Science.gov

Sample records for coring fluids

  1. Lunar Fluid Core and Solid-Body Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2-5] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening has been improving [3,5] and now seems significant. This strengthens the case for a fluid lunar core.

  2. Density Stratification in Rotating Spherical Fluid Shells: Application to the Earth's Fluid Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's outer core is a rotating ellipsoidal shell of compressible, stratified and self-gravitating fluid. The Galerkin method is applied to study the effects of density stratification on the frequencies of the inertial modes for a compressible shell proportional to the realistic Earth's fluid core. The inertial modes of the core are the free oscillations with periods longer than half of a day and have the Coriolis force as their restoring force. Historically an incompressible and homogeneous fluid sphere is considered to study these modes and analytical solutions are known for the frequencies and the displacement eigenfunctions of this model. The three potential description (3PD) is used to a compressible and stratified fluid core model with different stratification parameters β, related to the local Brunt-Väisälä frequency. As a first approximation, however, we ignore the ellipticity of the core's figure. The 3PD scheme describes the exact linearized dynamics of rotating, self-gravitating, stratified, compressible and inviscid fluids. We show that, depending on the size of β, some modal frequencies and eigenfunctions are practically unaffected by stratification, some are changed and some modes may disappear. We also first derive the web of characteristics, which gives more information about the eigenfunctions of these modes, as functions of frequency and stratification for compressible and inviscid fluids.

  3. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  4. Elusiveness of Fluid-Fluid Demixing in Additive Hard-Core Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, Luis; Cuesta, José A.

    2002-09-01

    The conjecture that when an additive hard-core mixture phase separates when one of the phases is spatially ordered, well supported by considerable evidence, is in contradiction with some simulations of a binary mixture of hard cubes on cubic lattices. By extending Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory to lattice models we show that the phase behavior of this mixture is far more complex than simulations show, exhibiting regions of stability of several smectic, columnar, and solid phases, but no fluid-fluid demixing. A comparison with the simulations show that they are, in fact, compatible with a fluid-columnar demixing transition, thus bringing this model into the same demixing scheme as the rest of additive hard-core mixtures.

  5. Some anticipated contributions to core fluid dynamics from the GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvorhies, C.

    1985-01-01

    It is broadly maintained that the secular variation (SV) of the large scale geomagnetic field contains information on the fluid dynamics of Earth's electrically conducting outer core. The electromagnetic theory appropriate to a simple Earth model has recently been combined with reduced geomagnetic data in order to extract some of this information and ascertain its significance. The simple Earth model consists of a rigid, electrically insulating mantle surrounding a spherical, inviscid, and perfectly conducting liquid outer core. This model was tested against seismology by using truncated spherical harmonic models of the observed geomagnetic field to locate Earth's core-mantle boundary, CMB. Further electromagnetic theory has been developed and applied to the problem of estimating the horizontal fluid motion just beneath CMB. Of particular geophysical interest are the hypotheses that these motions: (1) include appreciable surface divergence indicative of vertical motion at depth, and (2) are steady for time intervals of a decade or more. In addition to the extended testing of the basic Earth model, the proposed GRM provides a unique opportunity to test these dynamical hypotheses.

  6. Mean-field fluid behavior of the gaussian core model

    PubMed

    Louis; Bolhuis; Hansen

    2000-12-01

    We show that the Gaussian core model of particles interacting via a penetrable repulsive Gaussian potential, first considered by Stillinger [J. Chem. Phys. 65, 3968 (1976)], behaves as a weakly correlated "mean-field fluid" over a surprisingly wide density and temperature range. In the bulk, the structure of the fluid phase is accurately described by the random phase approximation for the direct correlation function, and by the more sophisticated hypernetted chain integral equation. The resulting pressure deviates very little from a simple mean-field-like quadratic form in the density, while the low density virial expansion turns out to have an extremely small radius of convergence. Density profiles near a hard wall are also very accurately described by the corresponding mean-field free-energy functional. The binary version of the model exhibits a spinodal instability against demixing at high densities. Possible implications for semidilute polymer solutions are discussed.

  7. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  8. Discrete perturbation theory for continuous soft-core potential fluids.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, L A; Jaime-Muñoz, G; Benavides, A L; Torres-Arenas, J; Sastre, F

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we present an equation of state for an interesting soft-core continuous potential [G. Franzese, J. Mol. Liq. 136, 267 (2007)] which has been successfully used to model the behavior of single component fluids that show some water-type anomalies. This equation has been obtained using discrete perturbation theory. It is an analytical expression given in terms of density, temperature, and the set of parameters that characterize the intermolecular interaction. Theoretical results for the vapor-liquid phase diagram and for supercritical pressures are compared with previous and new simulation data and a good agreement is found. This work also clarifies discrepancies between previous Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation results for this potential.

  9. Equation of state and critical point behavior of hard-core double-Yukawa fluids.

    PubMed

    Montes, J; Robles, M; López de Haro, M

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical study on the equation of state and the critical point behavior of hard-core double-Yukawa fluids is presented. Thermodynamic perturbation theory, restricted to first order in the inverse temperature and having the hard-sphere fluid as the reference system, is used to derive a relatively simple analytical equation of state of hard-core multi-Yukawa fluids. Using such an equation of state, the compressibility factor and phase behavior of six representative hard-core double-Yukawa fluids are examined and compared with available simulation results. The effect of varying the parameters of the hard-core double-Yukawa intermolecular potential on the location of the critical point is also analyzed using different perspectives. The relevance of this analysis for fluids whose molecules interact with realistic potentials is also pointed out.

  10. Influence of a Fluid Lunar Core on the Moons Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Yoder, C. F.; Dickey, J. O.

    2001-01-01

    Oblateness of and dissipation at the lunar liquid-core/solid-mantle boundary affects the precession of core and mantle. Analysis of Lunar Laser ranges gives a weak detection of oblateness and a strong determination of dissipation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Nonlinear fluid equations for fully toroidal electromagnetic waves for the core tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, J.; Liu, C. S.; Liu

    2013-12-01

    The rather general set of fluid equations with full curvature effects (Shukla and Weiland, Phys. Rev. A 40, 341 (1989)) has been modified to apply to the core and generalized to include also microtearing modes.

  12. Power-law rheology and flow behavior of low-invasion coring fluids

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    An improved pressure coring system has been developed in which an extremely viscous polymer mud is extruded by the core and is used to seal and protect the core from flushing by drilling fluids. The polymer mud must be extremely viscous to minimize invasion, yet must be extruded through a long, narrow annular gap with a minimum of pressure buildup. A highly non-Newtonian shear-thinning polymer is utilized in the low invasion coring fluid. This paper describes the measurement and modeling of non-Newtonian rheology from rotary viscometer data in detail since the simplified equations which are generally used with these instruments can be grossly in error. The development of both an approximate analytical solution and an exact numerical solution of the non-Newtonian extrusion process is presented. These solutions were used to optimize the non-Newtonian rheology of the low-invasion fluid which will be used in actual coring operations.

  13. Fluids circulations during the formation of the Naxos Metamorphic Core Complex (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Siebenaller, Luc

    2015-04-01

    The island of Naxos, in the central part of the Cycladic Metamorphic Core Complex (Greece) represents a perfect example to address the evolution of fluid circulations during collapse of an orogenic belt. It displays a complex detachment system characterized by mylonites, cataclasites and high-angle normal faults which geometric relationships reflect rheological layering of the orogenic crust and its evolution during collapse. The chemistry of fluid inclusions determined by microthermometry, RAMAN spectroscopy, LA-ICPMS, and crush-leach combined with C and H isotopic signatures point to three distinct types of fluids, namely (i) a H2O-dominated fluid, (ii) a composite H2O-CO2 fluid, and (iii) a NaCl-rich fluid concentrated in metals. These different types of fluids are interpreted to reflect mixtures to various degrees among fluids generated by (i) condensation of clouds (meteoric aqueous fluid), (ii) dehydration and decarbonatation of metasedimentary rocks during metamorphism (metamorphic aqueous-carbonic fluid), and (iii) crystallization of granitic magmas (magmatic saline fluid with high metal contents). The distribution of fluids with respect to microstructures evidences the close link between deformation and fluid circulations at the mineral scale from intracristalline deformation to fracturing. The orientation of fluid inclusion planes, veins and alteration zones allows to identify the scale and geometry of the reservoir into which fluids are circulating and their evolution during the formation of the Metamorphic Core Complex. These data indicate that the orogenic crust is subdivided in two reservoirs separated by the ductile/fragile transition. Meteoric fluids circulate in the upper crust affected by brittle deformation whereas metamorphic and magmatic fluids circulate in relation to intracristalline ductile deformation affecting the lower crust. The geometry of these reservoirs evolves during the formation of the Naxos Metamorphic Core Complex as the

  14. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  15. Agitation in Dementia: Relation to Core Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bloniecki, Victor; Aarsland, Dag; Cummings, Jeffrey; Blennow, Kaj; Freund-Levi, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the associations of agitation with the cerebrospinal fluid dementia biomarkers total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) and Aβ1-42. Methods One hundred patients (mean age ± SD, 78.6 ± 7.5 years) with dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms, of whom 67% were female, were included. Agitation was measured using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI; 46.5 ± 11.8 points). Results Total CMAI correlated with T-tau [rs (31) = 0.36, p = 0.04] and P-tau [rs (31) = 0.35, p = 0.05] in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 33) but not in the total dementia population (n = 95). Conclusions Our results suggest that tau-mediated pathology including neurofibrillary tangles and the intensity of the disease process might be associated with agitation in AD. PMID:25298777

  16. Hard sphere perturbation theory for fluids with soft-repulsive-core potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor; Stell, George

    2004-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of fluids with very soft repulsive-core potentials, resembling those of some liquid metals, are predicted with unprecedented accuracy using a new first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory. This theory is an extension of Mansoori-Canfield/Rasaiah-Stell (MCRS) perturbation theory, obtained by including a configuration integral correction recently identified by Mon, who evaluated it by computer simulation. In this work we derive an analytic expression for Mon's correction in terms of the radial distribution function of the soft-core fluid, g0(r), approximated using Lado's self-consistent extension of Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) theory. Comparisons with WCA and MCRS predictions show that our new extended-MCRS theory outperforms other first-order theories when applied to fluids with very soft inverse-power potentials (n⩽6), and predicts free energies that are within 0.3kT of simulation results up to the fluid freezing point.

  17. Highly responsive core-shell microactuator arrays for use in viscous and viscoelastic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Fiser, Briana L.; Shields, Adam R.; Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new fabrication method to produce arrays of highly responsive polymer-metal core-shell magnetic microactuators. The core-shell fabrication method decouples the elastic and magnetic structural components such that the actuator response can be optimized by adjusting the core-shell geometry. Our microstructures are 10 μm long, 550 nm in diameter, and electrochemically fabricated in particle track-etched membranes, comprising a poly(dimethylsiloxane) core with a 100 nm Ni shell surrounding the upper 3–8 μm. The structures can achieve deflections of nearly 90° with moderate magnetic fields and are capable of driving fluid flow in a fluid 550 times more viscous than water. PMID:26405376

  18. Magnetic field sensor based on selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vanita; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2016-02-01

    We reported the modeling result of selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber based magnetic field sensor. Inside the cross-section of the designed photonic crystal fiber, the two fiber cores filled with magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) form two independent waveguides with mode coupling. The mode coupling under different magnetic field strengths is investigated theoretically. The sensitivity of the sensor as a function of the structural parameters of the photonic crystal fiber is calculated. The result shows that the proposed sensing device with 1 cm photonic crystal fiber length has a large sensitivity of 305.8 pm/Oe.

  19. Expected contribution of the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) to studies of liquid core fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Finding satisfactory models of the fluid motions at the top of the core is important for delineating what kind of dynamo is in operation, for estimating the heat flux into the base of the mantle, and for forecasting the magnetic field forward in time. Each of these aspects will be discussed.

  20. Bacterial study of Vostok drilling fluid: the tool to make ice core finding confident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhina, I. A.; Petit, J. R.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    Decontamination of Vostok ice core is a critical issue in molecular biology studies. Core surface contains a film of hardly removable 'dirty' drilling fluid representing a mixture of polyhydrocarbons (PHC) including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and freon. To make ice microbial finding more confident the original Vostok drilling fluid sampled from different depths (110m - 3600m) was analyzed for bacterial content by ribosomal DNA sequencing. Total, 33 clones of 16S ribosomal DNA were recovered from four samples of drilling fluid at 110, 2750, 3400, and 3600m leading to identification of 8 bacterial species. No overlapping was observed even for neighboring samples (3400m and 3600m). At present four major bacteria with the titer more than 103-104 cells per ml (as estimated from PCR results) are identified. Among them we found: unknown representative of Desulfobacteraceae which are able to oxidize sulphates and degrade benzenes (110m); PAH-degrading alpha-proteobacterium Sphingomonas natatoria (3400m); alpha-proteobacterium representing closely-related group of Sphingomonas sp. (e.g., S. aurantiaca) which are able to degrade PAH as well, and human pathogen closely related to Haloanella gallinarum of CFB group (3600m). Four additional species were revealed as single clones and showed relatedness to human pathogens and saprophytes as well as soil bacteria. These bacteria may represent drilling fluid contaminants introduced during its sampling or DNA extraction procedure. Of four major bacteria revealed, one species, Sphingomonas natatoria, has been met by us in the Vostok core from 3607 m depth (AF532054) whereas another Sphingomonas sp. which we refer to as S. aurantiaca was found in Antarctic microbial endolithic community (AF548567), hydrocarbon-containing soil near Scott Base in Antarctica (AF184221) and even isolated from 3593m Vostok accretion ice (AF324199) and Taylor Dome core (AF395031). The source for major human pathogen-related bacteria is rather uncertain

  1. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  2. All-fiber magnetic field sensor based on tapered thin-core fiber and magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Qiao, Xueguang; Yang, Hangzhou; Wang, Ruohui; Rong, Qiangzhou; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-01-10

    A method for the measurement of a magnetic field by combining a tapered thin-core fiber (TTCF) and magnetic fluid is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The modal interference effect is caused by the core mode and excited eigenmodes in the TTCF cladding. The transmission spectra of the proposed sensor are measured and theoretically analyzed at different magnetic field strengths. The results field show that the magnetic sensitivity reaches up to -0.1039  dB/Oe in the range of 40-1600 e. The proposed method possesses high sensitivity and low cost compared with other expensive methods.

  3. SAPHIR: a physiome core model of body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S Randall; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave, Julie; Françoise, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, François; Hannaert, Patrick; Hernández, Alfredo; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mazière, Pierre; Tahi, Fariza; White, Ronald J

    2008-09-13

    We present the current state of the development of the SAPHIR project (a Systems Approach for PHysiological Integration of Renal, cardiac and respiratory function). The aim is to provide an open-source multi-resolution modelling environment that will permit, at a practical level, a plug-and-play construction of integrated systems models using lumped-parameter components at the organ/tissue level while also allowing focus on cellular- or molecular-level detailed sub-models embedded in the larger core model. Thus, an in silico exploration of gene-to-organ-to-organism scenarios will be possible, while keeping computation time manageable. As a first prototype implementation in this environment, we describe a core model of human physiology targeting the short- and long-term regulation of blood pressure, body fluids and homeostasis of the major solutes. In tandem with the development of the core models, the project involves database implementation and ontology development.

  4. Solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model fluid.

    PubMed

    Mausbach, Peter; Ahmed, Alauddin; Sadus, Richard J

    2009-11-14

    The solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model are determined using the GWTS [J. Ge, G.-W. Wu, B. D. Todd, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11017 (2003)] algorithm, which combines equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first reported use of the GWTS algorithm for a fluid system displaying a reentrant melting scenario. Using the GWTS algorithm, the phase envelope of the Gaussian core model can be calculated more precisely than previously possible. The results for the low-density and the high-density (reentrant melting) sides of the solid state are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in conjunction with calculations of the solid free energies. The common point on the Gaussian core envelope, where equal-density solid and liquid phases are in coexistence, could be determined with high precision.

  5. Syntectonic fluid flux during rift faulting: Record from the MIS core, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, C.; Wilson, T. J.; Paulsen, T. S.

    2009-12-01

    The McMurdo Ice Shelf project successfully recovered 1285 m of Neogene sedimentary core from the Victoria Land Basin, a large rift basin within the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) of Antarctica. The core contains 1475 natural fractures that were logged as faults, veins and clastic dikes, associated with the southern extension of the Neogene-active? Terror Rift fault zone. Veins constitute about 625 of this population. Most veins are filled with calcite, although zeolites and minor chlorite are common towards the bottom of the core. In the lower ~300 m of the core, veins contain opening-mode fiber fills and are wavy to tightly folded due to vertical shortening. Folded, opening-mode folded veins are filled by calcite fibers that grew normal to vein walls, indicating the host sediment was cohesive enough to fracture but was not fully lithified and accommodated vein buckling during compaction. Fold hinges are fractured and wedging of vein segments is marked by overlapping tips separated by zones with strong chlorite and clay fabrics, suggesting shearing during further vertical contraction of the host rock. Calcite veins are commonly strongly twinned. Cathodoluminescence microscopy shows minor changes in color and intensity and minimal concentric or sectoral zoning, suggesting relatively rapid crystallization of fluids of similar chemistry. However, stable isotope analyses reveal large variations in values, with carbon values ranging from -21.91 to -7.15 (VPBD) and oxygen values ranging from -5.35 to -11.97 (VPBD). Further detailed investigation of the fracture fills using cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy combined with isotopic analysis of carbon and oxygen will document the generations of the filling material in more detail and will constrain the sources and evolution of the fluids. There has clearly been significant structural control on fluid pathways during lithification, compaction and diagenesis of strata deforming within the Terror Rift zone.

  6. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Goerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity have been included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary and the subadjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the nonlinear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The trade-off between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and fluid flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  7. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity were included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the sub-adjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the non-linear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The tradeoff between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models (DGRF's) is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition, a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  8. Data use investigation for the magnetic field satellite (MAGSAT) mission: Geomagnetic field forecasting and fluid dynamics of the core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    MAGSAT data were used to construct a variety of spherical harmonic models of the main geomagnetic field emanating from Earth's liquid core at poch 1980. These models were used to: (1) accurately determine the radius of Earth's core by a magnetic method, (2) calculate estimates, of the long-term ange of variation of geomagnetic Gauss coefficients; (3) establish a preferred truncation level for current spherical harmonic models of the main geomagnetic field from the core; (4) evaluate a method for taking account of electrical conduction in the mantle when the magnetic field is downward continued to the core-mantle boundary; and (5) establish that upwelling and downwelling of fluid motion at the top of the core is probably detectable, observationally. A fluid dynamics forecast model was not produced because of insufficient data.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging study of complex fluid flow in porous media: flow patterns and quantitative saturation profiling of amphiphilic fracturing fluid displacement in sandstone cores.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to follow the removal process of a visco-elastic surfactant (VES) fracturing fluid in Bentheimer sandstone cores at typical reservoir temperatures (T=333 K). Two displacing fluids were investigated, a Gadolinium doped water phase (1M NaCl solution), and a Gadolinium doped hydrocarbon phase (Mineral Spirits). In addition to flow characteristics obtained by conventional core-flooding, i.e., the macroscopically averaged volumetric flow rates and differential pressures, we have also measured the saturation profiles and characteristic displacement patterns during all stages of the removal process. To acquire these data we have used quantitative one-dimensional chemically specific profiling along with fast two-dimensional imaging experiments while flooding Bentheimer sandstone cores in situ in the spectrometer. Our results show that both displacement processes (complex fluid displaced by water or hydrocarbon phase) are dominated by the large viscosity contrasts present. However, distinct differences were found between the displacement characteristics of water and hydrocarbon, which confirmed the sensitivity of the complex fracturing fluid to the displacing fluid.

  10. Structure and thermodynamics of hard-core Yukawa fluids: thermodynamic perturbation approaches.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok

    2011-07-21

    The thermodynamic perturbation theories, which are based on the power series of a coupling constant (λ-expansion), have been proposed for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of a hard-core Yukawa (HCY) fluid: one (A1-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere repulsion as a reference system. The other (A2-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the reference system which incorporates both the repulsive and short-range attractive interactions. The first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) provided by Tang and Lu [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9828 (1993)] has been employed for investigating the thermodynamic properties of a HCY fluid using the alternative method via the direct correlation function. The calculated results show that (i) the A1 and A2 approximations are in excellent agreements with previous computer simulation results in the literature and compare with the semi-empirical works of Shukla including the higher-order free energy terms, (ii) the A1 and A2 approximations are better than the FMSA and the mean-spherical approximation, (iii) the A2-approximation compares with the A1-approximation, even though the perturbation effect of an A2-approximation is much smaller than that of an A1-approximation, and that (iv) the FMSA study is particularly of advantage in providing the structure and thermodynamics in a simple and analytic manner.

  11. Structure and thermodynamics of hard-core Yukawa fluids: Thermodynamic perturbation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The thermodynamic perturbation theories, which are based on the power series of a coupling constant (λ-expansion), have been proposed for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of a hard-core Yukawa (HCY) fluid: one (A1-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the hard-sphere repulsion as a reference system. The other (A2-approximation) is the perturbation theory based on the reference system which incorporates both the repulsive and short-range attractive interactions. The first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) provided by Tang and Lu [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9828 (1993)], 10.1063/1.465465 has been employed for investigating the thermodynamic properties of a HCY fluid using the alternative method via the direct correlation function. The calculated results show that (i) the A1 and A2 approximations are in excellent agreements with previous computer simulation results in the literature and compare with the semi-empirical works of Shukla including the higher-order free energy terms, (ii) the A1 and A2 approximations are better than the FMSA and the mean-spherical approximation, (iii) the A2-approximation compares with the A1-approximation, even though the perturbation effect of an A2-approximation is much smaller than that of an A1-approximation, and that (iv) the FMSA study is particularly of advantage in providing the structure and thermodynamics in a simple and analytic manner.

  12. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Babić, Mirjana; Svob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R; Simić, Goran

    2014-08-28

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed.

  13. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Babić, Mirjana; Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R.; Šimić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed. PMID:25165049

  14. Fluid Dynamic Eqs. For Adiabatic Convection In Earth's Ultracompressed Core; Turbulence Engendered Large-Scale Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. L.

    2002-10-01

    Our analysis is divided into 2 parts, i.e., establishing formalism that predicts (a), convective flows in earth's molten, precessing, core, that arise from 15-20 heat sources distributed over solid inner core boundary, mathord r = R_ic = 1240 km how they induce B - field reversals and transport heat of 4 radioactive disintegration chains (some now inactive) contained within mathord r <= R_ic,and (b), turbulence engendered large-scale mer. motion and turbulent differential rot., which are coupled by Coriolis forces. We employ the vorticity transport equation, obtained by forming curl of Navier-Stokes eq. (thereby eliminating pressure mathord p(x_i,t) as a dependent variable) together with the amplification eq., both to be solved simultaneously with other necessary fluid dynamic eqs., to effect a general solution for molten iron core. We employ Navier-Stokes eq. and write ρ d v /dt=ρ g a + 2 ρ v x Υ -nabla p + (4πμ)-1 (nabla x B ) x B +ηnabla ^2 v + fracη3 nabla (nabla ot v ) - 2/3 (nabla ot v ) nabla η + nabla η ot nabla v + nabla v ot nabla η, where g a doteq - nabla Ω + nabla 1/2 (Υ x r ) ^2 + r x d Υ /dt + (g _s+p - ) is appar. acceleration of gravity. Since coeff. Of viscosity η depends only on p,T it is closely only a function of r; mathord η = η(r), altho η = const. will suffice for convection calculations. In eq. of secular fluid motion, obtained by forming ensemble mean of vector curl of N-S eq., viscous forces are driving forces and last 3 terms should be retained. Eq. of continuity remains as before but state eq. mathord p = ρ k^*T and adiabaticity eq. for perfect gas fail to apply to liquids and we must adopt eqs. for ultracompressed fluids (K L McDonald, Computations In Theoretical Physics..., Univ. Ut., Expt. Sta. Bul. 138, Vol. 56, No. 27(1966)), namely, state eq., κ (p-p_o) = loge ρ/ρo + ɛ(T-T_o) and adiabatic eq., Te ^α/ρ= const., α = M_Wɛ/κ c_V; cV is molar thermal capacity, etc. We subst. this into state equation to

  15. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  16. Comparative evaluation of the indigenous microbial diversity vs. drilling fluid contaminants in the NEEM Greenland ice core.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Vanya; Burlingame, Caroline; Sowers, Todd; Brenchley, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Demonstrating that the detected microbial diversity in nonaseptically drilled deep ice cores is truly indigenous is challenging because of potential contamination with exogenous microbial cells. The NEEM Greenland ice core project provided a first-time opportunity to determine the origin and extent of contamination throughout drilling. We performed multiple parallel cultivation and culture-independent analyses of five decontaminated ice core samples from different depths (100-2051 m), the drilling fluid and its components Estisol and Coasol, and the drilling chips collected during drilling. We created a collection of diverse bacterial and fungal isolates (84 from the drilling fluid and its components, 45 from decontaminated ice, and 66 from drilling chips). Their categorization as contaminants or intrinsic glacial ice microorganisms was based on several criteria, including phylogenetic analyses, genomic fingerprinting, phenotypic characteristics, and presence in drilling fluid, chips, and/or ice. Firmicutes and fungi comprised the dominant group of contaminants among isolates and cloned rRNA genes. Conversely, most Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria originating from the ice were identified as intrinsic. This study provides a database of potential contaminants useful for future studies of NEEM cores and can contribute toward developing standardized protocols for contamination detection and ensuring the authenticity of the microbial diversity in deep glacial ice.

  17. Modeling of Viscoelastic Properties of Porous Rocks Saturated with Viscous Fluid at Seismic Frequencies at the Core Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the moduli and velocities of rocks at seismic frequencies are usually measured by the strain-stress method in lab. However, such measurements require well-designed equipment and skilled technicians, which greatly hinders the experimental investigation on the elastic and visco-elastic properties of rocks at seismic frequencies. We attempt to model the dynamic moduli of porous rocks saturated with viscous fluid at seismic frequencies on core scale using the strain-stress method, aiming to provide a complement to real core measurements in lab. First, we build 2D geometrical models containing the pore structure information of porous rocks based on the digital images (such as thin section, SEM, CT, etc.) of real rocks. Then we assume the rock frames are linearly elastic, and use the standard Maxwell spring-dash pot model to describe the visco-elastic properties of pore fluids. Boundary conditions are set according to the strain-stress method; and the displacement field is calculated using the finite element method (FEM). We numerically test the effects of fluid viscosity, frequency, and pore structure on the visco-elastic properties based on the calculation results. In our modeling, the viscosity of the pore fluid ranges from 103mPas to 109mPas; and the frequency varies from 5Hz to 500Hz. The preliminary results indicate that the saturated rock behaves stiffer and shows larger phase lag between stress and strain when the viscosity of the pore fluid and (or) the frequency increase.

  18. Effect of the Earth's magnetic field spatial distribution on the electromagnetic coupling at the fluid core boundaries for nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koot, L.; Dumberry, M.

    2011-12-01

    Nutations are periodic variations in the orientation of the Earth's rotation axis in space. This motion is generated by the gravitational torque applied on the Earth's equatorial bulge by the Moon, the Sun, and the other planets. Because the mantle, the fluid outer core and the solid inner core react differently to the applied torque, the nutation motion is characterized by differential rotations between these three regions. Since the boundaries of the fluid outer core are permeated by a background magnetic field (the geodynamo field), the differential rotation at the fluid core boundaries induces a secondary magnetic field by shear and advection of the background field. The associated electric currents produce Lorentz forces and torques between the outer core, inner core, and mantle, that tend to oppose the differential rotation. A previous study has shown that the magnitude of the electromagnetic (EM) torque is mainly determined by the electrical conductivities on both sides of the outer core boundaries and by the mean RMS strength of the background magnetic field, with the spatial distribution of this magnetic field being unimportant to first order. The goal of the present work is to reassess the role of the magnetic field spatial distribution on the strength of the EM torque using a new model of the EM coupling for nutations that we have recently developed. Our model differs from previous ones in that we use a global approach to describe the induced magnetic field. Moreover, we also include in the torque the contribution from the poloidal component of the induced field, an effect neglected in previous models. In addition, we do not assume a priori that the non-dipolar components of the background magnetic field can be represented by a uniform field with the same power but instead we calculate the torque on the basis of the full geometry of the field. This is particularly important for the poloidal torque as it depends directly on the surface gradient of the

  19. Thermodynamic properties of Fe-S alloys from molecular dynamics modeling: Implications for the lunar fluid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, Oleg L.; Belashchenko, David K.

