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Sample records for corium concrete interaction

  1. New Experimental Results on the Interaction of Molten Corium with Reactor Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Granovsky, V.S.

    In order to justify the concept of in-vessel core melt retention, it is necessary to understand the thermal and physico-chemical phenomena. Especially the interaction of the molten pool with the reactor vessel during outside cooling needs to be understood. These phenomena are very complex, in particular, where interactions with the oxidic melt are concerned. In the early stages of the retention process, the oxidic corium and the vessel steel interact under the conditions of low oxygen potential in the melt. These conditions can be simulated by a molten corium having the composition UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}/Zr, where the degree of Zr-oxidationmore » is in the range between 30 % (C-30) and 100 % (C-100). Corresponding experiments with prototypic melts at low oxygen potentials are being performed in the ISTC METCOR project 2. phase. These are: - MC 5 of corium composition 71w%UO{sub 2}-29w%ZrO{sub 2} (C-100) in neutral atmosphere (argon), - MC 6 of corium composition 76w%UO{sub 2}-9w%ZrO{sub 2}-15w%Zr (C{approx}30), also in argon. In test MC 5, the interaction of molten C-100 corium with a water-cooled steel specimen was studied for the following maximum temperatures at the specimen surface: 1075 deg. C, 1180 deg. C, 1315 deg. C and 1435 deg. C. The total duration of the experiment was {approx} 36 hours. The MC 5 test serves as a reference test for determining the characteristics of the interaction between oxidic melt and steel specimen under the conditions of minimum chemical interaction potential. To investigate the effect of substoichiometry, test No 6 was then performed with sub-oxidized molten corium C{approx}30. The maximum surface temperature of the cooled steel specimen was held at {approx} 1400 deg. C. The test duration was {approx} 10 hours. The ablation phenomena were found to differ significantly from those observed both in the reference test, as well as in former tests with oxidized melts, as they involved the formation of a low-melting metallic phase at

  2. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  3. Corium protection assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

  4. Development of Molten Corium Using An Exothermic Chemical Reaction for the Molten- Fuel Moderator-Interaction Studies at Chalk River Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Nitheanandan, T.; Sanderson, D.B.; Kyle, G.

    2004-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has partnered with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a corium thermite prototypical of Candu material and test the concept of ejecting {approx}25 kg of the molten material from a pressure tube with a driving pressure of 10 MPa. This development program has been completed and the technology transferred to AECL. Preparation for the molten-fuel moderator-interaction tests at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories is well underway. A mixture of 0.582 U/0.077 U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/0.151 Zr/0.19 CrO{sub 3} (wt%) as reactant chemicals has been demonstrated to produce a corium consisting of 0.73 UO{sub 2}/0.11 Zr/0.06 ZrO{sub 2}/0.10more » Cr (wt%) at {approx}2400 deg. C. This is comparable to the target Candu specific corium of 0.9 UO{sub 2}/0.1 Zr (wt%), with limited oxidation. The peak melt temperature was confirmed from small-scale thermitic reaction tests. Several small-scale tests were completed to qualify the thermite to ensure operational safety and a quantifiable experimental outcome. The proposed molten-fuel moderator-interaction experiments at Chalk River Laboratories will consist of heating the thermite mixture inside a 1.14-m long insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material has reached the desired temperature of {approx}2400 deg. C, the pressure inside the tube will be raised to about 10 MPa, and the pressure tube will fail at a pre-machined flaw, ejecting the molten material into the surrounding tank of water. The test apparatus, instrumentation, data acquisition and control systems have been assembled, and a series of successful commissioning tests have been completed. (authors)« less

  5. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two

  6. Study of Interaction of Reinforcement with Concrete by Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, V. M.; Samoshkin, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the study of deformation of reinforced concrete. A mathematical model for the interaction of reinforcement with concrete, based on the introduction of a contact layer, whose mechanical characteristics are determined from the experimental data, is developed. The limiting state of concrete is described using the Drucker-Prager theory and the fracture criterion with respect to maximum plastic deformations. A series of problems of the theory of reinforced concrete are solved: stretching of concrete from a central-reinforced prism and pre-stressing of concrete. It is shown that the results of the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W

    Lower head failure and corium concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 were used as input.more » MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH.« less

  8. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core-Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell T.; Francis, Matthew W.

    Lower head failure and corium-concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for the analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, in this paper an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 weremore » used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH. For the MELCOR-based melt pour scenario, CORQUENCH predicted the melt would readily cool within 2.5 h after the pour, and the sumps would experience limited ablation (approximately 18 cm) under water-flooded conditions. Finally, for the MAAP-based melt pour scenarios, CORQUENCH predicted that the melt would cool in approximately 22.5 h, and the sumps would experience approximately 65 cm of concrete ablation under water-flooded conditions.« less

  9. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Ex-Vessel Prediction: Core-Concrete Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell T.; Francis, Matthew W.

    2016-10-31

    Lower head failure and corium-concrete interaction were predicted to occur at Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1) by several different system-level code analyses, including MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5. Although these codes capture a wide range of accident phenomena, they do not contain detailed models for ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes exist for the analysis of ex-vessel melt spreading (e.g., MELTSPREAD) and long-term debris coolability (e.g., CORQUENCH). On this basis, in this paper an analysis was carried out to further evaluate ex-vessel behavior for 1F1 using MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH. Best-estimate melt pour conditions predicted by MELCOR v2.1 and MAAP5 weremore » used as input. MELTSPREAD was then used to predict the spatially dependent melt conditions and extent of spreading during relocation from the vessel. The results of the MELTSPREAD analysis are reported in a companion paper. This information was used as input for the long-term debris coolability analysis with CORQUENCH. For the MELCOR-based melt pour scenario, CORQUENCH predicted the melt would readily cool within 2.5 h after the pour, and the sumps would experience limited ablation (approximately 18 cm) under water-flooded conditions. Finally, for the MAAP-based melt pour scenarios, CORQUENCH predicted that the melt would cool in approximately 22.5 h, and the sumps would experience approximately 65 cm of concrete ablation under water-flooded conditions.« less

  10. Novel metaphor comprehension: Semantic neighbourhood density interacts with concreteness.

    PubMed

    Al-Azary, Hamad; Buchanan, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Previous research suggests that metaphor comprehension is affected both by the concreteness of the topic and vehicle and their semantic neighbours (Kintsch, 2000; Xu, 2010). However, studies have yet to manipulate these 2 variables simultaneously. To that end, we composed novel metaphors manipulated on topic concreteness and semantic neighbourhood density (SND) of topic and vehicle. In Experiment 1, participants rated the metaphors on the suitability (e.g. sensibility) of their topic-vehicle pairings. Topic concreteness interacted with SND such that participants rated metaphors from sparse semantic spaces to be more sensible than those from dense semantic spaces and preferred abstract topics over concrete topics only for metaphors from dense semantic spaces. In Experiments 2 and 3, we used presentation deadlines and found that topic concreteness and SND affect the online processing stages associated with metaphor comprehension. We discuss how the results are aligned with established psycholinguistic models of metaphor comprehension.

  11. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully

  12. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized

  13. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1)more » resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized

  14. Modeling of interaction between steel and concrete in continuously reinforced concrete pavements : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) contains continuous longitudinal reinforcement with no transverse : expansion within the early life of the pavement and can continue to develop cracks in the long-term. The : accurate modeling of CRCPs...

  15. FCI experiments in the corium/water system

    SciTech Connect

    Huhtiniemi, I.; Hohmann, H.; Magallon, D.

    The KROTOS fuel coolant interaction (FCI) tests aim at providing benchmark data to examine the effect of fuel/coolant initial conditions and mixing on explosion energetics. Experiments, fundamental in nature, are performed in well-controlled geometries and are complementary to the FARO large scale tests. Recently, a new test series was started using 3 kg of prototypical core material (80 w/o UO{sub 2}, 20 w/o ZrO{sub 2}) which was poured into a water column of {le} 1.25 m in height (95 mm and 200 mm in diameter) under 0.1 MPa ambient pressure. Four tests have been performed in the test section ofmore » 95 mm in diameter (ID) with different subcooling levels (10-80K) and with and without an external trigger. Additionally, one test has been performed with a test section of 200 mm in diameter (ID) and with an external trigger. No spontaneous or triggered energetic FCIs (steam explosions) have been observed in these corium tests. This is in sharp contrast with the steam explosions observed in the previously reported Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} test series which had the same initial conditions of ambient pressure and subcooling. The post-test analysis of the corium experiments indicated that strong vaporisation at the melt/water contact led to a partial expulsion of the melt from the test section into the pressure vessel. In order to avoid this and to obtain a good penetration and premixing os the corium melt, an additional test has been performed with a larger diameter test section. In all the UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} tests an efficient quenching process (0.7-1.2 MW/kg-melt) with total fuel fragmentation (mass mean diameter 1.4-2.5 mm) was observed. Results from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tests under the same initial conditions are also presented for further confirmation of the observed differences in behaviour between Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melts.« less

  16. Phase separation of metal-added corium and its effect on a steam explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, B. T.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. W.; Hong, S. H.; Park, I. K.; Song, J. H.; Kim, H. D.

