allows the removal of the diseased ascending aortic wall caused by a previous patch enlargement or poststenotic dilation.

  15. Comparison of aortic valve allograft decellularization techniques in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Steven R; Chiu, Brian; Churchill, Thomas A; Zhu, Linfu; Lakey, Jonathan R T; Ross, David B

    2006-11-01

    Rodent models have been essential to understanding the immune-mediated failure of aortic valve allografts (AVAs). Decellularization has been proposed to reduce the immunogenicity of AVAs. The objective of this study was to determine the most effective method to decellularize AVAs for use in a rat model. Three different decellularization techniques were compared in Lewis aortic valves. Detergent decellularization involved a series of hypotonic and hypertonic Tris buffers at 4 degrees C for 48 h/buffer containing 0.5% Triton X-100 followed by a 72 h washout in phosphate-buffered saline. Osmotic decellularization was performed in similar manner to the detergent-based technique except without the addition of Triton X-100. Enzymatic decellularization consisted of trypsin/EDTA at 37 degrees C for 48 h. Assessment was performed with light microscopy (H&E, Movat's pentachrome), immunohistochemistry for residual cellular elements, and hydroxyproline assays. Detergent-based methodology effected near-complete decellularization of both the leaflets and aortic wall in addition to preservation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Osmotic lysis was associated with preservation of ECM and moderate decellularization. Enzymatic decellularization resulted in complete decellularization but extensive degeneration and fragmentation of the ECM. When implanted into the infrarenal aorta of allogeneic rats for 1 week, valves decellularized with detergent-based and osmotic methodology failed to stimulate an allogeneic immune response as evidenced by an absence of T cell infiltrates. Osmotic lysis protocols with low dose detergent appear to be most effective at both removing antigenic cellular elements and preserving ECM.

  16. Association of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol–Related Genetic Variants With Aortic Valve Calcium and Incident Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Luk, Kevin; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Engert, James C.; Do, Ron; Hindy, George; Rukh, Gull; Dufresne, Line; Almgren, Peter; Owens, David S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Peloso, Gina M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Wong, Quenna; Smith, Albert V.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rich, Stephen; Kathiresan, Sekar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; Thanassoulis, George

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with aortic stenosis in observational studies; however, randomized trials with cholesterol-lowering therapies in individuals with established valve disease have failed to demonstrate reduced disease progression. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether genetic data are consistent with an association between LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or triglycerides (TG) and aortic valve disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using a Mendelian randomization study design, we evaluated whether weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs), a measure of the genetic predisposition to elevations in plasma lipids, constructed using single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies for plasma lipids, were associated with aortic valve disease. We included community-based cohorts participating in the CHARGE consortium (n = 6942), including the Framingham Heart Study (cohort inception to last follow-up: 1971-2013; n = 1295), Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012; n = 2527), Age Gene/Environment Study-Reykjavik (2000-2012; n = 3120), and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS, 1991-2010; n = 28 461). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Aortic valve calcium quantified by computed tomography in CHARGE and incident aortic stenosis in the MDCS. RESULTS The prevalence of aortic valve calcium across the 3 CHARGE cohorts was 32% (n = 2245). In the MDCS, over a median follow-up time of 16.1 years, aortic stenosis developed in 17 per 1000 participants (n = 473) and aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis occurred in 7 per 1000 (n = 205). Plasma LDL-C, but not HDL-C or TG, was significantly associated with incident aortic stenosis (hazard ratio [HR] per mmol/L, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04-1.57; P = .02; aortic stenosis incidence: 1.3% and 2.4% in lowest and highest LDL-C quartiles, respectively). The LDL-C GRS, but not HDL-C or TG GRS, was significantly associated with presence of

  17. Is a Bioprosthetic Valve in the Aortic Position Desirable with a Continuous Flow LVAD?

    PubMed

    Doi, Atsuo; Marasco, Silvana F; McGiffin, David C

    2015-05-01

    Commissural fusion of the native aortic valve in a patient with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a known phenomenon. This may result in aortic insufficiency (AI) leading to symptomatic heart failure. In patients with AI at the time of LVAD implantation, repairing, or replacing the aortic valve is advisable. We describe a patient who had a severe dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate AI who underwent implantation of an LVAD and aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis that subsequently developed commissural fusion which was found at the time of heart transplantation. This case highlights the conundrum of the management of AI in patients requiring LVAD support.

  18. Endocarditis of the native aortic valve caused by Lactobacillus jensenii

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Soumya; Davila, Carlos Daniel; Chennupati, Anupama; Rubin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram-positive anaerobic rods or coccobacilli, commonly found as commensals in human mucosa. Rarely, they can cause serious infections such as infective endocarditis (IE), and the most frequently implicated species causing serious infections are L. casei and L. rhamnosus. IE caused by Lactobacillus jensenii is very rare, with only six reported cases so far, to the best of our knowledge. We present a case of native aortic valve endocarditis caused by L. jensenii, complicated by root abscess and complete heart block, and requiring emergent surgical intervention. PMID:25750218

  19. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  20. Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Alastair J; Dweck, Marc R; Dreisbach, John G; Williams, Michelle C; Mak, Sze Mun; Cartlidge, Timothy; Nicol, Edward D; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the second most common cardiothoracic procedure in the UK. With an ageing population, there are an increasing number of patients with prosthetic valves that require follow-up. Imaging of prosthetic valves is challenging with conventional echocardiographic techniques making early detection of valve dysfunction or complications difficult. CT has recently emerged as a complementary approach offering excellent spatial resolution and the ability to identify a range of aortic valve replacement complications including structural valve dysfunction, thrombus development, pannus formation and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. This review discusses each and how CT might be incorporated into a multimodal cardiovascular imaging pathway for the assessment of aortic valve replacements and in guiding clinical management. PMID:27843568

  1. Computed tomography assessment for transcatheter aortic valve in valve implantation: The vancouver approach to predict anatomical risk for coronary obstruction and other considerations.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Philipp; Soon, Jeanette; Dvir, Danny; Park, Jong K; Naoum, Christopher; Kueh, Shaw-Hua; Wood, David A; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Selvakumar, Kapilan; Ye, Jian; Cheung, Anson; Webb, John G; Leipsic, Jonathon

    Valve-in-valve implantation of a transcatheter heart valve into a failed bioprosthetic heart valve has emerged as a treatment alternative to repeat conventional surgery. This requires careful pre-procedural assessment using non-invasive imaging to identify patients at risk for procedure related adverse events, such as ostial coronary occlusion. Herein we report how to comprehensively assess aortic root anatomy using computed tomography prior to transcatheter valve implantation for failed bioprosthetic aortic valves.

  2. Aortic valve replacement in children: Options and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin

    2013-01-01

    Several disease pathologies such as congenital heart disease and rheumatic fever can affect the aortic valve (AV) in children frequently necessitating intervention. While percutaneous or surgical AV repair is recommended as initial management strategy in children with AV disease, AV replacement (AVR) might become necessary in children with significant valve destruction and after repair or intervention failure. AVR in children is associated with distinct clinical and technical problems owing to several anatomic, social and prosthesis-related issues. In the current review, we list different AV substitutes, discuss their advantages and shortcomings, outline AVR results in children, and explore the divergence of outcomes in various age, anatomy and pathology subgroups; all in the aim to identify optimal AVR choice for each patient taking into consideration his unique anatomic and demographic characteristics. PMID:24578598

  3. Valve-sparing replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch in a child with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozker, Emre; Vuran, Can; Saritas, Bülent; Türköz, Riza

    2012-05-01

    We describe a successful surgical treatment in a 2.5-year old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome, in whom we performed aortic arch and ascending aorta replacement with a valve-sparing operation (VSO) of the aortic root because of significant aortic insufficiency and dilation of the aortic root. We believe that VSO is ideal for treating young patients with aortic root aneurysm with normal or minimally diseased aortic cusps to avoid the disadvantages of prosthetic valve replacements.

  4. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  5. Replacement of the heavily calcified ascending aorta in aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Hisashi, Yosuke; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    A totally calcified ascending aorta prevents aortic crossclamping and aortotomy during aortic valve replacement, and replacement of the ascending aorta is a valid option in these cases. We describe a simple technique for calcified ascending aorta replacement using the Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator. This can be used in aortic endarterectomy for removal of the calcified plaque in the anastomotic part.

  6. Viscoelastic Properties of the Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Merryman, W. David; Bieniek, Paul D.; Guilak, Farshid; Sacks, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the mechanobiological function of the aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC), due to its role in valve tissue homeostasis and remodeling. In a recent study we determined the relation between diastolic loading of the AV leaflet and the resulting AVIC deformation, which was found to be substantial. However, due to the rapid loading time of the AV leaflets during closure (~0.05 s), time-dependent effects may play a role in AVIC deformation during physiological function. In the present study, we explored AVIC viscoelastic behavior using the micropipette aspiration technique. We then modeled the resulting time-length data over the 100 sec test period using a standard linear solid (SLS) model which included Boltzmann superposition. To quantify the degree of creep and stress relaxation during physiological timescales, simulations of micropipette aspiration were preformed with a valve loading time of 0.05 s and a full valve closure time of 0.3 s. The 0.05 s loading simulations suggest that, during valve closure, AVICs act elastically. During diastole, simulations revealed creep (4.65%) and stress relaxation (4.39%) over the 0.3 s physiological timescale. Simulations also indicated that if Boltzmann superposition was not used in parameter estimation, as in much of the micropipette literature, creep and stress relaxation predicted values were nearly doubled (7.92% and 7.35%, respectively). We conclude that while AVIC viscoelastic effects are negligible during valve closure, they likely contribute to the deformation time-history of AVIC deformation during diastole. PMID:19275434

  7. CREATION OF A SECONDARY VENTRICULAR OUTLET TO REVERSE HEMOLYSIS AFTER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ott, David A.; Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1979-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman developed severe hemolysis after undergoing aortic valve replacement. A diminutive annulus and extensive calcification of the aorta precluded further surgery of the aortic root. Hemolysis was completely reversed by the implantation of a woven Dacron apicoabdominal aortic conduit incorporating a Cooley-Cutter prosthetic valve. Fractionation of stroke volume by means of a second ventricular outlet can reduce shear stresses and turbulence associated with unfavorable hemodynamic conditions, thereby successfully correcting hemolysis. Images PMID:15216312

  8. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication.

  9. Clinical and necropsy observations early after simultaneous replacement of the mitral and aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C; Sullivan, M F

    1986-11-15

    Clinical and necropsy findings are described in 54 patients, aged 25 to 83 years (mean 53), who died within 60 days of simultaneous replacements of both mitral and aortic valves. The patients were separated into 4 groups on the basis of the presence of stenosis (with or without associated regurgitation) or pure regurgitation of each valve: 30 patients (56%) had combined mitral and aortic valve stenosis; 12 patients (22%) had mitral stenosis and pure aortic regurgitation; 8 patients (15%) had pure regurgitation of both valves; and 4 patients (7%) had pure aortic regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Necropsy examination in the 54 patients disclosed a high frequency (48%) of anatomic evidence of interference to poppet or disc movement in either the mitral or aortic valve position or both. Anatomic evidence of interference to movement of a poppet or disc in the aortic valve position was twice as common as anatomic evidence of interference to poppet or disc movement in the mitral position. Interference to poppet movement is attributable to the prosthesis's being too large for the ascending aorta or left ventricular cavity in which it resided. The ascending aorta is infrequently enlarged in patients with combined mitral and aortic valve dysfunction irrespective of whether the aortic valve is stenotic or purely regurgitant. Likewise, the left ventricular cavity is usually not dilated in patients with combined mitral and aortic valve stenosis, the most common indication for replacement of both left-sided cardiac valves. Of the 54 patients, 12 (22%) had 1 mechanical and 1 bioprosthesis inserted. It is recommended that both substitute valves should be mechanical prostheses or both should be bioprostheses.

  10. Intermittent Aortic Valve Opening and Risk of Thrombosis in VAD Patients.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Claudius; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony R; Beckman, Jennifer A; Mokadam, Nahush A; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-01-20

    This study evaluates quantitatively the impact that intermittent Aortic Valve opening has on the thrombogenicity in the aortic arch region for patients under Left Ventricular Assist Device therapy. The influence of flow through the Aortic Valve, opening once every five cardiac cycles, on the flow patterns in the ascending aortic is measured in a patient-derived CT-image-based model, after LVAD implantation. The mechanical environment of flowing platelets is investigated, by statistical treatment of outliers in Lagrangian particle tracking, and thrombogenesis metrics (platelet residence times and activation state characterized by shear stress accumulation) are compared for the cases of no Aortic Valve opening and intermittent Aortic Valve opening. All hemodynamics metrics are improved by Aortic Valve opening, even at a reduced frequency and flow rate. Residence times of platelets or microthrombi are reduced significantly by transvalvular flow, as are the shear stress history experienced and the shear stress magnitude and gradients on the aortic root endothelium. The findings of this device-neutral study support the multiple advantages of management that enables Aortic Valve opening, providing a rationale for establishing this as a standard in long-term treatment and care for advanced heart failure patients.

  11. [Aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Makita, Satoru; Maruyama, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-01

    A 76-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was referred to our hospital due to severe aortic valve stenosis. We performed aortic valve replacement using a bioprosthetic valve. Her postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged in good health on postoperative day 33. As for cardiovascular operations in APS patients, high rates have been reported of perioperative mortality and thromboembolic and bleeding events. Perioperative management of anticoagulation must be strict.

  12. Septoplasty for left ventricular outflow obstruction without aortic valve replacement: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A; Garrett, J R

    1986-10-01

    A new technique is described for relief of diffuse obstruction in the left ventricular outflow tract without aortic valve replacement. Left ventricular septoplasty was performed, preserving the aortic valve. The supra-valve stenosis was repaired using a Y-shaped extension of the aortotomy proximally and a pantaloon-shaped patch of woven Dacron fabric. A 10-year-old girl with "tunnel" or diffuse stenosis obtained striking relief of left ventricular hypertension by this technique.

  13. Traumatic rupture of Ionescu-Shiley aortic valve after the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Passik, C S; Ackermann, D M; Piehler, J M; Edwards, W D

    1987-05-01

    A 74-year-old woman who had undergone aortic valve replacement with an Ionescu-Shiley bioprosthesis was evaluated and treated because aortic insufficiency developed after the application of the Heimlich maneuver. Pathologic examination of the explanted valve disclosed a cuspid perforation and an adjacent tear of a second cusp at its insertion into the valve strut. Patients with unexplained acute prosthetic insufficiency should be questioned as to whether the Heimlich maneuver has been previously performed.

  14. Perceval S sutureless aortic valve prosthesis implantation via a right anterior minithoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Gilmanov, Daniyar; Farneti, Pier Andrea; Miceli, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Glauber, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development and refinement of techniques over the past decade have led to the realization that a minimally invasive approach enables aortic valve surgery to be performed with results, at the very least, equivalent to those of traditional (open) valve surgery done in experienced centres. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has now evolved into a safe, efficient treatment option providing greater patient satisfaction and fewer complications. For rapidly ageing population of industrialized countries, aortic valve replacement (AVR) has become the most frequent heart valve surgery. However, transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and sutureless aortic valve prostheses recently introduced into clinical practice are challenging now the results of MIAVR in certain high surgical risk patients. Right anterior minithoracotomy results in excellent exposure and a safe conduct of AVR. The minithoracotomy is performed via the second intercostal space with a 6-7 cm long skin incision and no bone transection. After direct aortic and peripheral venous cannulation, aortic valve is exposed in a conventional manner, and further conduct of the intervention is not different from the sutureless AVR in median sternotomy. Herein, we discuss the indications, surgical technique and initial results of sutureless AVR through right anterior minithoracotomy.

  15. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  16. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity.

  17. Differences in Aortic Valve and Left Ventricular Parameters Related to the Severity of Myocardial Fibrosis in Patients with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Ko, Sung Min; Yi, Jeong Geun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the morphological and functional characteristics of the aortic valve and the left ventricular (LV) systolic functional parameters and myocardial mass related to the severity of myocardial fibrosis (MF) in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 81 patients (48 men; mean age: 59±12 years) with severe AS who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), cardiac computed tomography (CCT), and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) within 1 month and subsequent aortic valve surgery. Degree of MF was determined on delayed contrast-enhanced CMR with visual sub-segmental analysis-based quantification and was classified into three groups (no, mild, and severe) for identifying the differences in LV function and characteristics of the aortic valve. One-way ANOVA, Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test were used to compare variables of the three groups. Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between the severity of MF and variables on imaging modalities. Results Of 81 patients, 34 (42%) had MF (mild, n = 18; severe, n = 16). Aortic valve calcium volume score on CCT, aortic valve area, LV mass index, LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR, presence of mild aortic regurgitation (AR), transaortic mean pressure gradient, and peak velocity on TTE were significantly different among the three groups and were associated with severity of MF on a univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis. Aortic valve calcium grade was different (p = 0.008) among the three groups but not associated with severity of MF (p = 0.375). Conclusions A multi-imaging approach shows that severe AS with MF is significantly associated with more severe calcific AS, higher LV end-diastolic volume, higher LV mass, and higher prevalence of mild AR. PMID:28129367

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation programme after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gustavo S; Melo, Rosangela D; Deresz, Luís F; Dal Lago, Pedro; Pontes, Mauro Rn; Karsten, Marlus

    2017-05-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is a valvular heart disease characterised by fixed obstruction of the left ventricular outflow. It can be managed by surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This review aimed to describe the evidence supporting a cardiac rehabilitation programme on functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients after sAVR or TAVI. Methods The search was conducted on multiple databases from January to March 2016. All studies were eligible that evaluated the effects of a post-interventional cardiac rehabilitation programme in aortic stenosis patients. The methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis was performed separately by procedure and between procedures. The walked distance during the six-minute walk test (6MWD) and Barthel index were evaluated. The analysis was conducted in Review Manager. Results Five studies were included (292 TAVI and 570 sAVR patients). The meta-analysis showed that a cardiac rehabilitation programme was associated with a significant improvement in 6MWD (0.69 (0.47, 0.91); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.80 (0.29, 1.30); P = 0.002) after TAVI and 6MWD (0.79 (0.43, 1.15); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.93 (0.67, 1.18); P < 0.001) after sAVR. In addition, the meta-analysis showed that the cardiac rehabilitation programme promoted a similar gain in 6MWD (4.28% (-12.73, 21.29); P = 0.62) and Barthel index (-1.52 points (-4.81, 1.76); P = 0.36) after sAVR or TAVI. Conclusions The cardiac rehabilitation programme improved the functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients. Patients who underwent TAVI benefitted with a cardiac rehabilitation programme similar to sAVR patients.

  19. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  20. Valve morphology effect in aortic coarctation flow using realistic silicon models and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, Oscar; Solis-Najera, Sergio; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Kesharvarz-Motamed, Zahra; Rodriguez, Alfredo O.; Garcia, Julio

    2014-11-01

    Aortic valve morphology and phenotype may alter the aortic wall structure and its normal flow hemodynamics. However, the relationship between altered flow patterns and progression of wall pathology is often not fully understood in patients with aortic coartation and needs larger experimental work. In this study, we introduced a compatible experimental setup with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a realistic aortic coarctation (AoCo) silicon model which can replicate physiological flow conditions (pressure, flow-wave, and systemic load). We evaluated the aortic valve hemodynamics of a normal tricuspid valve and a stenotic bicuspid valve using valve effective orifice area (EOA), peak and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). AoCo severity was assessed by the AoCo pressure gradient. For the tricuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.89 cm2, a peak TPG = 10 mmHg, and a mean TPG = 5 mmHg. For the bicuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.03 cm2, a peak TPG = 37 mmHg and a mean TPG = 13 mmHg. Furthermore, AoCo with tricuspid valve led to a peak AoCo pressure gradient (PG) = 11 mmHg and a mean PG = 5 mmHg. AoCo with bicuspid valve led to a peak PG = 6 mmHg and a mean PG = 3 mmHg. Aortic flow reattachment was more evident in presence of bicuspid valve and helical flow was present in all cases. This study showed that silicon prototyping in combination with MRI velocity measurements could successfully be used to assess hemodynamic effects of aortic valve morphology in aortic coarctation flow.

  1. A staged approach to transcatheter aortic valve implantation and mitral valve-in-valve implantation for a degenerated bioprosthesis in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Santarpino, Giuseppe; Fischlein, Theodor; Concistrè, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Steffen

    2012-10-01

    Recently, small case series have described the successful off-label use of transcatheter valve implantation in patients with degenerated bioprosthetic valves in the mitral position. We report here the case of a 78-year old female patient who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis and transapical valve-in-valve implantation for a degenerated mitral bioprosthesis. There was no evidence of intraprosthetic regurgitation and/or paraprosthetic leakages on control angiography and transoesophageal echocardiography. The postoperative course was uneventful. Following accurate patient selection and evaluation by an experienced multidisciplinary team, the transcatheter approach to double-valve implantation in the aortic and mitral positions may represent a viable treatment option for those high-risk patients who would otherwise be inoperable. We preferred a two-step approach, considering a single procedure to be high-risk.

  2. RNA expression profile of calcified bicuspid, tricuspid, and normal human aortic valves by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Droit, Arnaud; Tremblay-Marchand, Joël; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Dagenais, Francois; Seidman, Jonathan G; Body, Simon C; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to premature development of aortic valve stenosis (AS) in individuals with a bicuspid aortic valve are unknown. The objective of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed between calcified bicuspid aortic valves (BAVc) and tricuspid valves with (TAVc) and without (TAVn) AS using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We collected 10 human BAVc and nine TAVc from men who underwent primary aortic valve replacement. Eight TAVn were obtained from men who underwent heart transplantation. mRNA levels were measured by RNA-Seq and compared between valve groups. Two genes were upregulated, and none were downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVc, suggesting a similar gene expression response to AS in individuals with bicuspid and tricuspid valves. There were 462 genes upregulated and 282 downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVn. In TAVc compared with TAVn, 329 genes were up- and 170 were downregulated. A total of 273 upregulated and 147 downregulated genes were concordantly altered between BAVc vs. TAVn and TAVc vs. TAVn, which represent 56 and 84% of significant genes in the first and second comparisons, respectively. This indicates that extra genes and pathways were altered in BAVc. Shared pathways between calcified (BAVc and TAVc) and normal (TAVn) aortic valves were also more extensively altered in BAVc. The top pathway enriched for genes differentially expressed in calcified compared with normal valves was fibrosis, which support the remodeling process as a therapeutic target. These findings are relevant to understand the molecular basis of AS in patients with bicuspid and tricuspid valves.

  3. Change in amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms recorded below the aortic valve in patients with a valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, G; Lemire, F; Durand, L G; Latour, Y; Jarry, M; Solignac, A; Langlois, Y E

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms were characterized in a group of 22 patients having no aortic pressure gradient and another group of 26 patients having a stenotic aortic valve. Specifically, for each patient, the ratios of the mean amplitude in three normalized frequency bands (low, middle and high) to the mean amplitude of the Doppler spectrogram computed in selected portions of the systolic period were considered. Pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms were recorded by positioning the sample volume in the left ventricular outflow tract, approximately 1 cm below the aortic valve. Statistically significant differences were found between the middle (p = 0.041) and high (p = 0.028) frequency bands of Doppler signals recorded from the two groups of patients. The differences observed are believed to be attributed to blood flow eddies generated below the stenotic aortic heart valve and to changes in blood flow orientation.

  4. Reversed L-type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement: an Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent cause among aortic valve stenotic changes. Mini Sternotomy Aortic Valve Replacement is a replacement of aortic valve through upper partial sternotomy. Aim: The aim of this approach is to improve postoperative convalescence by leaving pleural spaces closed and do not compromise respiratory function, to decrease bleeding, and reduce post op ventilation time and ICU stay. All these advantages decrease cost during hospital stay by reducing ICU stay, respiration time, bleeding and using blood products, pain killers and shortening hospital stay. Esthetic effect is also considerable result of this method. Case report: This case report presents an initial experience with Reversed L-Type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement. The goal is to demonstrate that minimally invasive advanced cardiac surgery procedures can be performed in our country. PMID:27594754

  5. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  6. Study of Aortic Valve Sclerosis as A Marker of Atherosclerosis in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Picardo, Preeti Jane; Khariong, Peter Daniel S; Hajong, Debobratta; Naku, Narang; Anand, Madhur; Sharma, Girish; Singh, K Lenish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aortic valve sclerosis has been shown to be associated with increased incidence, chances of developing myocardial infarction and even death. The epidemiological risk factors causing calcification of aortic valves have also been found to cause atherosclerosis. Aim To analyse the epidemiological risk factors causing aortic valve sclerosis which have been studied in details and analysed to see whether they cause any significant increase in the incidence of cardiovascular events. Materials and Methods This prospective case-control study was conducted between 1st Jan 2015 to 31st Dec 2015 in NEIGRIHMS hospital and data for age, gender, socioeconomic status, hypertension, diabetes, tobacco use, Body Mass Iindex (BMI), cholesterol levels, Electrocardiography (ECG) changes and Ejection Fraction (EF) were collected and analysed by using SPSS software version 22. Results Hypertension, diabetes, weight, BMI, hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia were not found to be significantly associated with aortic valve sclerosis in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. The presence of aortic valve sclerosis was also not associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Conclusion The risk factors for atherosclerosis were found to be associated with the presence of aortic valve sclerosis more in the control group and hence finding of a sclerosed aortic valve in the apparent normal population might identify those persons at increased risk of developing coronary artery disease and appropriate preventive measures should be taken before the disease sets in. PMID:28208902

  7. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery. PMID:27621832

  8. Beneficial effects of modern perfusion concepts in aortic valve and aortic root surgery.

    PubMed

    Kutschka, I; Skorpil, J; El Essawi, A; Hajek, T; Harringer, W

    2009-01-01

    Minimized perfusion circuits (MPC) were found to reduce side effects of standard extracorporeal circulation (ECC). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the ROCsafe MPC for aortic valve and aortic root surgery. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized for surgery using either MPC [n = 85, 30 female/55 male, mean age: 69.8 +/- 11.8 years; aortic valve replacement (AVR): n = 40; AVR + coronary artery bypass graft (CABG): n = 31; David operation: n = 3; aortic root replacement (ARR): n = 11] or ECC [n = 85, 29 female/56 male, mean age: 67.7 +/- 9.5 years; AVR: n = 39; AVR+CABG: n = 35, David operation: n = 2; ARR: n = 9]. Neurological status, length of ICU stay, C-reactive protein (CRP), blood count, transfusion requirements and bleeding volume were analyzed. The MPC system provided ultrasound-controlled de-airing. A small roller pump and a flexible reservoir were used for left ventricular venting. As a control, we used a standard ECC with cardiotomy suction and hard-shell reservoir. Cross-clamp time (MPC: 76.5 +/- 29.5; ECC: 79.0 +/- 34.0 min) and bypass time (MPC: 103.0 +/- 37.9; ECC: 106.9 +/- 44.9 min) were comparable between groups. Transfusion requirements (red blood cells: MPC: 1.5 +/- 1.5 vs. ECC: 2.2 +/- 2.1 units [p = 0.05], frozen plasma: MPC: 1.2 +/- 1.8 vs. ECC: 1.9 +/- 2.4 units [p = 0.03]), postoperative bleeding (MPC: 521 +/- 283 vs. ECC: 615 +/- 326 ml/24 h, p = 0.09) were lower using MPC. ICU stay was shorter with MPC (1.6 +/- 1.6 days) compared to ECC (2.4 +/- 2.8 days, p = 0.001). One stroke occurred in each group. The ROCsafe MPC provides safe circulatory support for a wide range of aortic valve surgeries. Transfusion requirements, postoperative bleeding and length of ICU stay were markedly reduced compared to standard extracorporeal perfusion.