    2016-09-01

    Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids for the P-T parameters of the lunar core have not been constrained well. From the analysis of seismic wave travel time, Weber et al. (2011) proposed that the lunar core is composed of iron alloyed with ⩽6 wt% of light elements, such as S. A controversial issue in models of planetary core composition concerns whether Fe-S liquids under high pressure - temperature conditions provide sound velocity and density data, which match the seismic model. Here we report the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of iron-sulfur alloys based on Embedded Atom Model (EAM). The results of calculations include caloric, thermal and elastic properties of Fe-S alloys at concentrations of sulfur 0-18 at.%, temperatures up to 2500 K and pressures up to 14 GPa. The effect of sulfur on the elastic properties of Fe-rich melts is most evident in the notably decreased density with added S content. In the MD simulation, the density and bulk modulus KT of liquid Fe-S decrease with increasing sulfur content, while the bulk modulus KS decreases as a whole but has some fluctuations with increasing sulfur content. The sound velocity increases with increasing pressure, but depends weakly on temperature and the concentration of sulfur. For a fluid Fe-S core of the Moon (∼5 GPa/2000 K) with 6-16 at.% S (3.5-10 wt%), the sound velocity and density may be estimated at the level of 4000 m s-1 and 6.25-7.0 g cm-3. Comparison of thermodynamic calculations with the results of interpretation of seismic observations shows good agreement of P-wave velocities in the liquid outer core, while the core density does not match the seismic models. At such concentrations of sulfur and a density by 20-35% higher than the model seismic density, a radius for the fluid outer core should be less than about 330 km found by Weber et al. because at the specified mass and moment of inertia values of the Moon an increase of the core density leads to a decrease of the core

  20. Subseafloor Boiling Within the PACMANUS Hydrothermal System Indicated by Anhydrite-Hosted Fluid Inclusions from ODP Leg 193 Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanko, D. A.; Bach, W.; Scott, S. D.; Yeats, C.; Roberts, S.; Beaudoin, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Drilling during Leg 193 was in an area of active hydrothermal venting from dacitic rocks on Pual Ridge in the Manus Basin. All the cored rocks underlying the fresh surficial volcanic rocks are intensively hydrothermally altered. Primary fluid inclusions preserved in anhydrite veins provide unique fluid samples that provide direct evidence on the chemical and physical properties of hydrothermal fluids present beneath the seafloor. Site 1188 is located on Snowcap Knoll, an area of diffuse warm venting at a water depth of ~1645 m. Fluid inclusions have been studied from a coarse anhydrite +/- pyrite vein from ~123 m below the seafloor. The ambient hydrostatic pressure for this sample is calculated to be ~180 bars. The ambient temperature is unknown, but the T measured after 8 days of thermal rebound at a depth of 360 m in this hole was 313° C. Primary fluid inclusions measuring up to 100 μ m across are dominantly two-phase L + V inclusions, yet fluid inclusions with up to three daughter crystals are also observed. The largest daughter crystal is halite, commonly accompanied by a small transparent granular daughter crystal and an even smaller granular opaque crystal. Consequently, optical inspection alone demonstrates the co-occurrence of both hypersaline, multicomponent brines and less saline aqueous fluids. Ice melting temperatures for L+V inclusions vary from -0.1° to -14.5° C, with a strong mode at -2° C, corresponding to a seawater-like salinity. However, the range in Tm(ice) indicates that a significant number contain quite fresh water, and others contain quite saline water. Ice melting temperatures from the multiphase inclusions, measured in the presence of hydrohalite, range from -29.5° to -39.9° C, confirming their hypersaline composition. These data, as well as measured halite dissolution temperatures ranging from 125° to 257° C, indicate salinities of ~30+/-3 wt.% NaCl equivalent. Most two-phase inclusions homogenize to liquid between 191° C and

  1. Core-flood experiment for transport of reactive fluids in rocks.

    PubMed

    Ott, H; de Kloe, K; van Bakel, M; Vos, F; van Pelt, A; Legerstee, P; Bauer, A; Eide, K; van der Linden, A; Berg, S; Makurat, A

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of the transport of reactive fluids in porous rocks is an intriguing but challenging task and relevant in several areas of science and engineering such as geology, hydrogeology, and petroleum engineering. We designed and constructed an experimental setup to investigate physical and chemical processes caused by the flow of reactive and volatile fluids such as supercritical CO(2) and/or H(2)S in geological formations. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO(2) in the frame of carbon capture and storage and acid-gas injection for sulfur disposal and/or enhanced oil recovery. The present paper outlines the design criteria and the realization of reactive transport experiments on the laboratory scale. We focus on the spatial and time evolution of rock and fluid composition as a result of chemical rock fluid interaction and the coupling of chemistry and fluid flow in porous rocks.

  2. Fluid inclusions and preliminary studies of hydrothermal alteration in core hole PLTG-1, Platanares geothermal area, Honduras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Platanares geothermal area in western Honduras consists of more than 100 hot springs that issue from numerous hot-spring groups along the banks or within the streambed of the Quebrada de Agua Caliente (brook of hot water). Evaluation of this geothermal area included drilling a 650-m deep PLTG-1 drill hole which penetrated a surface mantling of stream terrace deposits, about 550 m of Tertiary andesitic lava flows, and Cretaceous to lower Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the lower 90 m of the drill core. Fractures and cavities in the drill core are partly to completely filled by hydrothermal minerals that include quartz, kaolinite, mixed-layer illite-smectite, barite, fluorite, chlorite, calcite, laumontite, biotite, hematite, marcasite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, stibnite, and sphalerite; the most common open-space fillings are calcite and quartz. Biotite from 138.9-m depth, dated at 37.41 Ma by replicate 40Ar/39 Ar analyses using a continuous laser system, is the earliest hydrothermal mineral deposited in the PLTG-1 drill core. This mid-Tertiary age indicates that at least some of the hydrothermal alteration encountered in the PLTG-1 drill core occured in the distant past and is unrelated to the present geothermal system. Furthermore, homogenization temperatures (Th) and melting-point temperatures (Tm) for fluid inclusions in two of the later-formed hydrothermal minerals, calcite and barite, suggest that the temperatures and concentration of dissolved solids of the fluids present at the time these fluid inclusions formed were very different from the present temperatures and fluid chemistry measured in the drill hole. Liquid-rich secondary fluid inclusions in barite and caicite from drill hole PLTG-1 have Th values that range from about 20??C less than the present measured temperature curve at 590.1-m depth to as much as 90??C higher than the temperature curve at 46.75-m depth. Many of the barite Th measurements (ranging between 114?? and 265??C) plot above the

  3. Core Angular Momentum and the IERS Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. Part 1; Core Angular Momentum and Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xia-Dong; Chao, Benjamin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The part of the grant was to use recordings of seismic waves travelling through the earth's core (PKP waves) to study the inner core rotation and constraints on possible density anomalies in the fluid core. The shapes and relative arrival times of such waves associated with a common source were used to reduce the uncertainties in source location and excitation and the effect of unknown mantle structure. The major effort of the project is to assemble historical seismograms with long observing base lines. We have found original paper records of SSI earthquakes at COL between 1951 and 1966 in a warehouse of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Golden, Colorado, extending the previous measurements at COL by Song and Richards [1996] further back 15 years. Also in Alaska, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI) has been operating the Alaskan Seismic Network with over 100 stations since the late 1960s. Virtually complete archives of seismograms are still available at UAFGI. Unfortunately, most of the archives are in microchip form (develocorders), for which the use of waveforms is impossible. Paper seismograms (helicorders) are available for a limited number of stations, and digital recordings of analog signals started around 1989. Of the paper records obtained, stations at Gilmore Dome (GLM, very close to COL), Yukon (FYU), McKinley (MCK), and Sheep Creek Mountain (SCM) have the most complete continuous recordings.

  4. Effects of confinement on anomalies and phase transitions of core-softened fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.; Bordin, José Rafael

    2015-04-07

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study how the confinement affects the dynamic, thermodynamic, and structural properties of a confined anomalous fluid. The fluid is modeled using an effective pair potential derived from the ST4 atomistic model for water. This system exhibits density, structural, and dynamical anomalies, and the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points similar to the quantities observed in bulk water. The confinement is modeled both by smooth and structured walls. The temperatures of extreme density and diffusion for the confined fluid show a shift to lower values while the pressures move to higher amounts for both smooth and structured confinements. In the case of smooth walls, the critical points and the limit between fluid and amorphous phases show a non-monotonic change in the temperatures and pressures when the nanopore size is increase. In the case of structured walls, the pressures and temperatures of the critical points varies monotonically with the pore size. Our results are explained on basis of the competition between the different length scales of the fluid and the wall-fluid interaction.

  5. Fluid core size of Mars from detection of the solar tide.

    PubMed

    Yoder, C F; Konopliv, A S; Yuan, D N; Standish, E M; Folkner, W M

    2003-04-11

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  6. Fluid core size of Mars from detection of the solar tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Konopliv, A. S.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Folkner, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  7. Fluid flow analysis of a hot-core hypersonic wind-tunnel nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B.; Sebacher, D. I.; Boatright, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A hypersonic-wind-tunnel nozzle concept which incorporates a hot-core flow surrounded by an annular flow of cold air offers a promising technique for maximizing the model size while minimizing the power required to heat the test core. This capability becomes especially important when providing the true-temperature duplication needed for hypersonic propulsion testing. Several two-dimensional wind-tunnel nozzle configurations that are designed according to this concept are analyzed by using recently developed analytical techniques for prediction of the boundary-layer growth and the mixing between the hot and cold coaxial supersonic airflows. The analyses indicate that introduction of the cold annular flow near the throat results in an unacceptable test core for the nozzle size and stagnation conditions considered because of both mixing and condensation effects. Use of a half-nozzle with a ramp on the flat portion does not appear promising because of the thick boundary layer associated with the extra length. However, the analyses indicate that if the cold annular flow is introduced at the exit of a full two-dimensional nozzle, an acceptable test core will be produced. Predictions of the mixing between the hot and cold supersonic streams for this configuration show that mixing effects from the cold flow do not appreciably penetrate into the hot core for the large downstream distances of interest.

  8. Resonant Tidal Excitation of Internal Waves in the Earth's Fluid Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  9. Resonant tidal excitation of internal waves in the Earth's fluid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-07-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  10. Modeling of the Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer an a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Core With a Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. Bryce; Yavuzkurt, Savas; Baratta, Anthony J.

    2002-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), a promising Generation IV nuclear reactor design, raises many novel technological issues for which new experience and techniques must be developed. This brief study explores a few of these issues, utilizes a computational fluid dynamics code to model some simple phenomena, and points out deficiencies in current knowledge that should be addressed by future research and experimentation. A highly simplified representation of the PBMR core is analyzed with FLUENT, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. The applied models examine laminar and turbulent flow in the vicinity of a single spherical fuel pebble near the center of the core, accounting for the effects of the immediately adjacent fuel pebbles. Several important fluid flow and heat transfer parameters are examined, including heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, and pressure drop, as well as the temperature, pressure, and velocity profiles near the fuel pebble. The results of these 'unit cell' calculations are also compared to empirical correlations available in the literature. As FLUENT is especially sensitive to geometry during the generation of a computational mesh, the sensitivity of code results to pebble spacing is also examined. The results of this study show that while a PBMR presents a novel and complex geometry, a code such as FLUENT is suitable for calculation of both local and global flow characteristics, and can be a valuable tool for the thermal-hydraulic study of this new reactor design. FLUENT results for pressure drop deviate from the Darcy correlation by several orders of magnitude in all cases. When determining the heat transfer coefficient, FLUENT is again much lower than Robinson's correlation. Results for Nusselt number show better agreement, with FLUENT predicting results that are 10 or 20 times as large as those from the Robinson and Lancashire correlations. These differences may arise because the empirical correlations concern mainly

  11. Regular black holes: Guilfoyle's electrically charged solutions with a perfect fluid phantom core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2016-06-01

    Regular black hole solutions are found among the Guilfoyle exact solutions. These are spherically symmetric solutions of general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter where the metric potentials and electromagnetic fields are related in some particularly simple form. We show that, for certain ranges of the parameters, there are objects which correspond to regular charged black holes, whose interior region is filled by an electrically charged phantomlike fluid, or, in the limiting case, a de Sitter false vacuum fluid, and whose exterior region is Reissner-Nordström. The boundary between both regions is a smooth boundary surface, except in the limiting case where the boundary is made of a massless electrically charged spherically symmetric coat. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular solutions are analyzed.

  12. Evolution of fluid-rock interactions: fluid inclusion, isotopic, and major/minor element chemistry of hydrothermally altered volcanic rock in core RN-17B, Reykjanes, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Marks, N. E.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    The Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland, hosts a seawater-dominated geothermal system. Previous studies indicate an evolution of the system from meteoric to seawater. The inclined 4-inch diameter RN-17B drill core was collected from 2798.5 m to 2808.5 m (~2555 m below surface) at in situ temperature of approximately 330°C. Samples for this study were obtained from the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP). The core contains hydrothermally altered rocks of basaltic composition. Hydrothermal alteration ranges from upper greenschist to lower amphibolite grade, dependent on protolith size and composition. Veins in the core grade inward from radial epidote + acicular hornblende + titanite + pyrite, to clearer equant and compositionally zoned epidote vein centers. Felted amphibole replaces hyaloclastite and smaller crystalline clasts within the core, but is absent from the centers of crystalline pillow basalt fragments. Amphibole in vein selvages and vesicle fillings is green and acicular. Electron microprobe analyses of amphibole indicate it spans a compositional range of ferrohornblende through paragasite. The pistacite component (Xps) of vein epidote ranges from 16.5 to 36.7. The Xps component shows both normal and reverse zoning within single epidote crystals across this range, and follows no distinct pattern. Vein epidote adjacent to the wall rock has a higher aluminum concentration than vein centers. This may be due to mobilization of aluminum from plagioclase in the wall rock during albitization. Solutions flowing through open fractures may have lower Al-content and thus precipitate more Fe-rich epidote than those next to the fracture walls. Primary fluid inclusions in epidote range in size from <1 to 10 μm in diameter. Secondary fluid inclusions are <1 μm in diameter and not measurable. Calculated fluid inclusion salinities range from 0.5 to 7.6 weight percent NaCl, with lower salinities adjacent to the wall rock and higher salinities in the vein centers

  13. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  14. A Direct-Push Sample-Freezing Drive Shoe for Collecting Sediment Cores with Intact Pore Fluid, Microbial, and Sediment Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Trost, J.; Christy, T. M.; Mason, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic and biological reactions in shallow groundwater and bottom sediments are central to understanding groundwater contaminant attenuation and biogeochemical cycles. The laminar flow regime in unconsolidated surficial aquifers creates narrow reaction zones. Studying these reaction zones requires fine-scale sampling of water together with adjacent sediment in a manner that preserves in situ redox conditions. Collecting representative samples of these narrow zones with traditional subsurface sampling equipment is challenging. For example, use of a basket type core catcher for saturated, non-cohesive sediments results in loss of fluid and sediments during retrieval. A sample-freezing drive shoe designed for a wire line piston core sampler allowed collection of cores with intact sediment, microbial, and pore fluid distributions and has been the basis for studies documenting centimeter-scale variations in aquifer microbial populations (Murphy and Herkelrath, 1996). However, this freezing drive shoe design is not compatible with modern-day direct push sampling rigs. A re-designed sample-freezing drive shoe compatible with a direct-push dual-tube coring system was developed and field-tested. The freezing drive shoe retained sediment and fluid distributions in saturated sediment core samples by freezing a 10 centimeter plug below the core sample with liquid CO­2. Core samples collected across the smear zone at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, were successfully extracted without loss of fluid or sediment. Multiple core sections from different depths in the aquifer were retrieved from a single hole. This new design makes a highly effective sampling technology available on modern-day direct push sampling equipment to inform myriad questions about subsurface biogeochemistry processes. The re-design of the freezing drive shoe was supported by the USGS Innovation Center for Earth Sciences. References: Murphy, Fred, and W. N. Herkelrath. "A sample

  15. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, hλ(r ,r') , in which interactions λ u (r ,r') are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function hλ(r ,r') is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure cλ(r ,r') ≈-λ β u (r ,r') , known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges.

  16. Eocene and Miocene extension, meteoric fluid infiltration, and core complex formation in the Great Basin (Raft River Mountains, Utah)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Teyssier, Christian; Wells, Michael L.; Cosca, Michael A.; Gottardi, Raphaël.; Gébelin, Aude; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) in the North American Cordillera reflect the effects of lithospheric extension and contribute to crustal adjustments both during and after a protracted subduction history along the Pacific plate margin. While the Miocene-to-recent history of most MCCs in the Great Basin, including the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek MCC, is well documented, early Cenozoic tectonic fabrics are commonly severely overprinted. We present stable isotope, geochronological (40Ar/39Ar), and microstructural data from the Raft River detachment shear zone. Hydrogen isotope ratios of syntectonic white mica (δ2Hms) from mylonitic quartzite within the shear zone are very low (-90‰ to -154‰, Vienna SMOW) and result from multiphase synkinematic interaction with surface-derived fluids. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals Eocene (re)crystallization of white mica with δ2Hms ≥ -154‰ in quartzite mylonite of the western segment of the detachment system. These δ2Hms values are distinctively lower than in localities farther east (δ2Hms ≥ -125‰), where 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data indicate Miocene (18-15 Ma) extensional shearing and mylonitic fabric formation. These data indicate that very low δ2H surface-derived fluids penetrated the brittle-ductile transition as early as the mid-Eocene during a first phase of exhumation along a detachment rooted to the east. In the eastern part of the core complex, prominent top-to-the-east ductile shearing, mid-Miocene 40Ar/39Ar ages, and higher δ2H values of recrystallized white mica, indicate Miocene structural and isotopic overprinting of Eocene fabrics.

  17. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  18. Gas phase synthesis of core-shell Fe@FeO x magnetic nanoparticles into fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, Sitki; Thornton, Stuart C.; Binns, Chris; Denby, Phil

    2016-12-01

    Sorbitol, short chain molecules, have been used to stabilise of Fe@FeO x nanoparticles produced in the gas phase under the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The sorbitol coated Fe@FeO x nanoparticles produced by our method have a narrow size distribution with a hydrodynamic diameter of 35 nm after NaOH is added to the solution. Magnetisation measurement shows that the magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at 100 K and demonstrate hysteresis at 5 K with an anisotropy constant of 5.31 × 104 J/m3 (similar to bulk iron). Also, it is shown that sorbitol is only suitable for stabilising the Fe@FeO x suspensions, and it does not prevent further oxidation of the metallic Fe core. According to MRI measurement, the nanoparticles have a high transverse relaxation rate of 425 mM-1 s-1.

  19. Laser-tuned whispering gallery modes in a solid-core microstructured optical fibre integrated with magnetic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Song, Binbin; Li, Yuetao; Yang, Chengkun; Liu, Yange

    2015-01-01

    A laser-assisted tuning method of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in a cylindrical microresonator based on magnetic-fluids-infiltrated microstructured optical fibres (MFIMOFs, where MF and MOF respectively refer to magnetic fluid and microstructured optical fibre) is proposed, experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analysed in detail. The MFIMOF is prepared by infiltrating the air-hole array of the MOF using capillary action effect. A fibre-coupling system is set up for the proposed MFIMOF-based microresonator to acquire an extinction ratio up to 25 dB and a Q-factor as large as 4.0 × 104. For the MF-infiltrated MOF, the light propagating in the fibre core region would rapidly spread out and would be absorbed by the MF-rod array cladding to induce significant thermal effect. This has been exploited to achieve a WGM resonance wavelength sensitivity of 0.034 nm/mW, which is ~20 times higher than it counterpart without MF infiltration. The wavelength response of the resonance dips exhibit linear power dependence, and owing to such desirable merits as ease of fabrication, high sensitivity and laser-assisted tunability, the proposed optical tuning approach of WGMs in the MFIMOF would find promising applications in the areas of optical filtering, sensing, and signal processing, as well as future all-optical networking systems. PMID:26632445

  20. Fluid Dynamic Eqs.For Adiabatic Convection In Earth's Ultracompressed Core; Turbulence Engendered Large-Scale Motions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. L.

    1996-11-01

    Our analysis is divided into 2 parts, i.e., establishing formalism that predicts (a), convective flows in Earth's, molten, precessing, core that arise from 15-20 heat sources distributed over solid inner core boundary, r=R_ic, how they induce B-field reversals and transport heat of 4 radioactive disintegration chains (some now inactive) contained within, r<= R_ic, and (b) turbulence-en-gendered large-scale \\underlinemer. motion and \\underlineturbulent different rot., which are coupled by Coriolis forces. Beginning with Navier-Stokes eq. we write for Earth's core, ρ dv/dt = ρga + 2 ρ v × Υ -nabla p + (4 π μ)-1 (nabla × B) × B + η nabla^2 v + η \\over 3 nabla (nabla - v) -2 \\over 3 (nabla - v) nabla η + nabla η - nabla v + nabla v - nabla η, where ga is appar. acceleration of gravity. Since coeff. of viscosity η depends only on p, T it is closely only a function of r; η = η(r), altho η = const. will suffice for convection calculations. In \\underlineeq. of secular fluid motion, obtained by forming ensemble mean of vector curl of N-S eq., viscous forces are driving forces and last 3 terms should be retained. Eq. of continuity remains as before but state eq. p = ρkT and adiabaticity eq. for perfect gas fail to apply to liquids and we must adopt eqs. for ultracompressed fluids^1, namely, \\underlinestate eq., κ (p=p_o) = loge ρ/ ρo + \\varepsilon (T-T_o) and \\underlineadiabatic eq., Te ^a/ρ= const., α = Mw \\varepsilon/κ c_V; cV is molar thermal capacity, etc. We subst. this into state equation to avoid dependent variable T getting a p-ρ form of adiabatic law: κ (p-p_o) = log ρ/ρo + \\varepsilon T_o[e^α(ρ_o-1 - ρ-1) - 1] dot = [1 + \\varepsilon α T_o/ρ_o] - (ρ - ρ_o)/ρ_o, r.h. approx. used in \\underlinediscrete juxtaposition. ^1 [-2.3pt] ^1 K L McDonald, Computations In Theoretical Physics ..., Univ. Ut., Expt. Sta. Bul. 138, Vol. 56, No. 27(1966), 129 pp.

  1. Spin-up From Rest In A Stratified Fluid: Core Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flor, J. B.; Bush, J. W. M.; Ungarish, M.

    We investigate the spin-up from rest of a stratified fluid with initial Brunt-Väisälä fre- quency N bound within a cylindrical container of height H and radius R which is set to rotate impulsively with angular speed . The initial phase of motion is marked by the establishment of axisymmetric corner vortices fed by radial Ekman transport, a process detailed in Flor, Ungarish &Bush (2001). The subsequent evolution of the central vortex depends critically on N/f. For N/f > 1 and H/R > 1, the axisymme- try of the system is retained throughout the spin-up process: the central vortex attains a state of near solid body rotation by the diffusion of vorticity from the sidewalls. For N/f > 1 and H/R < 1, the central vortex breaks up into a series of vertical vortices that enhance transfer of angular momentum from the boundaries and so expedite the spin-up process. For N/f < 1, the central vortex becomes unstable through a tilting instability. In a short tank, this is marked by a simple tipping of the central stratified vortex. In a tall tank, the centerline of the central vortex is twisted from its vertical po- sition, and the resulting instability gives rise to a stack of vortices with approximately constant Burger ratio Nh/fR.

  2. Fluid-Rock Characterization for NMR Well Logging and Special Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Kishore Mohanty

    2007-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop, build and test a high-speed drilling motor that can meet the performance guidelines of the announcement, namely: 'The motors are expected to rotate at a minimum of 10,000 rpm, have an OD no larger than 7 inches and work downhole continuously for at least 100 hours. The motor must have common oilfield thread connections capable of making up to a drill bit and bottomhole assembly. The motor must be capable of transmitting drilling fluid through the motor'. To these goals, APS would add that the motor must be economically viable, in terms of both its manufacturing and maintenance costs, and be applicable to as broad a range of markets as possible. APS has taken the approach of using a system using planetary gears to increase the speed of a conventional mud motor to 10,000 rpm. The mud flow is directed around the outside of the gear train, and a unique flow diversion system has been employed. A prototype of the motor was built and tested in APS's high-pressure flow loop. The motor operated per the model up to {approx}4200 rpm. At that point a bearing seized and the performance was severely degraded. The motor is being rebuilt and will be retested outside of this program.

  3. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2013-07-01

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  4. Metastable liquid-liquid coexistence and density anomalies in a core-softened fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, H. M.; Wilding, N. B.

    2006-06-01

    Linearly sloped or “ramp” potentials belong to a class of core-softened models which possess a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in addition to the usual liquid-gas critical point. Furthermore, they exhibit thermodynamic anomalies in their density and compressibility, the nature of which may be akin to those occurring in water. Previous simulation studies of ramp potentials have focused on just one functional form, for which the LLCP is thermodynamically stable. In this work we construct a series of ramp potentials, which interpolate between this previously studied form and a ramp-based approximation to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. By means of Monte Carlo simulation, we locate the LLCP, the first order high density liquid (HDL)-low density liquid (LDL) coexistence line, and the line of density maxima for a selection of potentials in the series. We observe that as the LJ limit is approached, the LLCP becomes metastable with respect to freezing into a hexagonal close packed crystalline solid. The qualitative nature of the phase behavior in this regime shows a remarkable resemblance to that seen in simulation studies of accurate water models. Specifically, the density of the liquid phase exceeds that of the solid; the gradient of the metastable LDL-HDL line is negative in the pressure (p) -temperature (T) plane; while the line of density maxima in the p-T plane has a shape similar to that seen in water and extends into the stable liquid region of the phase diagram. As such, our results lend weight to the “second critical point” hypothesis as an explanation for the anomalous behavior of water.

  5. Fluid-rock interactions in seismic faults: Implications from the structures and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of drilling cores from the rupture of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Ma, Shengli; Chen, Jianye; Chen, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    We describe the structural features and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the fault rocks recovered from boreholes at the Golden River site on the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, which activated and slipped along a 240 km-long main surface rupture zone during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The fault, which accommodated co-seismic slip, cuts granitic rocks from the Pengguan complex, in which this earthquake most likely nucleated. Fault rocks, including cohesive cataclasite, unconsolidated breccia and three fault gouges with distinct colors, were identified from the drilling cores. On-going uplift and erosion in the area means that the fault rocks, formed at different depth, were exhumed to the shallow surface during the uplift history of the Longmenshan fault zone. A clear change from fracturing and comminution in the cataclasites and breccia to more pervasive shear/formation of fine grained materials in the gouges has been observed. The gouges are distinct and have accommodated significant displacement in multiple increments of shear. Furthermore, fault rocks recovered from the boreholes display numerous features indicative of fluid infiltration and fluid-rock interaction. Toward the fault core, clay minerals have replaced feldspars. The element enrichment/depletion patterns of the fault rocks show general fluid infiltration trends, such as 1) mobile elements are generally depleted in the fault rocks, 2) the microstructural, mineralogical and geochemical results of the fault rocks consistently indicate that pervasive fluid infiltration and fluid-rock interactions altered feldspars and mafic minerals to clay minerals. The fluid was Mg2 +- and Fe2 +-rich, facilitating formation of chlorite. Isocon analyses further reveal that a large rock volume has been lost, which is attributed to the removal of mobile elements associated with fluid infiltration and perhaps enhanced by pressure solution. These results reflect the accumulated effects of cataclasis and fluid

  6. One-dimensional Gaussian-core fluid: ordering and crossover from normal diffusion to single-file dynamics.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Pérez-Angel, Gabriel; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-11-09

    The peculiarity of a bounded pair potential in combination with strong confinement brings some quite interesting new phenomenology in the structure and dynamics of one-dimensional colloidal systems. Such behaviour is atypical in comparison with colloidal systems interacting with potentials that diverge at the origin. In this contribution, by means of molecular dynamics simulations, a confined one-dimensional model of particles interacting via a Gaussian-core pair potential is studied. We explore the effects of confinement, density and temperature on the structural and dynamical correlation functions. Our findings indicate that the static and dynamic liquid-state anomalies already reported in open systems are also present in this 1D model system. Using the radial distribution function and the static structure factor to characterise the spatial ordering, it is observed that the system remains fluid at all densities. However, when the reduced temperature is above 0.03, it displays typical features of a liquid regime, i.e., there exist short-range spatial correlations among particles. In contrast, at lower temperatures and densities, where the particle-particle interaction dominates, the system behaves structurally and dynamically similar to a hard-core repulsive system. In such a region, interestingly, there is a crossover from a liquid to a solid-like regime. At any given temperature, the system undergoes a sort of reentrant structural behaviour as the density increases. At either high densities or temperatures, particle correlations vanish, thus, the system exhibits structural and dynamical properties similar to those of an ideal gas. To examine a possible correlation between the structural anomalies and the diffusive behaviour, the mean-square displacement and the self-intermediate scattering function are also computed. From these observables, we establish the thermodynamic phase-space points where the dynamical behaviour is non-monotonic. In conjunction with the

  7. Influence of open and sealed fractures on fluid flow and water saturation in sandstone cores using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka-Lokmane, S.; Teutsch, G.; Main, I. G.