    2008-07-01

    To simulate a relocation of molten core material and its interaction phenomenon with water during a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, a typical corium of UO 2/ZrO 2/Zr/Stainless steel mixed at a 62 wt%, 15 wt%, 12 wt% and 11 wt%, respectively, was melted and then cooled down to become a solidified ingot. It was shown that the molten corium was separated into two layers, of which the upper layer was oxide mixtures and the lower layer was metal alloys. The upper layer was UO 2 and ZrO 2 and the lower layer mostly consisted of metal mixtures such as uranium, zirconium and stainless steel. Iron content varied with the positions and about a half of it existed as an alloy such as Fe 2U. Uranium metal was produced by reduction of UO 2 by zirconium metal. The average densities of the upper oxide layer and the lower metal layer were 8.802 and 9.411 g/cm 3, respectively. In another test, metal-added molten corium was poured into water and it showed that a steam explosion could occur by applying an external trigger.

  17. In situ interactions between Opalinus Clay and Low Alkali Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, Catherine; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Warmont, Fabienne; Jenni, Andreas; Cloet, Veerle; Mäder, Urs

    2017-06-01

    A five-year-old interface between a Low Alkali Concrete (LAC) formulation (CEM III/B containing 66% slag and 10% nano-silica) and Opalinus Clay (OPA) from a field experiment at Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory in Switzerland (Jenni et al., 2014) has been studied to decipher the textural, mineralogical and chemical changes that occurred between the two reacting materials. Reactivity between LAC concrete and OPA is found to be limited to a ∼1 mm thick highly porous (ca. 75% porosity) white crust developed on the concrete side. Quantitative mineralogical mapping of the white crust using an electron microprobe and infrared spectroscopy on the cement matrix provides evidence of a Mg-rich phase accounting for approximatively 25 wt % of the matrix associated with 11 wt % of calcite, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and other cement phases. EDX analyses and electron diffraction combined with transmission electron microscopy of the Mg-rich phase provide evidence for a tri-octahedral 2:1 phyllosilicate with mean composition: (Ca0.5±0.2) (Mg2.0±0.4, Fe0.2±0.1, Al0.5±03, □0.3±0.3) (Al0.9±0.2, Si3.1±0.2) O10 (OH)2, where □ represents vacancies in the octahedral site. Apart from this reactive contact, textural, mineralogical and chemical modifications at the contact with the LAC concrete are limited. OPA mineralogy remains largely unmodified. X-ray micro-fluorescence and EPMA mapping of major elements on the OPA side also provides evidence for a Mg-enriched 300-400 μm thick layer. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) values measured in the OPA in contact with the LAC concrete range between 153 and 175 meq kg-1 of dry OPA, close to the reference value of 170 ± 10 meq kg-1 of dry OPA (Pearson et al., 2003). Changing cation occupancies at the interface with LAC concrete are mainly marked by increased Ca, Mg and K, and decreased Na. Leaching tests performed on OPA with deionized water and at different solid to water ratios strongly suggest that Cl and SO4 have

  18. Understanding the interacted mechanism between carbonation and chloride aerosol attack in ordinary Portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Qiu, Qiwen; Chen, Xiaochi

    An experimental study is carried out with the aim to understand the interacted mechanism between carbonation and chloride aerosol attack in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete. Effects of carbonation on the chloride profile, the chloride binding capacity and the chloride diffusion coefficient are evaluated. Besides, effect of chloride aerosol attack on the carbonation rate is investigated. Concrete specimens with three water-to-cement ratios (0.38, 0.47 and 0.53) are fabricated in this work. Tested results demonstrate that carbonation remarkably affects the chloride profile, reduces the chloride binding capacity, and also accelerates the rate of chloride ion diffusion of concrete. Besides, the presencemore » of chloride aerosol can lead to lower the carbonation depth and increase the pH value of carbonated concrete. Microscopic properties such as morphology, porosity, and pore size distribution for the contaminated concretes are explored by scanning electron microscope and mercury intrusion porosimetry, which provide strong evidence to these research findings.« less

  19. Key findings and remaining questions in the areas of core-concrete interaction and debris coolability

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, M. T.; Gerardi, C.; Bremer, N.; ...

    2016-10-31

    The reactor accidents at Fukushima-Dai-ichi have rekindled interest in late phase severe accident behavior involving reactor pressure vessel breach and discharge of molten core melt into the containment. Two technical issues of interest in this area include core-concrete interaction and the extent to which the core debris may be quenched and rendered coolable by top flooding. The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) programs at Argonne National Laboratory included the conduct of large scale reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensionalmore » molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. These tests provided a broad database to support accident management planning, as well as the development and validation of models and codes that can be used to extrapolate the experiment results to plant conditions. This paper provides a high level overview of the key experiment results obtained during the program. Finally, a discussion is also provided that describes technical gaps that remain in this area, several of which have arisen based on the sequence of events and operator actions during Fukushima.« less

  20. Key findings and remaining questions in the areas of core-concrete interaction and debris coolability

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Gerardi, C.; Bremer, N.

    The reactor accidents at Fukushima-Dai-ichi have rekindled interest in late phase severe accident behavior involving reactor pressure vessel breach and discharge of molten core melt into the containment. Two technical issues of interest in this area include core-concrete interaction and the extent to which the core debris may be quenched and rendered coolable by top flooding. The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) programs at Argonne National Laboratory included the conduct of large scale reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensionalmore » molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. These tests provided a broad database to support accident management planning, as well as the development and validation of models and codes that can be used to extrapolate the experiment results to plant conditions. This paper provides a high level overview of the key experiment results obtained during the program. Finally, a discussion is also provided that describes technical gaps that remain in this area, several of which have arisen based on the sequence of events and operator actions during Fukushima.« less

  1. Numerical modeling of interaction of the aircraft engine with concrete protective structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents numerical modeling results considering interaction of Boeing 747 aircraft engine with nuclear power station protective shell. Protective shell has been given as a reinforced concrete structure with complex scheme of reinforcement. The engine has been simulated by cylinder projectile made from titanium alloy. The interaction velocity has comprised 180 m/s. The simulation is three-dimensional solved by finite element method using the author’s own software package EFES. Fracture and fragmentation of materials have been considered in calculations. Program software has been assessed to be used in calculation of multiple-contact objectives.

  2. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part II: Bentonite contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.; Cuevas, Jaime; Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Rodríguez, Enrique; Turrero, María Jesús

    2017-06-01

    The in situ FEBEX experiment performed at the URL in Grimsel (Swizerland) was dismantled after 18 years of operation. Interface samples between bentonite and a shotcreted concrete plug that was constructed in a second operational phase have been studied after 13 years of interaction. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of samples have been performed by XRD, SEM-EDX, TG and FTIR techniques in addition to determinations of major ions by chemical analysis of aqueous extracts, δ18O and δ13C stable isotopes both in concrete paste and bentonite, and exchangeable cations in bentonite. Low mineralogical alteration impact was observed in bentonite that is only affected by a few millimeters. A large accumulation of Mg was observed at the bentonite side of the interface precipitating as silicates in various forms. In addition, heterogeneous carbonation was observed at the interface, but mostly affecting the concrete side. Migration of aqueous species occurred, being the most relevant the diffusion of chloride and sulfate from bentonite to concrete, in agreement with Part I of this study. Chloride advanced more into the concrete, while sulfates reacted to form ettringite, which has an evident alteration impact at the very interface (<0.5 mm rim) within the concrete. The ionic mobility has also redistributed the exchangeable cations in bentonite, increasing the content in Ca2+ and Na+, compensated by a decrease in Mg2+. The results presented in this paper complement those presented in Part I, focusing on the alteration of concrete by the bentonite and the granite groundwater.

  3. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  4. Water-Rock Interaction Simulations of Iron Oxide Mobilization and Precipitation: Implications of Cross-diffusion Reactions for Terrestrial and Mars 'Blueberry' Hematite Concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.; Parry, W. T.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling of how terrestrial concretions form can provide valuable insights into understanding water-rock interactions that led to the formation of hematite concretions at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Numerical simulations of iron oxide concretions in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah provide physical and chemical input parameters for emulating conditions that may have prevailed on Mars. In the terrestrial example, iron oxide coatings on eolian sand grains are reduced and mobilized by methane or petroleum. Precipitation of goethite or hematite occurs as Fe interacts with oxygen. Conditions that produced Navajo Sandstone concretions can range from a regional scale that is strongly affected by advection of large pore volumes of water, to small sub-meter scale features that are dominantly controlled by diffusive processes. Hematite concretions are results of a small-scale cross-diffusional process, where Fe and oxygen are supplied from two opposite sides from the 'middle' zone of mixing where concretions precipitate. This is an ideal natural system where Liesegang banding and other self-organized patterns can evolve. A complicating variable here is the sedimentologic (both mineralogic and textural) heterogeneity that, in reality, may be the key factor controlling the nucleation and precipitation habits (including possible competitive growth) of hematite concretions. Sym.8 water-rock interaction simulator program was used for the Navajo Sandstone concretions. Sym.8 is a water-rock simulator that accounts for advective and diffusive mass-transfer, and equilibrium and kinetic reactions. The program uses a dynamic composite media texture model to address changing sediment composition and texture to be consistent with the reaction progress. Initial one-dimensional simulation results indicate precipitation heterogeneity in the range of sub-meters, e.g., possible banding and distribution of iron oxide nodules may be centimeters apart for published diffusivities and

  5. Bridge-in-a-backpack(TM) task 3.3 : investigate soil-structure interaction-modeling and experimental results of concrete filled FRP tube arches.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-01

    This report includes fulfillment of Task 3.3 of a multi-task contract to further enhance concrete filled FRP tubes, or : the Bridge in a Backpack. Task 3 is an investigation of soil-structure interaction for the FRP tubes. Task 3.3 is the : modeling ...