  9. A simple method of aortic valve reconstruction with fixed pericardium in children

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Amir-Reza; González-Calle, Antonio; Adsuar-Gómez, Alejandro; Santos-deSoto, José

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve reconstruction with fixed pericardium may occasionally be very useful when treating children with aortic valve disease. This is because diseased aortic valves in children are sometimes too dysmorphic for simple repair without the addition of material, their annulus may be too small for a prosthesis, and the Ross operation may be precluded due to other congenital anomalies such as pulmonary valvar or coronary malformations. Such reconstruction is usually technically demanding and requires much precision. We describe a simple alternative method, which we have carried out in 3 patients, aged 1 week, 3 years and 12 years, respectively, with good early results. PMID:23343835

  10. First-in-man transcatheter aortic valve implantation of a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve: one step forward for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric

    2012-04-01

    We present the case of an 85-year-old woman diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, porcelain aorta, and a small aortic annulus (17.3 mm), who underwent successful transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve using the NovaFlex+ delivery system. At 1-month follow-up the patient was in NYHA functional class I, and Doppler echocardiography showed a mean residual gradient of 15 mm Hg and trivial paravalvular aortic regurgitation. This case, which shows for the first time the feasibility of TAVI with a 20-mm valve, opens a new avenue for the challenging treatment of patients with aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

  11. Abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodenday, Lucy S.; Simon, George; Craig, Hazel; Dalby, Lola

    1970-01-01

    Wasted ventilatory volume (VD) and its ratio to tidal volume (VD/VT) were measured at rest and during exertion in 17 patients with aortic valve disease. We considered VD/VT to indicate abnormal ventilation: perfusion relations if it did not decrease on exertion, or if the exercising value was greater than 40 per cent. Plain chest radiographs were independently examined for evidence of diversion of pulmonary blood to the upper lobes. There was significant agreement (p<0·05) between radiographic and pulmonary function estimations of abnormality. This suggests that the raised pulmonary venous pressure associated with left ventricular failure creates an abnormal pattern of blood flow through the lung, which is responsible for causing inadequate perfusion with respect to ventilation. Images PMID:5420086

  12. The development of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the USA.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Danny; Barbash, Israel M; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Okubagzi, Petros; Satler, Lowell F; Waksman, Ron; Pichard, Augusto D

    2012-03-01

    The penetration rate of devices in general, and in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) specifically, is significantly delayed in the United States of America (USA) compared with in Europe. This is mostly due to the mission statement of the regulatory agencies in the USA, which requires very rigorous clinical testing of a device prior to its approval. The USA had a major role in the development and evaluation of this technology and USA research has enabled clinicians inside and outside of the USA to conduct a concise scientifically based assessment of the performance of TAVR devices in terms of safety and efficacy. In the following review, we provide data on the development of TAVR in the USA, revealing the critical role the USA has played in this extraordinary process.

  13. Do we need sutureless or self-anchoring aortic valve prostheses?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh

    2015-03-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the 'gold standard' for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. Due to the increasing age of the patient population (reflecting the demographic changes), the use of biological valves has increased over the past years. At the same time, a large proportion of these patients require concomitant surgical procedures in addition to AVR. Although trans-apical or trans-femoral aortic valve implantations (TAVI) have been introduced for high risk patients, they are limited to patients with isolated aortic valve pathology. Therefore, strategies for avoiding long ischemia times, as well as long periods of extra-corporeal circulation (ECC) resulting in reduced peri-operative risks should be welcomed among the surgical community. Modern 'sutureless valves' with reduced cross-clamp and cardio-pulmonary bypass times as a result of the absence of sutures, combined with excellent hemodynamics in the short and mid-term, may be an ideal solution for geriatric patients. Additionally, 'self-anchoring' valves will increase the armament of surgeons in treating 'technically difficult' group of patients needing AVR who have small calcified aortic roots and those coming back after aortic root replacement with homografts. These valves should also expand the application of minimally access AVR. Therefore, the question of whether we need 'self-anchoring valves' is not only redundant, but the time may have come for these type of valves to be considered as the 'valve of choice' for higher risk geriatric patients who may be 'high risk' for conventional valves but not ineligible for TAVIs.

  14. Ten year clinical evaluation of Starr-Edwards 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, D; Fessatidis, I; Sapsford, R; Oakley, C

    1987-01-01

    The long term performance characteristics of the 2400 and 1260 series of Starr-Edwards aortic prostheses were investigated by a follow up study of clinical outcome of 327 patients discharged from hospital with isolated aortic valve replacement. Follow up lasted for up to 10 years and was based on 1616 patient-years. The 2400 series cloth covered tracked valve was implanted in 182 patients from 1974 to 1980 and the 1260 series bare strut silastic ball valve was inserted in 145 patients from 1979 to 1983. Total 10 year mortality and valve related morbidity were low and no cases of mechanical valve failure were recorded. There were no significant actuarial differences in mortality or valve related morbidity between the 2400 and 1260 valves. Starr-Edwards models 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses showed excellent durability without any mechanical failures over a 10 year period. The long term outcome of isolated aortic valve replacement with these models is associated with a low frequency of valve related complications. PMID:3580223

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide signaling regulates Notch1 in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Authors: Kevin; Hans, Chetan P.; Zhao, Ning; Koenig, Sara N.; Huang, Nianyuan; Guggilam, Anuradha; LaHaye, Stephanie; Tao, Ge; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Lincoln, Joy; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    2013-01-01

    The mature aortic valve is composed of a structured trilaminar extracellular matrix that is interspersed with aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) and covered by endothelium. Dysfunction of the valvular endothelium initiates calcification of neighboring AVICs leading to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The molecular mechanism by which endothelial cells communicate with AVICs and cause disease is not well understood. Using a co-culture assay, we show that endothelial cells secrete a signal to inhibit calcification of AVICs. Gain or loss of nitric oxide (NO) prevents or accelerates calcification of AVICs, respectively, suggesting that the endothelial cell-derived signal is NO. Overexpression of Notch1, which is genetically linked to human CAVD, retards the calcification of AVICs that occurs with NO inhibition. In AVICs, NO regulates the expression of Hey1, a downstream target of Notch1, and alters nuclear localization of Notch1 intracellular domain. Finally, Notch1 and NOS3 (endothelial NO synthase) display an in vivo genetic interaction critical for proper valve morphogenesis and the development of aortic valve disease. Our data suggests that endothelial cell-derived NO is a regulator of Notch1 signaling in AVICs in the development of the aortic valve and adult aortic valve disease. PMID:23583836

  16. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Moore, Alison N; Sucosky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve (LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta (AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects. METHODS: Transient wall shear stress (WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal (non-dilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity (total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively). CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA. PMID:26839660

  18. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  19. A case report and literature overview: Abiotrophia defectiva aortic valve endocarditis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J N; dos Santos, L S; Vidal, L M R; Pereira, P M A; Salgado, A A; Fortes, C Q; Vieira, V V; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L; Júnior, R H; Damasco, P V

    2014-06-01

    A fatal case of aortic valve endocarditis due to Abiotrophia defectiva was reported in Brazil. An overview of cases of endocarditis and other human infections related to A. defectiva in developing countries was also accomplished.

  20. Patient-Specific Modeling of Biomechanical Interaction in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a patient-specific computational model to quantify the biomechanical interaction between the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) stent and the stenotic aortic valve during TAV intervention. Finite element models of a patient-specific stenotic aortic valve were reconstructed from multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scans, and TAV stent deployment into the aortic root was simulated. Three initial aortic root geometries of this patient were analyzed: (a) aortic root geometry directly reconstructed from MSCT scans, (b) aortic root geometry at the rapid right ventricle pacing phase, and (c) aortic root geometry with surrounding myocardial tissue. The simulation results demonstrated that stress, strain, and contact forces of the aortic root model directly reconstructed from MSCT scans were significantly lower than those of the model at the rapid ventricular pacing phase. Moreover, the presence of surrounding myocardium slightly increased the mechanical responses. Peak stresses and strains were observed around the calcified regions in the leaflets, suggesting the calcified leaflets helped secure the stent in position. In addition, these elevated stresses induced during TAV stent deployment indicated a possibility of tissue tearing and breakdown of calcium deposits, which might lead to an increased risk of stroke. The potential of paravalvular leak and occlusion of coronary ostia can be evaluated from simulated post-deployment aortic root geometries. The developed computational models could be a valuable tool for pre-operative planning of TAV intervention and facilitate next generation TAV device design. PMID:22698832

  1. Nucleotide Catabolism on the Surface of Aortic Valve Xenografts; Effects of Different Decellularization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kutryb-Zajac, Barbara; Yuen, Ada H Y; Khalpey, Zain; Zukowska, Paulina; Slominska, Ewa M; Taylor, Patricia M; Goldstein, Steven; Heacox, Albert E; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Chester, Adrian H; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotide metabolism controls thrombosis and inflammation and may affect degeneration and calcification of aortic valve prostheses. We evaluated the effect of different decellularization strategies on enzyme activities involved in extracellular nucleotide metabolism. Porcine valves were tested intact or decellularized either by detergent treatment or hypotonic lysis and nuclease digestion. The rates of ATP hydrolysis, AMP hydrolysis, and adenosine deamination were estimated by incubation of aorta or valve leaflet sections with substrates followed by HPLC analysis. We demonstrated relatively high activities of ecto-enzymes on porcine valve as compared to the aortic wall. Hypotonic lysis/nuclease digestion preserved >80 % of ATP and AMP hydrolytic activity but reduced adenosine deamination to <10 %. Detergent decellularization completely removed (<5 %) all these activities. These results demonstrate high intensity of extracellular nucleotide metabolism on valve surface and indicate that various valve decellularization techniques differently affect ecto-enzyme activities that could be important in the development of improved valve prostheses.

  2. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Three Patient Populations, Two Disease Phenotypes, and One Shared Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) are two discrete cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by latent progressive disease states. There is a clear association between BAV and TAA; however the nature and extent of this relationship is unclear. There are both distinct and overlapping developmental pathways that have been established to contribute to the formation of the aortic valve and the aortic root, and the mature anatomy of these different tissue types is intimately intertwined. Likewise, human genetics studies have established apparently separate and common contributions to these clinical phenotypes, suggesting complex inheritance and a shared genetic basis and translating 3 patient populations, namely, BAV, TAA, or both, into a common but diverse etiology. A better understanding of the BAV-TAA association will provide an opportunity to leverage molecular information to modify clinical care through more sophisticated diagnostic testing, improved counseling, and ultimately new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:22970404

  3. A transverse isotropic viscoelastic constitutive model for aortic valve tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Andrea; Screen, Hazel R. C.; Evans, Sam L.

    2017-01-01

    A new anisotropic viscoelastic model is developed for application to the aortic valve (AV). The directional dependency in the mechanical properties of the valve, arising from the predominantly circumferential alignment of collagen fibres, is accounted for in the form of transverse isotropy. The rate dependency of the valve's mechanical behaviour is considered to stem from the viscous (η) dissipative effects of the AV matrix, and is incorporated as an explicit function of the deformation rate (λ˙). Model (material) parameters were determined from uniaxial tensile deformation tests of porcine AV specimens at various deformation rates, by fitting the model to each experimental dataset. It is shown that the model provides an excellent fit to the experimental data across all different rates and satisfies the condition of strict local convexity. Based on the fitting results, a nonlinear relationship between η and λ˙ is established, highlighting a ‘shear-thinning’ behaviour for the AV with increase in the deformation rate. Using the model and these outcomes, the stress–deformation curves of the AV tissue under physiological deformation rates in both the circumferential and radial directions are predicted and presented. To verify the predictive capabilities of the model, the stress–deformation curves of AV specimens at an intermediate deformation rate were estimated and validated against the experimental data at that rate, showing an excellent agreement. While the model is primarily developed for application to the AV, it may be applied without the loss of generality to other collagenous soft tissues possessing a similar structure, with a single preferred direction of embedded collagen fibres. PMID:28280556

  4. [A case report of aortic valvuloplasty by rasping technique for aortic stenosis with small annulus simultaneously performed with mitral valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, N; Kou, E; Hiramatsu, T; Yokoyama, S; Takenaka, A; Ikawa, O

    1997-02-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old woman with aortic stenosis and regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Preoperative cardiac catheterization revealed LV-Ao pressure gradient of 30 mmHg and regurgitation of Sellers III. The aortic annulus was measured less than 19 mm. As operative findings, the aortic annulus seemed to be too small to be replaced with 19 mm prosthetic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) with rasping technique was performed for the aortic valve and valve replacement was carried out for the mitral valve. After aortic declamping and occurring her beat, the transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation for AVP was effective. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative cardiac catheterization have shown decreased transvalvular pressure gradient up to 10 mmHg and aortic regurgitation of Sellers I.

  5. [A case of infective Aerococcus urinae endocarditis successfully treated by aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Akiko; Ohkusu, Kiyohumi; Ishii, Shunsuke; Sasaoka, Taishi; Ikeda, Masahiro; Niinami, Hiroshi; Ezaki, Takayuki; Mitsutake, Kotaro

    2011-11-01

    Aerococcus urinae is a endocarditis rare causative organism with low virulene. We report an A. urinae endocarditis case treated by aortic valve replacement. An 80-year-old woman hospitalized for urinary tract infection and hydronephrosis due to three-week renal calculi. Blood culture on admission isolated Streptococcus acidominimus. During the course, she was transferred to our care for surgical intervention after developing congestive heart failure due to severe aortic regurgitation. Echocardiographic findings indicated infective endocarditis. She underwent aortic valve replacement, and gram staining of the resected valve tissue showed gram-positive cocci, although valve culture was negative. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing using the valve material matched an A. urinae sequence. The woman recovered and was discharged six weeks after antibiotic treatment.

  6. Quantification of Calcified Particles in Human Valve Tissue Reveals Asymmetry of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Yabusaki, Katsumi; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Vyas, Payal; Bertazzo, Sergio; Body, Simon C.; Aikawa, Masanori; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that small calcified particles observable by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) may initiate calcification in cardiovascular tissues. We hypothesized that if the calcified particles precede gross calcification observed in calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD), they would exhibit a regional asymmetric distribution associated with CAVD development, which always initiates at the base of aortic valve leaflets adjacent to the aortic outflow in a region known as the fibrosa. Testing this hypothesis required counting the calcified particles in histological sections of aortic valve leaflets. SEM images, however, do not provide high contrast between components within images, making the identification and quantification of particles buried within tissue extracellular matrix difficult. We designed a new unique pattern-matching based technique to allow for flexibility in recognizing particles by creating a gap zone in the detection criteria that decreased the influence of non-particle image clutter in determining whether a particle was identified. We developed this flexible pattern particle-labeling (FpPL) technique using synthetic test images and human carotid artery tissue sections. A conventional image particle counting method (preinstalled in ImageJ) did not properly recognize small calcified particles located in noisy images that include complex extracellular matrix structures and other commonly used pattern-matching methods failed to detect the wide variation in size, shape, and brightness exhibited by the particles. Comparative experiments with the ImageJ particle counting method demonstrated that our method detected significantly more (p < 2 × 10−7) particles than the conventional method with significantly fewer (p < 0.0003) false positives and false negatives (p < 0.0003). We then applied the FpPL technique to CAVD leaflets and showed a significant increase in detected particles in the fibrosa at the base of the leaflets (p

  7. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix remodeling in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Rojas, Tatiana; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis Fernando; Rivera, Miguel; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Cuesta, Fernando de la; Barderas, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. The aortic valve is a thin, complex, layered connective tissue with compartmentalized extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by specialized cell types, which directs blood flow in one direction through the heart. There is evidence suggesting remodeling of such ECM during aortic stenosis development. Thus, a better characterization of the role of ECM proteins in this disease would increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aortic valve samples were collected from 18 patients which underwent aortic valve replacement (50% males, mean age of 74 years) and 18 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ methodology. The results showed an altered expression of 13 ECM proteins of which 3 (biglycan, periostin, prolargin) were validated by Western blotting and/or SRM analyses. These findings are substantiated by our previous results demonstrating differential ECM protein expression. The present study has demonstrated a differential ECM protein pattern in individuals with AS, therefore supporting previous evidence of a dynamic ECM remodeling in human aortic valves during AS development. PMID:26620461

  8. Isolated right atrial compression as a late sequela of aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Grishkin, B A; Catalano, P W; Watts, M A

    1994-01-01

    Isolated right atrial compression occurred 31 months after aortic valve replacement. Aortic bleeding contained by adjacent pericardium produced a pseudoaneurysm and local atrial tamponade. Transthoracic echocardiography could not distinguish the extracardiac hematoma from an intra-atrial thrombus, temporarily misleading investigators. Images PMID:8000271

  9. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  10. 4D Flow MRI in bicuspid aortic valve disease demonstrates altered distribution of aortic blood flow helicity

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, R.; Bock, J.; Barker, A. J.; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, F.; Wallis, W.; Korvink, J. G.; Bissell, M. M.; Schulz-Menger, J.; Markl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Changes in aortic geometry or presence of aortic valve disease can result in substantially altered aortic hemodynamics. Dilatation of the ascending aorta or aortic valve abnormalities can result in an increase in helical flow. Methods 4D flow MRI was used to test the feasibility of quantitative helicity analysis using equidistantly distributed 2D planes along the entire aorta. The evaluation of the method included three parts: 1) the quantification of helicity in 12 healthy subjects, 2) an evaluation of observer variability and test-retest reliability, and 3) the quantification of helical flow in 16 patients with congenitally altered bicuspid aortic valves. Results Helicity quantification in healthy subjects revealed consistent directions of flow rotation along the entire aorta with high clockwise helicity in the aortic arch and an opposite rotation sense in the ascending and descending aorta. The results demonstrated good scan-rescan and inter- and intra-observer agreement of the helicity parameters. Helicity quantification in patients revealed a significant increase of absolute peak relative helicity during systole and a considerably greater heterogeneous distribution of mean helicity in the aorta. Conclusion The method has the potential to serve as a reference distribution for comparisons of helical flow between healthy subjects and patients or between different patient groups. PMID:23716466

  11. Three-Dimensional Echocardiography of the Aortic Valve: Feasibility, Clinical Potential, and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D.; Salustri, Alessandro; Roelandt, Jos R.T.C.; Ten Cate, Folkert J.

    1998-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility and potential clinical utility of three-dimensional echocardiography for evaluation of the aortic valve. BACKGROUND: The value of three-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve has not been established yet. METHODS: The study group comprised 32 patients (11 women, 21 men), mean age 56.1 (range 20-82). Seven morphologically normal valves, 5 homografts, 6 mechanical prostheses, and 14 valves of abnormal morphology were evaluated. Images were acquired during a routine multiplane transesophageal echocardiographic examination (rotational scan with 2 degrees interval, respiration, and electrocardiogram [ECG] gating) and postprocessed off-line. A selection of reconstructed cutplanes (anyplane mode) and volume-rendered three-dimensional views of aortic valve anatomy were analyzed by two observers and compared with two-dimensional echocardiography findings. RESULTS: The quality of reconstructions was scored excellent when permitting unrestricted assessment of aortic valve anatomy with optimized planimetric measurements (19 patients, 59%), adequate when aortic valve was partially visualized (7 patients, 22%), or inadequate when no assessment was possible (6 patients, 19%, including 5 with prosthetic valves). Three-dimensional echocardiography provided additional information in ten (31%) patients as compared with the two-dimensional echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstruction of the aortic valve is feasible, with excellent or adequate quality in 81% of patients, more frequently in native than in prosthetic valves, P < 0.05. Morphologic information additional to that provided by two-dimensional echocardiography is obtained in a significant proportion of patients.

  12. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  13. Effects of increasing flow rate on aortic stenotic indices: evidence from percutaneous transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve in patients with combined aortic and mitral stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. M.; Su, S. F.; Chen, M. F.; Liau, C. S.; Lee, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of transvalvar flow rate on aortic valve resistance and valve area after percutaneous transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve in a homogeneous group of patients with rheumatic heart disease. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of 12 patients with combined aortic and mitral stenosis who had undergone balloon dilatation of the mitral valve over a period of 9 years. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Twelve (8 women, 4 men; mean (SD) age 37 (9) of 227 consecutive patients with critical mitral stenosis undergoing transvenous balloon dilation of the mitral valve in the centre also had aortic stenosis, defined as a transaortic pressure gradient of more than 25 mm Hg measured at a catheterisation study before valvuloplasty. INTERVENTIONS: Echocardiographic variables (mitral valve area measured by the pressure half-time method and planimetry, and the aortic valve area derived from the continuity equation) and haemodynamic measurements (cardiac output, left ventricular mean systolic pressure, aortic mean pressure, transaortic valve pressure gradient, mitral valve and aortic valve areas derived from the Gorlin formula, and aortic valve resistance) were assessed before and after transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. Follow up catheterisation to measure haemodynamic variables was performed one week after mitral valvuloplasty. RESULTS: Mean transaortic flow rate increased 33% after mitral valvuloplasty (from 198 (68) to 254 (41) ml/s, P = 0.002). Aortic valve areas derived from the Gorlin formula were significantly increased from 0.57 (0.12) to 0.73 (0.14) cm2 (P = 0.006) after mitral valvuloplasty. However, aortic valve area and valve resistance derived from the continuity equation were independent of the increase in flow rate after mitral valvuloplasty (from 1.29 (0.35) to 1.30 (0.29) cm2 and from 317 (65) to 259 (75) dyn.s.cm-5, both P = NS). CONCLUSION: The Gorlin-derived aortic valve area tends to be flow

  14. Rapid-deployment or transcatheter aortic valves in intermediate-risk patients?

    PubMed

    Bruno, Piergiorgio; Di Cesare, Alessandro; Nesta, Marialisa; Cammertoni, Federico; Mazza, Andrea; Paraggio, Lazzaro; Rosenhek, Raphael; Burzotta, Francesco; Crea, Filippo; Trani, Carlo; Massetti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and rapid-deployment aortic valve replacement represent two emerging therapies for patients with intermediate surgical risk and severe aortic stenosis. However, head-to-head comparisons between such novel therapies are lacking. Methods Severe aortic stenosis patients with intermediate surgical risk treated with rapid-deployment valve replacement at our institution were identified and compared with a propensity-matched population of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Postoperative echocardiographic findings, in-hospital and midterm clinical outcomes were compared. Results We identified 60 patients who received transcatheter ( n = 30) or rapid-deployment ( n = 30) valve replacement. On postoperative echocardiography, freedom from paravalvular regurgitation was higher in the rapid-deployment valve group ( p < 0.001), while postoperative mean transprosthetic gradient was lower in the transcatheter valve group ( p = 0.03). Permanent pacemaker implantation was required more frequently in transcatheter valve patients ( p = 0.01). Postoperative atrial fibrillation was more common in the rapid-deployment valve group ( p = 0.03). Hospital mortality was similarly low in both groups ( p = 0.33). At midterm follow-up, mortality was comparable ( p = 0.42) but the rapid-deployment valve group still had a lower degree of paravalvular regurgitation. Conclusions Transcatheter and rapid-deployment valve replacement are promising treatment options for patients with intermediate surgical risk. These two techniques are associated with specific patterns of prosthesis function and postoperative complications. Further evaluation of the clinical impact of these therapies in this patient population is needed.

  15. Surgical technique: establishing a pre-clinical large animal model to test aortic valve leaflet substitute

    PubMed Central

    Knirsch, Walter; Cesarovic, Niko; Krüger, Bernard; Schmiady, Martin; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Frese, Laura; Dave, Hitendu; Hoerstrup, Simon Philipp; Hübler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To overcome current limitations of valve substitutes and tissue substitutes the technology of tissue engineering (TE) continues to offer new perspectives in congenital cardiac surgery. We report our experiences and results implanting a decellularized TE patch in nine sheep in orthotropic position as aortic valve leaflet substitute. Establishing the animal model, feasibility, cardiopulmonary bypass issues and operative technique are highlighted. PMID:28149571

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: 12-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Solinas, Marco; Farneti, Pier Andrea; Cerillo, Alfredo Giuseppe; Kallushi, Enkel; Santarelli, Filippo; Glauber, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    Background This study reports the single center experience on minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR), performed through a right anterior minithoracotomy or ministernotomy (MS). Methods Eight hundred and fifty-three patients, who underwent MIAVR from 2002 to 2014, were retrospectively analyzed. Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox multivariable proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify independent predictors of follow-up mortality. Results Median age was 73.8, and 405 (47.5%) of patients were female. The overall 30-day mortality was 1.9%. Four hundred and forty-three (51.9%) and 368 (43.1%) patients received biological and sutureless prostheses, respectively. Median cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamping time were 108 and 75 minutes, respectively. Nineteen (2.2%) cases required conversion to full median sternotomy. Thirty-seven (4.3%) patients required re-exploration for bleeding. Perioperative stroke occurred in 15 (1.8%) patients, while transient ischemic attack occurred postoperative in 11 (1.3%). New onset atrial fibrillation was reported for 243 (28.5%) patients. After a median follow-up of 29.1 months (2,676.0 patient-years), survival rates at 1 and 5 years were 96%±1% and 80%±3%, respectively. Cox multivariable analysis showed that advanced age, history of cardiac arrhythmia, preoperative chronic renal failure, MS approach, prolonged mechanical ventilation and hospital stay as well as wound revision were associated with higher mortality. Conclusions MIAVR via both approaches is safe and feasible with excellent outcomes, and is associated with low conversion rate and low perioperative morbidity. Long term survival is at least comparable to that reported for conventional sternotomy AVR. PMID:25870812

  17. Microparticles in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Jung, Christian; Lichtenauer, Michael; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Wernly, Bernhard; Goebel, Bjoern; Foerster, Martin; Edlinger, Christoph; Lauten, Alexander

    2016-08-03

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent form of acquired valvular heart disease. AS is known to entail endothelial dysfunction caused by increased mechanical shear stress leading to elevated circulatory levels of microparticles. Endothelial and platelet microparticles (EMP and PMP) are small vesicles that originate from activated cells and thrombocytes. We sought to evaluate whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedure would elicit effects on circulating EMP and PMP. 92 patients undergoing TAVI procedure for severe AS were included in this study. Samples were obtained at each visit before TAVI, 1 week post-procedure and at 1, 3 and after 6 months after TAVI and were evaluated using flow cytometry. A 12 month clinical follow-up was also performed. CD62E+ EMP concentration before TAVI was 21.11 % (±6.6 % SD) and declined to 20.99 % (±6.8 % SD) after 1 week, to 16.63 % (±5.4 % SD, p < 0.0001) after 1 month, to 17.08 % (±4.6 % SD, p < 0.0001) after 3 months and to 15.94 % (±5.4 % SD, p < 0.0001) after 6 months. CD31+/CD42b-, CD31+/Annexin+/- EMP remained unchanged. CD31+/CD41b+ PMP evidenced a slight, but statistically significant increase after TAVI and remained elevated during the entire follow-up. Apart from a procedure-related improvement in echocardiographic parameters, TAVI procedure led also to a decline in CD62E+ EMP. The reduction in pressure gradients with less hemodynamic shear stress seems also to have beneficially affected endothelial homeostasis.