    2001-11-01

    We use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to image the imbibition of water by capillary action in a right-cylindrical sample of a porous sedimentary rock with low iron content. In the method some 55 repeat images are taken over a period of approximately two hours, covering five vertical sections. The evolution of the water flood front and the degree of water saturation can be observed by examining snapshots of proton density. The results clearly show (a) the development of a rising wetting front in the rock matrix (b) preferential flow along open fractures observed on the core surface, and (c) reduced flow associated with sealed fractures. The inferred location, orientation and connectivity of conducting and sealing fractures are confirmed by impregnating the sample after the test with an appropriate low-viscosity setting resin and taking serial thin sections in destructive mode. The results validate the utility of MRI as a non-destructive analytical tool for visualizing the distribution of water inside fractured porous media with low iron content. The technique identifies paths of high and low permeability in the sample, and quantifies the fracture location, orientation, and connectivity in sedimentary rocks. Preferential fluid flow in open fractures during capillary imbibition implies that the fractures are more water-wet than the clasts within the matrix. This may be due to due to differences in the age, morphology and mineral structure on the surface of the pores and the fractures.

  8. Evolution of fluid-rock interaction in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland: Evidence from Iceland Deep Drilling Project core RN-17B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Schiffman, Peter; Marks, Naomi; Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ómar

    2015-09-01

    We describe the lithology and present spatially resolved geochemical analyses of samples from the hydrothermally altered Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) drill core RN-17B. The 9.3 m long RN-17B core was collected from the seawater-dominated Reykjanes geothermal system, located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. The nature of fluids and the location of the Reykjanes geothermal system make it a useful analog for seafloor hydrothermal processes, although there are important differences. The recovery of drill core from the Reykjanes geothermal system, as opposed to drill cuttings, has provided the opportunity to investigate evolving geothermal conditions by utilizing in-situ geochemical techniques in the context of observed paragenetic and spatial relationships of alteration minerals. The RN-17B core was returned from a vertical depth of ~ 2560 m and an in-situ temperature of ~ 345 °C. The primary lithologies are basaltic in composition and include hyaloclastite breccia, fine-grained volcanic sandstone, lithic breccia, and crystalline basalt. Primary igneous phases have been entirely pseudomorphed by calcic plagioclase + magnesium hornblende + chlorite + titanite + albitized plagioclase + vein epidote and sulfides. Despite the extensive hydrothermal metasomatism, original textures including hyaloclastite glass shards, lithic clasts, chilled margins, and shell-fragment molds are superbly preserved. Multi-collector LA-ICP-MS strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) measurements of vein epidote from the core are consistent with seawater as the dominant recharge fluid. Epidote-hosted fluid inclusion homogenization temperature and freezing point depression measurements suggest that the RN-17B core records cooling through the two-phase boundary for seawater over time to current in-situ measured temperatures. Electron microprobe analyses of hydrothermal hornblende and hydrothermal plagioclase confirm that while alteration is of amphibolite-grade, it is in disequilibrium

  9. RESEARCH NOTE On the hard core Yukawa fluid of variable range: Monte Carlo simulations and test of the MSA equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Ernesto; Mier-Y-Teran, Luis; Del Rio, Fernando

    A recently proposed analytical equation of state (EOS) for the hard core Yukawa fluid is tested against results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The Duh and Mier-y-Teran (DMT) equation of state is based on the mean-spherical approximation (MSA) and gives the free energy of the fluid for arbitrary ranges of the Yukawa interaction. The pressure EOS is compared with results of new NV T MC simulations for shorter ranges of the potential and with the solution of the MSA. In all cases, the DMT EOS reproduces very accurately the MSA results obtained via the energy route. For the longer Yukawa ranges, the DMT EOS agrees well with the MC results but systematic deviations, due to the MSA itself, are noticeable for shorter ranges.

  10. The use of heat transfer fluids in the synthesis of high-quality CdSe quantum dots, core/shell quantum dots, and quantum rods.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Subashini; Krueger, Karl M; Alkhawaldeh, Ammar; Carreon, Alessandra R; Mu, Zuze; Colvin, Vicki L; Mantzaris, Nikos V; Wong, Michael S

    2005-10-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles, or quantum dots, have potential uses as an optical material, in which the optoelectronic properties can be tuned precisely by particle size. Advances in chemical synthesis have led to improvements in size and shape control, cost, and safety. A limiting step in large-scale production is identified to be the raw materials cost, in which a common synthesis solvent, octadecene, accounts for most of the materials cost for a batch of CdSe quantum dots. Thus, less expensive solvents are needed. In this paper, we identify heat transfer fluids, a class of organic liquids commonly used in chemical process industries to transport heat between unit operations, as alternative solvents for quantum dot synthesis. We specifically show that two heat transfer fluids can be used successfully in the synthesis of CdSe quantum dots with uniform particle sizes. We show that the synthesis chemistry for CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots and CdSe quantum rods can also be performed in heat transfer fluids. With the aid of a population balance model, we interpret the effect of different HT fluids on QD growth kinetics in terms of solvent effects, i.e., solvent viscosity, CdSe bulk solubility in the solvent, and surface free energy.

  11. Composition, Alteration, and Texture of Fault-Related Rocks from Safod Core and Surface Outcrop Analogs: Evidence for Deformation Processes and Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Davis, Colter R.; Shervais, John W.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Evans, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the fine-scale variations in mineralogical composition, geochemical alteration, and texture of the fault-related rocks from the Phase 3 whole-rock core sampled between 3,187.4 and 3,301.4 m measured depth within the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole near Parkfield, California. This work provides insight into the physical and chemical properties, structural architecture, and fluid-rock interactions associated with the actively deforming traces of the San Andreas Fault zone at depth. Exhumed outcrops within the SAF system comprised of serpentinite-bearing protolith are examined for comparison at San Simeon, Goat Rock State Park, and Nelson Creek, California. In the Phase 3 SAFOD drillcore samples, the fault-related rocks consist of multiple juxtaposed lenses of sheared, foliated siltstone and shale with block-in-matrix fabric, black cataclasite to ultracataclasite, and sheared serpentinite-bearing, finely foliated fault gouge. Meters-wide zones of sheared rock and fault gouge correlate to the sites of active borehole casing deformation and are characterized by scaly clay fabric with multiple discrete slip surfaces or anastomosing shear zones that surround conglobulated or rounded clasts of compacted clay and/or serpentinite. The fine gouge matrix is composed of Mg-rich clays and serpentine minerals (saponite ± palygorskite, and lizardite ± chrysotile). Whole-rock geochemistry data show increases in Fe-, Mg-, Ni-, and Cr-oxides and hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, and C-rich material, with a total organic content of >1 % locally in the fault-related rocks. The faults sampled in the field are composed of meters-thick zones of cohesive to non-cohesive, serpentinite-bearing foliated clay gouge and black fine-grained fault rock derived from sheared Franciscan Formation or serpentinized Coast Range Ophiolite. X-ray diffraction of outcrop samples shows that the foliated clay gouge is composed primarily of saponite and serpentinite, with localized

  12. Cryogenic brines as a diagenetic fluid: using clumped isotopes to reconstruct the cementation history of sediments in the ANDRILL 2A core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, P. T.; Dunham, D.; Fielding, C. R.; Frank, T. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    The ANDRILL 2A core contains a succession of Neogene glaciomarine deposits, cemented by up to 20 wt% carbonate. Isotopic analysis of the cements yielded extremely negative d18O values, indicating either formation from isotopically negative fluids or at extremely high temperature. In outcrop, such values could be interpreted as being the result of meteoric diagenesis, but the lack of any exposure horizons in the core precludes such an interpretation. A previous study of the pore fluids described a brine below 200m, with an extremely negative δ18O value (c. -10‰), probably formed by batch-freezing seawater on the continental margin. The present study integrates ∆47­ values of the cements with traditional approaches to further assess the nature of diagenetic fluids and processes. Isotopic data suggest three sources of carbonate: marine, methane reducing, and the aforementioned brines. Marine carbonate indicates δ13C and water δ18O within the range typical of seawater (c. -1‰), whereas the cryogenic brines show more negative values. A few samples exhibited extremely low δ13C values, the lowest below -25‰; the only feasible source for these cements would be the oxidation of methane. The shallow cements' signatures diminish with depth as cryogenic brines begin to dominate the isotopic signal. Biogenic materials show an increased influence of this brine at depth, the deepest buried shells are isotopically indistinguishable from adjacent cements. These analyses show that these cryogenic brines play a major role in the diagenetic history of this site. Clumped isotopic results support previous interpretations using traditional methods, which have identified cryogenic brine as a major cementing agent in the subsurface of Southern McMurdo Sound. Because cryogenic brines have likely formed throughout Earth history, results have the potential to change the way diagenesis is evaluated in sedimentary successions that formed in polar environments.

  13. Polar organic compounds in pore waters of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Eyreville core hole: Character of the dissolved organic carbon and comparison with drilling fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Sanford, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure cores recovered at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, were analyzed to characterize the dissolved organic carbon. After squeezing or centrifuging, a small volume of pore water, 100 ??L, was taken for analysis by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Porewater samples were analyzed directly without filtration or fractionation, in positive and negative mode, for polar organic compounds. Spectra in both modes were dominated by low-molecular-weight ions. Negative mode had clusters of ions differing by -60 daltons, possibly due to increasing concentrations of inorganic salts. The numberaverage molecular weight and weight-average molecular weight values for the pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure are higher than those reported for other aquatic sources of natural dissolved organic carbon as determined by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. In order to address the question of whether drilling mud fluids may have contaminated the pore waters during sample collection, spectra from the pore waters were compared to spectra from drilling mud fluids. Ions indicative of drilling mud fluids were not found in spectra from the pore waters, indicating there was no detectable contamination, and highlighting the usefulness of this analytical technique for detecting potential contamination during sample collection. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  14. Analysis of fluid instabilities in core collapse supernova progenitors by a semi-analytical methodology and by two dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raley, Elizabeth

    2004-12-01

    We have performed an analysis of fluid instabilities below the neutrinospheres of the collapsed cores of supernova progenitors using a methodology introduced by Bruenn and Dineva [28, 29, 31]. In an extensive survey we found that the rate of lepton diffusion always exceeds the rate of thermal diffusion and as a result we do not anywhere see the neutron finger instability as described by the Livermore group [16, 17]. A new instability, lepto-entropy fingers, extending from a radius of 10 15 km out to the vicinity of the neutrinosphere, driven by the cross-response functions (i.e. the dependence of lepton transport on entropy perturbations and vice versa) was discovered. This instability has a maximum growth rate of the order of 100 s-1 with a scale of approximately 1/20 the distance of a perturbed fluid element from the core center [18]. This instability has probably already been seen in some multi-dimensional core collapse calculations. To test our results predicting the presence of doubly diffusive instabilities below the neutrinosphere of a proto-supernova, we have performed two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radial ray neutrino transport. This entailed rewriting RadHyd, which is the merger of EVH-1 hydrodynamics and MGFLD neutrino transport developed by Bruenn and DiNisco [43], for two dimensions. In particular, hydrodynamic evolution along angular arrays was included, as was MPI message passing capabilities, in order to utilize massively parallel computer platform such as FAU's BOCA4 Beowulf cluster. This work was partially funded by a grant from the DOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

  15. Thermal convection of an internally heated infinite Prandtl number fluid in a spherical shell. [earth core-mantle-surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1980-01-01

    A Galerkin technique is used to study the finite-amplitude axisymmetric steady convective motions of an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid in a spherical shell. Two types of heating are considered: in one case, convection is driven both by internal heat sources in the fluid and by an externally imposed temperature drop across the shell boundaries; in the other case, only internal heat sources drive convection and the lower boundary of the shell is adiabatic. Two distinct classes of axisymmetric steady states are found to be possible: states characterized by temperature and radial velocity fields that are symmetric about an equatorial plane; and a class of solutions that does not possess any symmetry properties about the equatorial plane.

  16. Glass transition in hard-core fluids and beyond, using an effective static structure in the mode coupling theory.

    PubMed

    Amokrane, S; Tchangnwa Nya, F; Ndjaka, J M

    2017-02-01

    The dynamical arrest in classical fluids is studied using a simple modification of the mode coupling theory (MCT) aimed at correcting its overestimation of the tendency to glass formation while preserving its overall structure. As in previous attempts, the modification is based on the idea of tempering the static pair correlations used as input. It is implemented in this work by computing the static structure at a different state point than the one used to solve the MCT equation for the intermediate scattering function, using the pure hard-sphere glass for calibration. The location of the glass transition predicted from this modification is found to agree with simulations data for a variety of systems --pure fluids and mixtures with either purely repulsive interaction potentials or ones with attractive contributions. Besides improving the predictions in the long-time limit, and so reducing the non-ergodicity domain, the same modification works as well for the time-dependent correlators.

  17. A heterogeneous system based on GPU and multi-core CPU for real-time fluid and rigid body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Junior, José Ricardo; Gonzalez Clua, Esteban W.; Montenegro, Anselmo; Lage, Marcos; Dreux, Marcelo de Andrade; Joselli, Mark; Pagliosa, Paulo A.; Kuryla, Christine Lucille

    2012-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in simulation has become an important field not only for physics and engineering areas but also for simulation, computer graphics, virtual reality and even video game development. Many efficient models have been developed over the years, but when many contact interactions must be processed, most models present difficulties or cannot achieve real-time results when executed. The advent of parallel computing has enabled the development of many strategies for accelerating the simulations. Our work proposes a new system which uses some successful algorithms already proposed, as well as a data structure organisation based on a heterogeneous architecture using CPUs and GPUs, in order to process the simulation of the interaction of fluids and rigid bodies. This successfully results in a two-way interaction between them and their surrounding objects. As far as we know, this is the first work that presents a computational collaborative environment which makes use of two different paradigms of hardware architecture for this specific kind of problem. Since our method achieves real-time results, it is suitable for virtual reality, simulation and video game fluid simulation problems.

  18. Effects of fluids on faulting within active fault zones - evidence from drill core samples recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Kienast, M.; Morales, L. G.; Rybacki, E.; Wenk, H.; Dresen, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Low temperature microstructures observed in samples from SAFOD drill cores indicate fluid-related deformation and chemical reactions occurring simultaneously and interacting with each other. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observations, document open pores that formed in-situ during or after deformation. In TEM images, many pores with high aspect ratio appear to be unconnected. They were possibly filled with formation water and/or hydrothermal fluids suggesting that elevated pore fluid pressure exist in the fault gouge, preventing pore collapse. The chemical influence of fluids on mineralogical alteration and geomechanical processes in fault rocks is visible in pronounced dissolution-precipitation processes (stylolites, solution seams) as well as in the formation of new phases. Detrital quartz and feldspar grains are partially dissolved and replaced by authigenic illite-smectite (I-S) mixed-layer clay minerals. TEM imaging of these grains reveals that the alteration processes initiated within pores and small intra-grain fissures. In few samples syntectonic fluid-assisted overgrowth of chlorite-rich films on slickensides partly replaced sedimentary quartz grains. Quartz and feldspar grains are partially dissolved with sutured boundaries. Newly-formed phyllosilicates are illite-smectite phases, Mg-rich smectites and chlorite minerals. They are very fine-grained (down to 20 nm) and nucleate at grain surfaces (interfaces), which in many cases are pore or fracture walls. These relatively straight or curved crystals grow into open pore spaces and fractures. They are arranged in a card-house fabric with open pore spaces between the flakes. Locally, clay flakes are bent, folded or show sigmoidal shapes indicating that they were involved in faulting. The clay particles do not show a preferred shape orientation. The predominantly random orientation distribution of the clay minerals was confirmed by x-ray synchrotron texture analysis. Pole figures show very weak

  19. Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chornack, M.P.; French, C.A.

    1989-12-31

    Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Evolution of the liquid-vapor coexistence of the hard-core Yukawa fluid as a function of the interaction range.

    PubMed

    El Mendoub, E B; Wax, J-F; Jakse, N

    2010-04-28

    The present work is devoted to the study of the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of hard-core Yukawa fluids for range parameter lambda, going from 0.5 to 7 by means of an integral equation approach. Both binodal and spinodal lines are computed and compared to available simulation data, and the integral equation used appears to be accurate. We also compare two methods for determining the coordinates of the critical point. The first one, using the rectilinear diameter law, appears to be less accurate than the second one based on the heat capacity at constant volume. It is found that the critical temperature decreases as the range of the interactions increases and that the liquid-vapor coexistence disappears for lambda greater than 6.

  1. Simulating stress-dependent fluid flow in a fractured core sample using real-time X-ray CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Tobias; Huo, Da; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Enzmann, Frieder; Benson, Sally; Blum, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Various geoscientific applications require a fast prediction of fracture permeability for an optimal workflow. Hence, the objective of the current study is to introduce and validate a practical method to characterize and approximate single flow in fractures under different stress conditions by using a core-flooding apparatus, in situ X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans and a finite-volume method solving the Navier-Stokes-Brinkman equations. The permeability of the fractured sandstone sample was measured stepwise during a loading-unloading cycle (0.7 to 22.1 MPa and back) to validate the numerical results. Simultaneously, the pressurized core sample was imaged with a medical X-ray CT scanner with a voxel dimension of 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm3. Fracture geometries were obtained by CT images based on a modification of the simplified missing attenuation (MSMA) approach. Simulation results revealed both qualitative plausibility and a quantitative approximation of the experimentally derived permeabilities. The qualitative results indicate flow channeling along several preferential flow paths with less pronounced tortuosity. Significant changes in permeability can be assigned to temporal and permanent changes within the fracture due to applied stresses. The deviations of the quantitative results appear to be mainly caused by both local underestimation of hydraulic properties due to compositional matrix heterogeneities and the low CT resolution affecting the accurate capturing of sub-grid-scale features. Both affect the proper reproduction of the actual connectivity and therefore also the depiction of the expected permeability hysteresis. Furthermore, the threshold value CTmat (1862.6 HU) depicting the matrix material represents the most sensitive input parameter of the simulations. Small variations of CTmat can cause enormous changes in simulated permeability by up to a factor of 2.6 ± 0.1 and, thus, have to be defined with caution. Nevertheless, comparison with further CT

  2. On the importance of thermodynamic self-consistency for calculating clusterlike pair correlations in hard-core double Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Min; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Liu, Yun; Wagner, Norman J.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of clustering in colloids, nanoparticles, and proteins is of significant interest in material science and both chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, using an integral equation theory formalism, Bomont et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 184508 (2010)] studied theoretically the temperature dependence, at a fixed density, of the cluster formation in systems where particles interact with a hard-core double Yukawa potential composed of a short-range attraction and a long-range repulsion. In this paper, we provide evidence that the low-q peak in the static structure factor, frequently associated with the formation of clusters, is a common behavior in systems with competing interactions. In particular, we demonstrate that, based on a thermodynamic self-consistency criterion, accurate structural functions are obtained for different choices of closure relations. Moreover, we explore the dependence of the low-q peak on the particle number density, temperature, and potential parameters. Our findings indicate that enforcing thermodynamic self-consistency is the key factor to calculate both thermodynamic properties and static structure factors, including the low-q behavior, for colloidal dispersions with both attractive and repulsive interactions. Additionally, a simple analysis of the mean number of neighboring particles provides a qualitative description of some of the cluster features.

  3. Structural evolution of the Rio Grande rift: Synchronous exhumation of rift flanks from 20-10 Ma, embryonic core complexes, and fluid-enhanced Quaternary extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Jason William

    The Rio Grande rift in Colorado and New Mexico is one of the well-exposed and well-studied continental rifts in the world. Interest in the rift is driven not only by pure scientific intrigue, but also by a desire and a necessity to quantify earthquake hazards in New Mexico as well as to assess various water related issues throughout the state. These motivating topics have thus far led to the publication of two Geological Society of America Special Publication volumes in 1994 and 2013. This dissertation aims at building on the wealth of previous knowledge about the rift, and is composed of three separate chapters that focus on the structural evolution of the Rio Grande rift at several different time and spatial scales. At the largest scale, apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronologic data suggest synchronous extension along the entire length of the Rio Grande rift in Colorado and New Mexico from 20-10 Ma, which is important for understanding and evaluating possible driving mechanisms which are responsible for the rift. Previous tectonic and magmatic events in western North America were highly influential in the formation of the Rio Grande rift, and the new thermochronologic data suggest that its formation may have been closely linked to foundering and removal of the underlying Farallon Plate. A fundamental result of rift development at these scales is a concentration of strain is some regions of the rift. In these regions of maximum extension, fault networks display a geometry involving both high- and low-angle fault networks. These geometries are similar to the early stages in the development of metamorphic core complexes, and thus these regions in the rift link incipient extensional environments to highly extended terranes. At shorter time scales, heterogeneous strain accumulation may be governed in part by fluids in fault zones. As an example, along the western edge of the Albuquerque basin, travertine deposits are cut by extensional veins that record anomalously high

  4. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  5. Determination of the hydrocarbon core structure of fluid dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers by x-ray diffraction using specific bromination of the double-bonds: effect of hydration.

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, K; White, S H

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the structure of the hydrocarbon core (HC) of fluid lipid bilayers can reveal how bilayers respond to the partitioning of peptides and other solutes (Jacobs, R. E., and S. H. White. 1989. Biochemistry. 28:3421-3437). The structure of the HC of dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers can be determined from the transbilayer distribution of the double-bonds (Wiener, M. C., and S. H. White. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:434-447). This distribution, representing the time-averaged projection of the double-bond positions onto the bilayer normal (z), can be obtained by means of neutron diffraction and double-bond specific deuteration (Wiener, M. C., G. I. King, and S. H. White. 1991. Biophys. J. 60:568-576). For fully resolved bilayer profiles, a close approximation of the distribution could be obtained by x-ray diffraction and isomorphous bromine labeling at the double-bonds of the DOPC sn-2 acyl chain (Wiener, M. C., and S. H. White. 1991. Biochemistry. 30:6997-7008). We have modified the bromine-labeling approach in a manner that permits determination of the distribution in under-resolved bilayer profiles observed at high water contents. We used this new method to determine the transbilayer distribution of the double-bond bromine labels of DOPC over a hydration range of 5.4 to 16 waters per lipid, which reveals how the HC structure changes with hydration. We found that the transbilayer distributions of the bromines can be described by a pair of Gaussians of 1/e half-width A(Br) located at z = +Z(Br) relative to the bilayer center. For hydrations from 5.4 waters up to 9.4 waters per lipid, Z(Br) decreases from 7.97 +/- 0.27 A to 6.59 +/- 0.15 A, while A(Br) increased from 4.62 +/- 0.62 A to 5.92 +/- 0.37 A, consistent with the expected hydration-induced decrease in HC thickness and increase in area per lipid. After the phosphocholine hydration shell was filled at approximately 12 waters per lipid, we observed a shift in Z(Br) to approximately 7.3 A, indicative of a

  6. Determination of the hydrocarbon core structure of fluid dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers by x-ray diffraction using specific bromination of the double-bonds: effect of hydration.

    PubMed

    Hristova, K; White, S H

    1998-05-01

    Changes in the structure of the hydrocarbon core (HC) of fluid lipid bilayers can reveal how bilayers respond to the partitioning of peptides and other solutes (Jacobs, R. E., and S. H. White. 1989. Biochemistry. 28:3421-3437). The structure of the HC of dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers can be determined from the transbilayer distribution of the double-bonds (Wiener, M. C., and S. H. White. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:434-447). This distribution, representing the time-averaged projection of the double-bond positions onto the bilayer normal (z), can be obtained by means of neutron diffraction and double-bond specific deuteration (Wiener, M. C., G. I. King, and S. H. White. 1991. Biophys. J. 60:568-576). For fully resolved bilayer profiles, a close approximation of the distribution could be obtained by x-ray diffraction and isomorphous bromine labeling at the double-bonds of the DOPC sn-2 acyl chain (Wiener, M. C., and S. H. White. 1991. Biochemistry. 30:6997-7008). We have modified the bromine-labeling approach in a manner that permits determination of the distribution in under-resolved bilayer profiles observed at high water contents. We used this new method to determine the transbilayer distribution of the double-bond bromine labels of DOPC over a hydration range of 5.4 to 16 waters per lipid, which reveals how the HC structure changes with hydration. We found that the transbilayer distributions of the bromines can be described by a pair of Gaussians of 1/e half-width A(Br) located at z = +Z(Br) relative to the bilayer center. For hydrations from 5.4 waters up to 9.4 waters per lipid, Z(Br) decreases from 7.97 +/- 0.27 A to 6.59 +/- 0.15 A, while A(Br) increased from 4.62 +/- 0.62 A to 5.92 +/- 0.37 A, consistent with the expected hydration-induced decrease in HC thickness and increase in area per lipid. After the phosphocholine hydration shell was filled at approximately 12 waters per lipid, we observed a shift in Z(Br) to approximately 7.3 A, indicative of a

  7. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  8. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  9. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  10. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  11. Fluid-deposited graphitic inclusions in quartz: Comparison between KTB (German Continental Deep-Drilling) core samples and artificially reequilibrated natural inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pasteris, J.D.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We used Raman microsampling spectroscopy (RMS) to determine the degree of crystallinity of minute (2-15 ??m) graphite inclusions in quartz in two sets of samples: experimentally reequilibrated fluid inclusions in a natural quartz grain and biotite-bearing paragneisses from the KTB deep drillhole in SE Germany. Our sequential reequilibration experiments at 725??C on initially pure CO2 inclusions in a quartz wafer and the J. Krautheim (1993) experiments at 900-1100??C on organic compounds heated in gold or platinum capsules suggest that, at a given temperature, (1) fluid-deposited graphite will have a lower crystallinity than metamorphosed organic matter and (2) that the crystallinity of fluid-deposited graphite is affected by the composition of the fluid from which it was deposited. We determined that the precipitation of more-crystalline graphite is favored by lower fH2 (higher fO2), and that the crystallinity of graphite is established by the conditions (including gas fugacities) that pertain as the fluid first reaches graphite saturation. Graphite inclusions within quartz grains in the KTB rocks show a wide range in crystallinity index, reflecting three episodes of carbon entrapment under different metamorphic conditions. Isolated graphite inclusions have the spectral properties of totally ordered, completely crystalline graphite. Such crystallinity suggests that the graphite was incorporated from the surrounding metasedimentary rocks, which underwent metamorphism at upper amphibolite-facies conditions. Much of the fluid-deposited graphite in fluid inclusions, however, shows some spectral disorder. The properties of that graphite resemble those of experimental precipitates at temperatures in excess of 700??C and at elevated pressures, suggesting that the inclusions represent precipitates from C-O-H fluids trapped under conditions near those of peak metamorphism at the KTB site. In contrast, graphite that is intimately associated with chlorite and other

  12. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  13. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  14. FLUID DYNAMICS PRIZE: W.C. Reynolds, Stanford University, presiding: Core Dynamics Instability of a Vortex in Shear: A Physical-Space Cascade Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1998-11-01

    We study a rectilinear vortex normal to a uniform shear - a prototypical coherent structure in shear flows. A newly found instability of the vortex due to core size variations, absent without shear, is shown to result from stretching by shear of helically twisted vortex lines. Core Dynamics (CD)-induced strong axial flow generates a large low-enstrophy bubble, surrounded by a thin sheath of vorticity, which rolls up into fine-scale vortices due to localized instability. Additionally, fine-scale 3D vorticity fluctuations are generated within the bubble by vortex filament folding and reconnection. Despite its smaller linear growth rate compared to vortex bending modes, the CD instability (CDI) is shown to dominate transition and cascade when both modes are present. In particular, CDI of spanwise rolls by oblique modes dominates transition in a mixing layer (ML) even in the presence of well developed ribs. Interestingly, initiation of CDI in a ML closely resembles streak instability in fully-developed near-wall turbulence, the latter producing streamwise vortices and hence enhanced drag.

  15. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  16. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  17. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  18. Postimpact heat conduction and compaction-driven fluid flow in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure based on downhole vitrinite reflectance data, ICDP-USGS Eyreville deep core holes and Cape Charles test holes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malinconico, M.L.; Sanford, W.E.; Wright, Horton W.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance data from the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eyreville deep cores in the centralcrater moat of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and the Cape Charles test holes on the central uplift show patterns of postimpact maximum-temperature distribution that result from a combination of conductive and advective heat flow. Within the crater-fill sediment-clast breccia sequence at Eyreville, an isoreflectance (-0.44% Ro) section (525-1096 m depth) is higher than modeled background coastal-plain maturity and shows a pattern typical of advective fluid flow. Below an intervening granite slab, a short interval of sediment-clast breccia (1371-1397 m) shows a sharp increase in reflectance (0.47%-0.91% Ro) caused by conductive heat from the underlying suevite (1397-1474 m). Refl ectance data in the uppermost suevite range from 1.2% to 2.1% Ro. However, heat conduction alone is not sufficient to affect the temperature of sediments more than 100 m above the suevite. Thermal modeling of the Eyreville suevite as a 390 ??C cooling sill-like hot rock layer supplemented by compaction- driven vertical fluid flow (0.046 m/a) of cooling suevitic fluids and deeper basement brines (120 ??C) upward through the sediment breccias closely reproduces the measured reflectance data. This scenario would also replace any marine water trapped in the crater fill with more saline brine, similar to that currently in the crater, and it would produce temperatures sufficient to kill microbes in sediment breccias within 450 m above the synimsuevite. A similar downhole maturity pattern is present in the sediment-clast breccia over the central uplift. High-reflectance (5%-9%) black shale and siltstone clasts in the suevite and sediment-clast breccia record a pre-impact (Paleozoic?) metamorphic event. Previously published maturity data in the annular trough indicate no thermal effect there from impact-related processes. ?? 2009 The

  19. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... carefully. Removing a sample of the fluid through amniocentesis can provide information about the sex, health, and development of the fetus. Images Amniocentesis Amniotic fluid Polyhydramnios Amniotic fluid References Cunningham FG, ...