  6. Recycled concrete aggregate as road base: Leaching constituents and neutralization by soil Interactions and dilution.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nautasha; Kluge, Matt; Chadik, Paul A; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA) is often used as a replacement for natural aggregate in road construction activities because of its excellent mechanical properties, and this trend should increase as more transportation departments include RCA in specifications and design manuals. Concerns raised by some engineers and contractors include impacts from leachate generated by RCA, both from transport of metals to water sources and the impact of a high pH leachate on corrosion of underlying metal drainage pipes. In this study, RCA collected from various regions of Florida exhibited pH ranging from 10.5 to 12.3. Concentrations of Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ni, Sb, and Sr measured using batch leaching tests exceeded applicable risk-based thresholds on at least some occasions, but the concentrations measured suggest that risk to water supplies should be controlled because of dilution and attenuation. Two mechanisms of pH neutralization were evaluated. Soil acidity plays a role, but laboratory testing and chemical modeling found that at higher liquid-to-solid ratios the acidity is exhausted. If high pH leachate did reach groundwater, chemical modeling indicated that groundwater dilution and carbonation would mitigate groundwater pH effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  8. Ice damage to concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-04-01

    Concrete is a porous material. When saturated with water and then cooled to below 00C, it cracks internally. Upon repeated freezing and thawing, the cracks grow, interact, and lead eventually to macroscopic degradation, termed ice damage. This report...

  9. Investigation of deformation of elements of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures located in the soil, interacting with each other through rubber gaskets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Balafendieva, I. S.; Sachenkov, A. A.; Sekaeva, L. R.

    2017-06-01

    In work the technique of calculation of elements of three-dimensional reinforced concrete substructures located in a soil, interacting with each other through rubber linings is realized. To describe the interaction of deformable structures with the ground, special “semi-infinite” finite elements are used. A technique has been implemented that allows one to describe the contact interaction of three-dimensional structures by means of a special contact finite element with specific properties. The obtained numerical results are compared with the experimental data, their good agreement is noted.

  10. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertron, A.; Ranaivomanana, H.; Jacquemet, N.; Erable, B.; Sablayrolles, C.; Escadeillas, G.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+). The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  11. Conceptual model analysis of interaction at a concrete-Boom Clay interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sanheng; Jacques, Diederik; Govaerts, Joan; Wang, Lian

    In many concepts for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste, cementitious materials are used in the engineered barriers. For example, in Belgium the engineered barrier system is based on a considerable amount of cementitious materials as buffer and backfill in the so-called supercontainer embedded in the hosting geological formation. A potential hosting formation is Boom Clay. Insight in the interaction between the high-pH pore water of the cementitious materials and neutral-pH Boom Clay pore water is required. Two problems are quite common for modeling of such a system. The first one is the computational cost due to the long timescale model assessments envisaged for the deep disposal system. Also a very fine grid (in sub-millimeter), especially at interfaces has to be used in order to accurately predict the evolution of the system. The second one is whether to use equilibrium or kinetic reaction models. The objectives of this paper are twofold. First, we develop an efficient coupled reactive transport code for this diffusion-dominated system by making full use of multi-processors/cores computers. Second, we investigate how sensitive the system is to chemical reaction models especially when pore clogging due to mineral precipitation is considered within the cementitious system. To do this, we selected two portlandite dissolution models, i.e., equilibrium (fastest) and diffusion-controlled model with precipitation of a calcite layer around portlandite particles (diffusion-controlled dissolution). The results show that with shrinking core model portlandite dissolution and calcite precipitation are much slower than with the equilibrium model. Also diffusion-controlled dissolution smooths out dissolution fronts compared to the equilibrium model. However, only a slight difference with respect to the clogging time can be found even though we use a very small diffusion coefficient (10-20 m2/s) in the precipitated calcite layer.

  12. Effects of synthetic air entraining agents on compressive strength of Portland cement concrete : mechanism of interaction and remediation strategy

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-07-01

    This document reports the results of a comprehensive study pertaining to the determination of causes and mechanisms resulting in a reduction strength in concrete mixtures containing synthetic air entraining admixtures. The study involved experimentat...

  13. Reliability-based design optimization of reinforced concrete structures including soil-structure interaction using a discrete gravitational search algorithm and a proposed metamodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibinia, M.; Salajegheh, E.; Salajegheh, J.; Fadaee, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new discrete gravitational search algorithm (DGSA) and a metamodelling framework are introduced for reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) of reinforced concrete structures. The RBDO of structures with soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects is investigated in accordance with performance-based design. The proposed DGSA is based on the standard gravitational search algorithm (GSA) to optimize the structural cost under deterministic and probabilistic constraints. The Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS) method is considered as the most reliable method for estimating the probabilities of reliability. In order to reduce the computational time of MCS, the proposed metamodelling framework is employed to predict the responses of the SSI system in the RBDO procedure. The metamodel consists of a weighted least squares support vector machine (WLS-SVM) and a wavelet kernel function, which is called WWLS-SVM. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and computational advantages of DGSA and the proposed metamodel for RBDO of reinforced concrete structures.

  14. High temperature reaction between sea salt deposit and (U,Zr)O2 simulated corium debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masahide; Nishi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    In order to clarify the possible impacts of seawater injection on the chemical and physical state of the corium debris formed in the severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, the high temperature reaction between sea salt deposit and (U,Zr)O2 simulated corium debris (sim-debris) was examined in the temperature range from 1088 to 1668 K. A dense layer of calcium and sodium uranate formed on the surface of a sim-debris pellet at 1275 K under airflow, with the thickness of over 50 μm. When the oxygen partial pressure is low, calcium is likely to dissolve into the cubic sim-debris phase to form solid solution (Ca,U,Zr)O2+x. The diffusion depth was 5-6 μm from the surface, subjected to 1275 K for 12 h. The crystalline MgO remains affixed on the surface as the main residue of salt components. A part of it can also dissolve into the sim-debris.

  15. Concrete research

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    The papers in this volume deal with various facets of concrete technology. The first four papers discuss concrete performance from the perspectives of design, specifications, and testing. The following three papers address the use and management of by-products in cementitious systems. Kakodkar et al. present the results of a study to determine the influence of five different Class C fly ashes on inhibiting the expansion of concrete due to alkali-silica reaction. Ramakrishnan et al. present the results of an extensive study to determine the influence of natural possolans in reducing the deleterious expansion of concrete due to alkai-silica reaction. Themore » test results showed that all the natural pozzolans used in the study, except one, were very effective in reducing the expansions due to alkali-silica reaction. Johnston discusses a modified interpretation of the ASTM P214 test results for determining potential reactivity of sands used for concrete in South Dakota.« less

  16. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    36 Thermal Contraction . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Summary of Sulfur Concrete (unmodified) . . . 39 Modified Sulfur Concrete............ 40...Compressive strength of PCPD- modified sulfur concrete 47 20 Functional connection between reaction time and temperature in making DCPD- modified sulfur concrete...39 MODIFIED SULFUR CONCRETE In the previous section it was shown that sulfur concrete exhibits several undesirable properties, such as 1 poor

  17. Using cement paste rheology to predict concrete mix design problems : technical report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-07-01

    The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixture sometimes leads to : unpredictable concrete performance in the field, which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste : rheology measure...

  18. Experimental investigation of 150-KG-scale corium melt jet quenching in water

    SciTech Connect

    Magallon, D.; Hohmann, H.

    This paper compares and discusses the results of two large scale FARO quenching tests known as L-11 and L-14, which involved, respectively, 151 kg of W% 76.7 UO{sub 2} + 19.2 ZrO{sub 2} + 4.1 Zr and 125 kg of W% 80 UO{sub 2} + 20 ZrO{sub 2} melts poured into 600-kg, 2-m-depth water at saturation at 5.0 MPa. The results are further compared with those of two previous tests performed using a pure oxidic melt, respectively 18 and 44 kg of W% 80 UO{sub 2} + 20 ZrO{sub 2} melt quenched in 1-m-depth water at saturation at 5.0 MPa.more » In all the tests, significant breakup and quenching took place during the melt fall through the water. No steam explosion occurred. In the tests performed with a pure oxide UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt, part of the corium (from 1/6 to 1/3) did not breakup and reached the bottom plate still molten whatever the water depth was. Test L-11 data suggest that full oxidation and complete breakup of the melt occurred during the melt fall through the water. A proportion of 64% of the total energy content of the melt was released to the water during this phase ({approximately}1.5 s), against 44% for L-14. The maximum temperature increase of the bottom plate was 330 K (L-14). The mean particle size of the debris ranged between 2.5 and 4.8mm.« less

  19. High performance concrete bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-08-01

    This compilation of FHWA reports focuses on high performance concrete bridges. High performance concrete is described as concrete with enhanced durability and strength characteristics. Under the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), more than 40...