  18. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  19. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  20. Formation of cartilage in congenital bicuspid aortic valves of Syrian hamsters (mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Sans-Coma, V; López, D; Durán, A C; Guerrero, A; Fernández-Gallego, T; Fernández, M C; Arqué, J M

    2005-07-01

    The formation, topographical location and calcification of cartilage in congenital bicuspid aortic valves of 235 Syrian hamsters aged 0--173 days were studied by histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. In all animals the aortic valve was bicuspid; it had two leaflets, ventral and dorsal, each supported by its own aortic sinus. In 141 valves, a more or less developed raphe was located in the ventral sinus. The remaining 94 valves were devoid of any raphe. The first sign of valvular chondrogenesis was the presence of small groups of cells embedded in a type II collagen-positive extracellular matrix. These cellular groups, which appeared as early as 2 days after birth, became converted into hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage. A considerable proportion (67%) of the valvular cartilages developed within the first 6 weeks of life. The cartilaginous tissue was capable of forming anywhere along the attachments of the valve leaflets to their supporting sinuses. However, statistical analyses substantiated the observation that the bases of the sinuses and raphes were the valvular regions particularly prone to the development of cartilage. At these sites, the cartilage was usually hyaline and often became calcified. The findings were consistent with the assumption that intense mechanical stimulation plays an important role in the formation of the valvular cartilage. Moreover, these findings supplied new evidence that in the cardiac semilunar valves of Syrian hamsters, cartilage formation does not involve the aggregation of large numbers of cells before their differentiation into chondrocytes. The valvular hyaline cartilages appear to act as competent pivots, resisting mechanical tensions generated during the cardiac cycle. Deposition of calcium in the matrix can be regarded as a reinforcement process of the cartilaginous tissue. Finally, it is hypothesized that the formation of cartilage in the aortic valves of hamsters prevents dystrophic calcification

  1. Redo aortic valve surgery versus transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation for failing surgical bioprosthetic valves: consecutive patients in a single-center setting

    PubMed Central

    Wottke, Michael; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Piazza, Nicolo; Lange, Ruediger; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to a considerable rise in bioprosthetic as opposed to mechanical valve implantations, an increase of patients presenting with failing bioprosthetic surgical valves in need of a reoperation is to be expected. Redo surgery may pose a high-risk procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an innovative, less-invasive treatment alternative for these patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the outcome of consecutive patients after a valve-in-valve TAVI [transcatheter aortic valve-in-surgical aortic valve (TAV-in-SAV)] as compared to a standard reoperation [surgical aortic valve redo-operation (SAV-in-SAV)] has not yet been performed. The goal of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes after TAV-in-SAV and SAV-in-SAV in a single center setting. Methods All SAV-in-SAV and TAV-in-SAV patients from January 2001 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with previous mechanical or transcatheter valves, active endocarditis and concomitant cardiac procedures were excluded. Patient characteristics, preoperative data, post-procedural complications, and 30-day mortality were collected from a designated database. Mean values ± SD were calculated for all continuous variables. Counts and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. The Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare categorical variables. Continuous variables were compared using the t-test for independent samples. A 2-sided P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 102 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 50 patients (49%) underwent a transcatheter valve-in-valve procedure, while 52 patients (51%) underwent redo-surgery. Patients in the TAV-in-SAV group were significantly older, had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE and exhibited a lower mean left ventricular ejection fraction than patients in the SAV-in-SAV group (78.1±6.7 vs. 66.2±13.1, P<0.001; 27.4±18.7 vs. 14.4±10, P<0.001; and 49.8±13

  2. Paradoxical low flow aortic valve stenosis: incidence, evaluation, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Dumesnil, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical low-flow (PLF) aortic stenosis is defined by a stroke volume index <35 ml/m(2) despite the presence of preserved LV ejection fraction (≥ 50 %). This entity is typically characterized by pronounced LV concentric remodeling with small LV cavity, impaired LV filling, increased arterial load, and reduced LV longitudinal shortening. Patients with PLF also have a worse prognosis compared to patients with normal flow. Because of the low flow state, these patients often have a low gradient despite the presence of severe stenosis, thus leading to discordant AS grading (i.e., aortic valve area < 1.0 cm(2) but mean gradient < 40 mmHg) and thus uncertainty about the indication of aortic valve replacement. Stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium score by computed tomography may be helpful to differentiate true from pseudo severe stenosis and thereby guide therapeutic management in these patients. Aortic valve replacement improves outcomes in patients with PLF low gradient AS having evidence of severe stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement may provide an interesting alternative to surgery in these patients.

  3. Automated segmentation and geometrical modeling of the tricuspid aortic valve in 3D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Wang, Hongzhi; Takabe, Manabu; Jackson, Benjamin M; Sehgal, Chandra M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The aortic valve has been described with variable anatomical definitions, and the consistency of 2D manual measurement of valve dimensions in medical image data has been questionable. Given the importance of image-based morphological assessment in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of aortic valve disease, there is considerable need to develop a standardized framework for 3D valve segmentation and shape representation. Towards this goal, this work integrates template-based medial modeling and multi-atlas label fusion techniques to automatically delineate and quantitatively describe aortic leaflet geometry in 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images, a challenging task that has been explored only to a limited extent. The method makes use of expert knowledge of aortic leaflet image appearance, generates segmentations with consistent topology, and establishes a shape-based coordinate system on the aortic leaflets that enables standardized automated measurements. In this study, the algorithm is evaluated on 11 3DE images of normal human aortic leaflets acquired at mid systole. The clinical relevance of the method is its ability to capture leaflet geometry in 3DE image data with minimal user interaction while producing consistent measurements of 3D aortic leaflet geometry.

  4. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ping; Liu, Jialiang; Tao, Jun; Liu, Jianyang; Yang, Yanqi; Yang, Songran

    2015-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a pathogen of zoonosis often associated with occupational exposure. Although Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection has high mortality, the heart valves in humans are rarely involved. The clinical data of a case of a 65-year-old male with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis was summarized retrospectively and analyzed with a literature review. Based on a literature review and our experience, cases of E. rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis are extremely rare and surgical treatment for this condition is useful and recommended. PMID:25785050

  5. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ping; Liu, Jialiang; Tao, Jun; Liu, Jianyang; Yang, Yanqi; Yang, Songran

    2015-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a pathogen of zoonosis often associated with occupational exposure. Although Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection has high mortality, the heart valves in humans are rarely involved. The clinical data of a case of a 65-year-old male with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis was summarized retrospectively and analyzed with a literature review. Based on a literature review and our experience, cases of E. rhusiopathiae-induced aortic valve endocarditis are extremely rare and surgical treatment for this condition is useful and recommended.

  6. [The assessment of mechanical heart valves stenosis in adults after aortic valve replacement: the advantage of full-flow design of mechanical valve].

    PubMed

    Bokeria, L A; Bokeria, O L; Fadeev, A A; Makhachev, O A; Kosareva, T I; Averina, I I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of transprosthetic hemodynamics in adults after aortic valve replacement in the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery in 2007-2010 demonstrated the hemodynamic advantage of the concept of new full-flow mechanical aortic valve prosthesis "CorBeat". Having the same size of internal orifice and tissue annulus diameters, the values of transprosthetic parameters (peak and mean gradients, blood flow velocities) through "CorBeat" were close to physiological values of transvalvular native aortic parameters and had a tendency to be not dependent on the size of prosthesis (p = 0.63). In the article for the first time a morphometric database of geometric values of internal orifice area of normal native aortic valves in adults was used taking into account both the gender and the body surface area's of a patient. There was also used the standardized prosthesis size Z-score which represents the number of SDs by which the internal prosthesis area differs from the mean normal native aortic valve area for the patient's body surface area. The article emphasizes the need of the personal selection of the size and the type of prosthesis for any patient as well as the need for new design development of prosthetic heart valves.

  7. Silent destruction of aortic and mitral valve by Klebsiella pneumoniae endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, K H; Sharma, Rajni; Agrawal, Navin; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella endocarditis rarely affects the native valve especially in the immunocompromised and the elderly. We report a case of Klebsiella endocarditis in a 60-year-old man who had a nidus of infection on the aortic valve which led to severe aortic regurgitation. This possibly spread to the anterior mitral leaflet (AML) leading to AML perforation therefore causing moderate mitral regurgitation. The reason for this suspicion was that there was perforation of the AML in the absence of vegetation. Noteworthy is that he was asymptomatic apart from generalised fatigue. This case draws our attention to the nature of Klebsiella valvular affection due to the fact that it had bitten the aortic and mitral valve silently and compelled the patient to undergo double valve replacement without having a prolonged duration of symptomatic illness thereby calling for high suspicion especially in individuals in the extremes of ages where the symptoms are less-guiding than the signs. PMID:24057412

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  9. Deletion of CD73 in mice leads to Aortic Valve Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zukowska, P; Kutryb-Zajac, B; Jasztal, A; Toczek, M; Zabielska, M; Borkowski, T; Khalpey, Z; Smolenski, R T; Slominska, E M

    2017-02-10

    Aortic stenosis is known to involve inflammation and thrombosis. Changes in activity of extracellular enzyme - ecto-5'-nucleotidase (referred also as CD73) can alter inflammatory and thrombotic responses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of CD73 deletion in mice on development of aortic valve dysfunction and to compare it to the effect of high-fat diet. Four groups of mice (normal-diet Wild Type (WT), high-fat diet WT, normal diet CD73-/-, high-fat diet CD73-/-) were maintained for 15weeks followed by echocardiographic analysis of aortic valve function, measurement of aortic surface activities of nucleotide catabolism enzymes as well as alkaline phosphatase activity, mineral composition and histology of aortic valve leaflets. CD73-/- knock out led to an increase in peak aortic flow (1.06±0.26m/s) compared to WT (0.79±0.26m/s) indicating obstruction. Highest values of peak aortic flow (1.26±0.31m/s) were observed in high-fat diet CD73-/- mice. Histological analysis showed morphological changes in CD73-/- including thickening and accumulation of dark deposits, proved to be melanin. Concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and PO4(3-) in valve leaflets were elevated in CD73-/- mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was enhanced after ATP treatment and reduced after adenosine treatment in aortas incubated in osteogenic medium. AMP hydrolysis in CD73-/- was below 10% of WT. Activity of ecto-adenosine deaminase (eADA), responsible for adenosine deamination, in the CD73-/- was 40% lower when compared to WT. Deletion of CD73 in mice leads to aortic valve dysfunction similar to that induced by high-fat diet suggesting important role of this surface protein in maintaining heart valve integrity.

  10. Bicuspid aortic valve: theoretical and clinical aspects of concomitant ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    De Sá, Mauro Paes Leme; Bastos, Eduardo Sergio; Murad, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with annuloaortic ectasia, dissection and ascending aortic aneurysm. The high incidence of this congenital malformation and aortic disease suggests a close correlation between the two phenomena. Abnormalities in different phases of cell migration of the neural crest might be responsible for the occurrence of abnormalities in the aortic valve, media layer of the ascending aorta and vessels of the aortic arch. Previous studies have shown that patients with normal BAV or slight dysfunction may present with dilation of the aortic root. The hemodynamic changes caused by BAV without stenosis or insufficiency seem to be an insufficient explanation for these findings. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the molecular and hystological aspects of this disease. We found a reduced fibrillin-1 content in both ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk as a possible cause. Histologically, the ascending aorta can present cystic medial necrosis and elastic fragmentation, similar to Marfan's disease. Some authors concluded that many patients, mainly those with aortic regurgitation, should have the aortic valve and the ascending aorta replaced at the same procedure, even if a mild dilatation (45 mm) is present in patients with BAV if life expectancy is anticipated to be greater than 10 years to prevent further aneurysms or ruptures.

  11. Aortic root remodeling with the "cuff" technique for stentless valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Massetti, M; Bruno, P; Babatasi, G; Le Page, O; Neri, E; Veron, S; Saloux, E; Khayat, A

    2001-03-01

    Aortic root and sinotubular junction dilatation and aneurysm of ascending aorta are considered relative contra-indications to implantation of a stentless valve prosthesis, because the modified aortic geometry leads to aortic incompetence and early failure of the prosthesis. Aortic root reconstruction can be performed according to various techniques. We present a surgical technique in which a tubular graft, replacing an ascending aortic aneurysm, allows sinotubular remodeling and satisfactory implantation of a stentless prosthesis. The native aorta is inserted into the vascular prosthesis at the level of the sinotubular junction which is wrapped in order to prevent commissure spreading. Sizing of the vascular and valve prosthesis is made according to annular diameter. Since October 1999, 6 patients have been operated using this technique with good results.

  12. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  13. [Ascending aorta replacement late after aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Fujii, Genyo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji

    2013-07-01

    Replacement of the asceding aorta is indicated in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement( AVR), if the diameter of the ascending aorta is greater than 5.0 cm. If the diameter of the asceding aorta is from 4.0 to 5.0 cm, it was arguable whether replacement of the ascending aorta should be performed. Nine patients who underwent reoperative ascending aorta replacement after AVR were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation on the asending aorta replacement was performed 11.8±7.2 years (range 1y5m~23y3m) after AVR. Mean patient age was 69.9±6.3 (range 60~81). In 2 cases, reoperations were performed early year after AVR. Although ascending aorta was dilated at the 1st operation, replacement wasn't performed for the age and minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). In 3 cases, reoperations were performed more than 10 years later. On these cases, ascending aorta aneurysm and dissection occurred with no pain and were pointed out by computed tomography(CT) or ultrasonic cardiogram(UCG). We think that patients with dilatation of the ascending aorta should undergo AVR and aorta replacement at the 1st operation regardness of age. It is important that patients who underwent AVR should undergo a regular checkup on the ascending aorta.

  14. Analysis of Serum Metabolites to Diagnose Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenshuo; Maimaiti, Aikebaier; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lingfei; Tao, Hongyue; Nian, Hui; Xia, Limin; Kong, Biao; Wang, Chunsheng; Liu, Mofang; Wei, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart disease. The current study aims to construct a diagnostic model based on metabolic profiling as a non-invasive tool for BAV screening. Blood serum samples were prepared from an estimation group and a validation group, each consisting of 30 BAV patients and 20 healthy individuals, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In total, 2213 metabolites were detected and 41 were considered different. A model for predicting BAV in the estimation group was constructed using the concentration levels of monoglyceride (MG) (18:2) and glycerophospho-N-oleoyl ethanolamine (GNOE). A novel model named Zhongshan (ZS) was developed to amplify the association between BAV and the two metabolites. The area under curve (AUC) of ZS for BAV prediction was 0.900 (0.782–0.967) and was superior to all single-metabolite models when applied to the estimation group. Using optimized cutoff (−0.1634), ZS model had a sensitivity score of 76.7%, specificity score of 90.0%, positive predictive value of 80% and negative predictive value of 85.0% for the validation group. These results support the use of serum-based metabolomics profiling method as a complementary tool for BAV screening in large populations. PMID:27845433

  15. Avoiding the Learning Curve for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    John, Ranjit; Kelly, Rosemary F.; Helmer, Gregory; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Biring, Timinder; Oestreich, Brett

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate whether collaboration between existing and new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) programs could help reduce the number of cases needed to achieve optimal efficiency. Background. There is a well-documented learning curve for achieving procedural efficiency and safety in TAVR procedures. Methods. A multidisciplinary collaboration was established between the Minneapolis VA Medical Center (new program) and the University of Minnesota (established program since 2012, n = 219) 1 year prior to launching the new program. Results. 269 patients treated with TAVR (50 treated in the first year at the new program). Mean age was 76 (±18) years and STS score was 6.8 (±6). Access included transfemoral (n = 35, 70%), transapical (n = 8, 16%), transaortic (n = 2, 4%), and subclavian (n = 5, 10%) types. Procedural efficiency (procedural time 158 ± 59 versus 148 ± 62, p = 0.27), device success (96% versus 87%, p = 0.08), length of stay (5 ± 3 versus 6 ± 7 days, p = 0.10), and safety (in hospital mortality 4% versus 6%, p = 0.75) were similar between programs. We found no difference in outcome measures between the first and last 25 patients treated during the first year of the new program. Conclusions. Establishing a partnership with an established program can help mitigate the learning curve associated with these complex procedures. PMID:28246571

  16. Dynamic Energy Loss Characteristics in the Native Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwai Yap, Choon; Dasi, Laksmi P.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2009-11-01

    Aortic Valve (AV) stenosis if untreated leads to heart failure. From a mechanics standpoint, heart failure implies failure to generate sufficient mechanical power to overcome energy losses in the circulation. Thus energy efficiency-based measures are direct measures of AV disease severity, which unfortunately is not used in current clinical measures of stenosis severity. We present an analysis of the dynamic rate of energy dissipation through the AV from direct high temporal resolution measurements of flow and pressure drop across the AV in a pulsatile left heart setup. Porcine AV was used and measurements at various conditions were acquired: varying stroke volumes; heart rates; and stenosis levels. Energy dissipation waveform has a distinctive pattern of being skewed towards late systole, attributed to the explosive growth of flow instabilities from adverse pressure gradient. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume increases energy dissipation, but does not alter the normalized shape of the dissipation temporal profile. Stenosis increases energy dissipation and also alters the normalized shape of dissipation waveform with significantly more losses during late acceleration phase. Since stenosis produces a departure from the signature dissipation waveform shape, dynamic energy dissipation analysis can be extended into a clinical tool for AV evaluation.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a revolution in the therapy of elderly and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Teoman; Yilmaz, Irem

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a real revolution in the field of interventional cardiology for the treatment of elderly or high-risk surgical patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Today, TAVI seems to play a key and a reliable role in the treatment of intermediate and maybe low-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. TAVI has also evolved from a complex and hazardous procedure into an effective and safe therapy by the development of new generation devices. This article aims to review the background and future of TAVI, clinical trials and registries with old and new generation TAVI devices and to focus on some open issues related to post-procedural outcomes.

  18. Bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy in adults: Incidence, etiology, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Hector I; Della Corte, Alessandro; Prakash, Siddharth K; Milewicz, Dianna M; Evangelista, Artur; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2015-12-15

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart defect and is associated with an aortopathy manifested by dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta. The clinical consequences of this aortopathy are the need for periodic monitoring of aortic diameters, elective prophylactic surgical aortic repair, and the occurrence of aortic dissection or rupture. This review describes the current knowledge of BAV aortopathy in adults, including incidence, pathophysiologic insights into its etiology, contemporary hypothesis-generating observations into its complications, and recommendations for monitoring and intervention.

  19. Genetically alike Syrian hamsters display both bifoliate and trifoliate aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Sans-Coma, Valentín; Carmen Fernández, M; Fernández, Borja; Durán, Ana C; Anderson, Robert H; Arqué, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    The bifoliate, or bicuspid, aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac anomaly in man. It is a heritable defect, but its mode of inheritance remains unclear. Previous studies in Syrian hamsters showed that BAVs with fusion of the right and left coronary leaflets are expressions of a trait, the variation of which takes the form of a phenotypic continuum. It ranges from a trifoliate valve with no fusion of the coronary leaflets to a bifoliate root devoid of any raphe. The intermediate stages are represented by trifoliate valves with fusion of the coronary aortic leaflets, and bifoliate valves with raphes. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the distinct morphological variants rely on a common genotype, or on different genotypes. We examined the aortic valves from 1 849 Syrian hamsters belonging to a family subjected to systematic inbreeding by full-sib mating. The incidence of the different trifoliate aortic valve (TAV) and bifoliate aortic valve (BAV) morphological variants widely varied in the successive inbred generations. TAVs with extensive fusion of the leaflets, and BAVs, accounted for five-sixths of the patterns found in Syrian hamsters considered to be genetically alike or virtually isogenic, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.999 or higher. The remaining one-sixth hamsters had aortic valves with a tricuspid design, but in most cases the right and left coronary leaflets were slightly fused. Results of crosses between genetically alike hamsters, with the probability of homozygosity being 0.989 or higher, revealed no significant association between the valvar phenotypes in the parents and their offspring. Our findings are consistent with the notion that the BAVs of the Syrian hamster are expressions of a quantitative trait subject to polygenic inheritance. They suggest that the genotype of the virtually isogenic animals produced by systematic inbreeding greatly predisposes to the development of anomalous valves, be they

  20. Analysis of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Akt in Ascending Aortic Aneurysm With Tricuspid or Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, A.; Ruocco, M.R.; Albano, F.; Granato, G.; Romano, V.; Corso, G.; Bancone, C.; De Vendittis, E.; Corte, A. Della

    2014-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) is a consequence of medial degeneration (MD), deriving from apoptotic loss of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and fragmentation of elastin and collagen fibers. Alterations of extracellular matrix structure and protein composition, typical of medial degeneration, can modulate intracellular pathways. In this study we examined the relevance of extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) and Akt in AsAA pathogenesis, evaluating their tissue distribution and protein levels in ascending aortic tissues from controls (n=6), patients affected by AsAA associated to tricuspid aortic valve (TAV, n=9) or bicuspid aortic valve (BAV, n=9). The results showed a significant reduction of SOD3, phospho-Akt and Akt protein levels in AsAA tissues from patients with BAV, compared to controls, whereas the differences observed between controls and patients with TAV were not significant. The decreased levels of SOD3 and Akt in BAV aortic tissues are associated with decreased Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 levels increase. The authors suggest a role of decreased SOD3 protein levels in the progression of AsAA with BAV and a link between ECM modifications of aortic media layer and impaired Erk1/Erk2 and Akt signaling in the late stages of the aortopathy associated with BAV. PMID:25308842

  1. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery - minimally invasive Aortic valve surgery - open Bicuspid aortic valve Endocarditis Heart valve surgery Mitral valve prolapse Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive Mitral valve surgery - open Pulmonary valve stenosis Smoking - tips on how to quit Patient Instructions ...

  2. Comparison of the effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with stenotic bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valves (from the German TAVI Registry).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timm; Linke, Axel; Sievert, Horst; Kahlert, Philipp; Hambrecht, Rainer; Nickenig, Georg; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen; Sack, Stefan; Gerckens, Ulrich; Schneider, Steffen; Zeymer, Uwe; Zahn, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are considered a relative contraindication to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). One of the main reasons is the presumed risk for residual aortic regurgitation (AR). However, case reports and small case series have suggested that TAVI can be successfully performed with acceptable clinical outcomes in high-risk patients with BAV. Within the large German TAVI Registry, we sought to evaluate TAVI in older high-risk patients with BAV. From January 2009 to June 2010, a total of 1,424 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI were prospectively enrolled into the German TAVI Registry. For the present analysis, patients with valve-in-valve procedures were excluded and those with BAV (n = 38, 3%) were compared with those with tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 1357, 97%). Patient characteristics did not markedly differ and procedural success was very high in both groups. There was a higher rate of relevant AR (≥II) after TAVI among patients with BAV (25 vs 15%, p = 0.05), whereas pacemakers were more often implanted in patients with TAV (17% vs 35%, p = 0.02). Thirty-day mortality rate was similar in both cohorts (11% vs 11%). In a Cox proportional regression analysis, BAV was not associated with higher 1-year mortality rate (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 1.41). In selected patients with BAV, TAVI can be performed with a satisfactory clinical result. Although the risk for relevant AR seems to be greater among patients with BAV, 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were not elevated compared with patients with TAV.