  20. Fluid-loss control

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C.W.; Trittipo, B.L. ); Hutchinson, B.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Acid fluid loss is extremely difficult to control and is generally considered to be the major factor limiting the effectiveness of acid fracturing treatments. Chemical erosion of fracture faces and the development of wormholes are largely responsible for the reduced efficiency of acid fracturing fluids. The creation of acid wormholes increases the effective area from which leakoff occurs, thus reducing the acid hydraulic efficiency. Once wormholes form, most acid fluid loss originates from these wormholes rather than penetrating uniformly into the fracture face. Methods of acid fluid-loss control are discussed and evaluated with an improved fluid-loss test procedure. This procedure uses limestone cores of sufficient length to contain wormhole growth. Studies demonstrate that if wormhole growth can be controlled, acid fluid loss approaches that of nonreactive fluids. An improved acid fracturing fluid having unique rheological characteristics is described. This acid has a low initial viscosity but temporarily becomes extremely viscous during leakoff. This high leakoff viscosity blocks wormhole development and prevents acid entry into natural fractures. After the treatment, spent-acid viscosity declines rapidly to ensure easier cleanup.

  1. Rotation and Magnetism of Earth's Inner Core

    PubMed

    Glatzmaier; Roberts

    1996-12-13

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the geodynamo suggest that a super- rotation of Earth's solid inner core relative to the mantle is maintained by magnetic coupling between the inner core and an eastward thermal wind in the fluid outer core. This mechanism, which is analogous to a synchronous motor, also plays a fundamental role in the generation of Earth's magnetic field.

  2. Sponge coring apparatus with reinforced sponge

    SciTech Connect

    Park, A.; Wilson, B. T.

    1985-03-05

    A well coring apparatus includes an outer barrel and an inner barrel. A hollow sponge is disposed along a liner for insertion into the inner barrel. The sponge is operable to absorb subterranean fluid from a well core. A plurality of reinforcing members are disposed on the inner surface of the liner to prevent movement of the sponge with respect thereto. A plurality of orifices are disposed in the surface of the liner to allow gas and/or fluid to escape from the interior thereof when the subterranean fluid contained within the core bleeds into the sponge.

  3. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  4. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  5. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Anderson, R.; Garino, T.; Halsey, T.C.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.

    1996-10-01

    An Electrorheological fluid is normally a low-viscosity colloidal suspension, but when an electric field is applied, the fluid undergoes a reversible transition to a solid, being able to support considerable stress without yield. Commercial possibilities for such fluids are enormous, including clutches, brakes, valves,shock absorbers, and stepper motors. However, performance of current fluids is inadequate for many proposed applications. Our goal was to engineer improved fluids by investigating the key technical issues underlying the solid-phase yield stress and the liquid to solid switching time. Our studies focused on field-induced interactions between colloidal particles that lead to solidification, the relation between fluid structure and performance (viscosity, yield stress), and the time evolution of structure in the fluid as the field is switched on or off.

  6. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-07

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process.

  7. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  8. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  9. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  10. Dynamics of the core, geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.

    1995-07-01

    "The mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field remains one of the central unsolved problems in geoscience." So states the report on the National Geomagnetic Initiative (NGI) prepared by the U.S. Geodynamics Committee, et al [1993], with advice from the NGI Workshop held in Washington D.C. in March 1992. All analyses of the geomagnetic data point to the core as containing the source of the field and "The basic premise that virtually everyone accepts is that the Earth's magnetism is created by a self-sustaining dynamo driven by fluid motions in Earth's core" (NGI, p.135). Dynamical questions at once arise, such as "What is the energy source driving those motions?" Jacobs [1953] proposed that the solid inner core (SIC) is the result of the freezing of the fluid outer core (FOC). Verhoogen [1961] noticed that the release of latent heat at the inner core boundary (ICB) during freezing would help drive thermal convection in the FOC, and Braginsky [1963] pointed out that the release of the light alloying elements during fractionation at the ICB would provide compositional buoyancy. These two sources suffice to supply the geodynamo with energy throughout geological time, even in the absence of dissolved radioactivity in the core [Braginsky and Roberts, 1994a; Kuang et al, 1994]. Stevenson [1991] argues that potential differences on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of electrochemical origin may be partially responsible for the geomagnetic field.

  11. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    PubMed

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency.

  12. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  13. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. The Special Bureau for the Core of the IERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoolst, T.; Dehant, V.

    2003-04-01

    In 1998, the IERS established the Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC), which consists of eight Special Bureaus for the different geophysical fluids. The Special Bureau for the Core (SBC) focuses on theoretical modelling and observations related to core flow, and on inner core - outer core - mantle interactions. The fluid outer core is in constant motion, and related changes in core angular momentum are known to cause length-of-day variations of a few milliseconds at decadal time scales. This poster will give an overview of the activities of the SBC. Since its creation in 1998, the SBC has created a web site (www.astro.oma.be/SBC/main.html) as the central mechanism for providing services to the geodynamic community. The web site contains documented model data on core flow and core angular momentum and an extensive bibliography. In addition, a description is given of the relevant theories and of the dynamical assumptions used for constructing the flow.

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  16. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, D.L.; Corley, W.T.

    1983-12-27

    A clay-based or clay-free aqueous thixotropic wellbore fluid having improved fluid loss control, desirable flow characteristics and low shale sensitivity for use in drilling a well comprising water or a brine base including an effective amount of an additive comprising a crosslinked potato starch, a heteropolysaccharide derived from a carbohydrate by bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas, and hydroxyethylcellulose or carboxymethylcellulose, is disclosed. This drilling fluid has been found to be nondamaging to the formations through which the well is drilled.

  17. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  18. Method of determining drilling fluid invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H. J.; Wellington, S. L.

    1985-09-10

    A method of determining the invasion of drilling fluid into a core sample taken from a borehole. A first material is added to the drilling fluid to obtain a first fluid that has an effective atomic number that is different than the effective atomic number of the connate fluids in the rock formation surrounding the borehole. A preserved core sample is collected from the borehole for scanning by a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CAT) to determine the attenuation coefficients at a plurality of points in a cross section of the core sample. The preserved core sample is scanned with a CAT at first and second energies, and the determined attenuation coefficients for the plurality of points in the cross section at each energy are used to determine an atomic number image for the cross section of the core sample. The depth of invasion of the first fluid is then determined from the atomic number image, as an indication of the depth of invasion of the drilling fluid into the core sample.

  19. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  20. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  1. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  2. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  3. Multidisciplinary Study of the Core and Computation of Core Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoolst, T.; Dehant, V.

    2002-12-01

    In 1998, the IERS established the Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC), which consists of eight Special Bureaus for the different geophysical fluids. The Special Bureau for the Core (SBC) focuses on theoretical modelling and observations related to core flow, and on inner core - outer core - mantle interactions. The fluid outer core is in constant motion, and related changes in core angular momentum are known to cause length-of-day variations of a few milliseconds at decadal time scales. This poster will give an overview of the activities of the SBC. Since its creation in 1998, the SBC has created a web site (www.astro.oma.be/SBC/main.html) as the central mechanism for providing services to the geodynamic community. The web site contains documented model data on core flow and core angular momentum and an extensive bibliography. In addition, a description is given of the relevant theories and of the dynamical assumptions used for constructing the flow. Reference Core Dynamics, structure, and rotation. eds. V. Dehant, K. Creager, S. Karato, S. Zatman, AGU monograph, 2002, in press, and articles therein such as Ponsar, S., Dehant, V., Holme, R., Jault, D., Pais, A., Van Hoolst, T., The Core and fluctuations in the Earth's rotation

  4. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  5. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  6. Earth's core and the geodynamo

    PubMed

    Buffett

    2000-06-16

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the liquid iron core. Details of how this occurs are now emerging from numerical simulations that achieve a self-sustaining magnetic field. Early results predict a dominant dipole field outside the core, and some models even reproduce magnetic reversals. The simulations also show how different patterns of flow can produce similar external fields. Efforts to distinguish between the various possibilities appeal to observations of the time-dependent behavior of the field. Important constraints will come from geological records of the magnetic field in the past.

  7. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  10. Earth rotation and core topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  11. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  12. Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  13. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  14. Measurement of interleukins in vitreous infusion fluid.

    PubMed

    Kase, Satoru; Yokoi, Masahiko; Ishida, Susumu; Kase, Manabu

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of interleukin (IL)-6 and -10 concentrations in the vitreous can be used to differentiate intraocular lymphoma (IOL) from uveitis. This is the first study reporting the IL-6 and -10 concentrations in the undiluted vitreous fluid and vitreous infusion fluid, which were simultaneously examined in the patients. A total of 2 females presented with intraocular inflammation, and underwent pars plana vitrectomy. Undiluted anterior vitreous and vitreous infusion fluid were collected simultaneously. IL concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems. Vitreous infusion fluid of 20 ml was eventually collected following completion of core vitrectomy in the two patients. IL-6 concentrations of the first patient were 513 and 106 pg/ml in the undiluted vitreous and the infusion fluid, respectively, while those of the second patient were 263 and 29 pg/ml. By contrast, IL-10 was under the detectable levels in all the fluids. The IL-10/-6 ratio was <1 in both fluids in the patients. Cytological examination revealed the presence of reactive inflammatory cells in the vitreous fluid. The two patients were eventually diagnosed with uveitis. Measurements of IL concentrations in the vitreous infusion fluid provided significant evidence on the differential diagnosis between IOL and uveitis, when considering how vitreous infusion fluid was diluted. The present study highlighted a novel application of cytokine analyses using the vitreous infusion fluid, which may contribute to the development of future translational researches on uveitis/IOL patients.

  15. Fluid-loss control for high-permeability rocks in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Mitchell, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    A study is presented on the effectiveness of different combinations of fluid and fluid-loss additives to control fluid loss in high-permeability formations under high shear rates. The impact on matrix damage and proppant-pack damage is also studied. Borate-crosslinked guars, hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and a surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid were investigated. The fluid-loss additive considered was silica flour. All fluid-loss tests were run in dynamic fluid-loss cells. To properly test high-permeability cores, new long core dynamic fluid-loss cells were used. The matrix damage caused by the invasion of the fluid was determined using pressure taps along the core. Conductivity tests were also run to determine the damage to the proppant pack. Results show that the effectiveness of particulate fluid-loss additives under dynamic conditions is strongly dependent on the initial leakoff rate, which depends on the pressure gradient across the core, permeability of the core and viscosity of the invading fluid. The use of silica flour helps matrix flowback, and it has a minimal effect on proppant-pack conductivity in clean fluids (e.g., surfactant water-base gravel packing fluid). With the exception of the borate-crosslinked guar with no fluid-loss additive, the variety of fluids used in these tests (with and without silica flour) have a negligible effect on postproduction.

  16. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  17. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothesis passes the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale range. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small-scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magnetogeostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other

  18. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  19. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    2004-05-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton [1992; GAFD] to scale-variant field and flow [Voorhies, 2004; JGR-SE, in press]. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field [Voorhies, Sabaka and Purucker, 2002; JGR-P], and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The

  20. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  1. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, F. H.

    In the past 8 years, since Pedlosky's book was first published, it has found a well established place in the literature of dynamical meteorology and physical oceanography. Geophysicists less familiar with these fields may need to be reminded that the subject of geophysical fluid dynamics, in the narrow definition used in the title of the book, refers to the theory of the large-scale motions of the atmosphere and the oceans. Topics such as thermal convection in the atmosphere or in Earth's mantle and core are not treated in this book, and the reader will search in vain for a discussion of atmospheric or oceanic tides. The theory of quasi-geostrophic flow is described comprehensively, however, and its major applications to problems of atmospheric and oceanic circulations are considered in detail.

  2. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-01-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from “capillary-elastic instabilities,” as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the “oscillating butter knife;” liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg–Borgas–Gaver shock. PMID:21403768

  3. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  4. Effectiveness of fluid loss additives in laboratory dynamic fluid loss experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, D.D.; Xie, X.

    1995-12-31

    A commercially available HTHP (high temperature, high pressure) dynamic filtration unit and a widely available HTHP rheometer was used to study dynamic fluid-loss behavior of uncrosslinked hydroxypropyl guar hydraulic fracturing fluid containing varying concentrations of silica flour, starch, and diesel. New dimensionless groups were defined for the dynamic fluid-loss problem. These groups were used first to effectively correlate previously reported laboratory data and later were employed to analyze the ensuing experimental data. Results demonstrate that low and high permeability cores require different mechanisms for fluid-loss control and that, compared to silica flour, starch may lose its effectiveness at higher concentrations.

  5. Magnectic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth s core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypotheses pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth s core, this yields a JGR-PI, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change.In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length- scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto- geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core- source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other planets may differ; however, if a transition to non

  6. Some aspects of core formation in Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Some questions dealing with the nature and history of a large metallic core within Mercury are considered. These include the existence of a core, its size, whether it is fluid or solid, the timescale for core formation, the geological consequences of core formation, and whether such consequences are consistent with the surface geology. Several indirect lines of evidence are discussed which suggest the presence of a large iron-rich core. A core-formation model is examined in which core infall is accompanied by an increase of 17 km in planetary radius, an increase of 700 K in mean internal temperature, and substantial melting of the mantle. It is argued that if the core differentiated from an originally homogeneous planet, that event must have predated the oldest geological units comprising most of the planetary surface. A convective dynamo model for the source of Mercury's magnetic field is shown to conflict with cosmochemical models that do not predict a substantial radiogenic heat source in the core.

  7. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  8. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  9. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  10. Magnetized drive fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensweig, R.E.; Zahn, M.

    1986-04-01

    A process is described for recovering a first fluid from a porous subterranean formation which comprises injecting a displacement fluid in an effective amount to displace the first fluid, injecting a ferrofluid, applying a magnetic field containing a gradient of field intensity within the formation, driving the displacement fluid through the formation with the ferrofluid and recovering first fluid.

  11. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  12. VLBI Observations of the Free Core Nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smylie, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    At core scale lengths with periods from a few hours to days, the Coriolis acceleration dominates the Lorentz force density and core modes can be considered as purely mechanical. One of the most interesting core modes is the spin-over mode, which reflects the ability of the outer core to rotate about an axis different from that of either the inner core or the shell. It has a nearly diurnal period. In the Earth frame of reference, this mode produces the nearly diurnal retrograde wobble. In the space frame of reference it is accompanied by the free core nutations. When the flattening of the boundaries of the fluid outer core and the figure-figure gravitational coupling are taken into account, as well as the deformability of the boundaries, both a retrograde free core nutation and a prograde free core nutation are found. The retrograde free core nutation was first predicted by Poincare (1910) for a completly fluid, incompressible core bounded by a rigid shell. In a variational calculation of wobble-nutation modes in realistic Earth models, Jiang (1993) found the classical retrograde free core nutation (RFCN) but discovered a prograde free core nutation (PFCN) as well. VLBI residuals in longitude and obliquity compared to the 1980 IAU nutation series, and their standard errors, were downloaded from the Goddard Space Flight Center website, for the period August 3, 1979 to March 6, 2003, giving 3343 points over a span of 8617 days. In an overlapping segment analysis, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for each segment was found for the corresponding series of unequally spaced nutation residuals by singular value decomposition (SVD), with the number of singular values eliminated determined by the satisfaction of Parseval's theorem. Both the RFCN and the PFCN resonances were found in the resulting power spectrum. The nutation resonances were found to be in free decay, the half-life of the PFCN at 2620 days and that of the RFCN at 2229 days, with Ekman boundary layer

  13. Physical properties of preserved core from the Geysers scientific corehole

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.J.; Bonner, B.P.; Duba, A.G.; Schneberk, D.L.

    1996-01-24

    X-ray attenuation, electrical conductivity, and ultrasonic velocity are reported for a segment of preserved core from SB-15D, 918 ft. X-ray tomography and ultrasonic measurements change as the core dries, providing information regarding handling and disturbance of the core. Electrical conductivity measurements at reservoir conditions indicate that pore fluid properties and pore microstructure control bulk conductivity. These data are useful for calibration and interpretation of field geophysical measurements.

  14. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we

  15. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Convection in the Outer Core and its Geodynamic Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2004-01-01

    The Earth's fluid outer core is in vigorous convection through much of the Earth's history. In addition to generating and maintaining Earth s time-varying magnetic field (geodynamo), the core convection also generates mass redistribution in the core and a dynamical pressure field on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). All these shall result in various core-mantle interactions, and contribute to surface geodynamic observables. For example, electromagnetic core-mantle coupling arises from finite electrically conducting lower mantle; gravitational interaction occurs between the cores and the heterogeneous mantle; mechanical coupling may also occur when the CMB topography is aspherical. Besides changing the mantle rotation via the coupling torques, the mass-redistribution in the core shall produce a spatial-temporal gravity anomaly. Numerical modeling of the core dynamical processes contributes in several geophysical disciplines. It helps explain the physical causes of surface geodynamic observables via space geodetic techniques and other means, e.g. Earth's rotation variation on decadal time scales, and secular time-variable gravity. Conversely, identification of the sources of the observables can provide additional insights on the dynamics of the fluid core, leading to better constraints on the physics in the numerical modeling. In the past few years, our core dynamics modeling efforts, with respect to our MoSST model, have made significant progress in understanding individual geophysical consequences. However, integrated studies are desirable, not only because of more mature numerical core dynamics models, but also because of inter-correlation among the geophysical phenomena, e.g. mass redistribution in the outer core produces not only time-variable gravity, but also gravitational core-mantle coupling and thus the Earth's rotation variation. They are expected to further facilitate multidisciplinary studies of core dynamics and interactions of the core with other

  17. Union soluble oil flood in El Dorado cores

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.

    1983-02-01

    Results are presented of laboratory experiments using Union's soluble oil flood process in El Dorado cores. The core flood is to provide complete information on fluid compositions and phase behavior of the effluents such that adequate core flood match using the chemical flood simulator can be made. This step is essential for evaluating reservoir performance on the South Pattern of the El Dorado Micellar-Polymer Project. The results show the caustic preflush in the flood process causes face plugging of the field cores. The problem was controlled by using chelating agents along with the caustic fluid to keep divalent cations in solution. The required amount of chelating agent was determined to be ca 25 times as strong as the original design for the field test. Liquid chromatography analysis of sulfonate provides valuable information on selective fractionation of monosulfonate in the micellar fluid. 10 references.

  18. SBIR Final Report. Liquid Core Optical Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Buerstler, R.

    2000-05-16

    This Phase I SBIR project focused on developing flexible scintillating liquid core optical fibers, with potential uses in high-energy calorimetry, tracking, preradiators, active targets or other fast detectors. Progress on the six tasks of the project is summarized. The technical developments involve three technology components: (1) highly flexible capillaries or tubes of relatively low n (index of refraction) to serve as cladding and liquid core containment; (2) scintillator (and clear) fluids of relatively high n to serve as a core-- these fluids must have a high light transmission and, for some applications, radiation hardness; (3) optical end plugs, plug insertion, and plug-cladding tube sealing technology to contain the core fluids in the tubes, and to transmit the light.

  19. Experimental serpentinization of intact dunite cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Kong, X. Z.; Bagley, B. C.; Schaen, A. T.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, produces relatively cool and alkaline fluids that support diverse ecosystems. To simulate serpentinization in such systems, we conducted single-pass, flow-through experiments on dunite cores cut out of a sample from Jackson County, North Carolina. Experimental seawater prepared using laboratory-grade reagents and standards was pumped through a core at 150ºC and 150 bar pore-fluid outlet pressure at a flow rate of 0.01 ml/min. An additional experiment will be conducted at 200ºC. At 150ºC, permeability decreased by 2.3 times with reaction progress over the course of the 36 day experiment. Fluid-rock reaction generally produced CO2, H2, CH4, and CO concentrations of 100 μmol/kg, up to 40 μmol/kg, 2 μmol/kg, and less than 1 μmol/kg, respectively. Outlet fluid chemistry was relatively stable, except for initial peaks in Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, and Si. pH of outlet fluids increased with reaction progress, but it was always lower (6.9-7.4) than the initial seawater (7.8). X-ray computed tomography scans were/will be collected for both pre- and post-experimental cores. The combination of flow-through experiments on solid, intact rock cores cut out of natural samples and X-ray tomography permits visualization and quantification of mineralogical changes and flow path evolution during serpentinization. This approach further permits physical and chemical processes to be documented on a fine scale to better understand feedbacks between chemical reactions and flow fields, with implications for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  20. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  1. The Moon's Molten Core and Tidal Q

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Dickey, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    The rotation of the Moon is influenced by solid-body tides and interaction at a liquid-core/solid-mantle boundary. The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data are sensitive to variations in lunar rotation. Analysis of those ranges reveals four dissipation periodicities in the rotation. These signatures can be explained with the combined effects of tide plus core, but not with either alone. The fluid core detection exceeds three times its uncertainty. The inferred core radius has a 1 -sigma upper limit of 352 km for iron and up to 374 km if sulfur is present. The tidal dissipation is strong, Q at one month is 37 +/- 5 .Q increases for longer periods and is 60 (-15, +40) at one year.Dynamical evidence for a fluid lunar core has previously been presented. These-earlier solutions included three dissipation parameters. New solutions benefit from additional LLR data and an improved gravity field from Doppler tracking of Lunar Prospector. Five dissipation parameters are now solved for. There are several options for dissipation parameters: a core coupling parameter, a time delay for tidal distortion of the moments of inertia, and five periodic terms in the rotation angles. Solutions with different combinations of these are compatible (a theory relates K/C and time delay to a series of periodic terms). The solutions used K/C, time delay, and one periodic term. When dissipation signatures at five rotation frequencies are solved for, four amplitudes (4 to 263 milliarcseconds) are detected above the noise. Attempts to explain these results using either tides alone or core alone fail (less than 3(sigma) discrepancy for the former and 9(sigma), for the latter). A combination of tides and liquid core matches the results well.

  2. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  3. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity vv. The term “compressibility” as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci.10.1016/j.ijengsci.2012.01.006 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and

  4. Liquid sodium models of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Stone, Douglas R.; Zimmerman, Daniel S.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the dynamics of the Earth's core can be advanced by a combination of observation, experiments, and simulations. A crucial aspect of the core is the interplay between the flow of the conducting liquid and the magnetic field this flow sustains via dynamo action. This non-linear interaction, and the presence of turbulence in the flow, precludes direct numerical simulation of the system with realistic turbulence. Thus, in addition to simulations and observations (both seismological and geomagnetic), experiments can contribute insight into the core dynamics. Liquid sodium laboratory experiments can serve as models of the Earth's core with the key ingredients of conducting fluid, turbulent flow, and overall rotation, and can also approximate the geometry of the core. By accessing regions of parameter space inaccessible to numerical studies, experiments can benchmark simulations and reveal phenomena relevant to the Earth's core and other planetary cores. This review focuses on the particular contribution of liquid sodium spherical Couette devices to this subject matter.

  5. Method and apparatus for reducing field filter cake on sponge cores

    SciTech Connect

    Park, A.; Wilson, B. T.

    1984-10-30

    A well coring apparatus includes an outer barrel and an inner barrel. The inner barrel is sealed with a rupturable diaphragm and a check valve. A sponge is disposed around the inner walls of the inner barrel for contacting the core. A fluid is disposed in the sealed inner barrel to prewet the sponge. A piercer is reciprocally disposed within the outer barrel and has a conical shaped surface, the apex of which is operable to pierce the diaphragm. In response to forming of the core, the fluid displaced by the core prevents drilling mud from being disposed between the core and the sponge.

  6. Rapid rotational crust-core relaxation in magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    If a magnetar interior B-field exceeds 1015 G, it will unpair the proton superconductor in the stellar core by inducing diamagnetic currents that destroy the Cooper pair coherence. Then, the P-wave neutron superfluid in these non-superconducting regions will couple to the stellar plasma by scattering of protons off the quasiparticles that are confined in the cores of neutron vortices by the strong (nuclear) force. The dynamical timescales associated with this interaction span from several minutes at the crust-core interface to a few seconds in the deep core. We show that (a) the rapid crust-core coupling is incompatible with oscillation models of magnetars that completely decouple the core superfluid from the crust and (b) magnetar precession is damped by the coupling of normal fluids to the superfluid core and, if observed, needs to be forced or continuously excited by seismic activity.

  7. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  8. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  9. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  10. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    The two areas where discussion and comparison of work is most useful are in (1) the factors which influence containment in cold flow studies; and (2) the effects of heat generation on containment. The work in these areas have not received any critical review in the past. The review is structured in such a way as to compare and contrast the related work of the program, rather than to preserve the chronological order of the work.

  11. Viscosity of the Earth's inner core: constraints from nutation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koot, L.; Dumberry, M.

    2010-12-01

    Nutations are the variations in the orientation of the Earth’s rotation axis in a space-fixed reference frame. This motion shows two important normal modes, the Free Core Nutation (FCN) and the Free Inner Core Nutation (FICN), of which the frequencies and damping depend directly on the Earth’s interior structure and dynamics. The FICN is characterized by a differential rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle and outer core. Its natural frequency is thus directly affected both by the strength of the mechanical coupling at the inner core boundary (ICB) and by the way the inner core deforms due to centrifugal forces. Similarly, the damping of the mode reflects the energy dissipated both through the coupling at the ICB and through inner core deformation. Estimations of the ICB coupling strength and dissipation have been obtained previously from nutation observations by assuming a purely elastic inner core (Mathews et al. 2002, Koot et al. 2010). When interpreted in terms of a visco-magnetic coupling, these estimations lead to values of the magnetic field at the ICB around 6-7 mT and to a kinematic viscosity of the fluid core close to the ICB in the range of 10-30 m2 s-1. This value of the ICB fluid core viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than what is expected from laboratory measurements and ‘ab initio’ computations. In this work, we show that a visco-elastic inner core is able to reconcile the estimation of the outer core kinematic viscosity with that of laboratory measurements and ab initio computations. This reconciliation is achieved for a very narrow range of values of the inner core viscosity, which can be considered as a nutation constraint on this physical quantity. Finally, we show that this nutation constraint is in very good agreement with seismic observations of shear waves attenuation in the inner core.

  12. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  13. Vortex core identification in viscous hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finn, Lucas I; Boghosian, Bruce M; Kottke, Christopher N

    2005-08-15

    We describe a software package designed for the investigation of topological fluid dynamics with a novel algorithm for locating and tracking vortex cores. The package is equipped with modules for generating desired vortex knots and links and evolving them according to the Navier-Stokes equations, while tracking and visualizing them. The package is parallelized using a message passing interface for a multiprocessor environment and makes use of a computational steering library for dynamic user intervention.

  14. Critical asymmetry in renormalization group theory for fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wu, Liang; Wang, Long; Li, Liyan; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-21

    The renormalization-group (RG) approaches for fluids are employed to investigate critical asymmetry of vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of fluids. Three different approaches based on RG theory for fluids are reviewed and compared. RG approaches are applied to various fluid systems: hard-core square-well fluids of variable ranges, hard-core Yukawa fluids, and square-well dimer fluids and modelling VLE of n-alkane molecules. Phase diagrams of simple model fluids and alkanes described by RG approaches are analyzed to assess the capability of describing the VLE critical asymmetry which is suggested in complete scaling theory. Results of thermodynamic properties obtained by RG theory for fluids agree with the simulation and experimental data. Coexistence diameters, which are smaller than the critical densities, are found in the RG descriptions of critical asymmetries of several fluids. Our calculation and analysis show that the approach coupling local free energy with White's RG iteration which aims to incorporate density fluctuations into free energy is not adequate for VLE critical asymmetry due to the inadequate order parameter and the local free energy functional used in the partition function.

  15. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  16. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  18. Nonlinear dielectric effect of dipolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Nagy, S; Dietrich, S

    2009-10-21

    The nonlinear dielectric effect for dipolar fluids is studied within the framework of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) of hard core dipolar Yukawa fluids. Based on earlier results for the electric field dependence of the polarization our analytical results show so-called normal saturation effects, which are in good agreement with corresponding NVT ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) simulation data. The linear and the nonlinear dielectric permittivities obtained from MC simulations are determined from the fluctuations of the total dipole moment of the system in the absence of an applied electric field. We compare the MSA based theoretical results with the corresponding Langevin and Debye-Weiss behaviors and with actual experimental data.

  19. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, W.T.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

  1. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  2. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  3. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  4. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  5. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  6. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  7. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003720.htm Pericardial fluid culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pericardial fluid culture is a test performed on a sample of ...

  8. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  9. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  10. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  11. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  12. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  13. Persistent crust-core spin lag in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Lasky, Paul D.