  20. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  1. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. W.; Yoo, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction) and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete) models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  2. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  3. Thermophysical properties of liquid UO2, ZrO2 and corium by molecular dynamics and predictive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong Kee; Shim, Ji Hoon; Kaviany, Massoud

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the fate of accident-melted nuclear fuel-cladding requires the understanding of the thermophysical properties which are lacking or have large scatter due to high-temperature experimental challenges. Using equilibrium classical molecular dynamics (MD), we predict the properties of melted UO2 and ZrO2 and compare them with the available experimental data and the predictive models. The existing interatomic potential models have been developed mainly for the polymorphic solid phases of these oxides, so they cannot be used to predict all the properties accurately. We compare and decipher the distinctions of those MD predictions using the specific property-related autocorrelation decays. The predicted properties are density, specific heat, heat of fusion, compressibility, viscosity, surface tension, and the molecular and electronic thermal conductivities. After the comparisons, we provide readily usable temperature-dependent correlations (including UO2-ZrO2 compounds, i.e. corium melt).

  4. Concrete-Water-Interaction and Ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) Precipitation in a Man-Made River Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, R.; Dietzel, M.; Reichl, P.; Leis, A.; Pölt, P.; Baldermann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Centimetre-thick, beige-colored and soft crusts were observed shortly after construction of a man-made river bed, i.e. a small natural river was bypassed flowing through a new bed lined with concrete and blocks. Hydrochemical investigations during wintertime - when water temperatures dropped down close to freezing - showed surprisingly high pH values up to 13.0 and elevated Ca2+ concentrations up to 200 mg/l. Both, the artifical and natural (downstream) section of the river bed were affected by the anomalous hydrochemistry and formation of prominent secondary precipitates. In order to better understand the particular and rapid water-rock-interaction, a hydrochemical monitoring program was launched and several of the delicate precipitates were recovered in refrigerator boxes in their original solution. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory within a few hours after sampling and stored at 1 °C. XRD and FT-IR patterns clearly revealed the predominant occurrence of "ikaite" in the crusts next to minor amounts of other carbonates (calcite, aragonite, vaterite) and detrital minerals. Ikaite - calcium carbonate hexahydrate - is a worldwide rarely documented carbonate mineral. This mineral is metastable and needs particular and narrow conditions in order to precipitate from solutions, i.e. a very limited water-temperature range between 0 and 4 °C (with ambient-pressure and low-salinity), highly alkaline pH conditions, high supersaturation values, and in many cases carbonate precipitation inhibitors (e.g. phosphates). Outside these conditions it disintegrates into calcite and water within minutes to hours. The few places of ikaite formation include Ikka Fjord in Greenland, Arctic- and Antarctic sea-ice and some sites of water mixing at Mono Lake, California. Combining detailed field monitoring results, solid-phase analyses and regional meteorological data (rainfall, water discharge, temperature) with hydrogeochemical modeling allows constraining the mechanisms of

  5. SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.

    The ACL activities covered IFR fuel reprocessing, corium-concrete interactions, environmental samples, wastes, WIPP support, Advanced Photon Source, H-Tc superconductors, EBWR vessel, soils, illegal drug detection, quality control, etc.

  6. Fibre Concrete 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  7. Antifreeze Admixtures for Concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a chemical admixture that would reduce the need for wintertime thermal protection of freshly placed concrete. Chemicals were investigated for their ability to promote strength gain in concrete cured below 0 deg...

  8. Concrete aggregate durability study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-06-01

    There are many factors that affect the durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC), including the mix design and the : materials used, the quality of construction, and the environment. Durability is not an intrinsic property of the concrete, but : i...

  9. Concrete pavement joint deterioration.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in IN...

  10. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  11. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  12. Modified pavement cement concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  13. Differential emotional processing in concrete and abstract words.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Keitel, Anne; Bruce, Gillian; Scott, Graham G; O'Donnell, Patrick J; Sereno, Sara C

    2018-02-12

    Emotion (positive and negative) words are typically recognized faster than neutral words. Recent research suggests that emotional valence, while often treated as a unitary semantic property, may be differentially represented in concrete and abstract words. Studies that have explicitly examined the interaction of emotion and concreteness, however, have demonstrated inconsistent patterns of results. Moreover, these findings may be limited as certain key lexical variables (e.g., familiarity, age of acquisition) were not taken into account. We investigated the emotion-concreteness interaction in a large-scale, highly controlled lexical decision experiment. A 3 (Emotion: negative, neutral, positive) × 2 (Concreteness: abstract, concrete) design was used, with 45 items per condition and 127 participants. We found a significant interaction between emotion and concreteness. Although positive and negative valenced words were recognized faster than neutral words, this emotion advantage was significantly larger in concrete than in abstract words. We explored potential contributions of participant alexithymia level and item imageability to this interactive pattern. We found that only word imageability significantly modulated the emotion-concreteness interaction. While both concrete and abstract emotion words are advantageously processed relative to comparable neutral words, the mechanisms of this facilitation are paradoxically more dependent on imageability in abstract words. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Salt Action on Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    This pasuivates and protects the steel rebars against corrosion . As highway construction has expanded. such concrete has gone into pave- ments and...experts are beginning to recognize attack unrelated to rebar corrosion (Stevens 1977). Concrete and masonry may become "punky" from salt .0 and...departments. Corrosion aspects The alkalinity (high pH) of concrete tends to passivate embedded steel " . reinforcement ( rebars ). Probably it was earlier

  15. Underwater Concrete Inspection Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    nondestructive testing of con- crete waterfront structures. One instrument is a magnetic rebar locator that locates rebar in concrete structures and measures the...amount of con- crete cover over the rebar . Another instrument is a rebound hammer that measures the surface hardness of the concrete . The third...development of three specialized instruments for the underwater nondestructive testing or concrete waterfront structures. One instrument is a magnetic rebar

  16. Evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of recycled concrete as coarse aggregate in new concrete pavements. : Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) produced from demolished pavements in three geographically dispersed locations in Washington state were used to perfo...

  17. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    concrete paving block ( Van der Vlist 1980). The concrete paving block was readily accepted as a substitute for the scarce paving brick and today has...seen in Figure 4, its growth.has been steady ( Van der Vlist 1980). 20 15 0< 0. n 10 1𔃺 978 960 1 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 6970 71 72 73 74 7678 7778 79...Figure 4. Concrete paving block production in the Netherlands ( Van der Vlist 1980) 8. The use of concrete paving block in the Netherlands developedI

  18. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate predictionmore » of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.« less

  19. Concrete deck material properties.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold focus of this study was (a) to develop an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for causing : cracking in the concrete; and (b) to study the influence of the local materials on the performance of NYSDOTs HP : concrete mixture. R...

  20. Durability of high performance concrete in magnesium brine

    SciTech Connect

    Tumidajski, P.J.; Chan, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    The durability of six concretes exposed to magnesium brine was monitored for 24 months. These concretes incorporated ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, and fly ash. The Young`s moduli, chloride penetrations, and median pore diameters were measured. There was a cyclic nature to these properties due to the complicated interaction of hydration with magnesium, chloride and sulfate attack. Mineral admixtures, in combination with a long initial cure, provided the most durable concrete. Concrete with 65% slag had the best overall durability to the brines tested.

  1. Retrieval of concrete words involves more contextual information than abstract words: multiple components for the concreteness effect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Qin; Guo, Chun-yan

    2012-03-01

    The current study used the directed forgetting paradigm in implicit and explicit memory to investigate the concreteness effect. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to explore the neural basis of this phenomenon. The behavioral results showed a clear concreteness effect in both implicit and explicit memory tests; participants responded significantly faster to concrete words than to abstract words. The ERP results revealed a concreteness effect (N400) in both the encoding and retrieval phases. In addition, behavioral and ERP results showed an interaction between word concreteness and memory instruction (to-be-forgotten vs. to-be-remembered) in the late epoch of the explicit retrieval phase, revealing a significant concreteness effect only under the to-be-remembered instruction condition. This concreteness effect was realized as an increased P600-like component in response to concrete words relative to abstract words, likely reflecting retrieval of contextual details. The time course of the concreteness effect suggests advantages of concrete words over abstract words due to greater contextual information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Concrete Infrastructure Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.