  3. Influence of Beta-Blocker Therapy on Aortic Blood Flow in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bradley D.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.; van Ooij, Pim; Carr, James C.; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick; Bonow, Robert O.; Kansal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), beta-blockers (BB) are assumed to slow ascending aorta (AAo) dilation by reducing wall shear stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal segment. The aim of this study was to assess differences in AAo peak velocity and WSS in BAV patients with and without BB therapy. Methods BAV patients receiving BB (BB+, n=30, age:47±11 years) or not on BB (BB−, n=30, age:46±13 years) and healthy controls (n=15, age:43±11 years) underwent 4D flow MRI for the assessment of in-vivo aortic 3D blood flow. Peak systolic velocities and 3D WSS were calculated at the anterior and posterior walls of the AAo. Results Both patient groups had higher maximum and mean WSS relative to the control group (p=0.001 to p=0.04). WSS was not reduced in the BB+ group compared to BB− patients in the anterior AAo (maximum: 1.49±0.47N/m2 vs. 1.38±0.49N/m2, p=0.99, mean: 0.76±0.2N/m2 vs. 0.74±0.18N/m2, p=1.00) or posterior AAo (maximum: 1.45±0.42N/m2 vs. 1.39±0.58N/m2, p=1.00; mean: 0.65±0.16N/m2 vs. 0.63±0.16N/m2, p=1.00). AAo peak velocity was elevated in patients compared to controls (p<0.01) but similar for BB+ and BB− groups (p=0.42). Linear models identified significant relationships between aortic stenosis severity and increased maximum WSS (β=0.186, p=0.007) and between diameter at the sinus of Valsalva and reduced mean WSS (β=−0.151, p=0.045). Conclusions Peak velocity and systolic WSS were similar for BAV patients irrespective of BB therapy. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate the impact of dosage and duration of BB therapy on aortic hemodynamics and development of aortopathy. PMID:26817758

  4. Influence of beta-blocker therapy on aortic blood flow in patients with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bradley D; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J; van Ooij, Pim; Carr, James C; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick; Bonow, Robert O; Kansal, Preeti

    2016-04-01

    In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), beta-blockers (BB) are assumed to slow ascending aorta (AAo) dilation by reducing wall shear stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal segment. The aim of this study was to assess differences in AAo peak velocity and WSS in BAV patients with and without BB therapy. BAV patients receiving BB (BB+, n = 30, age: 47 ± 11 years) or not on BB (BB-, n = 30, age: 46 ± 13 years) and healthy controls (n = 15, age: 43 ± 11 years) underwent 4D flow MRI for the assessment of in vivo aortic 3D blood flow. Peak systolic velocities and 3D WSS were calculated at the anterior and posterior walls of the AAo. Both patient groups had higher maximum and mean WSS relative to the control group (p = 0.001 to p = 0.04). WSS was not reduced in the BB+ group compared to BB- patients in the anterior AAo (maximum: 1.49 ± 0.47 vs. 1.38 ± 0.49 N/m(2), p = 0.99, mean: 0.76 ± 0.2 vs. 0.74 ± 0.18 N/m(2), p = 1.00) or posterior AAo (maximum: 1.45 ± 0.42 vs. 1.39 ± 0.58 N/m(2), p = 1.00; mean: 0.65 ± 0.16 vs. 0.63 ± 0.16 N/m(2), p = 1.00). AAo peak velocity was elevated in patients compared to controls (p < 0.01) but similar for BB+ and BB- groups (p = 0.42). Linear models identified significant relationships between aortic stenosis severity and increased maximum WSS (β = 0.186, p = 0.007) and between diameter at the sinus of Valsalva and reduced mean WSS (β = -0.151, p = 0.045). Peak velocity and systolic WSS were similar for BAV patients irrespective of BB therapy. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate the impact of dosage and duration of BB therapy on aortic hemodynamics and development of aortopathy.

  5. Late results of mitral valve replacement using unstented antibiotic sterilised aortic homografts.

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, S A; Halim, M A; Campalani, G; Coe, Y J; Towers, M K; Yacoub, M H

    1983-01-01

    Three hundred and seventy nine patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement using unstented antibiotic sterilised aortic homografts were followed up for 52 to 138 months (mean 102 months). Patients requiring additional aortic valve replacement were excluded. The commonest cause was rheumatic heart disease (321 patients). There were 37 early deaths (9.8%) and 97 late deaths (28%). The actuarial survival of operative survivors was 83% at three years, 75% at five years, and 55% at nine years. Technical valve failure occurred in six patients (1.6%), infective endocarditis in 19 (5%), and degeneration of the valve in 43 (12.5%). The cumulative probability of freedom from endocarditis was 96% at three years, 94% at five years, and 91% at nine years, while that of freedom from valve degeneration was 97% at five years and 48% at 10 years. There were no early embolic episodes, but late embolism occurred in five patients (1.5%). Images PMID:6651999

  6. Insidious strut fractures in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Paulson, D M; Takaro, T

    1978-04-01

    Recent reports of cage wear occurring in DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses prompted us to examine with image intensification all our patients who have had this type of prosthesis implanted. One patient, who was asymptomatic, was discovered to have a prosthesis with two fractured struts. This patient's prosthetic valve was replaced successfully with a stented porcine heterograft prosthesis. Including the valve removed from this patient, 8 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valves with structural defects have been reported to the manufacturer. In the absence of a catastrophic event, patients with valves having fractured or worn struts may be totally asymptomatic, and routine periodic roentgenographic examination may be the only way of detecting strut wear or fracture.

  7. Effect of Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Positioning: A Patient-Specific Numerical Model.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matteo; Marom, Gil; Ghosh, Ram P; Fernandez, Harold A; Taylor, James R; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a life-saving and effective alternative to surgical valve replacement in high-risk, elderly patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. Despite its early promise, certain limitations and adverse events, such as suboptimal placement and valve migration, have been reported. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the effect of various TAVR deployment locations on the procedural outcome by assessing the risk for valve migration. The deployment of a balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN valve was simulated via finite element analysis in a patient-specific calcified aortic root, which was reconstructed from CT scans of a retrospective case of valve migration. The deployment location was parametrized in three configurations and the anchorage was quantitatively assessed based on the contact between the stent and the native valve during the deployment and recoil phases. The proximal deployment led to lower contact area between the native leaflets and the stent which poses higher risk for valve migration. The distal and midway positions resulted in comparable outcomes, with the former providing a slightly better anchorage. The approach presented might be used as a predictive tool for procedural planning in order to prevent prosthesis migration and achieve better clinical outcomes.

  8. Structural analysis of the natural aortic valve in dynamics: from unpressurized to physiologically loaded.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel R; Lobo, Keegan; Beller, Carsten J

    2010-07-20

    A novel finite element model of the natural aortic valve was developed implementing anisotropic hyperelastic material properties for the leaflets and aortic tissues, and starting from the unpressurized geometry. Static pressurization of the aortic root, silicone rubber moulds and published data helped to establish the model parameters, while high-speed video recording of the leaflet motion in a left-heart simulator allowed for comparisons with simulations. The model was discretized with brick elements and loaded with time-varying pressure using an explicit commercial solver. The aortic valve model produced a competent valve whose dynamic behavior (geometric orifice area vs. time) closely matched that observed in the experiment. In both cases, the aortic valve took approximately 30 ms to open to an 800 mm(2) orifice and remained completely or more than half open for almost 200 ms, after which it closed within 30-50 ms. The highest values of stress were along the leaflet attachment line and near the commissure during diastole. Von Mises stress in the leaflet belly reached 600-750 kPa from early to mid-diastole. While the model using the unpressurized geometry as initial configuration was specially designed to satisfy the requirements of continuum mechanics for large deformations of hyperelastic materials, it also clearly demonstrated that dry models can be adequate to analyze valve dynamics. Although improvements are still needed, the advanced modeling and validation techniques used herein contribute toward improved and quantified accuracy over earlier simplified models.

  9. Effect of gallium on in vitro aortic valve cusp mineralization - EDXRF studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.; Goncerz, G.; Kunz, J.; Podolec, P.; Rokita, E.

    2004-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine the effect of gallium on the aortic valve cusp mineralization. The studies were conducted on aortic valves collected at autopsy from 35 donors. Each sample was incubated for 21 days in the mineralization-promoting medium, containing Ga at concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 8.0 μg/ml. The elemental compositions of the samples were measured using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method. The concentrations of 14 elements were determined: Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Br and Sr. Calcium contents and Ca/P ratios were considered as markers of the mineralization process. The aortic valves could be divided into two groups depending on the advancement of the mineralization process. The first group in which the process progressed and the second one which was resistant to mineralization. Ga was accumulated in both groups. The results demonstrated that Ga reduced the aortic valve mineralization in dose-dependent manner in the first group and did not influence the mineralization in the mineralization-resistant aortic valves.

  10. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Cirillo, Marco; Brunelli, Federico; Tomba, Margherita Dalla; Mhagna, Zen; Tasca, Giordano; Quaini, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression. PMID:16803632

  11. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  12. Rapid 3D printing of anatomically accurate and mechanically heterogeneous aortic valve hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hockaday, L A; Kang, K H; Colangelo, N W; Cheung, P Y C; Duan, B; Malone, E; Wu, J; Girardi, L N; Bonassar, L J; Lipson, H; Chu, C C; Butcher, J T

    2012-09-01

    The aortic valve exhibits complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and heterogeneity essential for the long-term efficient biomechanical function. These are, however, challenging to mimic in de novo engineered living tissue valve strategies. We present a novel simultaneous 3D printing/photocrosslinking technique for rapidly engineering complex, heterogeneous aortic valve scaffolds. Native anatomic and axisymmetric aortic valve geometries (root wall and tri-leaflets) with 12-22 mm inner diameters (ID) were 3D printed with poly-ethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels (700 or 8000 MW) supplemented with alginate. 3D printing geometric accuracy was quantified and compared using Micro-CT. Porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVIC) seeded scaffolds were cultured for up to 21 days. Results showed that blended PEG-DA scaffolds could achieve over tenfold range in elastic modulus (5.3±0.9 to 74.6±1.5 kPa). 3D printing times for valve conduits with mechanically contrasting hydrogels were optimized to 14 to 45 min, increasing linearly with conduit diameter. Larger printed valves had greater shape fidelity (93.3±2.6, 85.1±2.0 and 73.3±5.2% for 22, 17 and 12 mm ID porcine valves; 89.1±4.0, 84.1±5.6 and 66.6±5.2% for simplified valves). PAVIC seeded scaffolds maintained near 100% viability over 21 days. These results demonstrate that 3D hydrogel printing with controlled photocrosslinking can rapidly fabricate anatomical heterogeneous valve conduits that support cell engraftment.

  13. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  14. Long-term survival with a stentless free-hand Batista pericardial aortic valve prosthesis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Valentina; Labbé, Javier; Cataldo, Anthony; Becerra, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stented bovine pericardial prosthetic valves are a good option for older patients, except when there is a fragile small aortic annulus, when, if there is no contraindication to anticoagulation, a mechanical prosthesis may be indicated. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a 72 year-old man who underwent coronary bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement with a stentless valve fashioned from bovine pericardium using the Batista technique. Despite early sternal infection and dehiscence, and renal and respiratory failure during 15 years follow-up, he remains alive and self-sufficient. Echocardiography demonstrates a well-functioning aortic valve. DISCUSSION When Batista reported his first 60 patients, concerns were raised about the surgical feasibility of constructing the valve and its long-term durability. Our case perhaps addresses both concerns. CONCLUSION Replacement of the aortic valve with a free-hand Batista pericardial valve is a feasible option in a suitable and carefully selected patient. PMID:25524300

  15. Transcatheter valve implantation can alter fluid flow fields in aortic sinuses and ascending aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves (TAVs) are valve replacements used to treat aortic stenosis. Currently, these have been used in elderly patients at high-risk for open-heart procedures. Since these devices are implanted under fluoroscopic guidance, the implantation position of the valve can vary with respect to the native aortic valve annulus. The current study characterizes the altered hemodynamics in the aortic sinus and ascending aorta under different implantation (high and low) and cardiac output (2.5 and 5.0 L/min) conditions. Two commonly used TAV designs are studied using 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). 200 phase locked images are obtained at every 25ms in the cardiac cycle, and the resulting vector fields are ensemble averaged. High implantation of the TAV with respect to the annulus causes weaker sinus washout and weaker sinus vortex formation. Additionally, the longer TAV leaflets can also result in a weaker sinus vortex. The level of turbulent fluctuations in the ascending aorta did not appear to be affected by axial positioning of the valve, but varied with cardiac output. The results of this study indicates that TAV positioning is important to be considered clinically, since this can affect coronary perfusion and potential flow stagnation near the valve.

  16. Mesenchymal state of intimal cells may explain higher propensity to ascending aortic aneurysm in bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Shohreh; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Paloschi, Valentina; Magné, Joelle; Branca, Rui Miguel Mamede; Du, Lei; Hultenby, Kjell; Petrini, Johan; Fuxe, Jonas; Dietz, Harry C.; Loeys, Bart; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Mertens, Luc; Mital, Seema; Mohamed, Salah A.; Andelfinger, Gregor; Lehtiö, Janne; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eriksson, Per; Björck, Hanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) are at significantly higher risk of developing aortic complications than individuals with tricuspid aortic valves (TAV) and defective signaling during the embryonic development and/or life time exposure to abnormal hemodynamic have been proposed as underlying factors. However, an explanation for the molecular mechanisms of aortopathy in BAV has not yet been provided. We combined proteomics, RNA analyses, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy to identify molecular differences in samples of non-dilated ascending aortas from BAV (N = 62) and TAV (N = 54) patients. Proteomic analysis was also performed for dilated aortas (N = 6 BAV and N = 5 TAV) to gain further insight into the aortopathy of BAV. Our results collectively showed the molecular signature of an endothelial/epithelial-mesenchymal (EndMT/EMT) transition-like process, associated with instability of intimal cell junctions and activation of RHOA pathway in the intima and media layers of ascending aorta in BAV patients. We propose that an improper regulation of EndMT/EMT during the spatiotemporally related embryogenesis of semilunar valves and ascending aorta in BAV individuals may result in aortic immaturity and instability prior to dilation. Exasperation of EndMT/EMT state in post embryonic life and/or exposure to non-physiological hemodynamic could lead to the aneurysm of ascending aorta in BAV individuals. PMID:27779199

  17. Replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis at the time of continuous flow ventricular assist device implantation for preexisting aortic valve dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Mountis, Maria; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation has become a mainstay of therapy for advanced heart failure patients who are either ineligible for, or awaiting, cardiac transplantation. Controversy remains over the optimal therapeutic strategy for preexisting aortic valvular dysfunction in these patients at the time of LVAD implant. In patients with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, surgical approaches are center specific and range from variable leaflet closure techniques to concomitant aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a bioprosthesis. In the present study, we retrospectively analyzed our outcomes in patients who underwent simultaneous AVR and LVAD implantation secondary to antecedent aortic valve pathology. Between January 2004 and June 2010, 144 patients underwent LVAD implantation at a single institution. Of these, 7 patients (4.8%) required concomitant AVR. Five of the 7 patients (71%) survived to hospital discharge and suffered no adverse events in the perioperative period. One-year survival for the discharged patients was 80%, and no prosthetic valve-related adverse events were observed in long-term follow-up. Given our experience, we conclude that bioprosthetic AVR is a plausible alternative for end-stage heart failure patients at the time of LVAD implantation. PMID:26424939

  18. Incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in Liverpool (1960-1990).

    PubMed Central

    Kitchiner, D J; Jackson, M; Walsh, K; Peart, I; Arnold, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in the five Health Districts of Liverpool that make up the Merseyside area. DESIGN--The records of the Liverpool Congenital Malformations Registry and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital identified 239 patients (155 male, 84 female) born with aortic valve stenosis between 1960 and 1990. Patients were traced to assess the severity of stenosis at follow up. Information on the severity at presentation and all subsequent events was obtained. RESULTS--Congenital aortic valve stenosis occurred in 5.7% of patients with congenital heart disease born in the Merseyside area. The median age at presentation was 16 months (range 0-20 years). Stenosis was mild at presentation in 145 patients, moderate in 33, severe in one and critical in 21 and 39 had a bicuspid valve without stenosis. Additional cardiac lesions were significantly more common in children presenting under one year of age and in those with critical stenosis. The median duration of follow up was 9.2 years (range 1-28 years) and seven patients were lost to follow up. 81 operations were performed in 60 patients. The reoperation rate was 28.3% after a median duration of 8.7 years (range 2.5-18 years). 15% of patients who presented with mild stenosis subsequently required operation compared with 67% of those with moderate stenosis. There were no sudden unexpected deaths and no deaths after aortic valvotomy, except in those presenting with critical stenosis. Mortality was 16.7% but patients presenting with critical aortic stenosis had a much worse prognosis. Actuarial and hazard analysis showed that the survival and absence of serious events (aortic valve surgery or balloon dilatation, endocarditis, or death) were significantly better in patients who presented with mild aortic stenosis than in those who presented with moderate aortic stenosis. 75% of patients presenting with mild stenosis had not progressed to moderate stenosis

  19. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  20. Changes in platelet indices in children with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Aylin Canbolat; Ayhan, Yusuf Izzet; Kalaycık, Ozlem; Timur, Cetin; Yoruk, Asım

    2015-03-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) can help diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the changes in platelet (PLT) indices in children diagnosed with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with mild stenosis and without stenosis to compare patients with mild stenosis with those without stenosis. A total of 73 children diagnosed with BAV (30 patients with mild stenosis and 43 without stenosis) with a mean age 9.73 ± 5.01 years and a control group were included in the study. Mean MPV value was significantly lower in the control group compared with patients with BAV with mild stenosis and patients without stenosis (p = 0.001, and p < 0.01, respectively). MPV was significantly greater in patients with mild stenosis than in patients without stenosis (p = 0.049 and p < 0.05, respectively). Patients with mild stenosis had a significantly greater mean PDW value compared with patients without stenosis and the control group (p = 0.024 and p < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference between patients without stenosis and the control group with respect to mean PDW value (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study demonsrate that children with BAV either with or without stenosis have increased MPV; the ones with mild stenosis have even greater values than the ones without stenosis. It emphasizes the risk of thrombosis in children with BAV.

  1. Aortic Valve Replacement for Moderate Aortic Stenosis with Severe Calcification and Left Ventricualr Dysfunction—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Nikhil; Lang, Roberto M.; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A.

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with a history of erosive, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and interstitial lung disease presented with shortness of breath. Echocardiography showed new-onset severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction with an ejection fraction (EF) of 15% and moderately increased mean aortic valve gradient of 20 mmHg in a trileaflet aortic valve with severe sclero-calcific degeneration. Coronary angiography revealed no significant obstructive coronary disease. Invasive hemodynamic studies and dobutamine stress echocardiography were consistent with moderate aortic stenosis. Guideline directed medical therapy for heart failure with reduced EF was initiated; however, diuretics and neurohormonal blockade (beta-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker) provided minimal improvement, and the patient remained functionally limited. Of interest, echocardiography performed 1 year prior to his presentation showed normal LV EF and mild aortic leaflet calcification with moderate stenosis, suggesting a rapid progressing of calcific aortic valve disease. Subsequently, the patient underwent surgical aortic valve replacement and demonstrated excellent postsurgical recovery of LV EF (55%). Calcific aortic valve disease is commonly associated with aging, bicuspid aortic valve, and chronic kidney disease. Pathophysiological mechanism for valvular calcification is incompletely understood but include osteogenic transformation of valvular interstitial cells mediated by local and systemic inflammatory processes. Several rheumatologic diseases including RA are associated with premature atherosclerosis and arterial calcification, and we speculated a similar role of RA accelerating calcific aortic valve disease. We present a case of accelerated aortic valve calcification with (only) moderate stenosis, complicated by a rapid decline in LV systolic performance. Guidelines for AVR in moderate stenosis without concomitant cardiac surgery are not well established, although it should be

  2. Cadherin-11 coordinates cellular migration and extracellular matrix remodeling during aortic valve maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Caitlin J.; Zhou, Jingjing; Sung, Derek C.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Proper remodeling of the endocardial cushions into thin fibrous valves is essential for gestational progression and long-term function. This process involves dynamic interactions between resident cells and their local environment, much of which is not understood. In this study, we show that deficiency of the cell-cell adhesion protein cadherin-11 (cad-11) results in significant embryonic and perinatal lethality primarily due to valve related cardiac dysfunction. While endocardial to mesenchymal transformation is not abrogated, mesenchymal cells do not homogeneously cellularize the cushions. These cushions remain thickened with disorganized ECM, resulting in pronounced aortic valve insufficiency. Mice that survive to adulthood maintain thickened and stenotic semilunar valves, but interestingly do not develop calcification. Cad-11 −/− aortic valve leaflets contained reduced sox9 activity, β1 integrin expression, and RhoA-GTP activity, suggesting that remodeling defects are due to improper migration and/or cellular contraction. Cad-11 deletion or siRNA knockdown reduced migration, eliminated collective migration, and impaired 3D matrix compaction by aortic valve interstitial cells (VIC). Cad-11 depleted cells in culture contained few filopodia, stress fibers, or contact inhibited locomotion. Transfection of Cad-11 depleted cells with constitutively active RhoA restored cell phenotypes. Together, these results identify cadherin-11 mediated adhesive signaling for proper remodeling of the embryonic semilunar valves. PMID:26188246

  3. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J.; Lis, G. J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E.; Czubek, U.; Bolechała, F.; Borca, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe3+ is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe3+ form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  4. Comparable long-term results for porcine and pericardial prostheses after isolated aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Martin; Wallner, Stephanie; Ruetzler, Kurt; Wiedemann, Dominik; Ehrlich, Marek; Heinze, Georg; Binder, Thomas; Moritz, Anton; Hiesmayr, Michael J.; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Outcome of aortic valve replacement may be influenced by the choice of bioprosthesis. Pericardial heart valves are described to have a favourable haemodynamic profile compared with porcine valves, although the clinical notability of this finding is still controversially debated. Herein, we compared the long-term results of two commonly implanted bioprosthesis at a single centre. METHODS All consecutive patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement with either a Carpentier-Edwards Magna pericardial prosthesis or a Medtronic Mosaic porcine prosthesis between 2002 and 2008 were analysed regarding preoperative characteristics, short- and long-term survival, valve-related complications and echocardiographic findings. RESULTS The Medtronic Mosaic was implanted in 163 patients and the Carpentier-Edwards Magna in 295 patients. The sizes of implanted valves were 22.4 ± 1.5 mm for the Mosaic and 21.8 ± 1.8 mm for the Magna (P = 0.001). The long-term survival rate was 76 and 56% after 5 and 10 years for the Medtronic Mosaic, which was comparable with the Carpentier-Edwards Magna (77 and 57%; P = 0.92). Overall long-term survival was comparable with an age- and sex-matched Austrian general population for both groups. Valve-related adverse events were similar between groups. The postoperative mean transvalvular gradient was significantly increased in the Mosaic group (24 ± 9 mmHg vs 17 ± 7 mmHg; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Both types of aortic bioprostheses offer excellent results after isolated aortic valve replacement. Despite relevant differences in gradients, long-term survival was comparable with the expected normal survival for both bioprostheses. Patients with a porcine heart valve had a higher postoperative transvalvular gradient. PMID:25527170

  5. Study of normal, fibrous and calcified aortic valve tissue by Raman and reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Kátia Calligaris; Munin, Egberto; Alves, Leandro P.; Silveira, Fabrício L.; Junior, Landulfo S.; De Lima, Carlos J.; Lázzaro, João C.; De Souza, Genivaldo C.; Piotto, José A. B.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Zângaro, Renato A.

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have identified the degree of aortic valve calcification as a strong predictor both for the progression and outcome of aortic stenosis. In industrialized countries, aortic valve stenosis is most frequently caused by progressive calcification and degeneration of aortic cusps. However, there are no accurate methods to quantify the extent of aortic valve calcification. To provide a non-invasive alternative to biopsy, a range of optical methods have been investigated, including Raman and reflectance spectroscopy. A Raman spectrum can be used to access the molecular constitution of a particular tissue and classify it. Raman spectroscopy is largely used in the quantification and evaluation of human atherosclerosis, being a powerful technique for performing biochemical analysis without tissue removal. Nevertheless, increased thickness and disorganization of the collagen fibre network and extracellular matrix are known to affect the diffuse spectral reflectance of the tissue. A catheter with the "6 around 1" configuration, the central fiber transmit laser radiation to the sample and the scattered light is collected by the other six surrounding fibers, was used both for Raman and reflectance spectroscopy. A white light (krypton lamp, flashtube Model FX 1160 Perkin Elmer, USA) excitation was used for reflectance measurements. A Ti-sapphire (785nm, Spectra Physics, model 3900S, USA) laser, pumped by an argon laser (Spectra Physics, model Stabilite 2017, USA) was used as the near infrared Raman set up. Several ex-vivo spectra of aortic valve samples were analyzed. The results show a promising way to differentiate normal, fibrous and calcified tissue in aortic valve.

  6. [Aortic arch and valve replacement in a hemodialysis patient with a porcelain aorta;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ban, Tetsuaki; Aizawa, Kei; Oki, Shin-ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. A 75-year-old man complained of back pain and hoarseness. He had been on dialysis for 15 years. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed marked calcification in the thoracic aortic arch, which is known as a porcelain aorta, and a distal arch aneurysm. Echocardiographic examination showed moderate aortic valve stenosis with calcification. An operation was scheduled, and both the aortic valve and the aortic arch aneurysm were successfully replaced with a mechanical valve and a prosthetic graft. Cardiovascular surgery for patients complicated by a porcelain aorta requires extra cares for the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass and anastomoses of the aorta.

  7. Isolated rupture of bicuspid aortic valve following blunt chest trauma: a case report and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajid; Luni, Faraz Khan; Hashmi, Fayyaz; Taleb, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma to chest cause injury to various cardiac structures. Isolated rupture of aortic valve without aortic dissection is rare complication of blunt chest trauma and can be caused by a tear or avulsion of the valve. We report a case of a 35-year-old male who presented with severe aortic insufficiency due to rupture of a non-infected congenital bicuspid aortic valve following non-penetrating chest trauma. The diagnosis was suggested by echocardiography and was confirmed by intra-operative and histological findings. The patient was successfully treated with surgical valve replacement with uneventful postoperative course and recovery. We describe patho-physiology, clinical manifestations, management and the literature review of traumatic rupture of bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:28164016

  8. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in an Extremely Tortuous S-Shaped Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Toleva, Olga; Pozeg, Zlatko; Menkis, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative technique to treating aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. We present a case of a successful transfemoral TAVI in a high-risk patient with an extremely tortuous iliofemoral system and a significant S-type bend in the descending aorta. With careful preprocedure planning and using all the techniques available, TAVI can be performed in the most challenging patients. PMID:28352480

  9. Aortic annulus dimension assessment by computed tomography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: differences between systole and diastole.

    PubMed

    Bertaso, Angela G; Wong, Dennis T L; Liew, Gary Y H; Cunnington, Michael S; Richardson, James D; Thomson, Viji S; Lorraine, Brett; Kourlis, George; Leech, Diana; Worthley, Matthew I; Worthley, Stephen G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate assessment of aortic annular dimensions is essential for successful transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Annular dimensions are conventionally measured in mid-systole by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), echocardiography and angiography. Significant differences in systolic and diastolic aortic annular dimensions have been demonstrated in cohorts without aortic stenosis (AS), but it is unknown whether similar dynamic variation in annular dimensions exists in patients with severe calcific AS in whom aortic compliance is likely to be substantially reduced. We investigated the variation in aortic annular dimensions between systole and diastole in patients with severe calcific AS. Patients with severe calcific AS referred for TAVI were evaluated by 128-slice MDCT. Aortic annular diameter was measured during diastole and systole in the modified coronal, modified sagittal, and basal ring planes (maximal, minimal and mean diameters). Differences between systole and diastole were analysed by paired t test. Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis. Three of the five aortic dimensions measured increased significantly during systole. The largest change was a 0.75 mm (3.4%) mean increase in the minimal diameter of the basal ring during systole (p = 0.004). This corresponds closely to the modified sagittal view, which also increased by mean 0.42 mm (1.9%) during systole (p = 0.008). There was no significant change in the maximal diameter of the basal ring or the modified coronal view during systole (p > 0.05). There is a small magnitude but statistically significant difference in aortic annulus dimensions of patients with severe AS referred for TAVI when measured in diastole and systole. This small difference is unlikely to alter clinical decisions regarding prosthesis size or suitability for TAVI.