    2015-06-01

    It is commonly believed that the magnetic field threading a neutron star provides the ultimate mechanism (on top of fluid viscosity) for enforcing long-term corotation between the slowly spun-down solid crust and the liquid core. We show that this argument fails for axisymmetric magnetic fields with closed field lines in the core, the commonly used `twisted torus' field being the most prominent example. The failure of such magnetic fields to enforce global crust-core corotation leads to the development of a persistent spin lag between the core region occupied by the closed field lines and the rest of the crust and core. We discuss the repercussions of this spin lag for the evolution of the magnetic field, suggesting that, in order for a neutron star to settle to a stable state of crust-core corotation, the bulk of the toroidal field component should be deposited into the crust soon after the neutron star's birth.

  14. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines.

  15. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  16. Rocky core solubility in Jupiter and giant exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh F; Militzer, Burkhard

    2012-03-16

    Gas giants are believed to form by the accretion of hydrogen-helium gas around an initial protocore of rock and ice. The question of whether the rocky parts of the core dissolve into the fluid H-He layers following formation has significant implications for planetary structure and evolution. Here we use ab initio calculations to study rock solubility in fluid hydrogen, choosing MgO as a representative example of planetary rocky materials, and find MgO to be highly soluble in H for temperatures in excess of approximately 10,000 K, implying the potential for significant redistribution of rocky core material in Jupiter and larger exoplanets.

  17. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  18. Goal directed fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Desai, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    The cornerstone of treating patients with shock remains as it has for decades, intravenous fluids. Surprisingly, dosing intravenous fluid during resuscitation of shock remains largely empirical. Recent data suggests that early aggressive resuscitation of critically ill patients may limit and/or reverse tissue hypoxia, progression to organ failure and improve outcome. However, overzealous fluid resuscitation has been associated with increased complications, increased length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay and increased mortality. This review focuses on methods to assess fluid responsiveness and the application of these methods for goal directed fluid therapy in critically ill and peri-operative patients.

  19. Core-shell hydrogel microcapsules for improved islets encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minglin; Chiu, Alan; Sahay, Gaurav; Doloff, Joshua C; Dholakia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Cohen, Joshua; Vegas, Arturo; Chen, Delai; Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Dang, Tram; York, Roger L; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Weir, Gordon C; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-05-01

    Islets microencapsulation holds great promise to treat type 1 diabetes. Currently used alginate microcapsules often have islets protruding outside capsules, leading to inadequate immuno-protection. A novel design of microcapsules with core-shell structures using a two-fluid co-axial electro-jetting is reported. Improved encapsulation and diabetes correction is achieved in a single step by simply confining the islets in the core region of the capsules.

  20. Seismic Detection of the Layers of the Lunar Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Garnero, Edward J.; Lin, Pei-Ying; Williams, Quentin; Lognonne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the analysis of Apollo-era seismic data and indirect geophysical measurements (i.e., moment of inertia, lunar laser ranging and electromagnetic induction) and concludes that significant questions still remain. The Apollo deep moonquake seismograms using terrestrial array processing methods is analyzed to infer the structure of the lunar core. The results indicate the presence of a solid inner and fluid outer core.

  1. LUBRICATED TRANSPORT OF VISCOUS FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    JOSEPH, DANIEL D

    2004-06-21

    We became the acknowledged world leaders in the science fundamentals of the technology of water lubricated pipelines focusing on stability, numerical and experimental studies. We completed the first direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric core flow. We showed that the pressure at the front of the wave is large (the fluid enters a converging region) and it pushes the interface in, steepening the wave at its front. At the backside of the wave, behind the crest, the pressure is low (diverging flow) and it pulls the interface to the wall, smoothing the backside of the wave. The steepening of the wave can be regarded as a shock up by inertia and it shows that dynamics works against the formation of long waves which are often assumed but not justified in the analysis of such problems. We showed that the steep wave persists even as the gap between the core and the wall decreases to zero. The wave length also decreases in proportion, so that the wave shape is preserved in this limit. This leads to the first mathematical solution giving rise sharkskin. The analysis also showed that there is a threshold Reynolds number below which the total force reckoned relative to a zero at the wave crest is negative, positive above, and we conjectured, therefore that inertia is required to center a density matched core and to levitate the core off the wall when the density is not matched. Other work relates to self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth and self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth.

  2. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  3. Perioperative Fluid Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bleier, Joshua I.S.; Aarons, Cary B.

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative fluid management of the colorectal surgical patient has evolved significantly over the last five decades. Older notions espousing aggressive hydration have been shown to be associated with increased complications. Newer data regarding fluid restriction has shown an association with improved outcomes. Management of perioperative fluid administration can be considered in three primary phases: In the preoperative phase, data suggests that avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation and avoidance of undue preoperative dehydration can improve outcomes. Although the type of intraoperative fluid given does not have a significant effect on outcome, data do suggest that a restrictive fluid regimen results in improved outcomes. Finally, in the postoperative phase of fluid management, a fluid-restrictive regimen, coupled with early enteral feeding also seems to result in improved outcomes. PMID:24436675

  4. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  5. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  6. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  7. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  8. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  9. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  10. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  11. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  12. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  13. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  14. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  15. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  16. A star harbouring a wormhole at its core

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta E-mail: vfolomeev@mail.ru E-mail: kunz@theorie.physik.uni-oldenburg.de

    2011-04-01

    We consider a configuration consisting of a wormhole filled by a perfect fluid. Such a model can be applied to describe stars as well as neutron stars with a nontrivial topology. The presence of a tunnel allows for motion of the fluid, including oscillations near the core of the system. Choosing the polytropic equation of state for the perfect fluid, we obtain static regular solutions. Based on these solutions, we consider small radial oscillations of the configuration and show that the solutions are stable with respect to linear perturbations in the external region.

  17. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, S.M.; Ward, R.L.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a pump for pumping a preselected quantity of fluid with each pump driving stroke from a fluid inlet port to a fluid outlet port, an inlet valve for selectively controlling fluid flow through the fluid inlet port, a pump body defining a pump bore therein, a piston slidably movable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, an operator unit for reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a manifold interconnect with the pump body. It comprises a flow path therein extending from a manifold inlet port to a manifold outlet port, flow path being in communication with the fluid outlet port in the pump body, a purge passageway extending from the flow path to the outlet passageway, a purge valve for regulating fluid flow through the purge passageway, and a filter positioned within the manifold and extending across a portion of the flow path, the filter defining a filtered zone within the flow path adjoining the inlet port in the pump body, and an unfiltered zone within the flow path extending from the manifold inlet to the manifold outlet, such that filtered fluid enters the pump bore while unfiltered fluid bypasses the filter and passes out the manifold outlet port.

  18. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  20. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  1. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  2. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  3. Space station integrated propulsion and fluid systems study. Space station program fluid management systems databook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicknell, B.; Wilson, S.; Dennis, M.; Lydon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Commonality and integration of propulsion and fluid systems associated with the Space Station elements are being evaluated. The Space Station elements consist of the core station, which includes habitation and laboratory modules, nodes, airlocks, and trusswork; and associated vehicles, platforms, experiments, and payloads. The program is being performed as two discrete tasks. Task 1 investigated the components of the Space Station architecture to determine the feasibility and practicality of commonality and integration among the various propulsion elements. This task was completed. Task 2 is examining integration and commonality among fluid systems which were identified by the Phase B Space Station contractors as being part of the initial operating capability (IOC) and growth Space Station architectures. Requirements and descriptions for reference fluid systems were compiled from Space Station documentation and other sources. The fluid systems being examined are: an experiment gas supply system, an oxygen/hydrogen supply system, an integrated water system, the integrated nitrogen system, and the integrated waste fluids system. Definitions and descriptions of alternate systems were developed, along with analyses and discussions of their benefits and detriments. This databook includes fluid systems descriptions, requirements, schematic diagrams, component lists, and discussions of the fluid systems. In addition, cost comparison are used in some cases to determine the optimum system for a specific task.

  4. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  5. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  6. Gas Core Nuclear Rocket Feasibility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  7. Gas core nuclear rocket feasibility project

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-09-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  8. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  9. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  10. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  11. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  12. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  13. Applications of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses supercritical fluids in industrial and near-to-industry applications. Supercritical fluids are flexible tools for processing materials. Supercritical fluids have been applied to mass-transfer processes, phase-transition processes, reactive systems, materials-related processes, and nanostructured materials. Some applications are already at industrial capacity, whereas others remain under development. In addition to extraction, application areas include impregnation and cleaning, multistage countercurrent separation, particle formation, coating, and reactive systems such as hydrogenation, biomass gasification, and supercritical water oxidation. Polymers are modified with supercritical fluids, and colloids and emulsions as well as nanostructured materials exhibit interesting phenomena when in contact with supercritical fluids that can be industrially exploited. For these applications to succeed, the properties of supercritical fluids in combination with the materials processed must be clearly determined and fundamental knowledge of the complex behavior must be made readily available.

  14. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  15. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid.

  16. Solar heat transport fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made on the development and delivery of noncorrosive fluid subsystems is reported. These subsystems are to be compatible with closed-loop solar heating or combined heating and hot water systems. They are also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered under the contract. The performance testing of a number of fluids is described.

  17. Fluid pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, R.T.; Gerlach, C.R.

    1986-05-13

    A fluid pumping system is described for use with a natural gas dehydrating system or the like having an absorber apparatus for removing water from wet natural gas to produce dry natural gas by use of a dessicant agent such as glycol, and a glycol treater apparatus for producing a source of dry glycol from wet glycol received from the absorber apparatus. The system consists of: a fluid pump means operatively connected between dry glycol source and absorber apparatus for pumping dry glycol from the dry glycol source to the absorber apparatus; a fluid operable piston motor means operatively associated with the pump means for driving the pump means and having fluid inlet passage means for receiving wet glycol from the absorber and fluid outlet passage means for delivering wet glycol to the glycol reboiler means wherein energy derived from the flow of fluid passing through the fluid inlet passage means provides the entire motivating force for the motor means and the pump means; the fluid pump means comprising a first pair of equal diameter chamber portion of a double acting piston means having a piston rod with two oppositely positioned piston heads at terminal ends thereof received within two oppositely positioned cylinders mounted on a fixed central body which slidably supports the piston rod; the fluid operable motor means comprising a second pair of equal diameter chamber portions of the double acting piston means; the effective areas of outwardly directed faces of the piston heads being substantially greater than the effective areas of inwardly directed faces of the piston heads; and a wet glycol passage shifting means associated with the fluid motor means for automatically changing the porting of the fluid motor means at the end of a piston stroke for producing reciprocal piston motion in the fluid motor means including toggle means actuated by the piston rod.

  18. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  19. Perioperative Fluid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Denise; Shih, Andre C

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia can lead to pathophysiologic changes that dramatically alter the fluid balance of the body compartments and the intravascular space. Fluid administration can be monitored and evaluated using static and dynamic indexes. Guidelines for fluid rates during anesthesia begin with 3 mL/kg/h in cats and 5 mL/kg/h in dogs. If at all possible, patients should be stabilized and electrolyte disturbances should be corrected before general anesthesia.

  20. Thermogelling magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrivar, Keshvad; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach is proposed for the formulation of kinetically stable magnetorheological (MR) fluids exhibiting an MR effect. Thermoresponsive carrier fluids are used which develop a sol-gel transition on increasing the temperature. Turbidity measurements, multiwave rheology and steady shear flow tests are carried out on model conventional MR fluids prepared by dispersion of carbonyl iron microparticles in triblock copolymer solutions of type PEOx-PPOy-PEOx with x = 100 and y = 65. Experiments demonstrate that the MR fluids remain stable against sedimentation in the gel phase and exhibit a very large (relative) MR effect (up to 1000%) in the sol phase.

  1. The Fluids RAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo

    2016-11-01

    After fifteen years of experience in rap, and ten in fluid mechanics, "I am coming here with high-Reynolds-number stamina; I can beat these rap folks whose flows are... laminar." The rap relates fluid flows to rap flows. The fluid concepts presented in the song have varying complexity and the listeners/viewers will be encouraged to read the explanations on a site dedicated to the rap. The music video will provide an opportunity to share high-quality fluid visualizations with a general audience. This talk will present the rap lyrics, the vision for the video, and the strategy for outreach. Suggestions and comments will be welcomed.

  2. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests for viruses, mycobacteria ( AFB testing in identifying tuberculosis ), and parasites Adenosine deaminase – rarely ordered for detecting tuberculosis in peritoneal fluid ^ Back to top When is ...

  3. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    DOEpatents

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  4. Spiral fluid separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fluid separator for separating particulate matter such as contaminates is provided which includes a series of spiral tubes of progressively decreasing cross sectional area connected in series. Each tube has an outlet on the outer curvature of the spiral. As fluid spirals down a tube, centrifugal force acts to force the heavier particulate matter to the outer wall of the tube, where it exits through the outlet. The remaining, and now cleaner, fluid reaches the next tube, which is smaller in cross sectional area, where the process is repeated. The fluid which comes out the final tube is diminished of particulate matter.

  5. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  6. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  7. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  8. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  9. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  10. Constraint on the 1D earth model near core-mantle boundary by free core nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengli; Zhang, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Free core nutation (FCN) is a normal mode of the rotating earth with fluid outer core (FOC). Its period depends on the physics of the mantle and FOC, especially the parameters near core-mantle boundary (CMB), like the density and elastic (Lame) parameters. FCN period can be determined very accurately by VLBI and superconductive tidal gravimetry, but the theoretical calculation results of FCN period from traditional approaches and 1D earth model (like PREM) deviate significantly from the accurate observation. Meanwhile, the influence of the uncertainty of a given earth model on nutation has never been studied before. In this work, a numerical experiment is presented to check this problem, and we want to see whether FCN can provide a constraint on the construction of a 1D earth model, especially on the gradient of material density near CMB.

  11. Constraint on the earth density near core-mantle boundary by free core nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Li; Zhang, Mian

    2015-08-01

    Free core nutation (FCN) is a normal mode of the rotating earth with fluid outer core (FOC). Its period depends on the physics of the mantle and FOC, especially the parameters near core-mantle boundary (CMB), like the density and elastic (Lame) parameters. FCN period can be determined very accurately by VLBI and superconductive tidal gravimetry, but the theoretical calculation results of FCN period from traditional approaches and 1D earth model (like PREM) deviate significantly from the accurate observation. Meanwhile, the influence of the uncertainty of a given earth model on nutation has never been studied before. In this work, a numerical experiment is presented to check this problem, and we want to see whether FCN can provide a constraint on the construction of a 1D earth model, especially on the gradient of material density near CMB.

  12. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  14. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  15. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  16. Incompressible fluid flows in rapidly rotating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Alexandre

    The subject of incompressible fluid flows in rapidly rotating cavities, relevant to the dynamics of the Earth's outer core, is addressed here by means of numerical modeling. We recall in the introduction what makes this topic fascinating and challenging, and emphasize the need for new, more flexible numerical approaches in line with the evolution of today's parallel computers. Relying upon recent advances in numerical analysis, we first introduce in chapter 2 a spectral element model of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equation, in a rotating reference frame. Comparisons with analytical or published numerical solutions are made for various test problems, which highlight the spectral convergence properties and adaptivity of the approach. In chapter 3, we couple this axisymmetric kernel with a Fourier expansion in longitude in order to describe the dynamics of three-dimensional convection flows. Again, several reference problems are studied. In the specific case of a rotating fluid undergoing thermal convection, this so-called Fourier-spectral element method (FSEM) proves to be as accurate as standard pseudo-spectral techniques. Having this numerical tool anchored on solid grounds, we study in chapter 4 fluid flows driven by thermal convection and precession at the same time. A new topic in the vast field of fluid mechanics, convecto-precessing flows are of particular importance for the Earth's core, and the equations governing their evolution are derived in detail. We solve these using the FSEM; results seem to indicate that to first order, thermal convection and precession ignore each other. We discuss the relevance of these calculations for the Earth's core and outline directions for future related research.

  17. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Lovely, David

    1999-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snap-shot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: (1) Shocks, (2) Vortex cores, (3) Regions of recirculation, (4) Boundary layers, (5) Wakes. Three papers and an initial specification for the (The Fluid eXtraction tool kit) FX Programmer's guide were included. The papers, submitted to the AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, are entitled : (1) Using Residence Time for the Extraction of Recirculation Regions, (2) Shock Detection from Computational Fluid Dynamics results and (3) On the Velocity Gradient Tensor and Fluid Feature Extraction.

  18. Space Station fluid management logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Sam M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on space station fluid management logistics are presented. Topics covered include: fluid management logistics - issues for Space Station Freedom evolution; current fluid logistics approach; evolution of Space Station Freedom fluid resupply; launch vehicle evolution; ELV logistics system approach; logistics carrier configuration; expendable fluid/propellant carrier description; fluid carrier design concept; logistics carrier orbital operations; carrier operations at space station; summary/status of orbital fluid transfer techniques; Soviet progress tanker system; and Soviet propellant resupply system observations.

  19. Nanowire-in-microtube structured core/shell fibers via multifluidic coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Nü; Di, Jiancheng; Zhao, Yong; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2010-07-06

    A multifluidic coaxial electrospinning approach is reported here to fabricate core/shell ultrathin fibers with a novel nanowire-in-microtube structure from more optional fluid pairs than routine coaxial electrospinning. The advantage of this approach lies in the fact that it introduces an extra middle fluid between the core and shell fluids of traditional coaxial electrospinning, which can work as an effective spacer to decrease the interaction of the other two fluids. Under the protection of a proper middle fluid, more fluid pairs, even mutually miscible fluids, can be operated to generate "sandwich"-structured ultrathin fibers with a sharp boundary between the core and shell materials. It thereby largely extends the scope of optional materials. Selectively removing the middle layer of the as-prepared fibers results in an interesting nanowire-in-microtube structure. Either homogeneous or heterogeneous fibers with well-tailored sandwich structures have been successfully fabricated. This method is an important extension of traditional co-electrospinning that affords a more universal avenue to preparing core/shell fibers; moreover, the special hollow cavity structure may introduce some extra properties into the conventional core/shell structure, which may find potential applications such as optical applications, microelectronics, and others.

  20. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Fluids Integrated Rack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corban, Robert R.; Winsa, Edward A.

    1998-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is a modular, multi-user facility to accommodate a wide variety of microgravity fluid physics science experiments on-board the US Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The FIR is one of three racks comprising the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The FCF is being designed to increase the amount and quality of scientific data and decrease the development cost of an individual experiment relative to the era of Space Shuttle experiments. The unique, long-term, microgravity environment and long operational times on the ISS will offer experimenters the opportunity to modify experiment parameters based on their findings similar to what can be accomplished in ground laboratories. The FIR concept has evolved over time to provide a flexible, 'optics bench' approach to meet the wide variety of anticipated research needs. The FIR's system architecture presented is designed to meet the needs of the fluid physics community while operating within the constraints of the available ISS resources.

  1. Fluid Bubble Eliminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal fore generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then filtered through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway.

  2. Fluid bubble eliminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal fore generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then filtered through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway.

  3. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  4. Time Independent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids by explaining flow curves exhibited by plastic, shear-thining, and shear-thickening fluids and Bingham plastic materials. Indicates that the exact mechanism governing shear-thickening behaviors is a problem of further study. (CC)

  5. Fluid Power Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Fluid power technicians, sometimes called hydraulic and pneumatic technicians, work with equipment that utilizes the pressure of a liquid or gas in a closed container to transmit, multiply, or control power. Working under the supervision of an engineer or engineering staff, they assemble, install, maintain, and test fluid power equipment.…

  6. Understanding Core-Mantle Coupling Through Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, B.

    2007-12-01

    Core-mantle interaction in the Earth is studied using convection-driven dynamo models. We begin by considering an idealized regime that supports locking of the fluid motion and magnetic field to external inhomogeneities. In perfect locking, the azimuthal velocity in the fluid core has the profile of a thermal wind imposed by the boundary. In strongly convective dynamos, the competition between buoyancy-driven and boundary-driven thermal winds determines the extent of fluid-boundary coupling. We go on to show that dynamos with weakly convecting outer layers support locking, whereas strongly convecting outer regions swamp any influence of the lateral variations at the boundary. Finally, we investigate the tomographic boundary condition to see how its individual harmonic components may affect the morphology of the geomagnetic field.

  7. Viscosity near Earth's solid inner core

    PubMed

    Smylie

    1999-04-16

    Anomalous splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of oscillation of Earth's solid inner core is used to estimate the effective viscosity just outside its boundary. Superconducting gravimeter observations give periods of 3.5822 +/- 0.0012 (retrograde) and 4.0150 +/- 0.0010 (prograde) hours. With the use of Ekman layer theory to estimate viscous drag forces, an inferred single viscosity of 1.22 x 10(11) Pascal seconds gives calculated periods of 3.5839 and 4.0167 hours for the two modes, close to the observed values. The large effective viscosity is consistent with a fluid, solid-liquid mixture surrounding the inner core associated with the "compositional convection" that drives Earth's geodynamo.

  8. FLUID SELECTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stinson, W.J.

    1958-09-16

    A valve designed to selectively sample fluids from a number of sources is described. The valve comprises a rotatable operating lever connected through a bellows seal to a rotatable assembly containing a needle valve, bearings, and a rotational lock. The needle valve is connected through a flexible tube to the sample fluid outlet. By rotating the lever the needle valve is placed over . one of several fluid sources and locked in position so that the fluid is traasferred through the flexible tubing and outlet to a remote sampling system. The fluids from the nonselected sources are exhausted to a waste line. This valve constitutes a simple, dependable means of selecting a sample from one of several scurces.

  9. Fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, K.

    A few nonflow field problems are considered, taking into account mainly fluid-shell dynamic interaction and fluid-solid impact. Fluid-shell systems are used as models for sloshing and POGO (structure-propulsion coupling oscillation) in liquid rockets, floating lids of oil tanks, large tanks containing fluid, nuclear containment vessels, and head injury studies in biomechanics. The study of structure-water impact finds applications in the problems associated with water landings of reentry vehicles, water entry of torpedoes, and slamming of ships in heavy seas. At least three different methods can be used in handling wet structures. Attention is given to the method which treats fluid by boundary elements and structure by finite elements.

  10. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos [Albuquerque, NM; Hughs, Chance G [Albuquerque, NM; Todd, Steven N [Rio Rancho, NM

    2012-01-10

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  11. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  12. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  13. Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids by Space Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Dehant, V.; Gross, R. S.; Ray, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    Since its establishment on 1/1/1998 by the International Earth Rotation Service, the Coordinating Center for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids (MGGF) and its seven Special Bureaus have engaged in an effort to support and facilitate the understanding of the geophysical fluids in global geodynamics research. Mass transports in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") will cause the following geodynamic effects on a broad time scale: (1) variations in the solid Earth's rotation (in length-of-day and polar motion/nutation) via the conservation of angular momentum and effected by torques at the fluid-solid Earth interface; (2) changes in the global gravitational field according to Newton's gravitational law; and (3) motion in the center of mass of the solid Earth relative to that of the whole Earth ("geocenter") via the conservation of linear momentum. These minute signals have become observable by space geodetic techniques, primarily VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS, with ever increasing precision/accuracy and temporal/spatial resolution. Each of the seven Special Bureaus within MGGF is responsible for calculations related to a specific Earth component or aspect -- Atmosphere, Ocean, Hydrology, Ocean Tides, Mantle, Core, and Gravity/Geocenter. Angular momenta and torques, gravitational coefficients, and geocenter shift will be computed for geophysical fluids based on global observational data, and from state-of-the-art models, some of which assimilate such data. The computed quantities, algorithm and data formats are standardized. The results are archived and made available to the scientific research community. This paper reports the status of the MGGF activities and current results.

  14. Electrokinetically modulated peristaltic transport of power-law fluids.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Prakash; Chakraborty, Jeevanjyoti; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-01-01

    The electrokinetically modulated peristaltic transport of power-law fluids through a narrow confinement in the form of a deformable tube is investigated. The fluid is considered to be divided into two regions - a non-Newtonian core region (described by the power-law behavior) which is surrounded by a thin wall-adhering layer of Newtonian fluid. This division mimics the occurrence of a wall-adjacent cell-free skimming layer in blood samples typically handled in microfluidic transport. The pumping characteristics and the trapping of the fluid bolus are studied by considering the effect of fluid viscosities, power-law index and electroosmosis. It is found that the zero-flow pressure rise is strongly dependent on the relative viscosity ratio of the near-wall depleted fluid and the core fluid as well as on the power-law index. The effect of electroosmosis on the pressure rise is strongly manifested at lower occlusion values, thereby indicating its importance in transport modulation for weakly peristaltic flow. It is also established that the phenomenon of trapping may be controlled on-the-fly by tuning the magnitude of the electric field: the trapping vanishes as the magnitude of the electric field is increased. Similarly, the phenomenon of reflux is shown to disappear due to the action of the applied electric field. These findings may be applied for the modulation of pumping in bio-physical environments by means of external electric fields.

  15. CAC - NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET CORE ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important factors in the development of nuclear rocket engine designs is to be able to accurately predict temperatures and pressures throughout a fission nuclear reactor core with axial hydrogen flow through circular coolant passages. CAC is an analytical prediction program to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a circular coolant passage. CAC predicts as a function of time axial and radial fluid conditions, passage wall temperatures, flow rates in each coolant passage, and approximate maximum material temperatures. CAC incorporates the hydrogen properties model STATE to provide fluid-state relations, thermodynamic properties, and transport properties of molecular hydrogen in any fixed ortho-para combination. The program requires the general core geometry, the core material properties as a function of temperature, the core power profile, and the core inlet conditions as function of time. Although CAC was originally developed in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 7094, this version is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and is designed to be machine independent. It has been successfully compiled on IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS with Lahey F77L, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS 4.1.1, and a VAX series computer running VMS 5.4-3. CAC requires 300K of RAM under MS-DOS, 422K of RAM under SunOS, and 220K of RAM under VMS. No sample executable is provided on the distribution medium. Sample input and output data are included. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. CAC was developed in 1966, and this machine independent version was released in 1992. IBM-PC and IBM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Lahey F77L is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. VMS is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  16. Enhanced oil recovery. Improved reservoir evaluation object of sponge coring process

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1981-04-01

    Oil saturation data determined by core analysis have improved. One result is the development of the sponge coring process. In the sponge coring method, the core sample is taken in much the same way as in conventional coring. The major difference is the porous, hard sponge that lines the core barrel. The sponge is so porous (approximately 80%) that cigarette smoke can be blown through it. It has one full darcy permeability and is oil-wet. The sponge is inside a thin polyvinyl chloride liner with small perforations in it. As the sponge core barrel is run into the hole, the sponge becomes wet with drilling fluid, usually water. Any oil in the core being forced out by the water and the reduction in pressure as the core is brought to surface is caught by the sponge. Since it is oil-wet the oil is retained. But water is forced out the small perforations in the liner. At the surface the 20-ft core is cut into 5-ft sections and put into special containers filled with fluid from the formation. That keeps the core in standard condition. Even much of the gas in solution remains in the core. This is noted during capping operations as the cap is forced back until the glue on it holds and seals the tube.

  17. Vibration Control of Sandwich Beams Using Electro-Rheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikantha Phani, A.; Venkatraman, K.

    2003-09-01

    Electro-rheological (ER) fluids are a class of smart materials exhibiting significant reversible changes in their rheological and hence mechanical properties under the influence of an applied electric field. Efforts are in progress to embed ER fluids in various structural elements to mitigate vibration problems. The present work is an experimental investigation of the behaviour of a sandwich beam with ER fluid acting as the core material. A starch-silicone-oil-based ER fluid is used in the present study. Significant improvements in the damping properties are achieved in experiments and the damping contributions by viscous and non-viscous forces are estimated by force-state mapping (FSM) technique. With the increase in electric field across the ER fluid from 0 to 2 kV, an increase of 25-50% in equivalent viscous damping is observed. It is observed that as concentration of starch is increased, the ER effect grows stronger but eventually is overcome by applied stresses.

  18. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  19. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  20. Steady flows in rotating spherical cavity excited by multi-frequency oscillations of free inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor G.; Kozlov, Nikolai V.; Subbotin, Stanislav V.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid motion in a rotating spherical cavity in the conditions of resonant oscillations of free inner core is experimentally investigated. The centrifugal force retains a solid core with density less than the fluid density near the center of the cavity. In the absence of external force field the system "solid core - liquid" performs solid body rotation. The oscillations of the core are excited by an external oscillating force field and this results in differential rotation of the core with respect to the cavity. The direction of rotation is determined by the ratio of the oscillation frequency to the cavity angular velocity. The core oscillations with the radian frequency, which exceeds the cavity angular velocity, are investigated. It is found that a steady flow in the form of a system of nested fluid columns of circular cross section, which rotate at different angular velocities, is generated in the cavity as a result of oscillations of the core and the fluid. It is shown that at simultaneous influence of several oscillating fields the resulting steady flow is determined by a linear superposition of the flows, which are excited by the oscillations of the inner core with different frequencies. At a certain ratio of the vibration frequency to the rotation one the transformation of the circular shape of the column into the elliptical one is observed.