    2003-06-01

    It is well known that many reinforced concrete structures are at risk of deterioration due to chloride ion contamination of the concrete or atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolving in water to form carbonic acid, which reacts with the concrete and the reinforcing steel. The environment within the concrete will determine the corrosion product layers, which might, inter alia, contain the oxides and/or hydroxides of iron. Tensile forces resulting from volume changes during their formation lead to the cracking and delamination of the concrete. In the present investigation the handrail of an outside staircase suffered rebar corrosion during 30 year's service, leading to severe delamination damage to the concrete structure. The railings had been sealed into the concrete staircase using a polysulphide sealant, Thiokol®. The corrosion products were identified by means of Mössbauer and SEM analyses, which indicated that the corrosion product composition varied from the original steel surface to the outer layers, the former being mainly iron oxides and the latter iron oxyhydroxide.

  3. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  4. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  5. Best practices for concrete pumping.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-01

    Pumping is one of the major placement techniques used in the concrete industry to deliver concrete : from the mixing truck to the formwork. Although concrete pumping has been used to place concrete since : the 1960s, there is still a lack of exact kn...

  6. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  7. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  8. Protocol to identify incompatible combinations of concrete materials : tech brief.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-07-01

    For this project, incompatibility of concrete materials is : defined as interactions between acceptable materials that result in unexpected or unacceptable performance. The most common problems are associated with premature stiffening (rapid sl...

  9. Identifying incompatible combinations of concrete materials: volume II, test protocol.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    Unexpected interactions between otherwise acceptable ingredients in portland cement : concrete are becoming increasingly common as cementitious systems become more complex : and demands on the systems are more rigorous. Examples of incompatibilities ...

  10. Identifying incompatible combinations of concrete materials : volume I, final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    Unexpected interactions between otherwise acceptable ingredients in portland cement concrete are becoming increasingly common as cementitious systems become more and more complex and demands on the systems are more rigorous. Such incompatibilities ar...

  11. Behavior of concrete specimens reinforced with composite materials : laboratory study

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the interaction between FRP composite and concrete by addressing the most important : variables in terms of FRP (fiber reinforced polymer) properties. Type of fibers, thickness of the laminates, fib...

  12. Concrete wear study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1968-06-01

    This report primarily investigates the wear characteristics of concrete using various cement contents and three different sources of aggregates. Compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity data was also obtained to assist in the evaluation...

  13. Texturing new concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-01-01

    Several texturing experiments on heavily traveled portland cement concrete pavements in Virginia are described. Included in the experiments were textures imparted by a heavy burlap drag, metal tines (transverse and longitudinal striations), sprinkled...

  14. Asphaltic concrete pavement survey.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-04-01

    The ever increasing problem of wheel path rutting and excessive desification of asphaltic concrete pavement has been the subject of asphalt technology for quite sometime. It is known that the density of the pavement, which is significant for several ...

  15. Premixed polymer concrete overlays.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study undertaken to evaluate premixed polymer concrete overlays (PMPCO) over a 3-year period are presented. The PMPCO evaluated were constructed with polyester amide para resin and silica sand 1;. polyester styrene resin 1 and silica...

  16. Corrosion Protection: Concrete Bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-09-01

    Premature corrosion of reinforcing steel has caused many concrete bridges in the United States to deteriorate before their design life was attained. Recognizing the burden that reinforcing steel corrosion imposes on natural resources, the Federal Hig...

  17. Improving concrete overlay construction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    Several road construction projects involving concrete overlays at the state and county levels in Iowa in 2009 were studied for : construction techniques and methods. The projects that were evaluated consisted of sites in four Iowa counties: Osceola, ...

  18. Bituminous concrete overlay studies.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-01-01

    Deflection tests conducted on eight sections of primary highway, both before and after asphaltic concrete resurfacings, were analyzed as a study of the utility of such tests in the design of overlays. The application of tentative traffic and allowabl...

  19. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  20. Modeling reinforced concrete durability.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This project developed a next-generation modeling approach for projecting the extent of : reinforced concrete corrosion-related damage, customized for new and existing Florida Department of : Transportation bridges and suitable for adapting to broade...

  1. Nondestructive Concrete Characterization System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    Army, locate steel reinforcing bars, and identify the presence of steel fiber reinforcement . The thickness of all sides of each concrete block was...concrete compressive strength within the accuracy required by the U.S. Army, locate steel reinforcing bars, and identify the presence of steel fiber ...tolerance of ±3 ksi. 3. Detect the presence of fiber reinforcement . 4. Locate and detect the presence and density (e.g. spacing) of metallic objects

  2. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  3. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  4. The Use of Concrete Experiences in Early Childhood Mathematics Instruction.

    PubMed

    Baroody, Arthur J

    2017-01-01

    Addressed are four key issues regarding concrete instruction: What is concrete? What is a worthwhile concrete experience? How can concrete experiences be used effectively in early childhood mathematics instruction? Is there evidence such experiences work? I argue that concrete experiences are those that build on what is familiar to a child and can involve objects, verbal analogies, or virtual images. The use of manipulatives or computer games, for instance, does not in itself guarantee an educational experience. Such experiences are worthwhile if they target and further learning (e.g., help children extend their informal knowledge or use their informal knowledge to understand and learn formal knowledge). A crucial guideline for the effective use of concrete experience is Dewey's principle of interaction-external factors (e.g., instructional activities) need to mesh with internal factors (readiness, interest). Cognitive views of concrete materials, such as the cognitive alignment perspective and dual-representation hypothesis, provide useful guidance about external factors but do not adequately take into account internal factors and their interaction with external factors. Research on the effectiveness of concrete experience is inconclusive because it frequently overlooks internal factors. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Usage of Crushed Concrete Fines in Decorative Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, Anton; Bazhenova, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the questions of usage of crushed concrete fines from concrete scrap for the production of high-quality decorative composite materials based on mixed binder. The main problem in the application of crushed concrete in the manufacture of decorative concrete products is extremely low decorative properties of crushed concrete fines itself, as well as concrete products based on them. However, crushed concrete fines could have a positive impact on the structure of the concrete matrix and could improve the environmental and economic characteristics of the concrete products. Dust fraction of crushed concrete fines contains non-hydrated cement grains, which can be opened in screening process due to the low strength of the contact zone between the hydrated and non-hydrated cement. In addition, the screening process could increase activity of the crushed concrete fines, so it can be used as a fine aggregate and filler for concrete mixes. Previous studies have shown that the effect of the usage of the crushed concrete fines is small and does not allow to obtain concrete products with high strength. However, it is possible to improve the efficiency of the crushed concrete fines as a filler due to the complex of measures prior to mixing. Such measures may include a preliminary mechanochemical activation of the binder (cement binder, iron oxide pigment, silica fume and crushed concrete fines), as well as the usage of polycarboxylate superplasticizers. The development of specific surface area of activated crushed concrete fines ensures strong adhesion between grains of binder and filler during the formation of cement stone matrix. The particle size distribution of the crushed concrete fines could achieve the densest structure of cement stone matrix and improve its resistance to environmental effects. The authors examined the mechanisms of structure of concrete products with crushed concrete fines as a filler. The results of studies of the properties of

  6. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase I : concrete temperature study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1968-08-01

    This report describes a study conducted to determine the temperature gradient throughout the depth of a six inch concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck selected for study was constructed using lightweight concrete for the center spans and sand and gra...

  8. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  9. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  10. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate predictionmore » of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.« less

  11. Radiant heat curing of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons were made of the properties of concrete mixtures cured with radiant heat and mixtures cured with low pressure steam and of the curing conditions. The concretes were prepared and cured at two plants which produce precast, prestressed concr...

  12. Acceptable vibrations on green concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    Vibrations are potentially harmful to green concrete in shaft foundations, and many states, including : Mississippi, cautiously established limits in terms of compressive strength, distance boundary, and : wait time to protect early age concrete. But...

  13. Improved concretes for corrosion resistance

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-07-01

    The deterioration of various reinforced concrete bridge components containing conventional black steel reinforcement is the most important problem facing U.S. highway agencies. A major cause of this concrete deterioration (cracking, delamination, and...

  14. Protection of structural concrete substructures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1992-12-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel within concrete has always been a problem in construction of bridge decks. With low slump concrete and epoxy rebar, progress has been made in controlling the corrosion. There is concern, however, that the chloride a...

  15. Advance Organizers: Concret Versus Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkill, Alice J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relative effects of concrete and abstract advance organizers on students' memory for subsequent prose. Results of the experiments are discussed in terms of the memorability, familiarity, and visualizability of concrete and abstract verbal materials. (JD)

  16. Modeling reinforced concrete durability : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    Many Florida bridges are built of steel-reinforced concrete. Floridas humid and marine : environments subject steel in these structures : to corrosion once water and salt penetrate the : concrete and contact the steel. Corroded steel : takes up mo...

  17. Polyester polymer concrete overlay.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    Polyester polymer concrete (PPC) was used in a trial application on a section of pavement that suffers from extensive studded tire wear. The purpose of the trial section is to determine if PPC is a possible repair strategy for this type of pavement d...

  18. Shell concrete pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1966-10-01

    This report describes the testing performed with reef shell, clam shell and a combination of reef and clam shell used as coarse aggregate to determine if a low modulus concrete could be developed for use as a base material as an alternate to the pres...