  10. Aortic valve debridement by ultrasonic surgical aspirator: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Craver, J M

    1990-05-01

    Aortic stenosis was relieved in 11 patients by ultrasonic debridement of the valve and annulus, while 102 other patients underwent valve replacement for aortic stenosis during 1988. Debridement was selectively applied based on findings of small annulus size (19 mm or less) and extensive calcification. Additional patient characteristics were mean transvalvular gradient of 78 mm Hg, advanced age, and marked left ventricular hypertrophy. Six patients had no residual gradient and 5 others a mean gradient less than 10 mm Hg. There were no complications related to the debridement process. Intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography demonstrated improved leaflet mobility and elimination of the gradient in all patients and elimination of associated valvular insufficiency in 2 patients. Follow-up echocardiography demonstrated late onset of new valvular regurgitation in 5 patients that was progressive and required reoperation in 3. Thickened, hardened, and retracted valve leaflets with loss of central coaptation were found in all 3 patients who underwent reoperation. Ultrasonic debridement can effectively relieve aortic stenosis, provide an excellent immediate hemodynamic result, and decrease operative time. However, the early occurrence of aortic insufficiency in a high percentage of patients makes it an unacceptable alternative to valve replacement, and the technique should be abandoned as a treatment for severe calcific aortic stenosis.

  11. Effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on intraoperative left ventricular end-diastolic pressure.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kosaku; Ota, Takashi; Nagamine, Katsutoshi; Koide, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Shishido, Koki; Tanaka, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for patients with aortic stenosis is a less invasive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement. Despite this, careful anesthetic management, especially strict control of blood pressure and fluid management, is necessary. During TAVI, normalization of left ventricular afterload due to aortic balloon valvuloplasty and prosthetic valve deployment is expected to result in rapid improvement of systolic function and consequent improvement in diastolic function. However, the early effect of TAVI on left ventricular diastolic function is less clear. We hypothesized that TAVI induces a rapid decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) after valve deployment. This retrospective observational study included 71 patients who had undergone TAVI using the transfemoral approach with a balloon-expandable valve under general anesthesia. Intraoperative LVEDP was measured using an intracardiac catheter. The severity of residual aortic regurgitation (AR) was assessed using the Sellers criteria. The mean (SD) LVEDP was 17.8 (5.3) mmHg just before TAVI and increased significantly to 27.3 (8.2) mmHg immediately after prosthetic valve deployment (p < 0.0001). The change in LVEDP was 8.7 (8.6) mmHg in patients with low residual AR (Sellers ≤1) and 11.0 (7.1) mmHg in those with high residual AR (Sellers ≥2); however, this difference was not significant. No correlation was found between the LVEDP change and intraoperative fluid balance. In conclusion, LVEDP increased significantly in the early period after valve deployment during TAVI, regardless of residual AR severity. It was suggested that the tolerability of fluid load could be reduced at that time.

  12. Patient selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A combined clinical and multimodality imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Cocchia, Rosangela; D’Andrea, Antonello; Conte, Marianna; Cavallaro, Massimo; Riegler, Lucia; Citro, Rodolfo; Sirignano, Cesare; Imbriaco, Massimo; Cappelli, Maurizio; Gregorio, Giovanni; Calabrò, Raffaele; Bossone, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been validated as a new therapy for patients affected by severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not eligible for surgical intervention because of major contraindication or high operative risk. Patient selection for TAVR should be based not only on accurate assessment of aortic stenosis morphology, but also on several clinical and functional data. Multi-Imaging modalities should be preferred for assessing the anatomy and the dimensions of the aortic valve and annulus before TAVR. Ultrasounds represent the first line tool in evaluation of this patients giving detailed anatomic description of aortic valve complex and allowing estimating with enough reliability the hemodynamic entity of valvular stenosis. Angiography should be used to assess coronary involvement and plan a revascularization strategy before the implant. Multislice computed tomography play a central role as it can give anatomical details in order to choice the best fitting prosthesis, evaluate the morphology of the access path and detect other relevant comorbidities. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography are emergent modality helpful in aortic stenosis evaluation. The aim of this review is to give an overview on TAVR clinical and technical aspects essential for adequate selection.

  13. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  14. A Rare Case of Aortic Valve Thrombosis in Patient with Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, Elisabetta; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Bonanni, Luca; Cutolo, Ada; Rigo, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and eosinophil-mediated organ-system damage. Cardiac thrombosis and thromboembolic complications represent common causes of morbidity and mortality and usually involve cardiac ventricles or mitral and prosthetic valves, while the involvement of the aortic valve is extremely rare in HES. Here we report peculiar multimodality images of an atypical case of extended thrombosis of the aortic valve, complicated by myocardial ischemia and asymptomatic cerebral ischemia, likely due to thrombus embolization, occurring in a 48-year-old man with HES. Prompt anticoagulant and steroid therapy lead to rapid and complete resolution of the thrombotic lesions, allowing preserving the native valve and preventing further embolic events. PMID:26435854

  15. Non-linear rotation-free shell finite-element models for aortic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Stolarski, Henryk; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2017-01-04

    Hyperelastic material models have been incorporated in the rotation-free, large deformation, shell finite element (FE) formulation of (Stolarski et al., 2013) and applied to dynamic simulations of aortic heart valve. Two models used in the past in analysis of such problem i.e. the Saint-Venant and May-Newmann-Yin (MNY) material models have been considered and compared. Uniaxial tests for those constitutive equations were performed to verify the formulation and implementation of the models. The issue of leaflets interactions during the closing of the heart valve at the end of systole is considered. The critical role of using non-linear anisotropic model for proper dynamic response of the heart valve especially during the closing phase is demonstrated quantitatively. This work contributes an efficient FE framework for simulating biological tissues and paves the way for high-fidelity flow structure interaction simulations of native and bioprosthetic aortic heart valves.

  16. Retrograde left ventricular catheterization in patients with an aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Karsh, D L; Michaelson, S P; Langou, R A; Cohen, L S; Wolfson, S

    1978-05-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive patients with an aortic valve prosthesis were evaluated with retrograde left ventricular catheterization. The prosthesis was successfully crossed, permitting hemodynamic and angiographic evaluation of function of the prosthetic valve, left ventricle and mitral valve in all 27 cases. No complications were encountered. In patients with active endocarditis or recent embolization, the retrograde technique was avoided when possible, and attempts were made to utilize other techniques for study. However, three such patients were evaluated with the retrograde technique without complication. Examination of pressure tracings and cineangiographic films suggested only minor interference with valve poppet movement induced by the catheter transversing the valve. In three cases, hemodynamic data were recorded with the catheter crossing the prosthesis at one time and a paraprosthetic valve defect at another time. Identical gradients were recorded. This series documents the safety and efficacy of the retrograde approach, which is proposed as an alternative to the transseptal technique and left ventricular puncture.

  17. First case of a left atrial dissection after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Kaddissi, Georges I; Sabir, Sajjad A; Topalian, Simon K

    2016-06-01

    The left atrial dissection is a very infrequently encountered complication after valve replacement and never seen after Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present an 84-year-old female, who underwent successful transapical TAVR and consequently developed contained left atrial dissection seen on transesophageal echocardiogram. The patient remained stable throughout the procedure and was monitored in critical care unit with conservative management. Although there is low associated intraop mortality, prompt recognition is paramount with follow-up serial imaging.

  18. A roadmap to investigate the genetic basis of bicuspid aortic valve and its complications: insights from the International BAVCon (Bicuspid Aortic Valve Consortium).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Siddharth K; Bossé, Yohan; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D; Michelena, Hector I; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Evangelista, Artur; Benson, D Woodrow; Body, Simon C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-08-26

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common adult congenital heart defect and is found in 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. The term "BAV" refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by diverse aortic valve malformations with associated aortopathy, congenital heart defects, and genetic syndromes. Even after decades of investigation, the genetic determinants of BAV and its complications remain largely undefined. Just as BAV phenotypes are highly variable, the genetic etiologies of BAV are equally diverse and vary from complex inheritance in families to sporadic cases without any evidence of inheritance. In this paper, the authors discuss current concepts in BAV genetics and propose a roadmap for unraveling unanswered questions about BAV through the integrated analysis of genetic and clinical data.

  19. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis – 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Skillington, Peter D.; Mokhles, M. Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Methods: Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16–62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. Results: There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. Conclusions: In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results. PMID:24749112

  20. Optimization and Reproducibility of Aortic Valve 18F-Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, Timothy R.G.; Jenkins, William S.A.; Adamson, Philip D.; Robson, Phillip; Lucatelli, Christophe; Van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Prendergast, Bernard; Denison, Alan R.; Forsyth, Laura; Rudd, James H.F.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fletcher, Alison; Tuck, Sharon; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Background— 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) can measure disease activity and progression in aortic stenosis. Our objectives were to optimize the methodology, analysis, and scan–rescan reproducibility of aortic valve 18F-fluoride PET-CT imaging. Methods and Results— Fifteen patients with aortic stenosis underwent repeated 18F-fluoride PET-CT. We compared nongated PET and noncontrast CT, with a modified approach that incorporated contrast CT and ECG-gated PET. We explored a range of image analysis techniques, including estimation of blood-pool activity at differing vascular sites and a most diseased segment approach. Contrast-enhanced ECG-gated PET-CT permitted localization of 18F-fluoride uptake to individual valve leaflets. Uptake was most commonly observed at sites of maximal mechanical stress: the leaflet tips and the commissures. Scan–rescan reproducibility was markedly improved using enhanced analysis techniques leading to a reduction in percentage error from ±63% to ±10% (tissue to background ratio MDS mean of 1.55, bias −0.05, limits of agreement −0·20 to +0·11). Conclusions— Optimized 18F-fluoride PET-CT allows reproducible localization of calcification activity to different regions of the aortic valve leaflet and commonly to areas of increased mechanical stress. This technique holds major promise in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis and as a biomarker end point in clinical trials of novel therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02132026. PMID:27733431

  1. Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Valvuloplasty and Intracardiac Adrenaline in Electromechanical Dissociation as Bridge to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Chaara, Jawad; Meier, Pascal; Ellenberger, Christophe; Gasche, Yvan; Bendjelid, Karim; Noble, Stephane; Roffi, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an emergent balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedure performed under cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a 79-year-old man with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (mean gradient 78 mm Hg, valve area 0.71 cm, and left ventricular ejection fraction 40%) awaiting surgery and who was admitted for heart failure rapidly evolving to cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Decision was made to perform emergent BAV. After crossing the valve with a 6 French catheter, the patient developed an electromechanical dissociation confirmed at transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac arrest. Manual chest compressions were initiated along with the application of high doses of intravenous adrenaline, and BAV was performed under ongoing resuscitation. Despite BAV, transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no cardiac activity. At this point, it was decided to advance a pigtail catheter over the wire already in place in the left ventricle and to inject intracardiac adrenaline (1 mg, followed by 5 mg). Left ventricular contraction progressively resumed and, in the absence of aortic regurgitation, an intraaortic balloon pump was inserted. The patient could be weaned from intraaortic balloon pump and vasopressors on day 1, extubated on day 6, and recovered from multiorgan failure. In the absence of neurologic deficits, he underwent uneventful transcatheter aortic valve implantation on day 12 and was discharged to a cardiac rehabilitation program on day 30. At 3-month follow-up, he reported dyspnea NYHA class II as the only symptom.This case shows that severe aortic stenosis leading to electromechanical dissociation may be treated by emergent BAV and intracardiac administration of high-dose adrenaline. Intracardiac adrenaline may be considered in case of refractory electromechanical dissociation occurring in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  2. Aortic valve dynamics using a fluid structure interaction model--The physiology of opening and closing.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Govinda Balan; Balakrishnan, Komarakshi R; Kumar, Ramarathnam Krishna

    2015-07-16

    Comparative study among aortic valves requires the use of an unbiased and relevant boundary condition. Pressure and flow boundary conditions used in literature are not sufficient for an unbiased analysis. We need a different boundary condition to analyze the valves in an unbiased, relevant environment. The proposed boundary condition is a combination of the pressure and flow boundary condition methods, which is chosen considering the demerits of the pressure and flow boundary conditions. In order to study the valve in its natural environment and to give a comparative analysis between different boundary conditions, a fluid-structure interaction analysis is made using the pressure and the proposed boundary conditions for a normal aortic valve. Commercial software LS-DYNA is used in all our analysis. The proposed boundary condition ensures a full opening of the valve with reduced valve regurgitation. It is found that for a very marginal raise in the ventricular pressure caused by pumping a fixed stroke volume, the cardiac output is considerably raised. The mechanics of the valve is similar between these two boundary conditions, however we observe that the importance of the root to raise the cardiac output may be overstated, considering the importance of the fully open nodule of arantius. Our proposed boundary condition delivers all the insights offered by the pressure and flow boundary conditions, along with providing an unbiased framework for the analysis of different valves and hence, more suitable for comparative analysis.

  3. Endovascular balloon versus transthoracic aortic clamping for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: impact on cerebral microemboli.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Daniele; Pizio, Raffaella; Borelli, Gabriele; Musumeci, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate micro embolic events occurrence during minimally invasive mitral valve procedures, comparing balloon endovascular aortic occlusion (Group I) and transthoracic aortic clamping technique (Group II), 36 patients (20 in Group I and 16 in Group II) undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve surgery were selected by CT scan and Doppler studies for absence of atherosclerotic disease at aortic, coronary or peripheral level. Assignment to one of the two groups was made on the basis of surgeon's preference. Continuous automated intra-operative transcranial Doppler was used to monitor micro embolic events during five operative steps: cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) setup, time interval from CPB start until aortic clamp positioning, first minute after clamp-on, first minute after clamp-off, first ten minutes after CPB weaning start. More embolic events were observed in Group II than in Group I (total 143.4+/-30.6 per patient vs. 78.9+/-28.6 per patient). A large amount of embolic events occurring mainly when the aortic clamp was positioned and released accounted for the observed differences. In a low risk population for embolic events occurrence, endovascular balloon aortic clamping determined less embolic signals than transthoracic aortic clamping.

  4. CT predictors of post-procedural aortic regurgitation in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: an analysis of 105 patients.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Ensminger, Stefan M; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Ludwig, Josef; Weyand, Michael; Daniel, Werner G; Arnold, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) allows accurate and detailed analysis of the anatomy of the aortic root and valve, including quantification of calcium. We evaluated the correlation between different CT parameters and the degree of post-procedural aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien prosthesis. Pre-intervention contrast-enhanced dual source CT data sets of 105 consecutive patients (48 males, mean age 81 ± 6 years, mean logEuroSCORE 34 ± 13%) with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis referred for TAVI using the Edwards Sapien prosthesis (Edwards lifesciences, Inc., CA, USA) were analysed. The degrees of aortic valve commissural calcification and annular calcification were visually assessed on a scale from 0 to 3. Furthermore, the degree of aortic valve calcification as quantified by the Agatston score, aortic annulus eccentricity, aortic diameter at the level of the sinus of valsalva and at the sinotubular junction were assessed. Early post-procedural AR was assessed using aortography. Significant AR was defined as angiographic AR of at least moderate degree (AR ≥ 2). Visual assessment of the degree of aortic annular calcification as well as the Agatston score of aortic valve calcium correlated weakly, yet significantly with the degree of post-procedural AR (r = 0.31 and 0.24, p = 0.001 and 0.013, respectively). Compared to patients with AR < 2, patients with AR ≥ 2 showed more severe calcification of the aortic annulus (mean visual scores 1.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.003) as well as higher aortic valve Agatston scores (1,517 ± 861 vs. 1,062 ± 688, p = 0.005). Visual score for commissural calcification did not differ significantly between both groups (mean scores 2.4 ± 0.5 vs. 2.5 ± 0.5, respectively, p = 0.117). No significant correlation was observed between the degree of AR and commissural calcification, aortic annulus eccentricity index or aortic diameters

  5. Hydrodynamic Assessment of Aortic Valves Prepared from Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Lordeus, Makensley; Mankame, Omkar V; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam; Bibevski, Steven; Bell, Sarah M; Baez, Ivan; Scholl, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Infants and children born with severe cardiac valve lesions have no effective long term treatment options since currently available tissue or mechanical prosthetic valves have sizing limitations and no avenue to accommodate the growth of the pediatric patient. Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) which could provide for growth, self-repair, infection resistance, and long-term replacement could be an ideal solution. Porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) has recently emerged as a potentially attractive bioscaffold for TEHVs. PSIS may possess the ability to recruit endogenous cardiovascular cells, leading to phenotypically-matched replacement tissue when the scaffold has completely degraded. Our group has successfully implanted custom-made PSIS valves in 4 infants with critical valve defects in whom standard bioprosthetic or mechanical valves were not an option. Short term clinical follow-up has been promising. However, no hydrodynamic data has been reported to date on these valves. The purpose of this study was to assess the functional effectiveness of tri-leaflet PSIS bioscaffolds in the aortic position compared to standard tri-leaflet porcine bioprosthetic valves. Hydrodynamic evaluation of acute PSIS function was conducted using a left heart simulator in our laboratory. Our results demonstrated similar flow and pressure profiles (p > 0.05) between the PSIS valves and the control valves. However, forward flow energy losses were found to be significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the PSIS valves compared to the controls possibly as a result of stiffer material properties of PSIS relative to glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine valve tissue. Our findings suggest that optimization of valve dimensions and shape may be important in accelerating de novo valve tissue growth and avoidance of long-term complications associated with higher energy losses (e.g. left ventricular hypertrophy). Furthermore, long term animal and clinical studies will be needed in order to

  6. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  7. Influence of St. Jude medical valve in patients with aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus on cardiac function and late survival result.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Masafumi; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Yukio; Takarabe, Kyoumi; Furukawa, Koujirou; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Ohtubo, Satoshi

    2002-10-01

    This clinical study analyzes our experience of postoperative cardiac function and long-term survival rate in patients with aortic stenosis and small-size St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve. Sixty-eight patients who underwent aortic valve replacement by SJM valve were divided into two groups by preoperative aortic annulus diameter. Group 1 consisted of 44 patients with small aortic annulus and small-size SJM valve (19 mm or 21 mm). In Group 1, small SJM standard valves were implanted in 16 patients, and small SJM Hemodynamic Plus (HP) valves were implanted in 28 patients. Group 2 consisted of 24 patients with large-size SJM standard valve (23 mm or larger). Preoperative left ventricular mass index, left ventricular dimension, the dimension of ascending aorta, and body surface area were significantly smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Average age at surgery was older in Group 1 than in Group 2. Effective orifice area index of the SJM valve measured by the manufacturer's data was smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Postoperative left ventricular mass indexes of Group 1 (standard valve or HP valve) and Group 2 significantly decreased in comparison with the preoperative mass indexes. Postoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and the peak ejection rate of Group 1 were not different from those of Group 2. The 10 year survival rate of Group 1 was 79%, and the rate of Group 2 was 77%. At 10 years after surgery, freedom from valve-related complication of Group 1 was 80%, and freedom from complication of Group 2 was 81%. Our results demonstrated that small-size SJM valve afforded satisfactory long-term survival rate and valve-related event-free rate for elderly patients with small body surface area and small aortic annulus.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation for severe bioprosthetic stenosis after Bentall operation using a homograft in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2015-03-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with severe aortic stenosis. Eight years previously, he had undergone primary surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic regurgitation, but one year later developed cardiac arrest and complete atrioventricular block as a result of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis with severe valvular dehiscence. Following the diagnosis of prosthetic valve failure caused by Behçet's disease, the patient underwent a Bentall operation using 23 mm aortic homograft with permanent pacemaker implantation and coronary artery bypass grafting. Subsequently, he was stable with steroid administration and azathioprine for seven years after the second operation, but recently suffered from severe dyspnea and chest pain. Echocardiography revealed the development of severe aortic stenosis. A preprocedural evaluation demonstrated a porcelain aorta with severe calcification in the previous homograft valve on computed tomography, and critical stenosis at the ostium of the left circumflex artery on coronary angiography. After percutaneous coronary intervention for the ostium of the left circumflex artery, a transcatheter AVR was successfully performed using a 26 mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. The patient recovered without any complications after the procedure. This is the first report of a successful transcatheter aortic valve-in valve implantation for severe homograft aortic stenosis after a Bentall operation, using a homograft, in a patient with Behçet's disease.

  9. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with dysfunctional versus normally functioning congenitally bicuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Perl, Leor; Leshem-Lev, Dorit; Dadush, Oshrat; Bental, Tamir; Shapira, Yaron; Yedidya, Idit; Greenberg, Gabi; Kornowski, Ran; Sagie, Alexander; Battler, Alexander; Lev, Eli I

    2011-07-15

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) may gradually develop significant valve dysfunction, whereas others remain free of dysfunction. Factors that determine the prognosis of BAV remain unclear. Because endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have a role in the repair of endothelial surfaces after injury, we hypothesized that EPCs may also be involved in preventing BAV degeneration. Accordingly, we compared EPC level and function in patients with BAV with versus without valve dysfunction. The study group included 22 patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction (at least moderate aortic regurgitation and/or at least moderate aortic stenosis). The control group included 28 patients with BAV without valve dysfunction. All patients had 1 blood sample taken. Proportion of peripheral mononuclear cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133 and CD34 was evaluated by flow cytometry. EPC colony-forming units (CFUs) were grown from peripheral mononuclear cells, characterized, and counted after 7 days of culture. The 2 groups had similar clinical characteristics except for higher prevalence of hypertension in the dysfunctional valve group. Number of EPC CFUs was smaller in the dysfunctional valve group (32 CFUs/plate, 15 to 42.5, vs 48 CFUs/plate, 30 to 62.5, respectively, p = 0.01), and the migratory capacity of the cells in this group was decreased. In addition, the proportion of cells coexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD133, and CD34 tended to be smaller in the dysfunctional valve group. In conclusion, patients with BAV and significant valve dysfunction appear to have circulating EPCs with impaired functional properties. These findings require validation by further studies.

  10. Mast Cells Might Have a Protective Role against the Development of Calcification and Hyalinisation in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, A; Petrovič, D; Zorc, M; Vraspir Porenta, O; Arko, M; Pleskovič, A; Alibegovic, A; Zorc-Pleskovic, R

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is characterized by inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of mast cells on the occurrence of histopathological changes of aortic valves in patients with severe grade, non-rheumatic degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Valve specimens were obtained from 38 patients undergoing valve replacement. The role of mast cells was analysed by dividing the specimens into two groups, characterized by the presence (group A, N = 13) or absence of mast cells (group B, N = 25). There were no significant differences in clinical data between the two groups. In group A, T cells and macrophages were present in all aortic valves, as compared to a significantly lower proportion of valves with T cells and macrophages in group B. Valves in group A were less often calcified and hyaline-degenerated than valves in group B. There were no changes in fibrosis between the two groups. We found a positive correlation between the presence of mast cells and macrophages/T cells, a negative correlation between the presence of mast cells and calcification/ hyaline degeneration, and no correlation between the presence of mast cells and fibrosis. There was also a negative correlation between the presence of macrophages/T cells and calcification. The linear regression model identified only the presence of mast cells as an independent negative prediction value for calcification. In conclusion, mast cells might have a protective role against the development of calcification and hyaline degeneration in severe grade, non-rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

  11. Long-term results after aortic root replacement using self-assembled valve composite grafts in patients with small aortic annulus

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, Paul P.; Dinstak, Witold; Rents, Wilko; Heinz, Nicolas; Diegeler, Anno

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The study was aimed to evaluate operative and long-term results after complete root replacement using self-assembled valve composite grafts in patients with a small aortic annulus. METHODS Among 547 consecutive patients who received the Bentall procedure between 2000 and 2012, a total of 29 patients (61 ± 10; range 42–79 years) had an annulus of ≤20 mm (mean 19.0 ± 0.9). Patients with a native aortic valve (22) suffered from stenosis, insufficiency or mixed defect in 10, 10 and 2 cases, respectively. Among the remaining 7 patients with an artificial aortic valve, there were 3 symptomatic prosthesis–patient mismatches, 3 valve prosthesis deteriorations (1 structural and 2 none-structural) and 1 paravalvular leak. Indication for aortic root replacement was true or false aneurysm, porcelain aorta and intraoperative aortic wall injury in 17, 6 and 6 patients, respectively. RESULTS The composite graft for complete aortic root replacement was assembled using a mechanical (26) or biological (3) valve prosthesis placed inside a vascular graft with a median size of 24 (range 22–26) mm. The margin of the tube beneath the valve was anastomosed to the aortic annulus, and coronary ostia were implanted in the usual manner. The mean transvalvular gradient at discharge was 10.8 ± 3.9 mmHg and remained virtually unchanged at the follow-up completed for all patients. Early mortality was 0. During the mean follow-up of 95.8 ± 43.7 months, 2 patients died (54 and 146 months after surgery) due to pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction, respectively. CONCLUSIONS In patients with a small aortic annulus who need complete aortic root replacement, an oversizing of the valve can be easily achieved using modified, self-assembled composite grafts. Offering excellent haemodynamic characteristics, these grafts lead to prevention of prosthesis–patient mismatch and result in very good and durable functional and clinical results. PMID:24179177

  12. Finite element investigation of stentless pericardial aortic valves: relevance of leaflet geometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fang Li; Goetz, Wolfgang A; Chong, Chuh Khiun; Chua, Yeow Leng; Pfeifer, Stefan; Wintermantel, Erich; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-05-01

    Recent developments in aortic valve replacement include the truly stentless pericardial bioprostheses with single point attached commissures (SPAC) implantation technique. The leaflet geometry available for the SPAC valves can either be a simple tubular or a complex three-dimensional structure molded using specially designed molds. Our main objective was to compare these two leaflet designs, the tubular vs. the molded, by dynamic finite element simulation. Time-varying physiological pressure loadings over a full cardiac cycle were simulated using ABAQUS. Dynamic leaflet behavior, leaflet coaptation parameters, and stress distribution were compared. The maximum effective valve orifice area during systole is 633.5 mm(2) in the molded valve vs. 400.6 mm(2) in the tubular valve, and the leaflet coaptation height during diastole is 4.5 mm in the former, in contrast to 1.6 mm in the latter. Computed compressive stress indicates high magnitudes at the commissures and inter-leaflet margins of the tubular valve, the highest being 3.83 MPa, more than twice greater than 1.80 MPa in the molded valve. The molded leaflet design which resembles the native valve exerts a positive influence on the mechanical performance of the SPAC pericardial valves compared with the simple tubular design. This may suggest enhanced valve efficacy and durability.