  1. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  2. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  3. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  4. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  5. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  6. Micromachined Fluid Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiqiang; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Micromachined fluid inertial sensors are an important class of inertial sensors, which mainly includes thermal accelerometers and fluid gyroscopes, which have now been developed since the end of the last century for about 20 years. Compared with conventional silicon or quartz inertial sensors, the fluid inertial sensors use a fluid instead of a solid proof mass as the moving and sensitive element, and thus offer advantages of simple structures, low cost, high shock resistance, and large measurement ranges while the sensitivity and bandwidth are not competitive. Many studies and various designs have been reported in the past two decades. This review firstly introduces the working principles of fluid inertial sensors, followed by the relevant research developments. The micromachined thermal accelerometers based on thermal convection have developed maturely and become commercialized. However, the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, which are based on jet flow or thermal flow, are less mature. The key issues and technologies of the thermal accelerometers, mainly including bandwidth, temperature compensation, monolithic integration of tri-axis accelerometers and strategies for high production yields are also summarized and discussed. For the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, improving integration and sensitivity, reducing thermal errors and cross coupling errors are the issues of most concern. PMID:28216569

  7. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  8. Micromachined Fluid Inertial Sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiqiang; Zhu, Rong

    2017-02-14

    Micromachined fluid inertial sensors are an important class of inertial sensors, which mainly includes thermal accelerometers and fluid gyroscopes, which have now been developed since the end of the last century for about 20 years. Compared with conventional silicon or quartz inertial sensors, the fluid inertial sensors use a fluid instead of a solid proof mass as the moving and sensitive element, and thus offer advantages of simple structures, low cost, high shock resistance, and large measurement ranges while the sensitivity and bandwidth are not competitive. Many studies and various designs have been reported in the past two decades. This review firstly introduces the working principles of fluid inertial sensors, followed by the relevant research developments. The micromachined thermal accelerometers based on thermal convection have developed maturely and become commercialized. However, the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, which are based on jet flow or thermal flow, are less mature. The key issues and technologies of the thermal accelerometers, mainly including bandwidth, temperature compensation, monolithic integration of tri-axis accelerometers and strategies for high production yields are also summarized and discussed. For the micromachined fluid gyroscopes, improving integration and sensitivity, reducing thermal errors and cross coupling errors are the issues of most concern.

  9. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  10. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  11. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  13. Geophysical fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, B. G.; Fichtl, G.; Fowlis, W.

    1979-01-01

    The essential fluid flow processes associated with the solar and Jovian atmospheres will be examined in a laboratory experiment scheduled for performance on Spacelab Missions One and Three. The experimental instrumentation required to generate and to record convective fluid flow is described. Details of the optical system configuration, the lens design, and the optical coatings are described. Measurement of thermal gradient fields by schlieren techniques and measurement of fluid flow velocity fields by photochromic dye tracers is achieved with a common optical system which utilizes photographic film for data recording. Generation of the photochromic dye tracers is described, and data annotation of experimental parameters on the film record is discussed.

  14. Space Station fluid resupply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Al

    Viewgraphs on space station fluid resupply are presented. Space Station Freedom is resupplied with supercritical O2 and N2 for the ECLSS and USL on a 180 day resupply cycle. Resupply fluids are stored in the subcarriers on station between resupply cycles and transferred to the users as required. ECLSS contingency fluids (O2 and N2) are supplied and stored on station in a gaseous state. Efficiency and flexibility are major design considerations. Subcarrier approach allows multiple manifest combinations. Growth is achieved by adding modular subcarriers.

  15. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  16. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  17. Physical properties of preserved core from The Geysers Scientific Corehole, SB-15D

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.J.; Bonner, B.P.; Duba, A.G.; Schneberk, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray attenuation, electrical conductivity, and ultra-sonic velocity are reported for a segment of preserved core from SB-15D, 918 ft. X- ray tomography and ultrasonic measurements change as the core dries, providing information regarding handling and disturbance of the core. Electrical conductivity measurements at reservoir conditions indicate that pore fluid properties and pore microstructure control bulk conductivity. These data are useful for calibration and interpretation of field geophysical measurements.

  18. Magnetic Fluids--Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, S. R.; Tanner, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of importance in understanding magnetic fluids (fine ferromagnetic particles suspended in a liquid) are discussed. They include home-made magnetic fluids, stable magnetic fluids, and particle surfactants. (DH)

  19. Results of SO222; Pore fluid chemistry of the Kumano Basin mud volcanoes, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, M. D.; Kopf, A.; Madison, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary hypotheses driving the MeMo Project at the mud volcanoes of the Kumano Basin, arcward of the NanTroSEIZE IODP drilling transect, are: 1) Much, if not most, of the chemically bound water released from depths corresponding to the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior are being transported via the subduction factory's intermediate loop, i.e., upwards through the wedge via faults and the fractured upper plate, and 2), the Kumano Basin mud volcanoes tap these fluids and may provide insights on fluid genesis and pathways within the Nankai forearc. During RV Sonne cruise SO222 (Jun-Jul 2012) we collected 600+ pore fluid samples from 6 MeBo drill cores (up to 35 mbsf) and 39 gravity cores (up to 8 mbsf). With few exceptions, the cores from mud volcanoes indicate two trends of fluid freshening with depth; a shallow freshening trend and a deeper freshening trend. Our initial thoughts on this is that the large amount of shallow freshening in the gravity cores is due to gas hydrate dissociation during core recovery and processing, and the deeper freshening trend may be due to advection of fluids influence by mineral dehydration at great depth. At this point, the fluids have just arrived back at the lab and further analyses are about to begin. We will report here on the initial results and present preliminary thoughts on the genesis of the fluids being emitted at the mud volcanoes.

  20. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  1. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOEpatents

    Semans, Joseph P.; Johnson, Peter G.; LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F.; Kromka, Joseph A.; Goron, Ronald H.; Hay, George D.

    1993-01-01

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  2. Lighter fluid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lighter fluids are called hydrocarbons. They include: Benzene Butane Hexamine Lacolene Naptha Propane Where Found Various ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 158. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron ...

  3. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  4. Well servicing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, A.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a well servicing fluid. It comprises an aqueous medium from about 0.2 to about 5 pounds per barrel of a partially hydrolyzed homopolymer of acrylamide having an average molecular weight greater than 1 million, and a calcium-controlling additive. It comprises from about 0.1 to about 2.5 pounds per barrel of the fluid of an alkali metal bicarbonate, from about 0.1 to about 2.5 pounds per barrel of the fluid of a water-soluble, carboxylic acid, and from about 0.1 to about 1.5 pounds per barrel of the fluid of a terpolymer containing from about 40 to about 70% by weight acrylamide, from about 20 to about 40% by weight of an acrylic acid and from about 5 to about 20% by weight of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid, the terpolymer having an average molecular weight of from about 5 to about 10 million.

  5. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bacterial infection. The Gram stain method is one of the most commonly used techniques for the rapid diagnosis of bacterial infections. How the Test is Performed A sample of fluid will be taken from the sac ...

  6. Improved perfluoroalkylether fluid development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paciorek, K.; Nakahara, J.; Smythe, M.; Kratzer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of transforming a commercial linear perfluoroalkylether fluid into a material stable in the presence of metals and metal alloys in oxidizing atmospheres at 300 C without the loss of the desirable viscosity temperature characteristics was determined. The approach consisted of thermal oxidative treatment in the presence of catalyst to remove weak links, followed by transformation of the created functional groups into phospha-s-triazine linkages. It it found that the experimental material obtained in 66% yield from the commercial fluid exhibits, over an 8 hr period at 300 C in the presence of Ti(4Al, 4Mn) alloy, thermal oxidative stability better by a factor of 2.6x1000 based on volatiles evolved than the commercial product. The viscosity and molecular weight of the developed fluid are unchanged and are essentially identical with the commercial material. No metal corrosion occurs with the experimental fluid at 300 C.

  7. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  8. Our World: Fluid Shift

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about the circulatory system and how gravity aids blood flow in our bodies here on Earth. Find out how NASA flight surgeons help the astronauts deal with the fluid shift that happens during s...

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF ... In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23d ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  10. Windshield washer fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... support, including oxygen, breathing tube through the mouth (intubation), and breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests ... Methanol, the main ingredient in windshield washing fluid, is extremely ... As little as 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) can be deadly ...

  11. Pericardial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test may be used to help detect tuberculosis (TB) . Less commonly ordered tests for infectious diseases, ... fluid in a person with symptoms that suggest tuberculosis means it is likely that person has a ...

  12. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2006-01-17

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  13. Fluid management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer; fluid handling; and components and instrumentation.

  14. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  15. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  17. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  18. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  19. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  20. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  1. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which…

  2. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  3. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  4. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  5. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  6. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  7. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  8. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  9. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  10. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians.

  11. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  12. Fluid therapy in shock.

    PubMed

    Mandell, D C; King, L G

    1998-05-01

    The goal of treatment for all types of shock is the improvement of tissue perfusion and oxygenation. The mainstay of therapy for hypovolemic and septic shock is the expansion of the intravascular volume by fluid administration, including crystalloids, colloids, and blood products. Frequent physical examinations and monitoring enable the clinician to determine the adequacy of tissue oxygenation and thus the success of the fluid therapy.

  13. Drilling fluid disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, L.E.; Sander, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the effect of the regulatory process on the selection and handling of drilling fluids for proper disposal. It is shown that a maze of regulations and regulatory agencies coupled with uncertainty in interpretation of environmental data and an evolving system of disposal engineering will require industry action to monitor the area and derive a solid engineering basis for disposal of spent drilling fluid. 16 refs.

  14. Fluid flow along faults in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a mathematical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). The Majella is a thrust related, asymmetric, box shaped anticline. The mountain carbonate outcrops are part of a lower Cretaceous-Miocene succession, covered by a siliciclastic sequence of lower Pliocene age. We study a fault zone located in the Bolognano Formation (Oligo-Miocene age) and exposed in the Roman Valley Quarry near the town of Lettomanoppello, in the northern sector of the Majella Mountain. This is one of the best places in the Apennines to investigate a fault zone and has been the subject of numerous field studies. Faults are mechanical and permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead a fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., kind of fractures, statistical properties, geometry and pertrophysical characteristics). Our analytical model describe the Bolognano Formation using a dual porosity/dual permeability model: global flow occurs through the fracture network only, while rock matrix contain the majority of fluid storage and provide fluid drainage to the fractures. Pressure behavior is analyzed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots and the effects of the characteristic parameters. The analytical model has been calibrated against published data on fluid flow and pressure distribution in the Bolognano Formation.

  15. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  16. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-26

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  17. Planetary Cores Flows Driven by Mantle Libration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noir, J.; Aurnou, J.; Wicht, J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate, via a set of laboratory and numerical experiments, the flow induced inside a spherical fluid cavity by torsional oscillation of the outer shell. Our goal is to produce models of libration-driven flows within planetary cores and subsurface oceans. Such models will improve our understanding of a number of planetary bodies including Mercury, Europa, Io, Callisto, Ganymede and the Earth's Moon. Here we focus on the case of a spherical shell with either a small inner core or no inner core; moderate planetary rotation rate (Ekman number E = 10- 4); and libration frequency equal to the planetary rotation frequency ("synchronous libration"). We vary only the non-dimensional amplitude of libration α, defined as α=Δ φ (2 π flib) / Ømega, where Δ φ is the total angular displacement, flib is the libration frequency and Ømega is the background angular rotation rate. Different core flow regimes are observed as α is increased. For a small amplitude of libration (α \\ll 1)), the oscillatory motion of the outer boundary drives laminar flows that are well described as inertial modes and waves. For α ~ 0.5, azimuthal roll instabilities periodically develop and decay along the outer shell boundary during each libration cycle. These instabilities tend to develop when the outer shell is decelerating and decay when it is accelerating. By further increasing α, the flow pattern transitions from axisymmetric rolls (m=0) to wavy rolls (m ≠ 0), and then to turbulent flow. Extrapolating our present results to Mercury suggests that mantle libration can drive large-scale instabilities in its liquid metal core. The authors wish to the thank NASA's PG&G and PME Programs for reasearch funding under grant #NNG0697G.

  18. Paleotemperatures preserved in fluid inclusions in halite

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.M.; Spencer, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A variety of paleoclimate proxy records allow determination of relative warming or cooling. However, if we are to understand climate change, quantification of past temperature fluctuations is essential. Our research indicates that fluid inclusions in halite can yield homogenization temperatures that record surface brine temperatures at the time of halite precipitation. To avoid problems with stretching, leaking, and initial trapping of air, samples with primary, single-phase (liquid) fluid inclusions are chilled in a freezer to nucleate vapor bubbles. We tested the reliability of this method of obtaining fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures using modern salts precipitated at Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California. Homogenization temperatures correlate well with measured brine temperatures. The same method is applied to fluid inclusions in Pleistocene halite from a core taken at the same location in Death Valley. Results are at several scales, recording diurnal temperature variations, seasonal temperature fluctuations, and longer-term warming and cooling events that correlate with major changes in the sedimentary environment related to climate. This technique is uniquely instrumental for paleoclimate studies because it offers actual, not just proxy, paleotemperature data. 27 refs., 17 figs.

  19. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M.; Moses, V.

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  20. Separation of core and crustal magnetic field sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L.; Parker, R. L.; Langel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Fluid motions in the electrically conducting core and magnetized crustal rocks are the two major sources of the magnetic field observed on or slightly above the Earth's surface. The exact separation of these two contributions is not possible without imposing a priori assumptions about the internal source distribution. Nonetheless models like these were developed for hundreds of years Gauss' method, least squares analysis with a truncated spherical harmonic expansion was the method of choice for more than 100 years although he did not address separation of core and crustal sources, but rather internal versus external ones. Using some arbitrary criterion for appropriate truncation level, we now extrapolate downward core field models through the (approximately) insulating mantle. Unfortunately our view can change dramatically depending on the degree of truncation for describing core sources.

  1. [Fluid management: estimation of fluid status].

    PubMed

    Renner, Jochen; Broch, Ole; Bein, Berthold

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac filling pressures alone are not appropriate to estimate the effect of a volume challenge on the corresponding change in stroke volume. Dynamic variables of fluid responsiveness have been shown to discriminate with acceptable sensitivity and specificity between responders and non-responders to a volume challenge. However, several clinical confounders have been indentified which potentially influence the predictive power of these variables. Sound knowledge of these confounders and the acknowledgement that there is no unique threshold value for volume optimisation but a considerable "gray zone" is necessary to fully exploit the advantages of functional haemodynamic monitoring.

  2. Fluid and Solute Fluxes from the Deformation Front to the Upper Slope at the Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, R. D.; Solomon, E. A.; Johnson, H. P.; Culling, D. P.; Harris, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid expulsion from accretionary convergent margins may be an important factor in global geochemical cycling and biogeochemical processes. However, the rates and distribution of fluid flow at these margins are not well known. To better understand these processes at the Cascadia margin, we collected 35 short (<1m) sediment cores and 23 Mosquito fluid flow meter measurements along a transect from the deformation front to the upper slope offshore of the Washington coast as part of a coupled heat and fluid flow survey. We identified two active seep areas, one emergent at 1990 mbsl, and one long-lived at 1050 mbsl. At both sites we observed carbonate deposits several meters thick and hundreds of meters in horizontal dimension. Thermogenic hydrocarbons measured in pore waters at the long-lived seep site indicate deeply-sourced fluids originating at >80oC, likely migrating along faults. In addition, pore water solute profiles from the emergent seep site suggest active shallow circulation in the upper sediment column, with implications for the seep biological community and fluid budget of the margin. Pore fluid advection rates along the transect are used to characterize the geographic distribution and geologic controls on active fluid pathways. Pore water solute profiles from the sediment cores are integrated with the measured fluid advection rates to calculate solute fluxes out of the margin. Our transect of fluid flow and pore water chemistry measurements from the Cascadia margin will help to better understand fluid and geochemical cycling at accretionary convergent margins.

  3. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  4. Fluid loss control differences of crosslinked and linear fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zigrye, J.L.; Whitfill, D.L.; Sievert, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Three fracturing fluids--a crosslinked guar, a delayed hydrating guar, and a linear guar--were tested for fluid loss control at set time intervals while being conditioned in a heated, pressurized flow loop. Each fluid was tested with 3 different fluid loss additive systems: diesel, silica flour, and a combination of diesel and silica flour. The crosslinked system was tested also with 2 additional fluid loss additive systems. These fluids were diesel plus an anionic surfactant and the combination of diesel/silica flour plus the anionic surfactant. These tests show that the fluid loss of crosslinked fracturing fluids is best controlled by using diesel in combination with a surfactant or a properly sized particulate material. The fluid loss of linear fluids is controlled best with particulate additives.

  5. Self-induced seismicity due to fluid circulation along faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Poisson, Blanche; Toussaint, Renaud; Rachez, Xavier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a system of equations describing fluid migration, fault rheology, fault thickness evolution and shear rupture during a seismic cycle, triggered either by tectonic loading or by fluid injection. Assuming that the phenomena predominantly take place on a single fault described as a finite permeable zone of variable width, we are able to project the equations within the volumetric fault core onto the 2-D fault interface. From the basis of this `fault lubrication approximation', we simulate the evolution of seismicity when fluid is injected at one point along the fault to model-induced seismicity during an injection test in a borehole that intercepts the fault. We perform several parametric studies to understand the basic behaviour of the system. Fluid transmissivity and fault rheology are key elements. The simulated seismicity generally tends to rapidly evolve after triggering, independently of the injection history and end when the stationary path of fluid flow is established at the outer boundary of the model. This self-induced seismicity takes place in the case where shear rupturing on a planar fault becomes dominant over the fluid migration process. On the contrary, if healing processes take place, so that the fluid mass is trapped along the fault, rupturing occurs continuously during the injection period. Seismicity and fluid migration are strongly influenced by the injection rate and the heterogeneity.

  6. Intravenous Fluid Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; McKay, Terri; Brown, Daniel; Zoldak, John

    2013-01-01

    The ability to stabilize and treat patients on exploration missions will depend on access to needed consumables. Intravenous (IV) fluids have been identified as required consumables. A review of the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) lists over 400 medical conditions that could present and require treatment during ISS missions. The Intravenous Fluid Generation System (IVGEN) technology provides the scalable capability to generate IV fluids from indigenous water supplies. It meets USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) standards. This capability was performed using potable water from the ISS; water from more extreme environments would need preconditioning. The key advantage is the ability to filter mass and volume, providing the equivalent amount of IV fluid: this is critical for remote operations or resource- poor environments. The IVGEN technology purifies drinking water, mixes it with salt, and transfers it to a suitable bag to deliver a sterile normal saline solution. Operational constraints such as mass limitations and lack of refrigeration may limit the type and volume of such fluids that can be carried onboard the spacecraft. In addition, most medical fluids have a shelf life that is shorter than some mission durations. Consequently, the objective of the IVGEN experiment was to develop, design, and validate the necessary methodology to purify spacecraft potable water into a normal saline solution, thus reducing the amount of IV fluids that are included in the launch manifest. As currently conceived, an IVGEN system for a space exploration mission would consist of an accumulator, a purifier, a mixing assembly, a salt bag, and a sterile bag. The accumulator is used to transfer a measured amount of drinking water from the spacecraft to the purifier. The purifier uses filters to separate any air bubbles that may have gotten trapped during the drinking water transfer from flowing through a high-quality deionizing cartridge that removes the impurities in

  7. Improved perfluoroalkylether fluid development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Masuda, S. R.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program was to optimize and scale up the linear perfluoroalkylether stabilization process and to provide test data regarding the fluids' thermal oxidative stability in the presence of metal alloys. The stabilization of Fomblin Z-25 was scaled up to 300 g of fluid. The modified fluid was stable at 316 C in oxygen in the presence of M-50 alloy for more than 24 hrs but less than 40 hrs; the amount of volatiles produced after 24 hrs was 5.5 mg/g. In the presence of Ti(4Al,4Mn) alloy, under the above conditions, following an exposure of 24 hrs, the amount of volatiles formed was 6.2 mg/g; 56 hrs exposure yielded 13.9 mg/g. The commercial fluid at 288 C (in oxygen) in the presence of M-50 after 15 hrs of exposure decomposed extensively, 342 mg/g; in the presence of Ti(4Al,4Mn) alloy after only 8 hrs at 288 C, the amount of volatiles was 191 mg/g. Formulation of the commercial fluid with C2PN3 additive was not as effective as the stabilization processing. All the perfluoroalkylether fluids studied were stable in nitrogen at 343 C. The thermal oxidative stability in the absence of metal alloys varied, with Aflunox exhibiting the best behavior. All the fluids were degraded in oxygen at 316 C during 24 hrs exposure to Ti(4Al,4Mn) alloy with the exception of a perfluoroalkylether substituted triazine and the modified Z-25.

  8. Orbital Fluid Transfer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S., (Nick); Ryder, Mel; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    An automated fluid and power interface system needs to be developed for future space missions which require on orbit consumable replenishment. Current method of fluid transfer require manned vehicles and extravehicular activity. Currently the US does not have an automated capability for consumable transfer on-orbit. This technology would benefit both Space Station and long duration satellites. In order to provide this technology the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) was developed. The AFIS project was an advanced development program aimed at developing a prototype satellite servicer for future space operations. This mechanism could transfer propellants, cryogens, fluids, gasses, electrical power, and communications from a tanker unit to the orbiting satellite. The development of this unit was a cooperative effort between Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Moog, Inc. in East Aurora, New York. An engineering model was built and underwent substantial development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). While the AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit. The lessons learned from testing the AFIS provided the foundation for the next generation fluid transfer mechanism, the Orbital Fluid Transfer System (OFTS). The OFTS project was a study contract with MSFC and Moog, Inc. The OFTS was designed for the International Space Station (ISS), but its flexible design could used for long duration satellite missions and other applications. The OFTS was designed to be used after docking. The primary function was to transfer bipropellants and high pressure gases. The other items addressed by this task included propellant storage, hardware integration, safety and control system issues. A new concept for high pressure couplings was also developed. The results of the AFIS testing provided an excellent basis for the OFTS design. The OFTS

  9. Fluid transport in faults and associated hydrofracture injection in fluid reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, S. L.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Faults may have strong effects on the permeability of fluid reservoirs. Fault zones normally consist of two major hydrogeological units: a fault core and a fault damage zone. The core consists primarily of breccia and other cataclastic rocks; in the damage zone fractures of various sizes occur. Active faults commonly have great effects on the transport of crustal fluids. For groundwater, for example, the effects of fault slip during earthquakes include changes in the yield of springs, water table, and stream flow. Similar effects occur in geothermal reservoirs. During fault slip (in an earthquake) all the pores and small fractures that meet with the slip plane become interconnected so that the fault may suddenly develop a very high hydraulic conductivity. The current stress field also controls fluid transport in fault zones. One reason for this is that fractures are sensitive to changes in the stress field and deform much more easily than circular pores. In a fault zone, most fractures in the damage zone are commonly subparallel to the main fault plane, in which case the effect of the current stress field can be strong. In a stress field where the maximum principal compressive stress is perpendicular to the strike of the fractures, many fractures will close and fluid transport is inhibited. In a stress field where the maximum principal compressive is parallel with the fracture strike, however, fractures tend to be open and fluid transport is enhanced. The best evidences of former fluid transport paths, particularly in deeply eroded, inactive fault zones, are networks of mineral veins. We present field examples of faults and mineral veins in layered sedimentary rocks from the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. The different lithologies studied include: (1) mudstones (Upper Triassic) with numerous faults and gypsum veins at Watchet, Somerset Coast (Southwest England); and (2) limestone and shale layers (Lower Jurassic) dissected by faults with calcite veins near Kilve

  10. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  11. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  12. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  13. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  14. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  18. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  19. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  20. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  1. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  2. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  3. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  4. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  5. Amniotic fluid embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Bhardwaj, Mamta; Kumar, Prashant; Singhal, Suresh; Singh, Tarandeep; Hooda, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%. PMID:27275041

  6. Boiler using combustible fluid

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  7. Fluid Mechanics: The Pamphlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, Evan

    2012-11-01

    One impediment to student learning in introductory fluid mechanics courses is that the fundamental laws of physics can become lost in the ``noise'' of dozens of semi-empirical equations describing special cases. This can be exacerbated by trends in textbooks and other teaching media. This talk will explore a minimalist approach, whereby the entire content of introductory fluids is distilled to a single 1-page pamphlet, designed to emphasize the governing equations and their near-universal applicability. We are particularly interested in hearing feedback from the audience on ways to further distill the content while keeping it accessible and useful. To further emphasize the difference between the fundamental laws and the many specific cases, we have begun assembling a complementary resource: a field guide to fluid phenomena, which mixes the approach of Van Dyke's book with a standard field guide. This is designed to emphasize that there is a ``zoology'' of fluid phenomena, to which the same small set of fundamental laws has been applied repeatedly. These materials may be useful in helping AP Physics teachers cover fluid mechanics, which is an under-utilized opportunity to introduce young scientists to our field of study.

  8. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, John C.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  9. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  10. Imaging the Moon's Core with Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Garnero, Ed J.; Williams, Quetin C.; Lognonne, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Constraining the structure of the lunar core is necessary to improve our understanding of the present-day thermal structure of the interior and the history of a lunar dynamo, as well as the origin and thermal and compositional evolution of the Moon. We analyze Apollo deep moonquake seismograms using terrestrial array processing methods to search for the presence of reflected and converted energy from the lunar core. Although moonquake fault parameters are not constrained, we first explore a suite of theoretical focal spheres to verify that fault planes exist that can produce favorable core reflection amplitudes relative to direct up-going energy at the Apollo stations. Beginning with stacks of event seismograms from the known distribution of deep moonquake clusters, we apply a polarization filter to account for the effects of seismic scattering that (a) partitions energy away from expected components of ground motion, and (b) obscures all but the main P- and S-wave arrivals. The filtered traces are then shifted to the predicted arrival time of a core phase (e.g. PcP) and stacked to enhance subtle arrivals associated with the Moon s core. This combination of filtering and array processing is well suited for detecting deep lunar seismic reflections, since we do not expect scattered wave energy from near surface (or deeper) structure recorded at varying epicentral distances and stations from varying moonquakes at varying depths to stack coherently. Our results indicate the presence of a solid inner and fluid outer core, overlain by a partial-melt-containing boundary layer (Table 1). These layers are consistently observed among stacks from four classes of reflections: P-to-P, S-to-P, P-to-S, and S-to-S, and are consistent with current indirect geophysical estimates of core and deep mantle properties, including mass, moment of inertia, lunar laser ranging, and electromagnetic induction. Future refinements are expected following the successful launch of the GRAIL lunar

  11. Fluid-loop reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor); Schier, J. Alan (Inventor); Iskenderian, Theodore C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved fluid actuating system for imparting motion to a body such as a spacecraft is disclosed. The fluid actuating system consists of a fluid mass that may be controllably accelerated through at least one fluid path whereby an opposite acceleration is experienced by the spacecraft. For full control of the spacecraft's orientation, the system would include a plurality of fluid paths. The fluid paths may be circular or irregular, and the fluid paths may be located on the interior or exterior of the spacecraft.

  12. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  13. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  14. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the deaths of massive stars, are among the most spectacular phenomena in astrophysics: Not only can supernovae outshine their host galaxy for weeks; they are also laboratories for the behavior of matter at supranuclear densities, and one of the few environments where collective neutrino effects can become important. Moreover, supernovae play a central role in the cosmic matter cycle, e.g., as the dominant producers of oxygen in the Universe. Yet the mechanism by which massive stars explode has eluded us for decades, partly because classical astronomical observations across the electromagnetic spectrum cannot directly probe the supernovae ``engine''. Numerical simulations are thus our primary tool for understanding the explosion mechanism(s) of massive stars. Rigorous modeling needs to take a host of important physical ingredients into account, such as the emission and partial reabsorption of neutrinos from the young proto-neutron star, multi-dimensional fluid motions, general relativistic gravity, the equation of state of nuclear matter, and magnetic fields. This is a challenging multi-physics problem that has not been fully solved yet. Nonetheless, as I shall argue in this talk, recent first-principle 3D simulations have gone a long way towards demonstrating the viability of the most popular explosion scenario, the ``neutrino-driven mechanism''. Focusing on successful explosion models of the MPA-QUB-Monash collaboration, I will discuss possible requirements for robust explosions across a wide range of progenitors, such as accurate neutrino opacities, stellar rotation, and seed asymmetries from convective shell burning. With the advent of successful explosion models, supernova theory can also be confronted with astronomical observations. I will show that recent 3D models come closer to matching observed explosion parameters (explosion energies, neutron star kicks) than older 2D models, although there are still discrepancies. This work has

  16. An improved method for field extraction and laboratory analysis of large, intact soil cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, J.A.; Hemmen, K.; Dowd, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for the extraction of large, undisturbed soil cores and for subsequent analysis of fluid movement within the cores. The major problems associated with these methods are expense, cumbersome field extraction, and inadequate simulation of unsaturated flow conditions. A field and laboratory procedure is presented that is economical, convenient, and simulates unsaturated and saturated flow without interface flow problems and can be used on a variety of soil types. In the field, a stainless steel core barrel is hydraulically pressed into the soil (30-cm diam. and 38 cm high), the barrel and core are extracted from the soil, and after the barrel is removed from the core, the core is then wrapped securely with flexible sheet metal and a stainless mesh screen is attached to the bottom of the core for support. In the laboratory the soil core is set atop a porous ceramic plate over which a soil-diatomaceous earth slurry has been poured to assure good contact between plate and core. A cardboard cylinder (mold) is fastened around the core and the empty space filled with paraffin wax. Soil cores were tested under saturated and unsaturated conditions using a hanging water column for potentials ???0. Breakthrough curves indicated that no interface flow occurred along the edge of the core. This procedure proved to be reliable for field extraction of large, intact soil cores and for laboratory analysis of solute transport.