  19. Forterra Concrete Products, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Forterra Concrete Products, Inc., a business located at 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX, 75062, for alleged violations at its facility located at 23600 W. 40th St

  20. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  1. Estimating Durability of Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, A. A.; Shapovalov, E. L.; Gavrilov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    In this article we propose to use the methods of fracture mechanics to evaluate concrete durability. To evaluate concrete crack resistance characteristics of concrete directly in the structure in order to implement the methods of fracture mechanics, we have developed special methods. Various experimental studies have been carried out to determine the crack resistance characteristics and the concrete modulus of elasticity during its operating. A comparison was carried out for the results obtained with the use of the proposed methods and those obtained with the standard methods for determining the concrete crack resistance characteristics.

  2. Application of microorganisms in concrete: a promising sustainable strategy to improve concrete durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Ersan, Yusuf Cagatay; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2016-04-01

    The beneficial effect of microbially induced carbonate precipitation on building materials has been gradually disclosed in the last decade. After the first applications of on historical stones, promising results were obtained with the respect of improved durability. An extensive study then followed on the application of this environmentally friendly and compatible material on a currently widely used construction material, concrete. This review is focused on the discussion of the impact of the two main applications, bacterial surface treatment and bacteria based crack repair, on concrete durability. Special attention was paid to the choice of suitable bacteria and the metabolic pathway aiming at their functionality in concrete environment. Interactions between bacterial cells and cementitious matrix were also elaborated. Furthermore, recommendations to improve the effectiveness of bacterial treatment are provided. Limitations of current studies, updated applications and future application perspectives are shortly outlined.

  3. Advances in concrete materials for sewer systems affected by microbial induced concrete corrosion: A review.

    PubMed

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Ukrainczyk, Neven; Koraimann, Günther; Kienesberger, Sabine; Dietzel, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Microbial induced concrete corrosion (MICC) is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms of subsurface infrastructure worldwide, raising the demand for sustainable construction materials in corrosive environments. This review aims to summarize the key research progress acquired during the last decade regarding the understanding of MICC reaction mechanisms and the development of durable materials from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special focus was laid on aspects governing concrete - micoorganisms interaction since being the central process steering biogenic acid corrosion. The insufficient knowledge regarding the latter is proposed as a central reason for insufficient progress in tailored material development for aggressive wastewater systems. To date no cement-based material exists, suitable to withstand the aggressive conditions related to MICC over its entire service life. Research is in particular needed on the impact of physiochemical material parameters on microbial community structure, growth characteristics and limitations within individual concrete speciation. Herein an interdisciplinary approach is presented by combining results from material sciences, microbiology, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to stimulate the development of novel and sustainable materials and mitigation strategies for MICC. For instance, the application of antibacteriostatic agents is introduced as an effective instrument to limit microbial growth on concrete surfaces in aggressive sewer environments. Additionally, geopolymer concretes are introduced as highly resistent in acid environments, thus representing a possible green alternative to conventional cement-based construction materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  5. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  6. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  7. Waterproofing Underground Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    include Rubberized Asphalt with 42 Polyethylene Cover, Vulcanized Rubbers such as EPDM , Butyl, and Neoprene, Thermoplastics such as PVC, CPE, HDPE, and...welding. However., PVC sheets tend to shrink excessively and become brittle with increasing age . The rubber sheets that are used most often in...underground concrete structures are Butyl rubber and Ethylene. Propylene Diene Monomer ( EPDM ). The adhesives with which they must be sealed are not quite as

  8. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  9. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Climent, Verónica

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in themore » mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.« less

  10. Optimization and influence of parameter affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate: using full factorial design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Thulasirajan; Purushothaman, Revathi

    2017-07-01

    There are several parameters that influence the properties of geopolymer concrete, which contains recycled concrete aggregate as the coarse aggregate. In the present study, the vital parameters affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate are analyzedby varying four parameters with two levels using full factorial design in statistical software Minitab® 17. The objective of the present work is to gain an idea on the optimization, main parameter effects, their interactions and the predicted response of the model generated using factorial design. The parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (8M and 12M), curing time (6hrs and 24 hrs), curing temperature (60°C and 90°C) and percentage of recycled concrete aggregate (0% and 100%) are considered. The results show that the curing time, molarity of sodium hydroxide and curing temperature were the orderly significant parameters and the percentage of Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was statistically insignificant in the production of geopolymer concrete. Thus, it may be noticeable that the RCA content had negligible effect on the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The expected responses from the generated model showed a satisfactory and rational agreement to the experimental data with the R2 value of 97.70%. Thus, geopolymer concrete comprising recycled concrete aggregate can solve the major social and environmental concerns such as the depletion of the naturally available aggregate sources and disposal of construction and demolition waste into the landfill.

  11. Operational features of decorative concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, Olga; Kotelnikov, Maxim

    2018-03-01

    This article deals with the questions of creation and use of decorative and finishing concrete and mortar. It has been revealed that the most effective artificial rock-imitating stone materials are those made of decorative concrete with the opened internal structure of material. At the same time it is important that the particles of decorative aggregate should be distributed evenly in the concrete volume. It can be reached only at a continuous grain-size analysis of the aggregate from the given rock. The article tackles the necessity of natural stone materials imitation for the cement stone color to correspond to the color of the rock. The possibility of creation of the decorative concrete imitating rocks in the high-speed turbulent mixer is considered. Dependences of durability and frost resistance of the studied concrete on the pore size and character and also parameters characterizing crack resistance of concrete are received.

  12. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  13. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, P. A., E-mail: radchenko@live.ru; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength propertiesmore » of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.« less

  14. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  15. Fire Resistance of Geopolymer Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-21

    1 Project report – Grant FA23860814096, "Fire resistance of geopolymer concretes" – J. Provis, University of Melbourne 1. Background and...experimental program This project provided funding for us to carry out fire testing of geopolymer concrete specimens and associated laboratory...testing. The focus of this report will be the outcomes of the series of pilot-scale (4’×4’×6”) tests on geopolymer concrete panels, which were conducted

  16. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells.

  17. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  18. Attenuating mass concrete effects in drilled shafts.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-09-01

    Drilled shafts are large diameter cast in place concrete foundation elements that until recently were not viewed with the same scrutiny as other massive concrete elements when considering mass concrete aspects. This study addressed three aspects of t...

  19. Characterisation and management of concrete grinding residuals.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Matt; Gupta, Nautasha; Watts, Ben; Chadik, Paul A; Ferraro, Christopher; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Concrete grinding residue is the waste product resulting from the grinding, cutting, and resurfacing of concrete pavement. Potential beneficial applications for concrete grinding residue include use as a soil amendment and as a construction material, including as an additive to Portland cement concrete. Concrete grinding residue exhibits a high pH, and though not hazardous, it is sufficiently elevated that precautions need to be taken around aquatic ecosystems. Best management practices and state regulations focus on reducing the impact on such aquatic environment. Heavy metals are present in concrete grinding residue, but concentrations are of the same magnitude as typically recycled concrete residuals. The chemical composition of concrete grinding residue makes it a useful product for some soil amendment purposes at appropriate land application rates. The presence of unreacted concrete in concrete grinding residue was examined for potential use as partial replacement of cement in new concrete. Testing of Florida concrete grinding residue revealed no dramatic reactivity or improvement in mortar strength.

  20. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  1. Concrete Masonry Designs: Educational Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Randi, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This special journal issue addresses concrete masonry in educational facilities construction. The issue's feature articles are: (1) "It Takes a Village To Construct a Massachusetts Middle School," describing a middle school constructed almost entirely of concrete masonry and modeled after a typical small New England village; (2)…

  2. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  3. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  4. Corrosion control for reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torigoe, R. M.

    The National Bureau of Standards has recorded that in 1975 the national cost of corrosion was estimated at $70 billion. Approximately 40% of that total was attributed to the corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete. Though concrete is generally perceived as a permanent construction material, cracking and spalling can occur when corrosion of steel reinforcements progresses to an advanced stage. This problem frequently occurs in reinforced concrete highway bridge decks, wharves, piers, and other structures in marine and snowbelt environments. Since concrete has a very low tensile strength, steel reinforcements are added to carry the tensile load of the composite member. Corrosion reduces the effective diameter of the reinforcements and, therefore, decreases the load carrying capability of the member. Though the corrosion process may occur in various forms and may be caused by different sources, the ultimate result is still the failure of the reinforced concrete.

  5. Multiscale Constitutive Modeling of Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Benjamin Shane

    found that the maximum aggregate size of the FAM is mixture dependent, but consistent with a gradation parameter from the Baily Method of mixture design. Mechanistic modeling of these different length scales reveals that although many consider asphalt concrete to be a LVE material, it is in fact only quasi-LVE because it shows some tendencies that are inconsistent with LVE theory. Asphalt FAM and asphalt mastic show similar nonlinear tendencies although the exact magnitude of the effect differs. These tendencies can be ignored for damage modeling in the mixture and FAM scales as long as the effects are consistently ignored, but it is found that they must be accounted for in mastic and binder damage modeling. The viscoelastic continuum damage (VECD) model is used for damage modeling in this research. To aid in characterization and application of the VECD model for cyclic testing, a simplified version (S-VECD) is rigorously derived and verified. Through the modeling efforts at each scale, various factors affecting the fundamental and engineering properties at each scale are observed and documented. A microstructure association model that accounts for particle interaction through physico-chemical processes and the effects of aggregate structuralization is developed to links the moduli at each scale. This model is shown to be capable of upscaling the mixture modulus from either the experimentally determined mastic modulus or FAM modulus. Finally, an initial attempt at upscaling the damage and nonlinearity phenomenon is shown.