  13. An unusual case of multiple aortic abnormalities: total occlusion of aortic arch, left external iliac artery, and bicuspid aortic valve in a 21-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Tanindi, Asli; Tavil, Yusuf; Mutluay, Ruya; Taktak, Hacer; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-03-01

    An unusual case of total occlusion of aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and occluded left external iliac artery in a 21-year-old man who was admitted with headache and severe hypertension is presented. We wish to report this case because so far there have been none reported with such multiple aortic abnormalities, although several documented cases of isolated total occlusion of aorta exist. Our patient underwent a successful surgical correction, i.e., patch plasty to the coarcted segment and end to side - end to side aortal-aortal bypass with Dacron graft.

  14. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p<0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. A Rare Case of Diffuse Hemangiomatosis of the Spleen with Splenic Rupture following Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Weinbeck, M.; Czerny, M.; Siepe, M.; Krauss, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a rare case of splenic rupture that occurred after an open aortic valve replacement in a male patient with hemangiomatosis of the spleen and the liver. The patient was treated with an emergency splenectomy. He showed no other sings of associated systemic disorder, such as Klippel-trénaunay syndrome or Proteus syndrome. PMID:28168078

  16. Total left main coronary artery occlusion after aortic aneurysm repair and valve replacement.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Lemole, G M; Wolf, N W; Dowinsky, S; Untereker, W; Spagna, P M

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with complete occlusion of the left main coronary artery secondary to cannulation during aortic valve replacement is presented. The clinical course was characterized by progressive left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. Recognition of this potential problem when it occurs is important as to institute therapeutic measures which may interrupt a patient's progressive clinical deterioration.

  17. The structure and material composition of ossified aortic valves identified using a set of scientific methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Antonín; Šmíd, Michal; Havelcová, Martina; Coufalová, Lucie; Kučková, Štěpánka; Velčovská, Martina; Hynek, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis has become a common and dangerous disease in recent decades. This disease leads to the mineralization of aortic valves, their gradual thickening and loss of functionality. We studied the detailed assessment of the proportion and composition of inorganic and organic components in the ossified aortic valve, using a set of analytical methods applied in science: polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample valves showed the occurrence of phosphorus and calcium in the form of phosphate and calcium carbonate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxy-fluorapatite, with varying content of inorganic components from 65 to 90 wt%, and with phased development of degenerative disability. The outer layers of the plaque contained an organic component with peptide bonds, fatty acids, proteins and cholesterol. The results show a correlation between the formation of fluorapatite in aortic valves and in other parts of the human bodies, associated with the formation of bones.

  18. Early stabilization of traumatic aortic transection and mitral valve regurgitation with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, David L; Wellens, Francis; Vercoutere, Rik A; De Geest, Raf

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening aortic transection with concomitant mitral papillary muscle rupture and severe lung contusion caused by a failed parachute jump. This blunt thoracic injury was treated by early stabilization with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by successful delayed graft repair of the descending aorta and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

  19. Septicemia and Aortic Valve Endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a Homeless Man

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bacterial endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a homeless man with no animal exposure. His course was complicated by an allergic reaction to ampicillin, urinary bladder infection, respiratory failure, and acute kidney injury. He recovered completely after aortic valve replacement and a 6-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone. PMID:23662222

  20. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Heather N.; Marohl, Taylor; Anderson, Matthew; Eliceiri, Kevin; Campagnola, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM) is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy) and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased). Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:27685946

  1. [Giant pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta following the aortic valve replacement;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yu; Inage, Yuichi; Masaki, Naoki; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2013-08-01

    56-year-old male, who had undergone re-aortic valve replacement (AVR) 33 years ago, received preoperative study for pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a giant pseudoaneurysm (7 cm diameter) of the ascending aorta. The ascending aorta was not dilated. A midline skin incision was performed, followed by full sternotomy. A tight pericardial adhesion was carefully dissected. Cardiopulmonary bypass was established by femoral arterial and bicaval venous cannulation. The pseudoaneurysm was incised under the retrograde cardioplegic protection. A communication between ascending aorta and aneurysm was found 1 cm distal to the previous aortic suture line. This communication coincided with the cardioplegic root cannulation site. The aortic prosthetic valve was intact. The ascending aorta was replaced with 26 mm prosthetic graft. Postoperative course was uneventful. In this case, CT was useful to select the approach to the complicated postoperative surgical site.

  2. Combined aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting for a calcified ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hironori; Umesue, Masayoshi; Matsui, Kanzi

    2012-04-01

    Although a severely calcified ascending aorta is encountered infrequently, it presents formidable problems during cardiac surgery. We describe a case of severe aortic valve stenosis and coronary artery disease combined with a severely calcified ascending aorta. The patient was an 80-year-old man with a calcified ascending aorta. He successfully underwent an aortic valve replacement and a single coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) using a saphenous vein graft with the proximal end connected on a Dacron patch, which was used for aortoplasty of the calcified plate along the aortotomy. These procedures were performed under moderate hypothermia with aortic clamping. This patch aortoplasty can be a useful alternative in cases that require aortotomy and proximal anastomoses of a CABG on a calcified ascending aorta.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular events: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Brian G; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2012-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has revolutionized the care of high-risk patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. Those considered at high or prohibitive risk of major adverse outcomes with open surgical aortic valve replacement may now be offered an alternative less-invasive therapy. Despite the rapid evolution and clinical application of this new technology, recent studies have raised concerns about adverse cerebrovascular event rates in patients undergoing TAVI. In this review, we explore the current data both in relation to procedure-related silent cerebrovascular ischemic events, as well as clinically apparent stroke. The timing of neurological events and their prognostic implications are also examined. Finally, potential mechanisms of TAVI-related cerebrovascular injury are described, in addition to efforts to minimize their occurrence.

  4. Patient evaluation and selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the heart team approach.

    PubMed

    Sintek, Marc; Zajarias, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been shown to significantly impact mortality and quality of life in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are deemed high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Essential to these outcomes is proper patient selection. The multidisciplinary TAVR heart team was created to provide comprehensive patient evaluation and aid in proper selection. This review with outline the history and components of the heart team, and delineate the team's role in risk and frailty assessment, evaluation of common co-morbidities that impact outcomes, and the complex multi-modality imaging necessary for procedural planning and patient selection. The heart team is critical in determining patient eligibility and benefit and the optimal operative approach for TAVR. The future of structural heart disease will certainly require a team approach, and the TAVR heart team will serve as the successful model.

  5. Comparison of tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics under steady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Clara; Ward, James; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), a congenital valvular defect consisting of two leaflets instead of three, is associated with a high prevalence of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). CAVD also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) but its progression in the BAV is more severe and rapid. Although hemodynamic abnormalities are increasingly considered potential pathogenic contributor, the native BAV hemodynamics remain largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims at comparing experimentally the hemodynamic environments in TAV and BAV anatomies. Particle-image velocimetry was used to characterize the flow downstream of a native TAV and a model BAV mounted in a left-heart simulator and subjected to three steady flow rates characterizing different phases of the cardiac cycle. While the TAV developed a jet aligned along the valve axis, the BAV was shown to develop a skewed systolic jet with skewness decreasing with increasing flow rate. Measurement of the transvalvular pressure revealed a valvular resistance up to 50% larger in the BAV than in the TAV. The increase in velocity between the TAV and BAV leads to an increase in shear stress downstream of the valve. This study reveals strong hemodynamic abnormalities in the BAV, which may contribute to CAVD pathogenesis.

  6. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  7. St. Jude Medical Trifecta™ aortic valve perioperative performance in 200 patients

    PubMed Central

    Permanyer, Eduard; Estigarribia, Arnaldo-Javier; Ysasi, Alejandro; Herrero, Enrique; Semper, Omar; Llorens, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The St. Jude Medical Trifecta aortic bioprosthesis (St. Jude Medical, Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) is a new stented pericardial tissue heart valve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and haemodynamic performance of the Trifecta bioprosthesis in the early postoperative period. METHODS From July 2010 to September 2012, a total of 200 consecutive patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta valve in our institution. All intraoperative and postoperative data were prospectively collected. Mean EuroSCORE II was 3.98%. Echocardiography was performed at discharge in all patients. RESULTS The mean age was 71.2 ± 7.7 (range 39–89 years). Extubation in the operating theatre was successfully performed in 96% of patients. Mean hospital stay was 8.5 days. The prosthesis sizes were 19 mm (n = 33), 21 mm (n = 81), 23 mm (n = 59), 25 mm (n = 23) and 27 mm (n = 4). Mean systolic pressure gradients ranged from 9.4 mmHg (size 19 valve) to 4.8 mmHg (size 27 valve). Mean effective orifice area (EOA) ranged from 1.61 cm2 (size 19 valve) to 2.5 cm2 (size 27 valve). Severe mismatch (<0.65 cm2/m2) did not occur in any patient. Of note, 99.5% of patients had mild or no aortic insufficiency at discharge. The early (30-day) mortality was 2.5% (n = 5). CONCLUSIONS The Trifecta valve offers good clinical results and excellent haemodynamic performance. Special care must be taken to avoid oversizing, which can lead to difficulty in implantation and can produce gradient increases due to an excess of prosthetic leaflet tissue. PMID:23825161

  8. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  9. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  10. Novel Use of an Apical-Femoral Wire Rail to Assist With Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Don, Creighton W.; Kim, Michael S.; Verrier, Edward D.; Aldea, Gabriel S.; Dean, Larry S.; Reisman, Mark; Mokadam, Nahush A.

    2015-01-01

    The inability to reposition or retrieve balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valves once they have been deployed requires implantation of the valve in the descending aorta or open surgical procedures to extract the valve. We describe the challenging transfemoral delivery of an Edwards Lifesciences Sapien valve wherein we had difficulty crossing the aortic valve and the guidewire position was compromised. We performed a transapical puncture to snare the guidewire and create a left ventricular to femoral wire rail, allowing us to deliver the transfemoral transcatheter valve, salvaging a situation where we would have been required to implant the valve in the descending aorta. We believe this is the first time this technique has been reported and represents an important method to facilitate delivery of transcatheter valves where guidewire support is insufficient or lost. PMID:24907088

  11. Analysis of hydrodynamic losses for various types of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobin, I. M.; Lupachev, S. P.; Dolgopolov, R. V.; Zaiko, V. M.; Kas'yanov, V. A.; Mungalov, D. D.; Morov, G. V.

    1985-05-01

    The creation of an automated computer-controlled hydraulic stand made it possible to measure the main hydrodynamic parameters of the flow through the investigated HVP and to determine the coefficients of Eq. (2) of fluid flow in the test chamber of the stand. The coefficients found can serve as a criterion of a comparative assessment of the hydrodynamics of HVPs. An analysis of the coefficients showed that the main contribution to pressure losses across ball and disc valves is made by viscous and convective effects. An analysis of inertial losses confirmed the presence of oscillations of the ball closing elements of the AKCh-3-06 valve around the props of the stroke limiters and made it possible to assess them quantitatively. For leaflet valves the contribution of inertial losses to the total pressure losses is more considerable than in the case of disc and ball valves both in the regime of an increase of power of the output and in the regime of a constant power. The mechanical properties of the material of leaflet valves have an effect on the hydrodynamic characteristics. The advantage of the investigated leaflet valves consists not only in that they have smaller total hydraulic losses compared with the other valves, but also in that they provide a high amplitude of pulsations of the blood stream in the case of insufficient contractility of the heart.

  12. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M. Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180–240 days old) and 56 old (300–440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta. PMID:27711171

  13. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  14. Single-Stage Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm through a Median Sternotomy in a Patient with Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta and Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Hironobu; Mukai, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudocoarctation of the aorta is a rare anomaly and considered a benign condition. Pseudocoarctation of the aorta has been associated with aneurysm formation in the thoracic aorta, which may cause sudden rupture or dissection. Thus, the presence of an aneurysm in combination with pseudocoarctation of the aorta is thought to be an indication for surgery. We present a case of pseudocoarctation of the aorta associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and severe aortic valve stenosis with a bicuspid aortic valve. In our case, single-stage repair was performed through a median sternotomy using our "pleural-window approach."

  15. The relationships of phytosterols and oxyphytosterols in plasma and aortic valve cusps in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Schött, Hans-Frieder; Luister, Alexandra; Husche, Constanze; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Plat, Jogchum; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich; Weingärtner, Oliver

    2014-04-11

    Phytosterols such as campesterol and sitosterol are susceptible to oxidation by reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that the plant sterols (PS) campesterol and sitosterol and their 7-oxygenated metabolites (POPs) correlate within and between human plasma and aortic valve cusps tissues. Plasma and tissue concentrations of PS and POPs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring. Prior to analysis valve cusps tissue was mechanically separated from the calcified parts. PS and POP levels per dry cusps tissue weight were significantly higher compared with the concentrations in the calcified part. Against our hypothesis we found that despite the fact that there is a high correlation between plant sterols in and between plasma and valves cusps tissue, as well as a high correlation between plant sterols and oxyphytosterols and oxyphytosterols themselves within the valve cusps tissue, there was hardly any correlation in the amount of oxyphytosterols in plasma and between plasma and valves. Because plasma samples are easily accessible for large scale population based studies, we have to understand in more detail what the analysis of POPs implies in terms of CVD risk for the future.

  16. Use of Circular Foldable Nitinol Blades for Resecting Calcified Aortic Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Florian; Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Kawa, Emilia; Wendt, Hermann; Müller, Wiebke; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Vogel, Bernd; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    The use of percutaneous aortic valve implantation is limited, as the native calcified valve is left in situ. A new device has been developed for resecting calcified aortic valves, using collapsible nickel-titanium blades: laser-cut T-structures of Nitinol sheet-material (Ni51Ti49 at.%) have been grinded on a high-speed milling cutter to produce cutting edges which have been given the shape of half-circles afterwards. These have been connected to each other and to struts by using rivets which also serve as articulating axes for the cutting ring. The blades are folded around these axes and retreated into a tube to be inserted in the heart through the calcified valve leaflets. Once released, the cutting edges regain their ring-shape. By combining rotation of the ring with a translating movement against a second ring of slightly greater diameter on the instrument, a punching process is created which cuts the calcified valve leaflets and leaves a circular annulus, where a prosthesis can be fixed. In vitro cutting of artificially calcified valves ( n = 6) resulted in a resection time of t = 22 ± 6.29 s with a maximum turning moment of M = 2.4 ± 1.27 Nm, proving the function and the feasibility of the concept.

  17. Aortic valve replacement with the Cardioprotese Premium bovine pericardium bioprosthesis: four-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Fábio Rocha; da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Fornazari, Daniele de Fátima; Collatusso, Claudinei; Ferreira, Andreia Dumsch de Aragon; Lopes, Sergio Veiga; Fernandes, Tadeu Augusto

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study reports the initial clinical and echocardiographic results of the Premium bioprosthetic aortic valve up to 4 years of follow-up. METHODS Between October 2007 and July 2011, 121 consecutive patients were submitted for aortic valve replacement with the Premium bioprosthetic valve. The mean age was 68 ± 9 years and 64 patients were males. The patients were periodically evaluated by clinical and echocardiographic examinations. The mean follow-up was 21 months (min = 2, max = 48), yielding 217 patients/year for the analysis. RESULTS The hospital mortality was 8%. Late survival at 3 years was 89% (95% CI: 81.9–93.3%), and 80% of the patients were in NYHA functional class I/II. The rates of valve-related complications were low, with a linearized incidence of 0.9%/100 patients/year for thromboembolic complications, 0% for haemorrhagic events and 0.9%/100 patients/year of bacterial endocarditis. There was no case of primary structural valve dysfunction. The mean effective orifice area was 1.61 ± 0.45 cm2; mean gradient 13 ± 5 mmHg and peak gradient 22 ± 9 mmHg. Significant patient–prosthesis mismatch was found in only 11% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS The Premium bioprosthetic aortic valve demonstrated very satisfactory clinical and echocardiographic results up to 4 years, similar to other commercially available, third-generation bioprosthetic valves. PMID:22588029

  18. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  19. Flow dynamics of stenotic aortic valves assessed by signal processing of Doppler spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, J; Antoranz, J C; García-Fernández, M A; Moreno, M M; Delcán, J L

    2000-03-01

    Clinical assessment of aortic stenosis (AS) is sometimes challenging, because all hemodynamic indexes of severity are modified by flow rate. However, the mechanisms underlying flow dependence remain controversial. Analysis of instantaneous flow dynamics has provided crucial information in a number of cardiovascular disorders and may add new insight into this phenomenon. This study was designed to analyze in vivo the effects of flow interventions on instantaneous valvular dynamics of stenotic valves. For this purpose, a custom algorithm for signal processing of Doppler spectrograms was developed and validated against a control population. Digital Doppler recordings at the aortic valve and left ventricular outflow tract were obtained in 15 patients with AS, at baseline and during low-dose dobutamine infusion; 10 normal subjects were studied as controls. Spectrograms were processed by signal averaging, time alignment, modal-velocity enhancement, envelope tracing, and numerical interpolation. Instantaneous relative aortic valve area (rAVA) was obtained by the continuity equation and plotted against normalized ejection time. Curves were classified as either type A (rapid, early-systolic opening) or type B (slow, end-systolic opening). Curves from controls closely matched prior knowledge of normal valve dynamics, but curves from patients were clearly different: all controls except 2 (80%) had type A, whereas all patients except 3 (80%) had a type B pattern (p = 0.03). Dobutamine infusion in patients increased and slightly anticipated peak rAVA by accelerating valve opening. Despite similar values of area and pressure difference, type B dynamics were associated with lower blood pressure (p = 0.01) and worse long-term outcome (>3 years) than type A flow dynamics (p = 0.02). Signal processing of Doppler spectrograms allows a comprehensive assessment of aortic flow dynamics. Differences in timing of valve aperture and in maximal leaflet excursion account for flow

  20. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  1. Stress Echocardiography in Aortic Stenosis: Insights into Valve Mechanics and Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; García-Fernández, Miguel A.; Antoranz, J. Carlos; Moreno, M. Mar; Delcán, Juan Luis

    1999-10-01

    Stress interventions have been classically combined with cardiac catheterization recordings to understand the hemodynamic principles of valvular stenosis. Indices of aortic stenosis such as pressure gradient and valve area were based on simple hydraulic principles and have proved to be clinically useful for patient management during a number of decades. With the advent of Doppler echocardiography, these hemodynamic indices can be readily obtained noninvasively. Abundant evidence obtained using exercise and pharmacological stress echocardiography has demonstrated that the assumptions of classic hemodynamic models of aortic stenosis were wrong. Consequently, it is recognized that conventional indices may be misleading indicators of aortic stenosis significance in particular clinical situations. To improve diagnostic accuracy, several alternative hemodynamic models have been developed in the past few years, including valve resistance and left ventricular stroke work loss, among others. Nevertheless, these more-accurate indices should be obtainable noninvasively and need to demonstrate greater diagnostic and prognostic power than conventional indices; preliminary data suggest such superiority. Stress echocardiography is well established as the tool of choice for testing hypothesis and physical models of cardiac valve function. Although the final role of alternative indices is not yet well established, the new insights into valvular hemodynamics provided by this technique may change the clinical assessment of aortic stenosis.

  2. Exercise Hemodynamics and Quality of Life after Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis in the Elderly Using the Hancock II Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Theodore; Lopez, Becky M.; Berberian, Christopher; Cunningham, Mark J.; Starnes, Vaughn A.; Cohen, Robbin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. While aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis can be performed safely in elderly patients, there is a need for hemodynamic and quality of life evaluation to determine the value of aortic valve replacement in older patients who may have age-related activity limitation. Materials and Methods. We conducted a prospective evaluation of patients who underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with the Hancock II porcine bioprosthesis. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and completed the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) preoperatively and six months postoperatively. Results. From 2004 to 2007, 33 patients were enrolled with an average age of 75.3 ± 5.3 years (24 men and 9 women). Preoperatively, 27/33 (82%) were New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification 3, and postoperatively 27/33 (82%) were NYHA Functional Classification 1. Patients had a mean predicted maximum VO2 (mL/kg/min) of 19.5 ± 4.3 and an actual max VO2 of 15.5 ± 3.9, which was 80% of the predicted VO2. Patients were found to have significant improvements (P ≤ 0.01) in six of the nine SF-36 health parameters. Conclusions. In our sample of elderly patients with aortic stenosis, replacing the aortic valve with a Hancock II bioprosthesis resulted in improved hemodynamics and quality of life. PMID:25544931

  3. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  4. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification.

  5. A New Cone-Shaped Aortic Valve Prosthesis for Orthotopic Position: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan; Peregrin, Jan H.; Pulda, Zdenek; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Roesch, Josef

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate a newly designed cone-shaped aortic valve prosthesis (CAVP) for one-step transcatheter placement in an orthotopic position. The study was conducted in 15 swine using either the transcarotid (11 animals) or the transfemoral (4 animals) artery approach. A 12- or 13-Fr sheath was inserted via arterial cutdown. The CAVP was deployed under fluoroscopic control and its struts, by design, induced significant native valve insufficiency. CAVP function was evaluated by aortography and aortic pressure curve tracing. In 11 of 15 swine the CAVP was properly deployed and functioned well throughout the scheduled period of 2-3 h. In three swine the CAVPs were placed lower than intended, however, they were functional even in the left ventricular outflow tract position. One swine expired due to inadvertent low CAVP placement that caused both aortic regurgitation and immobilization of the anterior mitral valve leaflet by the valve struts. We conclude that this design of CAVP is relatively easy to deploy, works well throughout a short time period (2-3 h), and, moreover, seems to be reliable even in a lower-than-orthotopic position (e.g., infra-annulary space). Longer-term studies are needed for its further evaluation.

  6. A three-dimensional co-culture model of the aortic valve using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Balaoing, Liezl R; Grigoryan, Bagrat; Raphael, Robert M; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve consists of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and endothelial cells (VECs). While these cells are understood to work synergistically to maintain leaflet structure and valvular function, few co-culture models of these cell types exist. In this study, aortic valve co-cultures (AVCCs) were assembled using magnetic levitation and cultured for 3 days. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were used to assess the maintenance of cellular phenotype and function, and the formation of extracellular matrix. AVCCs stained positive for CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), demonstrating that the phenotype was maintained. Functional markers endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), von Willebrand factor (VWF) and prolyl-4-hydroxylase were present. Extracellular matrix components collagen type I, laminin and fibronectin also stained positive, with reduced gene expression of these proteins in three dimensions compared to two dimensions. Genes for collagen type I, lysyl oxidase and αSMA were expressed less in AVCCs than in 2-D cultures, indicating that VICs are quiescent. Co-localization of CD31 and αSMA in the AVCCs suggests that endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation might be occurring. Differences in VWF and eNOS in VECs cultured in two and three dimensions also suggests that the AVCCs possibly have anti-thrombotic potential. Overall, a co-culture model of the aortic valve was designed, and serves as a basis for future experiments to understand heart valve biology.

  7. Left ventricular function in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and aortic valve disease

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1983-02-01

    Forty patients having aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively for ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular ejection fraction. Arrhythmias were classified as complex or simple using the Lown criteria on the 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram; ejection fractions were determined by radionuclide gated blood pool analysis and contrast angiography. The ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography were 59.1 +/- 13.1% for 26 patients with simple or no ventricular arrhythmias, and 43.9 +/- 20.3% for 14 patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). Ejection fractions determined by angiography, available for 31 patients, were also lower in patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (61.1 +/- 16.3% versus 51.4 +/- 13.4%; p less than 0.05). Seven of 9 patients showing conduction abnormalities on the electrocardiogram had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Eight of 20 patients with aortic stenosis had complex ventricular arrhythmias, while 2 of 13 patients with aortic insufficiency had such arrhythmias. It is concluded that decreased left ventricular ejection fraction, intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and aortic stenosis are associated with an increased frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias in patients with aortic valve disease.

  8. Programmed Speed Reduction Enables Aortic Valve Opening and Increased Pulsatility in the LVAD-Assisted Heart.

    PubMed

    Tolpen, Sam; Janmaat, Jochem; Reider, Claudine; Kallel, Faouzi; Farrar, David; May-Newman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve opening (AVO) during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support aids in preventing valve fusion, incompetence, and thrombosis. The programmed low speed algorithm (PLSA) allows AVO intermittently by reducing continuous motor speed during a dwell time. AVO and hemodynamics in the LVAD-assisted heart were measured using a HeartMate II (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) LVAD with a PLSA controller in a mock circulatory loop. Left ventricle and aortic pressures, LVAD, and total aortic flow were measured during pre-LVAD, non-PLSA and PLSA combinations of cardiac function, and LVAD speed. The low cardiac setting corresponded to a pre-LVAD cardiac output of 2.8 L/min, stroke volume of 40 ml, and ejection fraction of 22%; the medium setting produced values of 3.5 L/min, 50 ml, and 28%, respectively. Results show that the PLSA controller set at 10 krpm, dropping to 7 krpm for dwell time of 6 s, adequately produced AVO for all tested cardiac functions with only minimal changes in cardiac output. However, AVO frequency was independent of opening area and systolic duration, which both decreased with increasing LVAD support. Furthermore, aortic pulsatility index quadrupled in the aortic root and doubled in the distal aorta during PLSA conditions, providing evidence that AVO and blood mixing are enabled by PLSA control at the appropriate speed.

  9. [Selection of the prosthesis for aortic valve replacement: mechanical or bio?].

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2007-03-01

    To clarify the effect of the valve selection on the patients' prognosis, long-term outcome of the patients undergone isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) with the mechanical or bioprosthetic valve in our institution were investigated. In protocol 1, patients of all ages with isolated AVR (n = 472, composed of 166 who received a bioprosthesic valve [group B] and 306 who received a mechanical valve [Group MI) between 1975 and 2004 were investigated. In protocol 2, primary AVR patients aged 50-65 years (n = 184, composed of 47 in group B and 137 in group M) were compared. There were no significant differences in freedom from cardiac death, freedom from bleeding, and freedom from endocarditis in Protocols 1 and 2. Significantly fewer redo AVRs were required in group M in both protocols 1 and 2. However, group M was significantly worse in terms of freedom from thromboembolism in protocol 2. As a result, group M was superior to group B in freedom from valve-related events when redo AVR included. When redo AVR was excluded, there was no difference between the two groups in freedom from valve-related events in both protocols 1 and 2. There may thus be an advantage in selecting bioprosthetic valves in young adult patients who required AVR if they accepts the possibility of redo AVR in future.