  17. On the some magnetic properties of the Earth's solid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbraikh, E.

    2013-09-01

    The role of the solid part of Earth's core in the generation, stabilization and maintenance of the Earth's magnetic field and influence of this field on the properties of the solid core have not been sufficiently studied until now. It is well known that the core consists essentially of iron. In the last 10-15 years new methods were developed for the study of its properties at high pressure and temperature. As was shown in different experiments, the crystal structure of the iron is returned to the bcc state in the Earth's solid core. In this report we will discuss the possibility that the core can be in the vicinity of the Curie point. At the same time, it is shown that if the solid core temperature is somewhat higher than the Curie temperature, then the effective magnetic field generation connected with magnetic moment fluctuations near the transition point is possible. The estimate of the effective magnetic field is obtained in our work. Simultaneously, we have estimated the interaction of the solid part of the core with magnetic field generated in its fluid part.

  18. Fission-powered in-core thermoacoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Smith, Robert W. M.; Heidrich, Brenden J.; Heibel, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    A thermoacoustic engine is operated within the core of a nuclear reactor to acoustically telemeter coolant temperature (frequency-encoded) and reactor power level (amplitude-encoded) outside the reactor, thus providing the values of these important parameters without external electrical power or wiring. We present data from two hydrophones in the coolant (far from the core) and an accelerometer attached to a structure outside the reactor. These signals have been detected even in the presence of substantial background noise generated by the reactor's fluid pumps.

  19. Fission-powered in-core thermoacoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Smith, Robert W. M.; Heidrich, Brenden J.; Heibel, Michael D.

    2016-04-07

    A thermoacoustic engine is operated within the core of a nuclear reactor to acoustically telemeter coolant temperature (frequency-encoded) and reactor power level (amplitude-encoded) outside the reactor, thus providing the values of these important parameters without external electrical power or wiring. We present data from two hydrophones in the coolant (far from the core) and an accelerometer attached to a structure outside the reactor. Furthermore, these signals have been detected even in the presence of substantial background noise generated by the reactor's fluid pumps.

  20. Meteoric water in metamorphic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Mulch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The trace of surface water has been found in all detachment shear zones that bound the Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes of North America. DeltaD values of mica fish in detachment mylonites demonstrate that these synkinematic minerals grew in the presence of meteoric water. Typically deltaD values are very negative (-120 to -160 per mil) corresponding to deltaD values of water that are < -100 per mil given the temperature of water-mica isotopic equilibration (300-500C). From British Columbia (Canada) to Nevada (USA) detachment systems bound a series of core complexes: the Thor-Odin, Valhalla, Kettle-Okanogan, Bitterroot -Anaconda, Pioneer, Raft River, Ruby Mountain, and Snake Range. The bounding shear zones range in thickness from ~100 m to ~1 km, and within the shear zones, meteoric water signature is recognized over 10s to 100s of meters beneath the detachment fault. The age of shearing ranges generally from Eocene in the N (~50-45 Ma) to Oligo-Miocene in the S (25-15 Ma). DeltaD water values derived from mica fish in shear zones are consistent with supradetachment basin records of the same age brackets and can be used for paleoaltimetry if coeval isotopic records from near sea level are available. Results show that a wave of topography (typically 4000-5000 m) developed from N to S along the Cordillera belt from Eocene to Miocene, accompanied by the propagation of extensional deformation and volcanic activity. In addition, each detachment system informs a particular extensional detachment process. For example, the thick Thor-Odin detachment shear zone provides sufficient age resolution to indicate the downward propagation of shearing and the progressive incorporation of footwall rocks into the hanging wall. The Kettle detachment provides a clear illustration of the dependence of fluid circulation on dynamic recrystallization processes. The Raft River system consists of a thick Eocene shear zone that was overprinted by Miocene shearing; channels of meteoric

  1. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  2. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  3. Computational astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Michael L.; Clarke, David A.; Stone, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The field of astrophysical fluid dynamics (AFD) is described as an emerging discipline which derives historically from both the theory of stellar evolution and space plasma physics. The fundamental physical assumption behind AFD is that fluid equations of motion accurately describe the evolution of plasmas on scales that are large in comparison with particle interaction length scales. Particular attention is given to purely fluid models of large-scale astrophysical plasmas. The role of computer simulation in AFD research is also highlighted and a suite of general-purpose application codes for AFD research is discussed. The codes are called ZEUS-2D and ZEUS-3D and solve the equations of AFD in two and three dimensions, respectively, in several coordinate geometries for general initial and boundary conditions. The topics of bipolar outflows from protostars, galactic superbubbles and supershells, and extragalactic radio sources are addressed.

  4. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, E.R.; Perl, M.L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal inter-droplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications. 8 figs.

  5. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Eric R.; Perl, Martin L.

    1999-08-24

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

  6. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  7. Transverse axis fluid turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, B.

    1983-11-15

    A fluid turbine, the rotation axis of which is transverse to the direction of fluid flow, has at least two blade assemblies mounted for rotation about the rotation axis. Each blade assembly includes a streamlined elongated blade having a span parallel to the rotation axis. Each blade is pivotable about a pivot axis parallel to and spaced from the rotation axis. The pivot axis is located circumferentially ahead of the blade center of pressure with respect to the direction of turbine rotation. Each blade assembly is so constructed that its center of mass is located either at its pivot axis or circumferentially at its pivot axis and radially outboard of its pivot axis.

  8. On Gyroviscous Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Philip J.; Lingam, Manasvi

    2014-11-01

    Fluid models involving gyroviscous effects, whereby momentum is transported while conserving energy, are of interest for plasma, astrophysical, and condensed matter systems. Such fluids can be viewed as possessing intrinsic angular momentum. We present a systematic method for constructing such models from an action principle formalism that allows for an unambiguous means for introducing these effects, instead of ad-hoc phenomenological prescriptions. We also apply Noether's theorem to obtain the appropriate conserved quantities for these models. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FG05-80ET-53088.

  9. Triclinic Fluid Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattham, Nattaporn; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M.; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Clark, Noel A.

    2010-02-01

    Among the condensed phases, those of lowest point group symmetry are the triclinic crystals, which have only the identity element or the identity and inversion elements. Such low symmetry is stabilized by the specificity of molecular interaction, which is weakened with increasing disorder, so that known phases with fluid degrees of freedom are more symmetric. Here we report triclinic order, appearing as a broken symmetry in a single, isolated, fluid smectic liquid crystal layer freely suspended in air, showing that none of its principal dielectric axes lies either normal or parallel to the layer plane.

  10. Triclinic fluid order.

    PubMed

    Chattham, Nattaporn; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

    2010-02-12

    Among the condensed phases, those of lowest point group symmetry are the triclinic crystals, which have only the identity element or the identity and inversion elements. Such low symmetry is stabilized by the specificity of molecular interaction, which is weakened with increasing disorder, so that known phases with fluid degrees of freedom are more symmetric. Here we report triclinic order, appearing as a broken symmetry in a single, isolated, fluid smectic liquid crystal layer freely suspended in air, showing that none of its principal dielectric axes lies either normal or parallel to the layer plane.

  11. Electrorheological Fluids: Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Eftekhari, A.; Belvin, K. W.; Singh, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Electrorheological fluids (ERF) are an intriguing class of non-Newtonian industrial fluids. They consist of fine dielectric particles suspended in liquids of low dielectric constants. The objectives of this research were to select a particulate system such that: (1) its density can be varied to match that of the selected liquid, and (2) the dielectric constant of the particles and the liquids should be such that the critical fields needed for asymptotic increase in viscosity are less than or equal to 10 KV/cm. Synthetic Zeolite particles were selected as the solute/suspensions. Octoil oil was selected as the solvent. The results are summarized here.

  12. On the influence of a translating inner core in models of outer core convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Silva, L.; Mound, J.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the hemispheric seismic structure of the inner core can be explained by a self-sustained rigid-body translation of the inner core material, resulting in melting of the solid at the leading face and a compensating crystallisation at the trailing face. This process induces a hemispherical variation in the release of light elements and latent heat at the inner-core boundary, the two main sources of thermochemical buoyancy thought to drive convection in the outer core. However, the effect of a translating inner core on outer core convection is presently unknown. In this paper we model convection in the outer core with a nonmagnetic Boussinesq fluid in a rotating spherical shell driven by purely thermal buoyancy, incorporating the effect of a translating inner core by a time-independent spherical harmonic degree and order 1 (Y11) pattern of heat-flux imposed at the inner boundary. The analysis considers Rayleigh numbers up to 10 times the critical value for onset of nonmagnetic convection, a parameter regime where the effects of the inhomogeneous boundary condition are expected to be most pronounced, and focuses on varying q∗, the amplitude of the imposed boundary anomalies. The presence of inner boundary anomalies significantly affects the behaviour of the model system. Increasing q∗ leads to flow patterns dominated by azimuthal jets that span large regions of the shell where radial motion is significantly inhibited. Vigorous convection becomes increasingly confined to isolated regions as q∗ increases; these regions do not drift and always occur in the hemisphere subjected to a higher than average boundary heat-flux. Effects of the inner boundary anomalies are visible at the outer boundary in all inhomogeneous models considered. At low q∗ the expression of inner boundary effects at the core surface is a difference in the flow speed between the two hemispheres. As q∗ increases the spiralling azimuthal jets driven from the

  13. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  14. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  15. Faculty Supports Communication Core Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Asks public relations educators what they think about core classes required for students in their field. Finds they generally support the idea that their students should take core mass communications courses, even if such core courses are developed from a traditional journalism/news-editorial standpoint. (MS)

  16. Design of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Oh, Jong-Soek; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a new type of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core is proposed and its braking performance is numerically evaluated. In order to achieve high braking torque with restricted size and weight of MR brake system, tapered inner magnetic core is designed and expands the area that the magnetic flux is passing by MR fluid-filled gap. The mathematical braking torque model of the proposed MR brake is derived based on the field-dependent Bingham rheological model of MR fluid. Finite element analysis is carried out to identify electromagnetic characteristics of the conventional and the proposed MR brake configuration. To demonstrate the superiority of the proposed MR brake, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is numerically evaluated and compared with that of conventional MR brake model.

  17. SOLUBILITY OF WATER ICE IN METALLIC HYDROGEN: CONSEQUENCES FOR CORE EROSION IN GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, H. F.; Militzer, B.

    2012-01-20

    Using ab initio simulations we investigate whether water ice is stable in the cores of giant planets, or whether it dissolves into the layer of metallic hydrogen above. By Gibbs free energy calculations we find that for pressures between 10 and 40 Mbar the ice-hydrogen interface is thermodynamically unstable at temperatures above approximately 3000 K, far below the temperature of the core-mantle boundaries in Jupiter and Saturn. This implies that the dissolution of core material into the fluid layers of giant planets is thermodynamically favored, and that further modeling of the extent of core erosion is warranted.

  18. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  19. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  20. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  1. Drilling fluid thinner

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.

    1989-06-27

    A drilling fluid additive is described comprising a mixture of: (a) a sulfoalkylated tannin and (b) chromium acetate selected from the group consisting of chromium (III) acetate and chromium (II) acetate, wherein the chromium acetate is present in a weight ratio of the chromium acetate to the sulfoalkylated tannin in the range of from about 1:20 to about 1:1.

  2. Turbulent scaling in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.; Li, Ning; Chen, Shiyi; Liu, Yuanming

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a study of turbulence in fluids that are subject to different body forces and to external temperature gradients. Our focus was on the recent theoretical prediction that the Kolomogorov picture of turbulence may need to be modified for turbulent flows driven by buoyancy and subject to body forces such as rotational accelerations. Models arising from this research are important in global climate modeling, in turbulent transport problems, and in the fundamental understanding of fluid turbulence. Experimentally, we use (1) precision measurements of heat transport and local temperature; (2) flow visualization using digitally- enhanced optical shadowgraphs, particle-image velocimetry, thermochromic liquid-crystal imaging, laser-doppler velocimetry, and photochromic dye imaging; and (3) advanced image- processing techniques. Our numerical simulations employ standard spectral and novel lattice Boltzmann algorithms implemented on parallel Connection Machine computers to simulate turbulent fluid flow. In laboratory experiments on incompressible fluids, we measure probability distribution functions and two-point spatial correlations of temperature T and velocity V (both T-T and V-T correlations) and determine scaling relations for global heat transport with Rayleigh number. We also explore the mechanism for turbulence in thermal convection and the stability of the thermal boundary layer.

  3. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  4. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  5. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  6. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  7. Time Dependent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the flow characteristics of thixotropic and negative thixotropic fluids; various theories underlying the thixotropic behavior; and thixotropic phenomena exhibited in drilling muds, commercial paints, pastes, and greases. Inconsistencies in the terminology used to label time dependent effects are revealed. (CC)

  8. PROCESS FOR JACKETING A CORE

    DOEpatents

    Last, G.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for enclosing the uranium core of a nuclear fuel element by placing the core in an aluminum cup and closing the open end of the cup over the core. As the metal of the cup is brought together in a weld over the center of the end of the core, it is extruded inwardly as internal projection into a central recess in the core and outwardly as an external projection. Thus oxide inclusions in the weld of the cup are spread out into the internal and external projections and do not interfere with the integrity of the weld.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  10. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, M.S.; Lail, J.C.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  11. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lail, Jason C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  12. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  13. Laboratory Experiments on Core Merging and Stratification After Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, M.; Olson, P.; Deguen, R.; Hirsh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The fluid dynamics of core merging after giant impacts in the late stages of accretion provides constraints on metal-silicate equilibration, core stratification, and early magnetic field generation. The energy released during giant impacts, such as those thought to have formed Earth's Moon and the crustal dichotomy on Mars, likely resulted in melting of the impactor and much or all of the protoplanet's mantle. Under these conditions, the liquid core of the impactor migrates through a fully-liquid magma ocean, and merges with the protoplanet's core. Unlike the laminar flow in numerical simulations, liquid impact experiments can produce turbulence, as expected during core formation. We present experiments on liquid blobs of variable density released into another liquid consisting of two immiscible layers, representing the magma ocean and protocore, respectively. The released liquid is denser than the upper layer, immiscible in the upper layer, and miscible in the lower layer. With a shallow upper layer, the relevant regime for giant impacts, a turbulent cloud of released and upper liquids penetrates into the lower layer, collapses and spreads along the interface between the upper and lower layers. This behavior contrasts with the laminar core merging observed in impact simulations or the classical iron rain scenario, and suggests that metal-silicate chemical equilibration extends inside the protocore. Experimental scalings for low-density releases predict that compositional stratification of the core is likely in the aftermath of planet formation, and the stratified layer detected by seismology at the top of Earth's core is compatible with a moon-forming impact. By implication, the early core dynamo had to overcome compositional stratification to initiate.

  14. Gaseous species in fluid inclusions: A tracer of fluids and indicator of fluid processes

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, David I.; Moore, Joseph N.; Yonaka, Brad; Musgrave, John

    1996-01-24

    Quantitative bulk analysis of fluid inclusion volatiles measures the composition of trapped geothermal liquids and vapor. Fluid-inclusion gas-analyses may identify fluid boiling and mixing, and the analyses can be used as a fluid tracer. Fluid boiling is indicated by excess gaseous species. Linear arrays of data points on gas ratio diagrams indicate fluid mixing. Nitrogen-argon ratios are used to discriminate atmospheric fiom magmatic volatiles. Crustal components in geothermal fluids are best indicated by concentrations of methane and helium. Methane strongly correlates with other organic compounds, and N2-Ar-CH4 plots are similar to N2-Ar-He diagrams. Alkene to alkane ratios of C2-7 organic species indicate the oxidation state of geothermal fluids. The Geysers inclusion analyses are an example of how inclusion fluids may be used to understand the paleo hydrology of a geothermal system.

  15. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, we developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch-diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about -109??F (-78??C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  16. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-11-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, the authors developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch -diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about {minus}109 F ({minus}78 C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  17. Use of Magnetorheological fluid in a force feedback glove.

    PubMed

    Winter, Scott H; Bouzit, Mourad

    2007-03-01

    Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) is a smart material that has the property of changing its viscosity when exposed to a magnetic field. By placing this fluid into a sealed cylinder with an electromagnet piston as a core, a controllable resistance motion dampener can be created. A novel exoskeleton mechanical power transmission system was designed, utilizing rapid prototype parts, to transmit these resistive forces to the user's fingertips. A first iteration force feedback glove was developed and tested on human subjects for overall usability. The eventual goal of the system is to provide an alternative force producing system for exercises and rehabilitation. The entire system is lightweight, low power, and easily portable.

  18. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  19. Dual Drug Release Electrospun Core-Shell Nanofibers with Tunable Dose in the Second Phase

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei; Yu, Deng-Guang; Li, Ying; Liao, Yao-Zu; Wang, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a new type of drug-loaded core-shell nanofibers capable of providing dual controlled release with tunable dose in the second phase. The core-shell nanofibers were fabricated through a modified coaxial electrospinning using a Teflon-coated concentric spinneret. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and ethyl cellulose were used as the shell and core polymer matrices respectively, and the content of active ingredient acetaminophen (APAP) in the core was programmed. The Teflon-coated concentric spinneret may facilitate the efficacious and stable preparation of core-shell nanofibers through the modified coaxial electrospinning, where the core fluids were electrospinnable and the shell fluid had no electrospinnability. The resultant nanofibers had linear morphologies and clear core-shell structures, as observed by the scanning and transmission electron microscopic images. APAP was amorphously distributed in the shell and core polymer matrices due to the favorite second-order interactions, as indicated by the X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopic tests. The results from the in vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the core-shell nanofibers were able to furnish the desired dual drug controlled-release profiles with a tunable drug release amount in the second phase. The modified coaxial electrospinning is a useful tool to generate nanostructures with a tailored components and compositions in their different parts, and thus to realize the desired functional performances. PMID:24406731

  20. Vapor core propulsion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Nils J.

    1991-01-01

    Many research issues were addressed. For example, it became obvious that uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is a most preferred fuel over uranium hexafluoride (UF6). UF4 has a very attractive vaporization point (1 atm at 1800 K). Materials compatible with UF4 were looked at, like tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, carbon. It was found that in the molten state, UF4 and uranium attacked most everything, but in the vapor state they are not that bad. Compatible materials were identified for both the liquid and vapor states. A series of analyses were established to determine how the cavity should be designed. A series of experiments were performed to determine the properties of the fluid, including enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the system. CFD's and experimental programs are available that deal with most of the major issues.

  1. Spontaneous Core Rotation in Ferrofluid Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krekhov, Alexei; Shliomis, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Ferrofluid flow along a tube of radius R in a constant axial magnetic field is revisited. Our analytical solution and numerical simulations predict a transition from an initially axial flow to a steady swirling one. The swirl dynamo arises above some critical pressure drop and magnetic field strength. The new flow pattern consists of two phases of different symmetry: The flow in the core resembles Poiseuille flow in a rotating tube of the radius r*fluid element moves along a screw path, and the annular layer of the thickness R -r*, where the flow remains purely axial. These phases are separated by a thin domain wall. The swirl appearance is accompanied with a sharp increase in the flow rate that might serve for the detection of the swirling instability.

  2. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  3. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  4. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  5. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  6. Metallization of fluid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Louis, A.A.; Ashcroft, N.W.

    1997-05-14

    The electrical activity of liquid hydrogen has been measured at the high dynamic pressures, and temperatures that can be achieved with a reverberating shock wave. The resulting data are most naturally interpreted in terms of a continuous transition from a semiconducting to a metallic, largely diatomic fluid, the latter at 140 CPa, (ninefold compression) and 3000 K. While the fluid at these conditions resembles common liquid metals by the scale of its resistivity of 500 micro-ohm-cm, it differs by retaining a strong pairing character, and the precise mechanism by which a metallic state might be attained is still a matter of debate. Some evident possibilities include (i) physics of a largely one-body character, such as a band-overlap transition, (ii) physics of a strong-coupling or many-body character,such as a Mott-Hubbard transition, and (iii) process in which structural changes are paramount.

  7. Drilling fluid filter

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Garner, Kory

    2007-01-23

    A drilling fluid filter for placement within a bore wall of a tubular drill string component comprises a perforated receptacle with an open end and a closed end. A hanger for engagement with the bore wall is mounted at the open end of the perforated receptacle. A mandrel is adjacent and attached to the open end of the perforated receptacle. A linkage connects the mandrel to the hanger. The linkage may be selected from the group consisting of struts, articulated struts and cams. The mandrel operates on the hanger through the linkage to engage and disengage the drilling fluid filter from the tubular drill string component. The mandrel may have a stationary portion comprising a first attachment to the open end of the perforated receptacle and a telescoping adjustable portion comprising a second attachment to the linkage. The mandrel may also comprise a top-hole interface for top-hole equipment.

  8. Body Fluids Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siconolfi, Steven F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are described for determining volumes of body fluids in a subject using bioelectrical response spectroscopy. The human body is represented using an electrical circuit. Intra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with a capacitor; extra-cellular water is represented by a resistor in series with two parallel inductors. The parallel inductors represent the resistance due to vascular fluids. An alternating, low amperage, multifrequency signal is applied to determine a subject's impedance and resistance. From these data, statistical regression is used to determine a 1% impedance where the subject's impedance changes by no more than 1% over a 25 kHz interval. Circuit component, of the human body circuit are determined based on the 1% impedance. Equations for calculating total body water, extra-cellular water, total blood volume, and plasma volume are developed based on the circuit components.

  9. Continuous fluid level detector

    SciTech Connect

    LeVert, F.E.

    1989-02-21

    A fluid level detector is described which consists of: a junctionless thermocouple cable consisting of two thermoelectric elements enclosed in a metallic sheath wherein a negative resistance temperature coefficient insulant is interpositioned between the thermoelectric elements and the inner surface of the metallic sheath thereby providing electrical insulation and thermal energy transfer between the thermoelectric elements; a metallic sheathed resistance heater, which is used to input thermal energy to the fluid level detector; an outer metallic cylindrical tube capable of being sealed on one end, into which the juctionless thermocouple cable and resistance heater are inserted and held in place by mechanically swaging or drawing, to reduce the outer diameter of the metallic cylindrical tube; separate means for supplying electric currents to the thermoelectric elements and to the resistance heater; and electronic and computing means for measuring the loop resistance of the thermoelectric elements with a temporary junction.

  10. Production of MHD fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lacey, James J.; Kurtzrock, Roy C.; Bienstock, Daniel

    1976-08-24

    A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

  11. Canonical fluid thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    The space-time integral of the thermodynamic pressure plays the role of the thermodynamic potential for compressible, adiabatic flow in the sense that the pressure integral for stable flow is less than for all slightly different flows. This stability criterion can be converted into a variational minimum principle by requiring the molar free-enthalpy and the temperature, which are the arguments of the pressure function, to be generalized velocities, that is, the proper-time derivatives of scalar spare-time functions which are generalized coordinates in the canonical formalism. In a fluid context, proper-time differentiation must be expressed in terms of three independent quantities that specify the fluid velocity. This can be done in several ways, all of which lead to different variants (canonical transformations) of the same constraint-free action integral whose Euler-Lagrange equations are just the well-known equations of motion for adiabatic compressible flow.

  12. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOEpatents

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  13. Growth outside the core.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  14. Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of cuttings, core, and rock formation in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.; McDaniel, J.C.

    1985-12-31

    A drilling-and-casing method (Odex 115 system) utilizing air as a drilling fluid was used successfully to drill through various rock types within the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This paper describes this method and the equipment used to rapidly penetrate bouldery alluvial-colluvial deposits, poorly consolidated bedded and nonwelded tuff, and fractured, densely welded tuff to depths of about 130 meters. A comparison of water-content and water-potential data from drill cuttings with similar measurements on rock cores indicates that drill cuttings were only slightly disturbed for several of the rock types penetrated. Coring, sampling, and handling methods were devised to obtain minimally disturbed drive core from bouldery alluvial-colluvial deposits. Bulk-density values obtained from bulk samples dug from nearby trenches were compared to bulk-density values obtained from drive core to determine the effects of drive coring on the porosity of the core. Rotary coring methods utilizing a triple-tube core barrel and air as the drilling fluid were used to obtain core from welded and nonwelded tuff. Results indicate that the disturbance of the water content of the core was minimal. Water-content distributions in alluvium-colluvium were determined before drilling occurred by drive-core methods. After drilling, water-content distributions were determined by nuclear-logging methods. A comparison of the water-content distributions made before and after drilling indicates that Odex 115 drilling minimally disturbs the water content of the formation rock. 10 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The Mechanism of Fluid Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonkarman, T.; Rubach, H.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of fluid resistance within the limit of the square law is presented. It was concluded that the investigations should be extended and completed in two directions, namely: by an investigation of stable vortex configurations in space, and by considering the perfect fluid as the limiting case of a viscous fluid and then limiting the law of vortex of formation with the condition that only those fluid particles which were in contact with the surface of the body can receive rotation.

  16. Numerical Fluid Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Bernoulli’s friend Leonhard Euler (1707-83), in two path-breaking papers (1752, 1755). In his second paper, Euler claimed optimistically that "all the theory...the dream of Euler , Poincare, and Hilbert: of making fluid mechanics into a mathematical science, like geometry. Von Neumann, who seems to have...ORIGINATORS LAMB Chaps. KEY PHRASES 1. EULER -LAGRANCE III-VI SOLID BOUNDARIES vs. POTENTIAL FLOW VIII-IX FREE BOUNDARIES INTERFACES, SLIP- STREAMS GRAVITY

  17. Drilling fluid disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, L.E.; Sanders, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    A maze of U.S. regulations and regulatory agencies coupled with uncertainty in interpretation of environmental data and an evolving system of disposal engineering will require industry action to monitor the area and derive a solid engineering basis for disposal of spent drilling fluid. A set of disposal methods with approximate costs is presented to serve as an initial guide for disposal. 16 refs.

  18. The mixing of fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ottino, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    What do the eruption of Krakatau, the manufacture of puff pastry and the brightness of stars have in common Each involves some aspect of mixing. Mixing also plays a critical role in modern technology. Chemical engineers rely on mixing to ensure that substances react properly, to produce polymer blends that exhibit unique properties and to disperse drag-reducing agents in pipelines. Yet in spite of its of its ubiquity in nature and industry, mixing is only imperfectly under-stood. Indeed, investigators cannot even settle on a common terminology: mixing is often referred to as stirring by oceanographers and geophysicists, as blending by polymer engineers and as agitation by process engineers. Regardless of what the process is called, there is little doubt that it is exceedingly complex and is found in a great variety of systems. In constructing a theory of fluid mixing, for example, one has to take into account fluids that can be miscible or partially miscible and reactive or inert, and flows that are slow and orderly or very fast and turbulent. It is therefore not surprising that no single theory can explain all aspect of mixing in fluids and that straightforward computations usually fail to capture all the important details. Still, both physical experiments and computer simulations can provide insight into the mixing process. Over the past several years the authors and his colleague have taken both approaches in an effort to increase understanding of various aspect of the process-particularly of mixing involving slow flows and viscous fluids such as oils.

  19. Apparatus for establishing flow of a fluid mass having a known velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P.; Veikins, O.; Bate, E. R., Jr.; Jones, R. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus for establishing a flow of fluid mass, such as gas, having a known velocity is introduced. The apparatus is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber conforming to a closed-loop configuration and including a throat and a plurality of axially displaceable pistons for sweeping through the throat a stream of gas including a core and an unsheared boundary layer. Within the throat there is a cylindrical coring body concentrically related to the throat for receiving the core, and a chamber surrounding the cylindrical body for drawing off the boundary layer, whereby the velocity of the core is liberated from the effects of the velocity of the boundary layer.

  20. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  1. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  2. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  3. Galilean relativistic fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ván, P.

    2017-01-01

    Single-component nonrelativistic dissipative fluids are treated independently of reference frames and flow-frames. First the basic fields and their balances are derived, then the related thermodynamic relations and the entropy production are calculated and the linear constitutive relations are given. The usual basic fields of mass, momentum, energy and their current densities, the heat flux, pressure tensor and diffusion flux are the time- and spacelike components of the third-order mass-momentum-energy density-flux four-tensor. The corresponding Galilean transformation rules of the physical quantities are derived. It is proved that the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame theory, including the thermostatic Gibbs relation and extensivity condition and also the entropy production, is independent of the reference frame and also the flow-frame of the fluid. The continuity-Fourier-Navier-Stokes equations are obtained almost in the traditional form if the flow of the fluid is fixed to the temperature. This choice of the flow-frame is the thermo-flow. A simple consequence of the theory is that the relation between the total, kinetic and internal energies is a Galilean transformation rule.