  6. Strength and Microstructure of Concrete with Iron Ore Tailings as Replacement for River Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umara Shettima, Ali; Ahmad, Yusof; Warid Hussin, Mohd; Zakari Muhammad, Nasiru; Eziekel Babatude, Ogunbode

    2018-03-01

    River Sand is one of the basic ingredients used in the production of concrete. Consequently, continuous consumption of sand in construction industry contributes significantly to depletion of natural resources. To achieve more sustainable construction materials, this paper reports the use of iron ore tailings (IOT) as replacement for river sand in concrete production. IOT is a waste product generated from the production of iron ore and disposed to land fill without any economic value. Concrete mixtures containing different amount of IOT were designed for grade C30 with water to cement ratio of 0.60. The percentage ratios of the river sand replacements by IOT were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Concrete microstructure test namely, XRD and Field Emission Scanned Electron Microscopic/Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (FESEM/EDX) were conducted for control and IOT concretes in order to determine the interaction and performance of the concrete containing IOT. Test results indicated that the slump values of 130 mm and 80 to 110 mm were recorded for the control and IOT concretes respectively. The concrete sample of 50% IOT recorded the highest compressive strength of 37.7 MPa at 28 days, and the highest flexural strength of 5.5 MPa compared to 4.7 MPa for reference concrete. The texture of the IOT is rough and angular which was able to improve the strength of the concrete.

  7. Active hematite concretion formation in modern acid saline lake sediments, Lake Brown, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Brenda Beitler; Benison, K. C.; Oboh-Ikuenobe, F. E.; Story, S.; Mormile, M. R.

    2008-04-01

    Concretions can provide valuable records of diagenesis and fluid-sediment interactions, however, reconstruction of ancient concretion-forming conditions can be difficult. Observation of modern hematite concretion growth in a natural sedimentary setting provides a rare glimpse of conditions at the time of formation. Spheroidal hematite-cemented concretions are actively precipitating in shallow subsurface sediments at Lake Brown in Western Australia. Lake Brown is a hypersaline (total dissolved solids up to 23%) and acidic (pH ˜ 4) ephemeral lake. The concretion host sediments were deposited between ˜ 1 and 3 ka, based on dating of stratigraphically higher and lower beds. These age constraints indicate that the diagenetic concretions formed < 3 ka, and field observations suggest that some are currently forming. These modern concretions from Lake Brown provide an example of very early diagenetic formation in acid and saline conditions that may be analogous to past conditions on Mars. Previously, the hematite concretions in the Burns formation on Mars have been interpreted as late stage diagenetic products, requiring long geologic time scales and multiple fluid flow events to form. In contrast, the Lake Brown concretions support the possibility of similar syndepositional to very early diagenetic concretion precipitation on Mars.

  8. Maximum heat of mass concrete - phase 2 [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-01

    Concrete hardens through a chemical reaction that produces heat and expansion, followed by contraction as the concrete cools. Concrete near the edge of a pour cools faster and shrinks earlier than concrete further from the edge. Most concrete pours a...

  9. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and curemore » conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.« less

  10. Long-life concrete : how long will my concrete last?

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about moving toward performance-based specifications for concrete pavements. This document seeks to : move the discussion forward by outlining the needs and the challenges, and proposing some immediate actions. However,...

  11. Experimental Study on Impermeability of Recycled Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao Zhen; Yang, Jian Gong; Wei, Lu

    2018-06-01

    Recycled concrete is a kind of concrete which is constructed by crushing and removing the building waste and concrete blocks and mixing them according to a certain proportion after grading. In this study, the applicability of recycled concrete is studied only in terms of impermeability.

  12. Lightweight Concrete : Mechanical Properties : TechBrief

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    There is a limited amount of test data on the mechanical properties of high-strength lightweight concrete (LWC) with a concrete unit weight (wc) between that of traditional LWC and normal weight concrete (NWC). Concrete with a wc in this range is als...

  13. Best practices for concrete pumping : technical summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-01

    Pumping is one of the major placement techniques used in the concrete industry : to deliver concrete from the mixing truck to the formwork. Although concrete : pumping has been used to place concrete since the 1960s, there is still a lack : of exact ...

  14. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin, E-mail: pauzi@nm.gov.my; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containingmore » crushed granite.« less

  15. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  16. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  17. Development of quiet and durable porous Portland cement concrete paving materials

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-09-01

    This report outlines the systematic research effort conducted in order to develop and characterize Enhanced Porosity Concrete (EPC) to mitigate the problem of tire-road interaction noise. The basic tenet of this research is that carefully introduced ...

  18. Uncontrolled concrete bridge parapet cracking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation has recently identified the problem of wide-spread premature cracking of concrete bridge : parapets throughout its District 12 region (Northeast Ohio). Many of the bridge decks that contain these prematurely crac...

  19. Signs on concrete median barriers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    Concrete median barriers have been used throughout the state as permanent and temporary barriers for providing separation of traffic. Typically, these barriers are tested and considered crashworthy through crash testing according to National Cooperat...

  20. Performance of Michigan's concrete barriers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-08-01

    Modifications to design standards, material specifications, construction methods, and roadway : maintenance practices are believed to be major contributing causes for the observed premature : deterioration of Michigans Portland cement concrete bri...

  1. Sustainable concretes for transportation infrastructure.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-07-01

    performance in concrete for structural and transportation applications. Based on the challenges associated with coal ash (including SDA) and the economic costs linked to cement production, this research seeks to develop an environmentally friendly an...

  2. GFRP reinforced concrete bridge decks

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-07-01

    This report investigates the application of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars in concrete bridge decks as a potential replacement or supplement to conventional steel rebars. Tests were conducted to determine the material properties of the ...

  3. GFRP reinforced concrete bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-07-01

    This report investigates the application of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars in concrete bridge decks as a potential replacement or supplement to conventional steel rebars. Tests were conducted to determine the material properties of the ...

  4. Field Performance Of Concrete Admixtures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-06-30

    This project investigated compatibility problems involving two concrete admixtures from W.R. Grace Products and Dacotah portland cement. The problems experienced by the South Dakota Department of Transportation (SDDOT) were described as rapid slump l...

  5. Fiber reinforcement of concrete structures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-09-01

    Deterioration of concrete structures due to steel corrosion is a matter of considerable concern since the repairing of these structures proved to be a costly process. Repair and rehabilitation of the civil structures needs an enduring repair material...

  6. Evaluating Concrete Bridge Deck Performance

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-06-01

    Since the service life of concrete bridge decks designed by traditional procedures is often shorter than desired, : their ability to withstand constant and heavy use in a variety of operating environments is of major concern. In : this project, the r...

  7. Corrosion inhibitors for concrete bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-12-01

    Deicing salts and salt-water spray can cause serious corrosion problems for reinforced concrete bridge structures. : These problems can lead to costly and labor-intensive repair and even replacement of the structure. Surface applied : corrosion inhib...

  8. Premature asphalt concrete pavement cracking.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has identified hot mix asphalt concrete : (HMAC) pavements that have displayed top-down cracking within three years of construction. The objective of : the study was to evaluate the top-down cr...

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  10. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. Annotated Bibliography: Polymers in Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    under the general supervision of Mr. Bryant Mather, Chief, SL, and Mr. John Scanlon, Chief, Concrete Technology Division , SL, and under the direct...Foreign Technology Division , Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The shrinkage effect on concrete is a significant factor in solving the problem of using...Infrared Radiation," p 13, Jun 1974, Foreign Technology Division , Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Infrared irradiation is an effective means of

  13. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests.

  14. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical modelling of the reinforced concrete influence on a combined system of tunnel support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Bojana; Jokanović, Igor; Grujić, Žarko; Zeljić, Dragana

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the experimental, laboratory determined rheological-dynamic analysis of the properties of fiber reinforced concrete, which was then utilized to show nonlinear analysis of combined system of tunnel support structure. According to the performed experiments and calculations, different processes of destructive behavior of tunnel lining were simulated in combination with elastic and elastic-plastic behavior of materials taking into account the tunnel loading, the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and soil, as well as the interaction between the fiber reinforced concrete and the inner lining of the tunnel.

  16. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  17. Concrete induced cardiac contusion.

    PubMed Central

    Curzen, N.; Brett, S.; Fox, K.