  10. Intra-operative 2-D ultrasound and dynamic 3-D aortic model registration for magnetic navigation of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhe; Cai, Junfeng; Peters, Terry M; Gu, Lixu

    2013-11-01

    We propose a navigation system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation that employs a magnetic tracking system (MTS) along with a dynamic aortic model and intra-operative ultrasound (US) images. This work is motivated by the desire of our cardiology and cardiac surgical colleagues to minimize or eliminate the use of radiation in the interventional suite or operating room. The dynamic 3-D aortic model is constructed from a preoperative 4-D computed tomography dataset that is animated in synchrony with the real time electrocardiograph input of patient, and then preoperative planning is performed to determine the target position of the aortic valve prosthesis. The contours of the aortic root are extracted automatically from short axis US images in real-time for registering the 2-D intra-operative US image to the preoperative dynamic aortic model. The augmented MTS guides the interventionist during positioning and deployment of the aortic valve prosthesis to the target. The results of the aortic root segmentation algorithm demonstrate an error of 0.92±0.85 mm with a computational time of 36.13±6.26 ms. The navigation approach was validated in porcine studies, yielding fiducial localization errors, target registration errors, deployment distance, and tilting errors of 3.02±0.39 mm, 3.31±1.55 mm, 3.23±0.94 mm, and 5.85±3.06(°) , respectively.

  11. Decreased aerobic capacity 4 years after aortic valve replacement in male patients operated upon for chronic aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Kristofer; Tamás, Éva; Nylander, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Exercise testing is underutilized in patients with valve disease. We have previously found a low physical work capacity in patients with aortic regurgitation 6 months after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate aerobic capacity in patients 4 years after AVR, to study how their peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) had changed postoperatively over a longer period of time. Twenty-one patients (all men, 52 ± 13 years) who had previously undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) pre- and 6 months postoperatively underwent maximal exercise testing 49 ± 15 months postoperatively using an electrically braked bicycle ergometer. Breathing gases were analysed and the patients' physical fitness levels categorized according to Åstrand's and Wasserman's classifications. Mean peakVO2 was 22·8 ± 5·1 ml × kg−1 × min−1 at the 49-month follow-up, which was lower than at the 6-month follow-up (25·6 ± 5·8 ml × kg−1 × min−1, P = 0·001). All but one patient presented with a physical fitness level below average using Åstrand's classification, while 13 patients had a low physical capacity according to Wasserman's classification. A significant decrease in peakVO2 was observed from six to 49 months postoperatively, and the decrease was larger than expected from the increased age of the patients. CPET could be helpful in timing aortic valve surgery and for the evaluation of need of physical activity as part of a rehabilitation programme. PMID:22487149

  12. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  13. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose.

  14. Patient selection for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: An interventional cardiology perspective.

    PubMed

    Mylotte, Darrren; Martucci, Giuseppe; Piazza, Nicolo

    2012-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a highly effective minimally invasive treatment symptomatic for severe calcific aortic stenosis in patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The success of TAVI has been determined by a number of factors, but in particular by appropriate patient selection. Appropriate patient selection involves identifying patients with the potential to benefit most from TAVI and individualizing the bioprosthesis type and size, and the vascular access site for each case. We present herein, our critical appraisal on patient selection for TAVI: an interventional cardiology perspective.

  15. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  16. Assessment of trans-aortic pressure gradient using a coronary pressure wire in patients with mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kherada, Nisharahmed; Brenes, Juan Carlos; Kini, Annapoorna S; Dangas, George D

    2017-03-15

    Accurate evaluation of trans-aortic valvular pressure gradients is challenging in cases where dual mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses are present. Non-invasive Doppler echocardiographic imaging has its limitations due to multiple geometric assumptions. Invasive measurement of trans-valvular gradients with cardiac catheterization can provide further information in patients with two mechanical valves, where simultaneous pressure measurements in the left ventricle and ascending aorta must be obtained. Obtaining access to the left ventricle via the mitral valve after a trans-septal puncture is not feasible in the case of a concomitant mechanical mitral valve, whereas left ventricular apical puncture technique is associated with high procedural risks. Retrograde crossing of a bileaflet mechanical aortic prosthesis with standard catheters is associated with the risk of catheter entrapment and acute valvular regurgitation. In these cases, the assessment of trans-valvular gradients using a 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure wire technique has been described in a few case reports. We present the case of a 76-year-old female with rheumatic valvular heart disease who underwent mechanical aortic and mitral valve replacement in the past. She presented with decompensated heart failure and echocardiographic findings suggestive of elevated pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. The use of a high-fidelity 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure guidewire resulted in the detection of a normal trans-valvular pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve. This avoided a high-risk third redo valve surgery in our patient. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Application of Regent mechanical valve in patients with small aortic annulus: 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) with a small aortic annulus is always challenging for the cardiac surgeon. In this study, we sought to evaluate the midterm performance of implantation with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve in retrospective consecutive cohort of patients with small aortic annulus (diameter ≤ 19 mm). Methods From January 2008 to April 2011, 40 patients (31 female, mean age = 47.2 ± 5.8 years) with small aortic annulus (≤19 mm in diameter) underwent aortic valve replacement with a 17-mm or 19-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJM Regent) mechanical valve. Preoperative mean body surface area, New York Heart Association class, and mean aortic annulus were 1.61 ± 0.26 m2, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 18 ± 1.4 mm respectively. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the implantation of 17 mm SJM Regent mechanical valve (group 1, n = 18) or 19 mm SJM Regent valve (group 2, n = 22). All patients underwent echocardiography examination preoperatively and at one year post-operation. Results There were no early deaths in either group. Follow-up time averaged 36 ± 17.6 months. The mean postoperative New York Heart Association class was 1.3 ± 0.6 (p < 0.001). By echocardiography, in group 1, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), and the indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) increased from 43.7% ± 11.6%, 27.3% ± 7.6%, and 0.70 ± 0.06 cm2/m2 to 69.8 ± 9.3%, 41.4 ± 8.3%, and 0.92 ± 0.10 cm2/m2 respectively (P < 0.05), while the left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and the aortic transvalvular pressure gradient decreased from 116.4 ± 25.4 g/m2, 46.1 ± 8.5 mmHg to 86.7 ± 18.2 g/m2 , 13.7 ± 5.2 mmHg respectively. In group 2, the LVEF, LVFS and EOAI increased from 45.9% ± 9.7%, 30.7% ± 8.0%, and 0.81 ± 0.09 cm2/m2 to 77.4%

  18. Successful application of a PressureWire retrogradely across an ATS prosthetic aortic valve to diagnose constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sonny; Mariani, Justin A; Newcomb, Andrew; Stokes, Michael B; Burns, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the left ventricular pressure measured across an aortic valve prosthesis is occasionally necessary when noninvasive imaging and Doppler echocardiographic data are inconclusive or differ from the clinical findings for specific scenarios, such as diagnosing constrictive or restrictive physiology. We present a case in which we safely and effectively replicate the previous successful application of a PressureWire in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis in a patient with a bileafltet mechanical aortic and mitral valves.

  19. Aortic valve replacement in the elderly. Risk factors and long-term results.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, E E; Lee, C A; Cameron, D E; Stuart, R S; Greene, P S; Sussman, M S; Watkins, L; Gardner, T J; Baumgartner, W A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study was undertaken to determine long-term results of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in the elderly, to ascertain predictors of poor outcome, and to assess quality of life. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Aortic valve replacement is the procedure of choice for elderly patients with aortic valve disease. The number of patients aged 70 and older requiring AVR continues to increase. However, controversy exists as to whether surgery devoted to this subset reflect a cost-effective approach to attaining a meaningful quality of life. METHODS: This study reviews data on 247 patients aged 70 to 89 years who underwent isolated AVR between 1980 and 1995; there were 126 men (51%) and 121 women (49%). Follow-up was 97% complete (239/247 patients) for a total of 974.9 patient-years. Mean age was 76.2 +/- 4.8 years. Operative mortality and actuarial survival were determined. Patient age, gender, symptoms, associated diseases, prior conditions, New York Health Association class congestive heart failure, native valve disease, prosthetic valve type, preoperative catheterization data, and early postoperative conditions were analyzed as possible predictors of outcome. Functional recovery was evaluated using the SF-36 quality assessment tool. RESULTS: Operative mortality was 6.1% (15/247). Multivariate logistic regression showed that poor left ventricular function and preoperative pacemaker insertion were independent predictors of early mortality. After surgery, infection was predictive of early mortality. Overall actuarial survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 89.5 +/- 2% (198 patients at risk), 69.3 +/- 3.4% (89 patients at risk), and 41.2 +/- 6% (13 patients at risk), respectively. Cox proportional hazards model showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and urgency of operation were independent predictors of poor long-term survival. Postoperative renal failure also was predictive of poor outcome. Using the SF-36 quality assessment tool, elderly patients who

  20. Increased systolic load causes adverse remodeling of fetal aortic and mitral valves

    PubMed Central

    Louey, Samantha; Espinoza, Herbert; Chattergoon, Natasha; You, Fanglei; Thornburg, Kent L.; Giraud, George

    2015-01-01

    While abnormal hemodynamic forces alter fetal myocardial growth, little is known about whether such insults affect fetal cardiac valve development. We hypothesized that chronically elevated systolic load would detrimentally alter fetal valve growth. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep received either a continuous infusion of adult sheep plasma to increase fetal blood pressure, or a lactated Ringer's infusion as a volume control beginning on day 126 ± 4 of gestation. After 8 days, mean arterial pressure was higher in the plasma infusion group (63.0 mmHg vs. 41.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mitral annular septal-lateral diameter (11.9 mm vs. 9.1 mm, P < 0.05), anterior leaflet length (7.7 mm vs. 6.4 mm, P < 0.05), and posterior leaflet length (P2; 4.0 mm vs. 3.0 mm, P < 0.05) were greater in the elevated load group. mRNA levels of Notch-1, TGF-β2, Wnt-2b, BMP-1, and versican were suppressed in aortic and mitral valve leaflets; elastin and α1 type I collagen mRNA levels were suppressed in the aortic valves only. We conclude that sustained elevated arterial pressure load on the fetal heart valve leads to anatomic remodeling and, surprisingly, suppression of signaling and extracellular matrix genes that are important to valve development. These novel findings have important implications on the developmental origins of valve disease and may have long-term consequences on valve function and durability. PMID:26354842

  1. Improving Hemostasis during Replacement of the Ascending Aorta and Aortic Valve with a Composite Graft

    PubMed Central

    Pratali, Stefano; Milano, Aldo; Codecasa, Riccardo; De Carlo, Marco; Borzoni, Giancarlo; Bortolotti, Uberto

    2000-01-01

    The use of a composite graft is an established treatment for patients with aortic valve disease and ascending aortic aneurysms. Since bleeding from suture lines is a potential complication of this procedure, we modified the technique and evaluated the effect on hemostasis. From January 1994 through December 1998, 35 patients underwent composite aortic graft replacement for chronic aortic disease. In the first 16 patients (Group 1), we used the standard open technique, with excision of the aortic aneurysm and anastomosis of aortic buttons containing the coronary ostia to the vascular graft. In the next 19 patients (Group 2), we modified the technique by placing an additional suture at the proximal graft anastomosis and harvesting large coronary buttons that were then attached to the graft by an “endo-button” buttress method. There were no operative deaths; the actuarial survival rate at 36 months was 92% ± 5%. Between groups 1 and 2, a significant difference was found in postoperative bleeding (1,052 ± 433 mL vs 806 ± 257 mL, respectively; p = 0.02) and in number of blood transfusions required (2.1 ± 2.0 units vs 0.4 ± 0.7 units, respectively; p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that the surgical technique used in Group 1 was the only independent risk factor for postoperative bleeding of 1,000 mL or more (p = 0.01) and for transfusion requirements of 3 or more units of blood (p = 0.004). Composite aortic valve and root replacement can be accomplished with excellent results. Technical modifications may reduce bleeding complications and related morbidity significantly. PMID:11093407

  2. Blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI compared to surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Löbe, Ulrike; Barker, Alex J; Gelsinger, Carmen; Butter, Christian; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Ascending aortic blood flow characteristics are altered after aortic valve surgery, but the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Abnormal flow may be associated with aortic and cardiac remodeling. We analyzed blood flow characteristics in the ascending aorta after TAVI in comparison to conventional stented aortic bioprostheses (AVR) and healthy subjects using time-resolved three-dimensional flow-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI). Seventeen patients with TAVI (Edwards Sapien XT), 12 with AVR and 9 healthy controls underwent 4D-flow MRI of the ascending aorta. Target parameters were: severity of vortical and helical flow pattern (semiquantitative grading from 0 = none to 3 = severe) and the local distribution of systolic wall shear stress (WSSsystole). AVR revealed significantly more extensive vortical and helical flow pattern than TAVI (p = 0.042 and p = 0.002) and controls (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001). TAVI showed significantly more extensive vortical flow than controls (p < 0.001). Both TAVI and AVR revealed marked blood flow eccentricity (64.7 and 66.7%, respectively), whereas controls showed central blood flow (88.9%). TAVI and AVR exhibited an asymmetric distribution of WSSsystole in the mid-ascending aorta with local maxima at the right anterior aortic wall and local minima at the left posterior wall. In contrast, controls showed a symmetric distribution of WSSsystole along the aortic circumference. Blood flow was significantly altered in the ascending aorta after TAVI and AVR. Changes were similar regarding WSSsystole distribution, while TAVI resulted in less helical and vortical blood flow.

  3. [Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis in a Patient with Aortic Regurgitation and Patent Foramen Ovale;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Doi, Toshio; Gyoten, Takayuki; Sakata, Kimimasa; Nagura, Saori; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is an extremely rare clinical condition. Here, we report a case of pulmonary valve endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An 84-year-old man with a history of aortic regurgitation and patent foramen ovale was admitted to our hospital due to fever of unknown origin for 4 weeks' duration. MRSA was detected in his blood cultures. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a mobile vegetation attached to the pulmonary valve, moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and patent foramen ovale with left-to-right shunt. After 30-days' treatment with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin, he defervesced and blood cultures became negative. At surgery, a large vegetation was still attached to the pulmonary valve, but the leaflets remained with minimum damage. Aortic valve replacement, direct closure of the patent foramen ovale, and simple resection of the vegetation were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  4. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve . Learn about the different types of stenosis: Aortic stenosis Tricuspid stenosis Pulmonary stenosis Mitral stenosis Outlook for ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  5. [Ball variance and fracture of a Smeloff-Cutter prosthesis 24 years after aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Hust, M H; Klinkmüller, A; Keim, M; Momper, R; Nothwang, G

    1997-07-01

    This report documents a case of ball variance in a Smeloff-Cutter aortic prosthesis occurring 24 years after implantation. After episodes of embolic complications the patient died in acute shock. The silicone rubber ball showed several alterations including discoloration, grooving, cracking, swelling and subtotal fracture of the poppet. Terminal valvular malfunction was caused by complete thrombosis of the prosthesis. In most patients ball variance occurred during the first years after valve replacement; thus, the observed case is a very rare late complication of a ball-valve prosthesis.

  6. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities.

  7. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities. PMID:27561388

  8. A Roadmap to Investigate the Genetic Basis of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and its Complications

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth K.; Bossé, Yohan; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Michelena, Hector I.; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Francesca R.; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Evangelista, Artur; Benson, D. Woodrow; Body, Simon C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common adult congenital heart defect and is found in 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. The term “BAV” refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by diverse aortic valve malformations with associated aortopathy, congenital heart defects, and genetic syndromes. Even after decades of investigation, the genetic determinants of BAV and its complications remain largely undefined. Just as BAV phenotypes are highly variable, the genetic etiologies of BAV are equally diverse and vary from complex inheritance in families to sporadic cases without any evidence of inheritance. In this paper, the authors discuss current concepts in BAV genetics and propose a roadmap for unraveling unanswered questions about BAV through the integrated analysis of genetic and clinical data. PMID:25145529

  9. Common and unusual dental development abnormalities in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Răducanu, Anca Maria; Feraru, Ion Victor; Suciu, Ioana; Teodorescu, Elina; Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Ionescu, Ileana; Ionescu, Ecaterina

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital abnormality of the heart. In this condition, instead of three cusps, the aortic valve has two cusps. Children with congenital heart diseases are at increased risk of developing oral diseases, such as: higher number of decayed teeth, developmental anomalies, periodontal disease, malocclusion, dental crowding, as well as susceptibility to develop infective endocarditis from bacteremia caused by chronic poor oral health. However, little information is available regarding oral manifestations and their management in patients with congenital heart defects, despite the importance of these diseases. This paper presents oral manifestations associated with BAV in a young patient, alongside the general features of the condition. The presented case with BAV brings together features of a complex pathology and multidisciplinary treatment, which was conducted over a long period of time and still continues nowadays.

  10. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  11. Total ellipse of the heart valve: the impact of eccentric stent distortion on the regional dynamic deformation of pericardial tissue leaflets of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Paul S.; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; McNamara, Laoise M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVRs) are a percutaneous alternative to surgical aortic valve replacements and are used to treat patients with aortic valve stenosis. This minimally invasive procedure relies on expansion of the TAVR stent to radially displace calcified aortic valve leaflets against the aortic root wall. However, these calcium deposits can impede the expansion of the device causing distortion of the valve stent and pericardial tissue leaflets. The objective of this study was to elucidate the impact of eccentric TAVR stent distortion on the dynamic deformation of the tissue leaflets of the prosthesis in vitro. Dual-camera stereophotogrammetry was used to measure the regional variation in strain in a leaflet of a TAVR deployed in nominal circular and eccentric (eccentricity index = 28%) orifices, representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. It was observed that (i) eccentric stent distortion caused incorrect coaptation of the leaflets at peak diastole resulting in a ‘peel-back’ leaflet geometry that was not present in the circular valve and (ii) adverse bending of the leaflet, arising in the eccentric valve at peak diastole, caused significantly higher commissure strains compared with the circular valve in both normotensive and hypertensive pressure conditions (normotension: eccentric = 13.76 ± 2.04% versus circular = 11.77 ± 1.61%, p = 0.0014, hypertension: eccentric = 15.07 ± 1.13% versus circular = 13.56 ± 0.87%, p = 0.0042). This study reveals that eccentric distortion of a TAVR stent can have a considerable impact on dynamic leaflet deformation, inducing deleterious bending of the leaflet and increasing commissures strains, which might expedite leaflet structural failure compared to leaflets in a circular deployed valve. PMID:26674192

  12. Deficiency in the anti-aging gene Klotho promotes aortic valve fibrosis through AMPKα-mediated activation of RUNX2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianglei; Lin, Yi; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-10-01

    Fibrotic aortic valve disease (FAVD) is an important cause of aortic stenosis, yet currently there is no effective treatment for FAVD due to its unknown etiology. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether deficiency in the anti-aging Klotho gene (KL) promotes high-fat-diet-induced FAVD and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. Heterozygous Klotho-deficient (KL(+/-) ) mice and WT littermates were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet for 13 weeks, followed by treatment with the AMPKα activator (AICAR) for an additional 2 weeks. A HFD caused a greater increase in collagen levels in the aortic valves of KL(+/-) mice than of WT mice, indicating that Klotho deficiency promotes HFD-induced aortic valve fibrosis (AVF). AMPKα activity (pAMPKα) was decreased, while protein expression of collagen I and RUNX2 was increased in the aortic valves of KL(+/-) mice fed with a HFD. Treatment with AICAR markedly attenuated HFD-induced AVF in KL(+/-) mice. AICAR not only abolished the downregulation of pAMPKα but also eliminated the upregulation of collagen I and RUNX2 in the aortic valves of KL(+/-) mice fed with HFD. In cultured porcine aortic valve interstitial cells, Klotho-deficient serum plus cholesterol increased RUNX2 and collagen I protein expression, which were attenuated by activation of AMPKα by AICAR. Interestingly, silencing of RUNX2 abolished the stimulatory effect of Klotho deficiency on cholesterol-induced upregulation of matrix proteins, including collagen I and osteocalcin. In conclusion, Klotho gene deficiency promotes HFD-induced fibrosis in aortic valves, likely through the AMPKα-RUNX2 pathway.

  13. Differential expression of cartilage and bone-related proteins in pediatric and adult diseased aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Elaine E; Hinton, Robert B; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 5 million people are affected with aortic valve disease (AoVD) in the United States. The most common treatment is aortic valve (AoV) replacement surgery, however, replacement valves are susceptible to failure, necessitating additional surgeries. The molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression and late AoV calcification are not well understood. Recent studies suggest that genes involved in bone and cartilage development play an active role in osteogenic-like calcification in human calcific AoVD (CAVD). In an effort to define the molecular pathways involved in AoVD progression and calcification, expression of markers of valve mesenchymal progenitors, chondrogenic precursors, and osteogenic differentiation was compared in pediatric non-calcified and adult calcified AoV specimens. Valvular interstitial cell (VIC) activation, extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, and markers of valve mesenchymal and skeletal chondrogenic progenitor cells were observed in both pediatric and adult AoVD. However, activated BMP signaling, increased expression of cartilage and bone-type collagens, and increased expression of the osteogenic marker Runx2 are observed in adult diseased AoVs. They are not observed in the majority of pediatric diseased valves, representing a marked distinction in the molecular profile between pediatric and adult diseased AoVs. The combined evidence suggests that an actively regulated osteochondrogenic disease process underlies the pathological changes affecting AoVD progression, ultimately resulting in stenotic AoVD. Both pediatric and adult diseased AoVs express protein markers of valve mesenchymal and chondrogenic progenitor cells while adult diseased AoVs also express proteins involved in osteogenic calcification. These findings provide specific molecular indicators of AoVD progression, which may lead to identification of early disease markers and the development of potential therapeutics.

  14. Mechanosensitive microRNA-181b Regulates Aortic Valve Endothelial Matrix Degradation by Targeting TIMP3.

    PubMed

    Heath, Jack M; Fernandez Esmerats, Joan; Khambouneheuang, Lucky; Kumar, Sandeep; Simmons, Rachel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2017-02-24

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major cause of morbidity in the aging population, but the underlying mechanisms of its progression remain poorly understood. Aortic valve calcification preferentially occurs on the fibrosa, which is subjected to disturbed flow. The side-specific progression of the disease is characterized by inflammation, calcific lesions, and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we explored the role of mechanosensitive microRNA-181b and its downstream targets in human aortic valve endothelial cells (HAVECs). Mechanistically, miR-181b is upregulated in OS and fibrosa, and it targets TIMP3, SIRT1, and GATA6, correlated with increased gelatinase/MMP activity. Overexpression of miR-181b led to decreased TIMP3 and exacerbated MMP activity as shown by gelatinase assay, and miR-181b inhibition decreased gelatinase activity through the repression of TIMP3 levels. Luciferase assay showed specific binding of miR-181b to the TIMP3 gene. Overexpression of miR-181b in HAVECs subjected to either LS or OS increased MMP activity, and miR-181b inhibition abrogated shear-sensitive MMP activity. These studies suggest that targeting this shear-dependent miRNA may provide a novel noninvasive treatment for CAVD.

  15. Long-term consequences of atrial fibrillation after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Hiroki; Ueda, Hideki; Matsuura, Kaoru; Tamura, Yusaku; Watanabe, Michiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2017-03-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a common complication after cardiac surgery, but the risk factors and long-term outcome after primary isolated aortic valve replacement remains to be clarified. Methods A single-center retrospective study was conducted on 157 patients who underwent first-time isolated aortic valve replacement between April 1999 and February 2015. Fifty-eight patients developed new-onset atrial fibrillation within 6 months postoperatively, and they were compared with patients who remained in sinus rhythm. Multivariate analyses, which incorporated the propensity score patient matching technique, were conducted to evaluate the long-term outcome of new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation and identify patients at risk of developing this arrhythmia. Results At a mean follow-up of 52.4 months (range 8.4-200.7 months), mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed atrial fibrillation compared to those who remained in sinus rhythm (2.8%/patient-year vs. 0.2%/patient-year, respectively; p < 0.05). Patients developing atrial fibrillation were also at an independently increased risk of stroke and readmission during follow-up. Risk analysis revealed that advanced age (>70 years) and absence of a postoperative β-blocker were predictors of atrial fibrillation. Conclusions New-onset atrial fibrillation after first-time isolated aortic valve replacement correlated significantly with late morbidity and mortality. Advanced age and absence of a postoperative β-blocker may increase the incidence of atrial fibrillation.

  16. Acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ibrahim; Delil, Kenan; Ileri, Cigdem; Samadov, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    ST elevation acute myocardial infarction in patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve is rare and usually due to inadequate anticoagulation. We present a case of acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio, which has not been reported previously. PMID:24799934

  17. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  18. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  19. Variations in structure of the outflow tract of the human embryonic heart: A new hypothesis for generating bicuspid aortic semilunar valves.

    PubMed

    Milos, Nadine C; Nordstrom, Derek B; Ongaro, Ivano; Chow, Ava K

    2017-02-04

    Outflow tract development of the heart is complex. The presence, differential growth and interactions of the various tissues through space and time contribute to the final development of the tract. This paper presents a novel interpretation of observations of outflow tract development, in particular of the aortic and pulmonary semilunar valves in embryos from the Shaner Collection at the University of Alberta. Three-dimensional reconstructions assist in the visualization of the spatial relationships of the developing valve tissues. In some embryos the aortic intercalated valve swelling is displaced proximally, giving rise to a bicuspid aortic semilunar valve more distally. In addition, the developing valve tissue first appears external to the myocardial cuff. The pulmonary semilunar valve regions appear to be more normal. This paper thus proposes a novel mechanism for generating a bicuspid aortic valve and also supports the idea that there is some independence of the aortic and pulmonary regions from each other during development.

  20. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kansara, Bhuvnesh; Singh, Ajmer; Karlekar, Anil; Mishra, Yugal K

    2013-01-01

    Valvular heart disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current therapy includes symptomatic measures and valve replacement. SLE can present major challenges because of accrued organ damage, coagulation defects and complex management regimes. The peri-operative goals are to maintain strict asepsis, avoid use of nephrotoxic drugs and thereby renal insult, and to promote early ambulation post-operatively. PMID:23878452

  1. Infective Endocarditis and Aortic Valve Abscess in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kristy A; Gmuca, Sabrina; Rosman, Eliyahu C; Thomas, Philomena

    2015-09-01

    Infective endocarditis is relatively uncommon in the pediatric population, but when it does occur, results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Children at risk for endocarditis are typically those with an underlying congenital heart condition. Furthermore, an endocardial abscess is a very rare yet serious complication of infective endocarditis. We describe a case of a 23-month-old previously healthy male infant with no known congenital heart disease who returned to the emergency department after a recent hospitalization for pneumococcal bacteremia, presenting acutely ill but without fever. He was found to be in congestive heart failure due to endocarditis and an aortic root abscess.