  4. Galilean relativistic fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ván, P.

    2017-03-01

    Single-component nonrelativistic dissipative fluids are treated independently of reference frames and flow-frames. First the basic fields and their balances are derived, then the related thermodynamic relations and the entropy production are calculated and the linear constitutive relations are given. The usual basic fields of mass, momentum, energy and their current densities, the heat flux, pressure tensor and diffusion flux are the time- and spacelike components of the third-order mass-momentum-energy density-flux four-tensor. The corresponding Galilean transformation rules of the physical quantities are derived. It is proved that the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame theory, including the thermostatic Gibbs relation and extensivity condition and also the entropy production, is independent of the reference frame and also the flow-frame of the fluid. The continuity-Fourier-Navier-Stokes equations are obtained almost in the traditional form if the flow of the fluid is fixed to the temperature. This choice of the flow-frame is the thermo-flow. A simple consequence of the theory is that the relation between the total, kinetic and internal energies is a Galilean transformation rule.

  5. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  6. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-22

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  7. Fluid handling equipment: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Devices and techniques used in fluid-handling and vacuum systems are described. Section 1 presents several articles on fluid lines and tubing. Section 2 describes a number of components such as valves, filters, and regulators. The last section contains descriptions of a number of innovative fluid-handling systems.

  8. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  9. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  10. Fluid loss control differences of crosslinked and linear fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zigrye, J.L.; Sievert, J.A.; Whitfill, D.L.

    1983-10-01

    Three fracturing fluids-a cross-linked guar, a delayed hydrating guar and a linear guar-were tested for fluid loss control at set time intervals while being conditioned in a heated, pressurized flow loop. Each fluid was tested with three different fluid loss additive systems: diesel, silica flour, and a combination of diesel and silica flour. The cross-linked system was also tested with two additional fluid loss additive systems. They were diesel plus an anionic surfactant and the combination of diesel/silica flour plus the anionic surfactant. These tests show that the fluid loss of cross-linked fracturing fluids is best controlled by using diesel in combination with a surfactant or a properly sized particulate material. The fluid loss of linear fluids is controlled best with particulate additives. Therefore, it is important to take into account the type of fracturing fluid that is being used for a particular job when planning which fluid loss additives to use.

  11. Coating Of Model Rheological Fluids In Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelling, Kurt; Boehm, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Researchers have strived to understand and quantify the dynamics within the myriad micro/nano-devices proposed and developed within the last decade. Concepts such as fluid flow, mass transfer, molecule manipulation, and reaction kinetics must be understood in order to intelligently design and operate these devices. In addition to general engineering principles, intelligent design should also focus on material properties (e.g. density, viscosity, conductivity). One key property, viscosity, will play a large part of any fluidic device, including biomedical devices, because the fluids used will, most likely, be non-Newtonian and therefore highly dependent upon the shear rate. Be it a biomedical or macromolecule separation device, or simply the processing of polymeric material, select model polymers and simple flow schemes can be used to investigate the dynamics within micro-devices. Here, we present results for the processing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian polymeric fluids in micro-channels during two-phase penetrating flow. The system investigated is a circular capillary 100 microns in diameter, which is pre-filled with a polymeric liquid. The polymeric liquid is either of Newtonian viscosity, or the same liquid with dispersed high molecular weight polystyrene, which exhibits viscoelastic behavior. A second, immiscible phase, silicone oil of low Newtonian viscosity, is pumped into the system and subsequently cores the polymeric liquid. The dynamics of bubble flow (e.g. bubble velocity and bubble shape) as well as the influence of rheology on coating will be investigated. By studying these model systems, we will learn how complex fluids behave on progressively smaller size scales.

  12. Global Geophysical Fluids Center of IERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Dehant, V.; Gross, R. S.; Ray, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.; Watkins, M.; Wilson, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC) and its seven Special Bureaus (SB, for Atmosphere, Oceans, Tides, Hydrology, Mantle, Core and Gravity/Geocenter) were establishes by the International Earth Rotation Service in 1998, to support global geodynamic research. Mass transports in the geophysical fluids of the Earth system will cause observable geodynamic effects on a broad time scale.These include (1) variations in the solid Earth's rotation (in length-of-day and polar motion/nutation) via the conservation of angular momentum and effected by torques at the fluid-solid Earth interface; (2) changes in the global gravitational field according to Newton's gravitational law; and (3) motion in the center of mass of the solid Earth relative to that of the whole Earth ("geocenter") via the conservation of linear momentum. These minute signals have become observable by space geodetic techniques, primarily VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS, and new exciting data will be available by space gravity, altimetry, SAR, and magnetic missions. In this sense the precise space geodetic techniques have become effective means of remote sensing of global mass transports. The GGFC and its SBs have the responsibility of supporting, facilitating, and providing services to the worldwide research community in the related research areas. We compute, analyze, compare, archive, and disseminate the time series of the angular momenta and the related torques, gravitational coefficients, and geocenter shift for all geophysical fluids, based on global observational data, and/or products from state-of-the-art models some of which assimilate such data. The computed quantities, algorithm and data formats are standardized. This paper reviews our activities, reports the status, and looks forward into the future.

  13. Respiratory Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James

    2005-11-01

    This brief overview of our groups activities includes liquid plug propagation in single and bifurcating tubes, a subject which pertains to surfactant delivery, liquid ventilation, pulmonary edema, and drowning. As the plug propagates, a variety of flow patterns may emerge depending on the parameters. It splits unevenly at airway bifurcations and can rupture, which reopens the airway to gas flow. Both propagation and rupture may damage the underlying airway wall cells. Another topic is surfactant dynamics and flow in a model of an oscillating alveolus. The analysis shows a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration time periods and the sorption parameter. Vortices, single and multiple, may be achieved, as well as a saddle point configuration. Potential applications are pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. Finally, capillary instabilities which cause airway closure, and strategies for stabilization, will be presented. This involves the core-annular flow of a liquid-lined tube, where the core (air) is forced to oscillate axially. The stabilization mechanism is similar to that of a reversing butter knife, where the core shear wipes the growing liquid bulge, from the Rayleigh instability, back on to the tube wall during the main tidal volume stroke, but allows it to grow back as the stroke and shear turn around.

  14. The potential role of HCV core antigen testing in diagnosing HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Dawson, George J

    2012-01-01

    The potential uses of serological tests that detect HCV core antigens in biological fluids are highlighted. The most common serological tests utilized to detect exposure to HCV rely on the detection of antibodies to HCV. However, these tests cannot distinguish between individuals who have resolved their infection and those who remain actively infected with HCV. By contrast, the HCV core antigen test detects circulating HCV core antigen and identifies individuals who are actively infected with HCV. There is increasing interest in using the HCV core antigen test as a reflex test for seropositive individuals to identify individuals who are actively infected with HCV. In addition, the HCV core antigen test can be utilized to detect the early phase of HCV infection prior to the development of antibodies, both in the blood bank setting and in the diagnostic laboratory. Lastly, quantitative versions of the HCV core antigen test can be used to monitor the effectiveness of antiviral therapy.

  15. Fluid-fluid versus fluid-solid demixing in mixtures of parallel hard hypercubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, Luis; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri

    2011-02-01

    It is well known that increase of the spatial dimensionality enhances the fluid-fluid demixing of a binary mixture of hard hyperspheres, i.e. the demixing occurs for lower mixture size asymmetry as compared to the three-dimensional case. However, according to simulations, in the latter dimension the fluid-fluid demixing is metastable with respect to the fluid-solid transition. According to the results obtained from approximations to the equation of state of hard hyperspheres in higher dimensions, the fluid-fluid demixing might become stable for high enough dimension. However, this conclusion is rather speculative since none of these works have taken into account the stability of the crystalline phase (by a minimization of a given density functional, by spinodal calculations or by MC simulations). Of course, the lack of results is justified by the difficulty of performing density functional calculations or simulations in high dimensions and, in particular, for highly asymmetric binary mixtures. In the present work, we will take advantage of a well tested theoretical tool, namely the fundamental measure density functional theory for parallel hard hypercubes (in the continuum and in the hypercubic lattice). With this, we have calculated the fluid-fluid and fluid-solid spinodals for different spatial dimensions. We have obtained, no matter what the dimensionality, the mixture size asymmetry or the polydispersity (included as a bimodal distribution function centered around the asymmetric edge lengths), that the fluid-fluid critical point is always located above the fluid-solid spinodal. In conclusion, these results point to the existence of demixing between at least one solid phase rich in large particles and one fluid phase rich in small ones, preempting a fluid-fluid demixing, independently of the spatial dimension or the polydispersity.

  16. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  17. Drilling the Thuringian Syncline, Germany: core processing during the INFLUINS scientific deep drilling campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abratis, Michael; Methe, Pascal; Aehnelt, Michaela; Kunkel, Cindy; Beyer, Daniel; Kukowski, Nina; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Deep drilling of the central Thuringian Syncline was carried out in order to gather substantial knowledge of subsurface fluid dynamics and fluid rock interaction within a sedimentary basin. The final depth of the borehole was successfully reached at 1179 m, just a few meters above the Buntsandstein - Zechstein boundary. One of the aspects of the scientific drilling was obtaining sample material from different stratigraphic units for insights in genesis, rock properties and fluid-rock interactions. Parts of the section were cored whereas cuttings provide record of the remaining units. Coring was conducted in aquifers and their surrounding aquitards, i.e. parts of the Upper Muschelkalk (Trochitenkalk), the Middle Muschelkalk, the Upper Buntsandstein (Pelitrot and Salinarrot) and the Middle Buntsandstein. In advance and in cooperation with the GFZ Potsdam team "Scientific Drilling" core handling was discussed and a workflow was developed to ensure efficient and appropriate processing of the valuable core material and related data. Core curation including cleaning, fitting, marking, measuring, cutting, boxing, photographing and unrolled scanning using a DMT core scanner was carried out on the drilling site in Erfurt. Due care was exercised on samples for microbiological analyses. These delicate samples were immediately cut when leaving the core tube and stored within a cooling box at -78°C. Special software for data input was used developed by smartcube GmbH. Advantages of this drilling information system (DIS) are the compatibility with formats of international drilling projects from the IODP and ICDP drilling programs and thus options for exchanges with the international data bases. In a following step, the drill cores were brought to the national core repository of the BGR in Berlin Spandau where the cores were logged for their physical rock properties using a GeoTek multi sensor core logger (MSCL). After splitting the cores into a working and archive half, the

  18. Satellite Gravity and the Geosphere: Contributions to the Study of the Solid Earth and Its Fluid Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Bentley, C. R.; Bilham, R.; Carton, J. A.; Eanes, R. J.; Herring, T. A.; Kaula, W. M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Rojstaczer, S.; Smith, W. H. F.; van den Dool, H. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Zuber, M. T.

    1998-01-01

    The Earth is a dynamic system-it has a fluid, mobile atmosphere and oceans, a continually changing distribution of ice, snow, and groundwater, a fluid core undergoing hydromagnetic motion, a mantle undergoing both thermal convection and rebound from glacial loading of the last ice age, and mobile tectonic plates.

  19. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  20. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  1. Fluid management: the pharmacoeconomic dimension

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Cost is a key concern in fluid management. Relatively few data are available that address the comparative total costs of care between different fluid management regimens in particular clinical indications. Relevant costs of fluid-associated morbidity and mortality, including those incurred after intensive care unit or hospital discharge, also need to be considered in evaluating the cost-benefit ratios of administered fluids. Rigorously designed pharmacoeconomic studies are needed to delineate the costs and benefits of various approaches to fluid management. PMID:11255597

  2. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations for Realistic Flows (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    these calculations, the reference length is the vortex core radius, the reference flow conditions are the free stream conditions with the Mach number M...currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...From - To) 11-10-2007 Technical Paper & Briefing Charts 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics

  3. Gyroid phase of fluids with spherically symmetric competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Markus; Roth, Roland

    2016-06-01

    We study the phase diagram of a fluid with spherically symmetric competing pair interactions that consist of a short-ranged attraction and a longer-ranged repulsion in addition to a hard core. To this end we perform free minimizations of three-dimensional triple periodic structures within the framework of classical density functional theory. We compare our results to those from Landau theory. Our main finding is that the double gyroid phase can exist as a thermodynamically stable phase.

  4. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  5. Fluid viscosity under confined conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Closed equations of fluid transfer in confined conditions are constructed in this study using ab initio methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown that the fluid viscosity is not determined by the fluid properties alone, but becomes a property of the "fluid-nanochannel walls" system as a whole. Relations for the tensor of stresses and the interphase force, which specifies the exchange by momentum of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules, are derived. It is shown that the coefficient of viscosity is now determined by the sum of three contributions. The first contribution coincides with the expression for the coefficient of the viscosity of fluid in the bulk being specified by the interaction of fluid molecules with each other. The second contribution has the same structure as the first one but is determined by the interaction of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules. Finally, the third contribution has no analog in the usual statistical mechanics of transport processes of a simple fluid. It is associated with the correlation of intermolecular forces of the fluid and the channel walls. Thus, it is established that the coefficient of viscosity of fluid in sufficiently small channels will substantially differ from its bulk value.

  6. Rheological properties of synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Fam, H; Bryant, J T; Kontopoulou, M

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is the joint lubricant and shock absorber [Semin. Arthritis Rheum. 32 (2002), 10-37] as well as the source of nutrition for articular cartilage. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the rheological properties of synovial fluid as they relate to its chemical composition. Given its importance in the rheology of synovial fluid, an overview of the structure and rheology of HA (hyaluronic acid) is presented first. The rheology of synovial fluids is discussed in detail, with a focus on the possible diagnosis of joint pathology based on the observed differences in rheological parameters and trends. The deterioration of viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid in pathological states due to effects of HA concentration and molecular weight is further described. Recent findings pertaining to the composition and rheology of periprosthetic fluid, the fluid that bathes prosthetic joints in vivo are reported.

  7. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  8. Ratcheting fluid with geometric anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiria, Benjamin; Zhang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    We investigate a mechanism that effectively transports fluids using vibrational motion imposed onto fluid boundary with anisotropy. In our experiment, two asymmetric, sawtooth-like structures are placed facing each other and form a corrugated fluid channel. This channel is then forced to open and close periodically. Under reciprocal motion, fluid fills in the gap during the expansion phase of the channel and is then forced out during contraction. Since the fluid experiences different impedances when flowing in different directions, the stagnation point that separates flows of two directions changes within each driving period. As a result, fluid is transported unidirectionally. This ratcheting effect of fluid is demonstrated through our measurements and its working principle discussed in some detail.

  9. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  10. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  11. Influence of shear history at bottomhole temperature on fracturing-fluid efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.; Penny, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    The effects of downhole environmental conditions on fracturing-fluid rheology and leakoff were evaluated in a flow loop at simulated fracture conditions. Linear and crosslinked gel fluids were subjected to shear rates of 50 to 100 seconds/sup -1/ past core for 4 hours at temperatures of 75 to 250/sup 0/F (24 to 121/sup 0/C). Nonlinear effects commonly observed with crosslinked gel fluids diminished as the fluid was sheared. Shearing for 30 minutes to 4 hours at 100 seconds/sup -1/ before a fluid-loss test was run resulted in leakoff following square-root-of-time behavior. Spurt loss increased for crosslinked gel fluids as the fluid degraded, whether by enzyme or oxidative mechanism. The leakoff coefficient decreased slightly with time under shearing conditions. Although the polymer was breaking, the absolute amount of polymer available for deposition did not change. The apparent viscosity of fluid remaining within the fracture was also investigated. During initial fluid leakoff, polymer was concentrated as a gel filter cake at the fracture face. Once an equilibrium filter-cake thickness was achieved, however, fluid loss to the formation resulted in an increase in the polymer concentration in the remaining fluid and hence an increase in apparent viscosity.

  12. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  13. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  14. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  15. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .fluid movement and temperature changes will cause very minor effects). In previous SAFE-100 tests, the point kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  16. Magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune: Metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Based on a substantial database measured over several decades for representative planetary fluids at representative dynamic pressures and temperatures up to 200 GPa and a few 1000 K, the complex magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune (U/N) are (i) made primarily by degenerate metallic fluid H (MFH) at or near crossovers from H-He envelopes to "Ice" cores at 100 GPa (Mbar) pressures and 90% the radii of U/N; (ii) electrical conductivity of MFH is a factor of 100 larger than conductivity of "Ices" thought previously to make the magnetic fields of U/N; (iii) because those magnetic fields are made close to outer surfaces, non-dipolar magnetic fields can be expected as observed; (iv) the "Ice" cores are a heterogeneous fluid mixture of nebular Ice and Rock that accreted, sank below the H-He envelopes into the cores in which nebular materials decomposed at high pressures and temperatures and re-reacted to form new chemical species; (v) those magnetic fields are probably non-axisymmetric because rotational motions of U/N are weakly coupled to convective motions that make their magnetic fields by dynamos. For U/N "polar wander" is probably a better descriptor for variations of magnetic field over time than "polar reversal" as for Earth. Ironically, there probably is little "Ice" in the Ice Giants.

  17. NMR response of non-reservoir fluids in sandstone and chalk.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, C H; Stallmach, F; Skjetne, T; Veliyulin, E

    2001-01-01

    Transverse (T2) NMR relaxation time at 2 MHz proton resonance frequency was measured on core plug samples from two different lithologies, sandstone and chalk, before and after exposure to selected drilling fluids. The results show that NMR signal response was significantly altered after displacing 50% of the original pore fluids, crude oil and water, by drilling fluid filtrate. Relaxation spectra of the rock samples invaded by water-based filtrate shift to significantly shorter T2-values. This shift yields an underestimation of the free-fluid volumes when selecting cut-off values of 33 ms and 100 ms for sandstone and chalk, respectively. In opposite, rock samples affected by oil-based filtrate respond with a signal indicating significantly larger free-fluid volumes than present before exposure. NMR-permeability calculated based on the Timur-Coates Free Fluid model altered in some cases by one order of magnitude.

  18. Fluid and Electrolyte Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Smith, Scott M.; Leach, Carolyn S.; Rice, Barbara L.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis have been completed since the early human space flight programs, with comprehensive research completed on the Spacelab Life Sciences missions SLS-1 and SLS-2 flights, and more recently on the Mir 18 mission. This work documented the known shifts in fluids, the decrease in total blood volume, and indications of reduced thirst. Data from these flights was used to evaluate the nutritional needs for water, sodium, and potassium. Interpretations of the data are confounded by the inadequate energy intakes routinely observed during space flight. This in turn results in reduced fluid intake, as food provides approximately 70% water intake. Subsequently, body weight, lean body mass, total body water, and total body potassium may decrease. Given these issues, there is evidence to support a minimum required water intake of 2 L per day. Data from previous Shuttle flights indicated that water intake is 2285 +/- 715 ml/day (mean +/- SD, n=26). There are no indications that sodium intake or homeostasis is compromised during space flight. The normal or low aldosterone and urinary sodium levels suggest adequate sodium intake (4047 +/- 902 mg/day, n=26). Because excessive sodium intake is associated with hypercalciuria, the recommended maximum amount of sodium intake during flight is 3500 mg/day (i.e., similar to the Recommended Dietary Allowance, RDA). Potassium metabolism appears to be more complex. Data indicate loss of body potassium related to muscle atrophy and low dietary intake (2407 +/- 548 mg/day, n=26). Although possibly related to measurement error, the elevations in blood potassium suggest alterations in potassium homeostasis. The space RDA for minimum potassium intake is 3500 mg/day. With the documented inadequate intakes, efforts are being made to increase dietary consumption of potassium.

  19. Catenaries in viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, James; Chakrabarti, Brato

    2015-11-01

    Slender structures live in fluid flows across many scales, from towed instruments to plant blades to microfluidic valves. The present work details a simple model of a flexible structure in a uniform flow. We present analytical solutions for the translating, axially flowing equilibria of strings subjected to a uniform body force and linear drag forces. This is an extension of the classical catenaries to a five-parameter family of solutions, represented as trajectories in angle-curvature ``phase space.'' Limiting cases include neutrally buoyant towed cables and freely sedimenting flexible filaments. Now at University of California, San Diego.

  20. Rotational fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This project which began in 1986 as part of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Advanced Space Design Program focuses on the design and implementation of an electromechanical system for studying vortex behavior in a microgravity environment. Most of the existing equipment was revised and redesigned by this project team, as necessary. Emphasis was placed on documentation and integration of the electrical and mechanical subsystems. Project results include reconfiguration and thorough testing of all hardware subsystems, implementation of an infrared gas entrainment detector, new signal processing circuitry for the ultrasonic fluid circulation device, improved prototype interface circuits, and software for overall control of experiment operation.

  1. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  2. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs.

  3. Core-to-core uniformity improvement in multi-core fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Cvetojevic, Nick; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Lawrence, Jon; Gris-Sanchez, Itandehui; Birks, Tim; Haynes, Roger; Haynes, Dionne

    2014-07-01

    Multi-core fiber Bragg gratings (MCFBGs) will be a valuable tool not only in communications but also various astronomical, sensing and industry applications. In this paper we address some of the technical challenges of fabricating effective multi-core gratings by simulating improvements to the writing method. These methods allow a system designed for inscribing single-core fibers to cope with MCFBG fabrication with only minor, passive changes to the writing process. Using a capillary tube that was polished on one side, the field entering the fiber was flattened which improved the coverage and uniformity of all cores.

  4. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  5. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  6. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  7. Complicated Politics to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  8. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  9. Data interchange across cores of multi-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ehab S.

    2015-12-01

    A novel device for data interchange among space-division multiplexed cores inside MCF is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The device allows complete exchange of all WDM data channels between MCF cores in propagation direction whether the channels have the same or different sets of wavelengths. This is crucial in future MCF optical networks where in-fiber data interchange over space-division multiplexed cores can allow for a simple and fast data swapping among cores without a need for space-division demultiplexing to single-mode single-core fibers. The data core-interchange (DCI) device consists of a graded refractive-index rectangular waveguide enclosing the two interchanged cores in addition to the cladding region in between them. Both finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and eigenmode expansion (EME) simulations are performed to verify the device operation and characterize its performance. The simulations demonstrate that the DCI has a very short-length with polarization independent operation, and high performance over the broadband wavelength range S, C, L, and U bands. Moreover, the device shows a high coupling-factor of -0.13 dB with small cross-talk, back-reflection, and return-loss of -26.3, -46.1, and -48.8 dB, respectively.

  10. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  11. Amniotic fluid assessment.

    PubMed

    Smith, C V

    1990-03-01

    The mysterious environment surrounding the fetus for much of his or her life is now being explored with increasing fervor. Assessment of amniotic fluid in the early portion of pregnancy is now possible for fetal karyotype determination. This may permit early diagnosis of abnormal fetuses, increasing the options for patients. As pregnancy progresses, high-resolution ultrasound assessment of amniotic fluid volume is integral to the management of pregnancies at risk for oligohydramnios. Such pregnancies include those who are postdate and those with suspected intrauterine growth retardation. Additional evaluation and ultrasonography are recommended for evaluation of the fetus in this clinical situation. With either hydramnios or oligohydramnios, careful ultrasound assessment of the fetus is essential to rule out significant congenital malformations. Finally, the use of ultrasound-directed amniocentesis in later pregnancy permits an assessment of fetal lung maturity and of the fetus at risk for Rhesus immunization. Attention to detail should increase chances of a successful pregnancy outcome while decreasing neonatal morbidity and mortality.

  12. Fluid injection microvalve

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2005-11-22

    A microvalve for extracting small volume samples into analytical devices, e.g., high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) column, includes: a first body having a first interior surface and two or more outlet ports at the first interior surface that are in fluid communication with two or more first channels; a second body having a second interior surface and two or more inlet ports at the second interior surface that are in fluid communication with two or more second channels wherein the outlet ports of the first body are coaxial with the corresponding inlet ports of the second body such that there are at least two sets of coaxial port outlets and port inlets; a plate member, which has a substantially planar first mating surface and a substantially planar second mating surface, that is slidably positioned between the first interior surface and the second interior surface wherein the plate member has at least one aperture that traverses the height of the plate member, and wherein the aperture can be positioned to be coaxial with any of the at least two sets of coaxial port outlets and port inlets; and means for securing the first surface of the first body against the first mating surface and for securing the second surface of the second body against the second mating surface.

  13. Entomological fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John

    2007-11-01

    The world of arthropods (insects and spiders) presents a number of novel fluid mechanics problems on a scale of interest to the microfluidics community. We address a number of such problems, giving particular attention to elucidating and rationalizing natural strategies for water-repellency and fluid transport on a small scale. The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional roles in underwater breathing and propulsion along the free surface. When submerged, many arthropods are able to survive by virtue of a thin air bubble trapped along their rough exteriors. The diffusion of dissolved oxygen from the water into the bubble allows it to function as an external lung, and enables certain species to remain underwater indefinitely. By coupling the bubble mechanics and chemistry, we develop criteria for this style of underwater breathing. We further demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. Finally, we provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest new directions for biomimetic design.

  14. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  15. Soft particles at fluid interfaces: wetting, structure, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, Lucio

    Most of our current knowledge concerning the behavior of colloidal particles at fluid interfaces is limited to model spherical, hard and uniform objects. Introducing additional complexity, in terms of shape, composition or surface chemistry or by introducing particle softness, opens up a vast range of possibilities to address new fundamental and applied questions in soft matter systems at fluid interfaces. In this talk I will focus on the role of particle softness, taking the case of core-shell microgels as a paradigmatic example. Microgels are highly swollen and cross-linked hydrogel particles that, in parallel with their practical applications, e.g. for emulsion stabilization and surface patterning, are increasingly used as model systems to capture fundamental properties of bulk materials. Most microgel particles develop a core-shell morphology during synthesis, with a more cross-linked core surrounded by a corona of loosely linked and dangling polymer chains. I will first discuss the difference between the wetting of a hard spherical colloid and a core-shell microgel at an oil-water interface, pinpointing the interplay between adsorption at the interface and particle deformation. I will then move on to discuss the interplay between particle morphology and the microstructure and rheological properties of the interface. In particular, I will demonstrate that synchronizing the compression of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer makes it possible to transfer the 2D phase diagram of the particles onto a solid substrate, where different positions correspond to different values of the surface pressure and the specific area. Using atomic force microscopy, we analyzed the microstructure of the monolayer and discovered a phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases correspond to shell-shell or core-core inter

  16. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  17. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  18. Wireline-rotary air coring of the Bandelier Tuff, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teasdale, W.E.; Pemberton, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes experiments using wireline-rotary air-coring techniques conducted in the Bandelier Tuff using a modified standard wireline core-barrel system. The modified equipment was used to collect uncontaminated cores of unconsolidated ash and indurated tuff at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Core recovery obtained from the 210-foot deep test hole was about 92 percent. A standard HQ-size, triple-tube wireline core barrel (designed for the passage of liquid drilling fluids) was modified for air coring as follows: (1) Air passages were milled in the latch body part of the head assembly; (2) the inside dimension of the outer core barrel tube was machined and honed to provide greater clearance between the inner and outer barrels; (3) oversized reaming devices were added to the outer core barrel and the coring bit to allow more clearance for air and cuttings return; (4) the eight discharge ports in the coring bit were enlarged. To control airborne-dust pollution, a dust-and-cuttings discharge subassembly, designed and built by project personnel, was used. (USGS)

  19. Multifunctional core-shell nanoparticles: discovery of previously invisible biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tamburro, Davide; Fredolini, Claudia; Espina, Virginia; Douglas, Temple A; Ranganathan, Adarsh; Ilag, Leopold; Zhou, Weidong; Russo, Paul; Espina, Benjamin H; Muto, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra

    2011-11-30

    Many low-abundance biomarkers for early detection of cancer and other diseases are invisible to mass spectrometry because they exist in body fluids in very low concentrations, are masked by high-abundance proteins such as albumin and immunoglobulins, and are very labile. To overcome these barriers, we created porous, buoyant, core-shell hydrogel nanoparticles containing novel high affinity reactive chemical baits for protein and peptide harvesting, concentration, and preservation in body fluids. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) nanoparticles were functionalized with amino-containing dyes via zero-length cross-linking amidation reactions. Nanoparticles functionalized in the core with 17 different (12 chemically novel) molecular baits showed preferential high affinities (K(D) < 10(-11) M) for specific low-abundance protein analytes. A poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-vinylsulfonic acid) shell was added to the core particles. This shell chemistry selectively prevented unwanted entry of all size peptides derived from albumin without hindering the penetration of non-albumin small proteins and peptides. Proteins and peptides entered the core to be captured with high affinity by baits immobilized in the core. Nanoparticles effectively protected interleukin-6 from enzymatic degradation in sweat and increased the effective detection sensitivity of human growth hormone in human urine using multiple reaction monitoring analysis. Used in whole blood as a one-step, in-solution preprocessing step, the nanoparticles greatly enriched the concentration of low-molecular weight proteins and peptides while excluding albumin and other proteins above 30 kDa; this achieved a 10,000-fold effective amplification of the analyte concentration, enabling mass spectrometry (MS) discovery of candidate biomarkers that were previously undetectable.

  20. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779