  2. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the right side of the aortic valve in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Durán, A C; Fernández-Gallego, T; Fernández, B; Fernández, M C; Arqué, J M; Sans-Coma, V

    2006-05-01

    This study describes the coronary artery distribution patterns associated with the anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the right side of the aortic valve in Syrian hamsters. The hearts of 15 affected animals were examined by means of a corrosion-cast technique, histology and scanning electron microscopy. The hamsters belonged to a laboratory inbred colony with a high incidence of coronary artery anomalies and bicuspid aortic valves. The aortic valve was tricuspid in eight hamsters and bicuspid in the other seven. In all cases, the right coronary artery was normal, whereas the left main coronary artery trunk arose from the right aortic sinus or from the right side of the ventral aortic sinus when the aortic valve was bicuspid. In 12 specimens, the left main trunk crossed the infundibular septum and then divided into the left circumflex branch and the obtuse marginal branch. In another specimen, the course of the left main trunk was ventral to the right ventricular outflow tract; in the remaining two, it surrounded the aorta dorsally. In man, some of these distribution patterns may cause myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. The present findings prove that the origin of the left coronary artery from the right aortic sinus occurs in primitive mammals such as the Syrian hamster, suggesting that the defect may occur in other mammalian species. Its possible occurrence should be borne in mind in domestic animals, especially in those with signs of myocardial ischaemia after strenuous activity.

  3. Single coronary artery with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ogura, Hiroki; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    A 73-year-old man with a severely stenosed bicuspid valve and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta underwent valve and aortic surgery. Preoperative imaging revealed a single coronary artery arising from the right side of the sinus of Valsalva and a branch that perfused into the left side of the heart to pass through the front of the pulmonary artery. We replaced the aortic valve and ascending aorta, painstakingly avoiding damage to the coronary artery and obstruction of the sole coronary ostium.

  4. Choice of Aortic Valve Prosthesis in a Rapidly Aging and Long-Living Society

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Michio; Matsumura, Yoko; Naruse, Hitomi; Bando, Ko; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical (M) and bioprosthetic (B) valves as recommended by the Japanese guidelines. Methods: From April 1995 to March 2014, 366 adult patients underwent AVR. Of these, 127 (35%) patients received M and 239 patients (65%) received B valves. A retrospective analysis of the entire and the selected 124 patients aged 60 to 70 years was carried out. Results: In patients aged 60 to 70 years, the 15-year survival and freedom from reoperation were 88% ± 7% and 100% for the M group and 34% ± 25% (p <0.001) and 73% ± 14% (p = 0.059) for the B group, respectively. Among propensity score matching of the subgroup, there was no significant difference in survival and freedom from reoperation. The rate of thromboembolism was higher in the M (M: 0.58% vs B: 0.35% patient per year, p <0.001) and the rate of hemorrhage was higher in the M group (M: 0.34% vs B: 0.12% patient per year, p <0.001). Conclusion: The current strategy of aortic valve choice based on the Japanese guidelines has provided excellent long-term results so far. PMID:27616041

  5. Segmentation of the Aortic Valve Apparatus in 3D Echocardiographic Images: Deformable Modeling of a Branching Medial Structure.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Tian, Sijie; Takabe, Manabu; Wang, Hongzhi; Yuan, Jiefu; Cheung, Albert T; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    3D echocardiographic (3DE) imaging is a useful tool for assessing the complex geometry of the aortic valve apparatus. Segmentation of this structure in 3DE images is a challenging task that benefits from shape-guided deformable modeling methods, which enable inter-subject statistical shape comparison. Prior work demonstrates the efficacy of using continuous medial representation (cm-rep) as a shape descriptor for valve leaflets. However, its application to the entire aortic valve apparatus is limited since the structure has a branching medial geometry that cannot be explicitly parameterized in the original cm-rep framework. In this work, we show that the aortic valve apparatus can be accurately segmented using a new branching medial modeling paradigm. The segmentation method achieves a mean boundary displacement of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm (approximately one voxel) relative to manual segmentation on 11 3DE images of normal open aortic valves. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology.

  6. Aortic valve prosthesis selection in dialysis patients based on the patient's condition.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinya; Yamamura, Mitsuhiro; Mitsuno, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroe; Ryomoto, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Yuji

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have examined outcomes in dialysis patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, only a few studies have solely focused on outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR). This study aimed to clarify independent predictors of the long-term survival of dialysis patients with AVR and to determine whether a mechanical valve or bioprosthesis is suitable based on the patient's condition. A total of 38 consecutive dialysis patients who underwent AVR at our institute were reviewed (mean age 69.1 ± 9.4 years). There were 23 bioprostheses and 15 mechanical valve replacements. The operative mortality and the long-term survival were not different between the bioprosthesis and the mechanical valve group (13.0 vs. 13.3%). The significant multivariate predictors for long-term survival were concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and prosthesis size. Valve types and age at operation did not affect long-term survival. Five-year survival of patients with small prosthetic valves and concomitant CABG was 0%. When the patient's quality of life is taken into account, it may be appropriate to use a bioprosthesis in a dialysis patient with a small annulus and concomitant CABG even if the patient is young.

  7. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:27092555

  8. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD.

  9. Posterior enlargement of the small annulus during aortic valve replacement versus implantation of a small prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, P; Bernabei, M; Santi, C; Pasqué, A; Eufrate, S

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-two patients with a small aortic annulus were identified among 196 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The 11 patients in Group 1 underwent posterior enlargement aortic annuloplasty, and the 11 in Group 2 received a small aortic prosthesis (less than or equal to 21 mm). The two groups were unselected. Core hypothermia, cardioplegia, and local cooling were employed for all operations. Isolated AVR was performed in 3 patients in each group. In Group 1, the mean increase in diameter of the annulus was 4.82 mm, which resulted in a mean area increase of 169.91 mm2 (51.7%). Mean aortic cross-clamp times were 140.4 minutes and 93.5 minutes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. There were 2 operative deaths in Group 1, and 1 operative and 1 late death in Group 2. Mean follow-up was 26.5 months for Group 1 and 43.4 months for Group 2. No thomboembolic or bleeding episodes have been recorded. Considerations and conclusions are offered from the study of this small series of patients.

  10. Diastolic Mitral Regurgitation in a Patient With Complex Native Mitral and Aortic Valve Endocarditis: A Rare Phenomenon With Potential Catastrophic Consequences.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Juan N; Lynch, James J; Mauermann, William J; Michelena, Hector I; Rehfeldt, Kent H

    2016-03-01

    Diastolic mitral valve regurgitation is a rare phenomenon described in patients with atrioventricular conduction abnormalities, severe left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction with regional wall motion dyssynchrony, or severe acute aortic valve regurgitation. The presence of diastolic mitral valve regurgitation in acute aortic regurgitation due to endocarditis suggests critical severity requiring urgent surgical valve replacement. We describe a case of diastolic mitral regurgitation in the setting of complex native mitral-aortic valve endocarditis in a patient in normal sinus rhythm and review the etiologic mechanisms of this phenomenon, echocardiographic assessment, and therapeutic implications for hemodynamic management.

  11. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral Valve Prolapse Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation - Problem: Aortic ...

  12. Relation of circulating C-reactive protein to progression of aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Santos, Jose L; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Cruz, Ignacio; Arribas, Antonio; Villacorta, Eduardo; Cascon, Manuel; Palacios, Igor F; Martin-Luengo, Candido

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation and predicts outcome in apparently healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease. Systemic inflammation is present in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether CRP levels predict the progression of AS severity. Blood samples for high-sensitivity CRP measurements and echocardiographic data were obtained in 43 patients (70% men; mean age 73 +/- 8 years) with asymptomatic degenerative AS at study entry. On the basis of repeat echocardiographic assessment at 6 months, patients were grouped as (1) slow progressors (a decrease in aortic valve area [AVA] <0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity <0.15 m/s) and (2) rapid progressors (a decrease in AVA > or =0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity > or =0.15 m/s). Plasma CRP levels were significantly higher in rapid progressors than slow progressors (median 5.1 [range 2.3 to 11.3] vs 2.1 [range 1.0 to 3.1] mg/L, p = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, CRP levels >3 mg/L were independently associated with rapid AS progression (odds ratio 9.1, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 37.3). In conclusion, CRP levels are higher in patients with degenerative AS who show rapid valve disease progression. These findings suggest that inflammation may have a pathogenic role in degenerative AS.

  13. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Verde, Pablo E; Veulemanns, Verena; Kahlstadt, Lisa; Wolff, Georg; Erkens, Ralf; Westenfeld, Ralf; Navarese, Eliano P; Merx, Marc W; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width (RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6% (n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure. CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia. PMID:26981217

  14. Effect of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Apurva O; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Patel, Samir V; Jhamnani, Sunny; Singh, Vikas; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Nish; Patel, Nilay; Arora, Shilpkumar; Thakkar, Badal; Manvar, Sohilkumar; Dhoble, Abhijeet; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Patel, Jay; Chothani, Ankit; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Grines, Cindy L; Curtis, Jeptha; Mangi, Abeel A; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K

    2015-08-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with a significant learning curve. There is paucity of data regarding the effect of hospital volume on outcomes after TAVI. This is a cross-sectional study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample database of 2012. Subjects were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes, 35.05 (Trans-femoral/Trans-aortic Replacement of Aortic Valve) and 35.06 (Trans-apical Replacement of Aortic Valve). Annual hospital TAVI volumes were calculated using unique identification numbers and then divided into quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression models were created. The primary outcome was inhospital mortality; secondary outcome was a composite of inhospital mortality and periprocedural complications. Length of stay (LOS) and cost of hospitalization were assessed. The study included 1,481 TAVIs (weighted n = 7,405). Overall inhospital mortality rate was 5.1%, postprocedural complication rate was 43.4%, median LOS was 6 days, and median cost of hospitalization was $51,975. Inhospital mortality rates decreased with increasing hospital TAVI volume with a rate of 6.4% for lowest volume hospitals (first quartile), 5.9% (second quartile), 5.2% (third quartile), and 2.8% for the highest volume TAVI hospitals (fourth quartile). Complication rates were significantly higher in hospitals with the lowest volume quartile (48.5%) compared to hospitals in the second (44.2%), third (39.7%), and fourth (41.5%) quartiles (p <0.001). Increasing hospital volume was independently predictive of shorter LOS and lower hospitalization costs. In conclusion, higher annual hospital volumes are significantly predictive of reduced postprocedural mortality, complications, shorter LOS, and lower hospitalization costs after TAVI.

  15. Long-term Mortality Predictors in Patients with Small Aortic Annulus Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement with a 19- or 21-mm Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Jenny Lourdes Rivas; Arnoni, Renato Tambellini; dos Santos, Magaly Arrais; Almeida, Antonio Flávio Sanchez; Issa, Mário; Arnoni, Antoninho Sanfins; Chaccur, Paulo; de Souza, Luiz Carlos Bento

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Replacement of the aortic valve in patients with a small aortic annulus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A prosthesis-patient mismatch is one of the main problems associated with failed valves in this patient population. Objective To evaluate the long-term mortality predictors in patients with a small aortic annulus undergoing aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Methods In this retrospective observational study, a total of 101 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement from January 2000 to December 2010 were studied. There were 81 (80.19%) women with a mean age of 52.81±18.4 years. Severe aortic stenosis was the main indication for surgery in 54 (53.4%) patients. Posterior annulus enlargement was performed in 16 (15.8%) patients. Overall, 54 (53.41%) patients underwent concomitant surgery: 28 (27.5%) underwent mitral valve replacement, and 13 (12.7%) underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Results Mean valve index was 0.82±0.08 cm2/m2. Overall, 17 (16.83%) patients had a valve index lower than 0.75 cm2/m2, without statistical significance for mortality (P=0.12). The overall 10-year survival rate was 83.17%. The rate for patients who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement was 91.3% and 73.1% (P=0.02) for patients who underwent concomitant surgery. In the univariate analysis, the main predictors of mortality were preoperative ejection fraction (P=0.02; HR 0.01) and EuroSCORE II results (P=0.00000042; HR 1.13). In the multivariate analysis, the main predictors of mortality were age (P=0.01, HR 1.04) and concomitant surgery (P=0.01, HR 5.04). Those relationships were statistically significant. Conclusion A valve index of < 0.75 cm2/m2 did not affect 10-year survival. However, concomitant surgery and age significantly affected mortality. PMID:27849298

  16. Understanding Heart Valve Problems and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... affecting the aortic valve, and can lead to aortic stenosis . Mediastinal radiation therapy (radiation to the chest) – Studies ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  17. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  18. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System

    PubMed Central

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S.; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela

    2015-01-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open–close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  19. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    PubMed

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  20. CALCIFIC AORTIC VALVE DISEASE: PART 1 – MOLECULAR PATHOGENETIC ASPECTS, HEMODYNAMICS AND ADAPTIVE FEEDBACKS

    PubMed Central

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), produced by calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) causing reduced cusp opening, afflicts mostly older persons eventually requiring valve replacement. CAVD had been considered “degenerative,” but newer investigations implicate active mechanisms similar to atherogenesis—genetic predisposition and signaling pathways, lipoprotein deposits, chronic inflammation and calcification/osteogenesis. Consequently, CAVD may eventually be controlled/reversed by lifestyle and pharmacogenomics remedies. Its management should be comprehensive, embracing not only the valve but also the left ventricle and the arterial system with their interdependent morphomechanics/hemodynamics, which underlie the ensuing diastolic and systolic LV dysfunction. Compared to even a couple of decades ago, we now have an increased appreciation of genomic and cytomolecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying CAVD. Future pluridisciplinary studies will characterize better and more completely its pathobiology, evolution and overall dynamics, encompassing intricate feedback processes involving specific signaling molecules and gene network cascades. They will herald more effective, personalized medicine treatments of CAVD/AVS. PMID:26891845

  1. Collagen mineralization in human aortic valve stenosis: a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Ida; Davoli, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Calcific aortic stenosis is a slowly progressive disorder characterized by an important extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and massive deposition of minerals (primarily calcium) in the valve leaflet. The main structural components of human aortic valve are the large, thick collagen bundles that withstand the diastolic loading. Collagen has been studied in a number of reports that aim to clarify the mechanisms underlying the structural deterioration of heart valve substitutes, however to date, little is known regarding the morphological interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the calcifying tissue of native aortic valve. Here, we have analyzed a total of 12 calcified native aortic valves by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) to depict the morphological appearance of mineralized collagen and to determine the location of calcium phosphate minerals in the collagen matrix of the valve cusp. Our results demonstrate that crystals probably nucleate and grow in the interior of the collagen fibers in the absence of surface events.

  2. Infective endocarditis of the aortic valve in a Border collie dog with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) in dogs with cardiac shunts has not been reported previously. However, we encountered a dog with concurrent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and IE. The dog was a 1-year-old, 13.9-kg female Border collie and presented with anorexia, weight loss, pyrexia (40.4°C) and lameness. A continuous murmur with maximal intensity over the left heart base (Levine 5/6) was detected on auscultation. Echocardiography revealed a PDA and severe aortic stenosis (AS) caused by aortic-valve vegetative lesions. Corynebacterium spp. and Bacillus subtilis were isolated from blood cultures. The dog responded to aggressive antibiotic therapy, and the PDA was subsequently surgically corrected. After a series of treatments, the dog showed long-term improvement in clinical status. PMID:25391395

  3. Usefulness of two- and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of proximal left coronary system compression by a paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Amier; McElwee, Samuel K; Jiang, Amy Z; Barssoum, Kirolos N; Elkaryoni, Ahmed E; Arisha, Mohammed J; Srialluri, Swetha; Seghatol, Frank; Nanda, Navin C

    2017-02-01

    Paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess represents a rare, but lethal complication of infective endocarditis. We report a case of proximal left coronary system compression by a paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess whose detection was augmented using live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. Our case illustrates the usefulness of combined two- and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in detecting this finding.

  4. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  5. Simulation of motor current waveforms in monitoring aortic valve state during ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Alonazi, Khalid A; Lovell, Nigel H; Dokos, Socrates

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring of aortic valve (AV) opening and closure during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) heart pump support is crucial in preventing AV abnormalities and remodeling caused by anomalous resirculation. In this study, simulations of LVAD motor current waveforms were undertaken to investigate AV response to rotary blood pump assistance, as well as to detect AV open and close status under heart failure conditions. A two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction finite-element model is presented to predict AV state during LVAD outflow. The data will be useful in the development of a pump speed controller for optimal management of pump outflow.

  6. A rare case of acquired aortopulmonary fistula with bicuspid aortic valve: report of successful surgical repair

    PubMed Central

    Premchand, Rajendra Kumar; Bhaskar Rao, Bolleneni; Partani, Kaustubh

    2014-01-01

    An acquired aortopulmonary fistula is a rare and usually fatal phenomenon. Rarer still are reports of successful surgical repair of aortopulmonary fistulae. We present the case of a 48-year-old hypertensive man who presented with congestive cardiac failure. Examination revealed a bicuspid aortic valve and a large aneurysm of the arch of the aorta, which was communicating with the main pulmonary artery. The diagnosis of acquired aortopulmonary fistula was made using transthoracic echocardiography findings and confirmed by CT. The patient was successfully managed by surgery, with an uneventful postoperative recovery, with control of congestive cardiac failure. At 1-year follow-up, the patient had Class I symptoms. PMID:25406218

  7. The sutureless aortic valve prosthesis: experience with and technical considerations for replacement of the early model.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Flye, M W; Takaro, T

    1976-01-01

    Reoperation was performed in seven (16%) of 43 patients with early models of Magovern sutureless aortic valve prostheses, because of thromboembolism and ball variance. All patients survived reoperation with no major complications. Removal of the sutureless prosthesis was not difficult when an insertion tool of proper size was used. A scarred annulus remained which was favorable for the suturing of a new prosthesis. The incidence of disabling thromboembolism (42%) and poppet failure (21%) is high with these early models. When these complications occur, replacement of the prosthesis is recommended to prevent death or recurrent embolic episodes. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Figs. 4a to d. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:133642

  8. The sutureless aortic valve prosthesis: experience with and technical considerations for replacement of the early model.

    PubMed

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Flye, M W; Takaro, T

    1976-08-01

    Reoperation was performed in seven (16%) of 43 patients with early models of Magovern sutureless aortic valve prostheses, because of thromboembolism and ball variance. All patients survived reoperation with no major complications. Removal of the sutureless prosthesis was not difficult when an insertion tool of proper size was used. A scarred annulus remained which was favorable for the suturing of a new prosthesis. The incidence of disabling thromboembolism (42%) and poppet failure (21%) is high with these early models. When these complications occur, replacement of the prosthesis is recommended to prevent death or recurrent embolic episodes.

  9. Culture-negative infective endocarditis of the aortic valve due to Aerococcus urinae: a rare aetiology.

    PubMed

    Alozie, Anthony; Yerebakan, Can; Westphal, Bernd; Steinhoff, Gustav; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Bacteria of the species Aerococcus urinae are Gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci that are arranged in pairs, tetrads, or clusters resembling enterococci or staphylococci. They are rare causative agents of infective endocarditis. Repetitive urinary tract infections based upon underlying genitourinary tract abnormalities could involve these bacteria. Due to their similarity to other Gram-positive cocci misinterpretation may occur along the line of microbiologic differentiation, which could potentially lead to a fatal outcome. We herein report on the clinical course of a 68 year-old male patient who in the setting of an embolic stroke was initially diagnosed with a culture-negative acute infective endocarditis of the aortic valve.

  10. Prevalence and significance of reversible radionuclide ischemic perfusion defects in symptomatic aortic valve disease patients with or without concomitant coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pfisterer, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Bruendler, H.; Cueni, T.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and significance of exercise-induced localized perfusion defects in symptomatic patients with aortic valve disease, thallium-201 rest and exercise studies were performed in a consecutive series of 29 such patients prior to left heart catheterization with coronary arteriography. Eight patients had repeat studies after aortic valve replacement. Twelve of 17 patients with predominant aortic regurgitation (AR) had distinct LV apical defects during exercise despite normal coronary arteries, while 10 of 12 patients with aortic valve disease and associated coronary artery disease (CAD) had localized perfusion defects in LV areas other than the apex. In patients with AR, reversible apical perfusion defects can occur without CAD; these apical defects are probably a reflection of severe LV volume overload in AR. LV perfusion defects in areas other than the apex are specific for CAD in aortic valve disease, and concomitant CAD may not provoke regional LV perfusion deficits in aortic stenosis patients with severe LV hypertrophy.

  11. Imaging Analysis of Collagen Fiber Networks in Cusps of Porcine Aortic Valves: Effect of their Local Distribution and Alignment on Valve Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Mega, Mor; Marom, Gil; Halevi, Rotem; Hamdan, Ashraf; Bluestein, Danny; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cusps of native Aortic Valve (AV) are composed of collagen bundles embedded in soft tissue, creating a heterogenic tissue with asymmetric alignment in each cusp. This study compares native collagen fiber networks (CFNs) with a goal to better understand their influence on stress distribution and valve kinematics. Images of CFNs from five porcine tricuspid AVs are analyzed and fluid-structure interaction models are generated based on them. Although the valves had similar overall kinematics, the CFNs had distinctive influence on local mechanics. The regions with dilute CFN are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher stress magnitudes. PMID:26406926

  12. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  13. Coronary artery bypass grafting associated to aortic valve replacement in the elderly: survival and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is often associated to aortic valve stenosis in the elderly. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on survival and quality of life of CABG associated to aortic valve replacement in the septuagenarians and octogenarians. Between January 1991 and January 2010, 520 patients ageing > 70 years underwent aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis in two Institutions. They were divided into 2 groups: Group A included 406 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement; Group B 114 patients receiving aortic valve replacement and CABG. A comparative analysis of long-term survival and quality of life (SF-36 test) was performed. Mean age was 74.2 ± 3.6 years (74.3 ± 3.6 in Group A, 74 ± 3.3 in Group B; p = 0.33). Hospital mortality was 9.5% (46 patients). Twenty-nine (7.8%) in Group A and 17 in Group B (15.2%)(p = 0.019). Actuarial survival was 88.5% ± 0.015 at 1 year, 81.9% ± 0.02 at 5 years, 76.6% ± 0.032 at 10 and 57.3 ± 0.1 at 15 years. Ten-year survival was 77% ± 0.034 in Group A and 77.8% ± 0.045 in Group B (p = 0.2). Multivariate analysis did not reveal associated CABG as a predictor of long term mortality. The scores obtained in the SF-36 test were similar in the two groups and significantly higher than those of the general population matched for country, age and sex (p < 0.001 in all domains). Associated CABG determines a significant increase of hospital mortality in the elderly undergoing aortic valve replacement. Survivors did not show differences in long-term outcome and quality of life according to the presence of associated CABG. PMID:22309837

  14. Experimental measurement of dynamic fluid shear stress on the ventricular surface of the aortic valve leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is a highly prevalent disease with serious impact on mortality and morbidity. The exact causes and mechanisms of AV calcification are unclear, although previous studies suggest that mechanical forces play a role. It has been clinically demonstrated that calcification preferentially occurs on the aortic surface of the AV. This is hypothesized to be due to differences in the mechanical environments on the two sides of the valve. It is thus necessary to characterize fluid shear forces acting on both sides of the leaflet to test this hypothesis. The current study is one of two studies characterizing dynamic shear stress on both sides of the AV leaflets. In the current study, shear stresses on the ventricular surface of the AV leaflets were measured experimentally on two prosthetic AV models with transparent leaflets in an in vitro pulsatile flow loop using two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Experimental measurements were utilized to validate a theoretical model of AV ventricular surface shear stress based on the Womersley profile in a straight tube, with corrections for the opening angle of the valve leaflets. This theoretical model was applied to in vivo data based on MRI-derived volumetric flow rates and valve dimension obtained from the literature. Experimental results showed that ventricular surface shear stress was dominated by the streamwise component. The systolic shear stress waveform resembled a half-sinusoid during systole and peaks at 64–71 dyn/cm2, and reversed in direction at the end of systole for 15–25 ms, and reached a significant negative magnitude of 40–51 dyn/cm2. Shear stresses from the theoretical model applied to in vivo data showed that shear stresses peaked at 77–92 dyn/cm2 and reversed in direction for substantial period of time (108–110 ms) during late systole with peak negative shear stress of 35–38 dyn/cm2. PMID:21465260

  15. [Left ventricular rupture of mitral valve prosthesis implantation treated using an intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation].

    PubMed

    García-Villarreal, Ovidio Alberto; Ramírez-González, Bertín; Saldaña-Becerra, Martín A

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular rupture is an infrequent but potentially fatal complication of mitral valve replacement. In spite of the fact that several methods of repair have previously been described, the mortality rate remains nearly 85%. The use of the intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation may increase the possibilities of success in the repair of this dreaded complication. We present here three cases of left ventricular rupture associated to mitral valve prosthesis implantation successfully treated with the aid of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation.

  16. Radi pressurewire rupture and embolization to the right common carotid artery after crossing a bjork-shiley mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2013-10-01

    Direct measurement of the left ventricular pressure in patients with mechanical prosthetic aortic valve is an important technical challenge. In the past, transseptal puncture or direct left ventricular accesses were the only available methods. The use of a pressure wire through mechanical aortic prosthesis has been described to be feasible and safe. We report the first case report of pressure guidewire entrapment through a single tilting disk valve (Bjork-Shiley), which resulted in hemodynamic collapse, rupture, and embolization of the pressure wire tip to the right common carotid artery and its successful snaring.

  17. A comparison of two forms of the continuity equation in the Trifecta bovine pericardial aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, Denise; Roxburgh, James; Bapat, Vinayak; Young, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim To compare the classical and simplified form of the continuity equation in small Trifecta valves. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of post-operative echocardiograms performed for clinical reasons after implantation of Trifecta bioprosthetic valves. Results There were 60 patients aged 74 (range 38–89) years. For the valves of size 19, 21 and 23mm, the mean gradient was 11.3, 10.7 and 9.7mmHg, respectively. The effective orifice areas by the classical form of the continuity equation were 1.4, 1.7 and 1.9cm2, respectively. There was a good correlation between the two forms of the continuity equation, but they were significantly different using a t-test (P<0.00001). Results using the classical form were a mean 0.11 (s.d. 0.18)cm2 larger than those using the simple formula. Conclusion Haemodynamic function of the Trifecta valve in the small aortic root is good. There are significant differences between the classical and simplified forms of the continuity equation. PMID:27249811

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Study of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Dynamics Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenbin; Li, Kewei; Sun, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Computational modeling of heart valve dynamics incorporating both fluid dynamics and valve structural responses has been challenging. In this study, we developed a novel fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) mo