    1997-01-01

    A previously fit 22 year old man was struck in the chest by a concrete block dropped through the windscreen of his car while he was driving on the motorway. He suffered extensive chest wall trauma and lung contusion, which subsequently precipitated acute respiratory distress. On admission ECG showed right bundle branch block and left axis deviation. Three days later QRS duration was normal but there was anterior ST segment elevation and subsequent T wave change. There was a large rise in creatine kinase, and echocardiography revealed septal and apical hyokinesis as well as a mobile mass attached to the left side of the interventricular septum, which had the echogenic texture of myocardium. The patient had fixed perfusion defects in the areas of hypokinesis on thallium scanning but the coronary arteries were unobstructed at angiography. He was treated with warfarin in the short term and an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor in the longer term and has made an asymptomatic recovery. Outpatient echocardiography two months after the injury demonstrated some recovery in overall left ventricular systolic function and no evidence of the intracardiac mass. This case illustrates some of the typical features of non-fatal cardiac contusion associated with non-penetrating cardiac trauma, and was complicated by partial thickness avulsion of a strip of the myocardium in the interventricular septum. Images PMID:9391297

  18. Evaluation of flyash in lean concrete base and continuously reinforced concrete pavements : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-07-01

    Proposed research on this project included five main objectives: 1) To test and evaluate the physical characteristics of flyash concrete in comparions to non-flyash concrete. Tests will be conducted to see if flyash concrete meets OSHD specifications...

  19. Creep and cracking of concrete hinges: insight from centric and eccentric compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Schlappal, Thomas; Schweigler, Michael; Gmainer, Susanne; Peyerl, Martin; Pichler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Existing design guidelines for concrete hinges consider bending-induced tensile cracking, but the structural behavior is oversimplified to be time-independent. This is the motivation to study creep and bending-induced tensile cracking of initially monolithic concrete hinges systematically. Material tests on plain concrete specimens and structural tests on marginally reinforced concrete hinges are performed. The experiments characterize material and structural creep under centric compression as well as bending-induced tensile cracking and the interaction between creep and cracking of concrete hinges. As for the latter two aims, three nominally identical concrete hinges are subjected to short-term and to longer-term eccentric compression tests. Obtained material and structural creep functions referring to centric compression are found to be very similar. The structural creep activity under eccentric compression is significantly larger because of the interaction between creep and cracking, i.e. bending-induced cracks progressively open and propagate under sustained eccentric loading. As for concrete hinges in frame-like integral bridge construction, it is concluded (i) that realistic simulation of variable loads requires consideration of the here-studied time-dependent behavior and (ii) that permanent compressive normal forces shall be limited by 45% of the ultimate load carrying capacity, in order to avoid damage of concrete hinges under sustained loading.

  20. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  1. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  2. Investigation of rectangular concrete columns reinforced or prestressed with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars or tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ching Chiaw

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in concrete construction. This research focused on the behavior of concrete columns reinforced with FRP bars, or prestressed with FRP tendons. The methodology was based the ultimate strength approach where stress and strain compatibility conditions and material constitutive laws were applied. Axial strength-moment (P-M) interaction relations of reinforced or prestressed concrete columns with FRP, a linearly-elastic material, were examined. The analytical results identified the possibility of premature compression and/or brittle-tension failure occurring in FRP reinforced and prestressed concrete columns where sudden and explosive type failures were expected. These failures were related to the rupture of FRP rebars or tendons in compression and/or in tension prior to concrete reaching its ultimate strain and strength. The study also concluded that brittle-tension failure was more likely to occur due to the low ultimate tensile strain of FRP bars or tendons as compared to steel. In addition, the failures were more prevalent when long term effects such as creep and shrinkage of concrete, and creep rupture of FRP were considered. Barring FRP failure, concrete columns reinforced with FRP, in some instances, gained significant moment resistance. As expected the strength interaction of slender steel or FRP reinforced concrete columns were dependent more on column length rather than material differences between steel and FRP. Current ACI minimum reinforcement ratio for steel (rhomin) reinforced concrete columns may not be adequate for use in FRP reinforced concrete columns. Design aids were developed in this study to determine the minimum reinforcement ratio (rhof,min) required for rectangular reinforced concrete columns by averting brittle-tension failure to a failure controlled by concrete crushing which in nature was a less catastrophic and more gradual type failure. The proposed method using rhof

  3. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.« less

  4. Use of rubber crumbs in cement concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longvinenko, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Rubber crumb obtained from worn out tires has been increasingly used over the last 15-20 years, especially in manufacture of asphalt and cement concrete mixtures. This review pays principal attention to application of the rubber crumb to cement concrete mixtures. Use of the rubber crumb in cement concrete is not as successful as in asphalt concrete mixtures, due to incompatibility problems linked to chemical composition and a significant difference in rigidity between the rubber crumb and concrete mixture aggregates. Different methods are proposed and studied to mitigate the adverse influence and increase the beneficial effects of the rubber crumb when added to cement concrete.

  5. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  6. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  7. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. Use of roller-compacted concrete pavement in Stafford, Virginia.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-05-01

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) is a relatively stiffer hydraulic cement concrete mixture than regular concrete when : fresh. Similar to regular concrete, RCC is a mixture of aggregate, cementitious materials, and water, but it is placed using asphal...

  9. Continuously reinforced concrete pavement inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, A. D.; Hagen, M. G.

    1982-09-01

    A typical concrete pavement has expansion and contraction joints across and along the pavement surface. The joints allow the pavement to change in dimension with changes in temperature. A continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) does not have expansion or contraction joints. Random, closely spaced cracks are expected to develop naturally and allow for expansion and contraction due to temperature changes. The many random cracks eliminate expensive joint maintenance. This maintenance-free service life feature has not occurred in Minnesota. This CRCP inventory is a physical evaluation of the extent of corrosion on random sections of pavement. It is related to concurrent efforts which will evaluate CRCP rehabilitation techniques.

  10. Development of concrete shrinkage performance specifications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    During its service life, concrete undergoes volume changes. One of the types of deformation is shrinkage. The four main types of shrinkage associated with concrete are plastic, autogenous, carbonation, and drying shrinkage. The volume changes in conc...

  11. Accelerated aging of concrete : a literature review

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-02-01

    This report provides a review of the literature on accelerated aging of concrete. It was undertaken, as part of a research project : on predicting the long-term environmental performance of Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements containing coal fly...

  12. International concrete crosstie and fastening system survey.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-02-01

    The International Concrete Crosstie and : Fastening System Survey assesses the : international railway industrys state of practice : regarding concrete crossties and fastening : system design, performance, and research : needs. The Rail Transporta...

  13. International concrete crosstie and fastening system survey.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-02-01

    The International Concrete Crosstie and Fastening System Survey assesses the international railway industrys state of practice regarding concrete crossties and fastening system design, performance, and research needs. The Rail Transportation and E...

  14. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  15. Joint sealant materials for concrete pavement repairs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-01-01

    This report on joint sealant materials for concrete pavement repairs is based on conversations with specialists from several states, the Federal Highway Administration, the Portland Cement Association, and the American Concrete Pavement Association, ...

  16. Systems Study of Precast Concrete Tunnel Liners

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-03-01

    The study addresses precast concrete lining systems. Existing precast concrete systems designed or constructed in Europe, Japan, and the United States are evaluated. With these as a point of departure, designs for lining systems applicable to the spe...

  17. Influence of processing factors over concrete strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, K. A.; Dolzhenko, A. V.; Zharikov, I. S.

    2018-03-01

    Construction of facilities of cast in-situ reinforced concrete poses additional requirements to quality of material, peculiarities of the construction process may sometimes lead to appearance of lamination planes and inhomogeneity of concrete, which reduce strength of the material and structure as a whole. Technology compliance while working with cast in-situ concrete has a significant impact onto the concrete strength. Such process factors as concrete curing, vibration and compaction of the concrete mixture, temperature treatment, etc., when they are countered or inadequately followed lead to a significant reduction in concrete strength. Here, the authors experimentally quantitatively determine the loss of strength in in-situ cast concrete structures due to inadequate following of process requirements, in comparison with full compliance.

  18. Surface Chloride Levels in Colorado Structural Concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    This project focused on the chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in structural concrete. The primary goal of this project is to analyze the surface chloride concentration level of the concrete bridge decks throughout Colorado. The study in...

  19. Neoprene pads for capping concrete cylinders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of using neoprene pads as an alternate to sulfur mortar for capping concrete specimens subjected to compression tests was investigated. In preliminary tests to determine the feasibility of the investigation, two batches of concrete we...

  20. Long-life slab replacement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    This research was initiated following reports of high incidence of cracking on FDOT concrete pavement replacement : slab projects. Field slabs were instrumented for data acquisition from high-early-strength concrete pavement : replacement slabs place...

  1. Rapid setting concrete patching study : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-03-01

    This investigation was prompted by the increasing number of concrete roadway failures which have required corrective action. A more permanent solution than the placing of hot or cold mixed asphalt compounds into concrete voids was deemed necessary. t...

  2. Concrete probe-strength study : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1969-12-01

    The Windsor probe - test system was evaluated for determining compressive strength of concrete by comparing probe strengths against cylinder and core strengths from both laboratory and field-poured concrete. Advantages and disadvantages of this syste...

  3. Fly ash in concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-08-01

    This study was initiated to develop information regarding the use of fly ash in portland cement concrete for state construction projects. : Concrete mixes containing 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 60% fly ash were evaluated in the laboratory in combination w...

  4. Tests for early acceptance of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-01-01

    A literature survey and limited study of laboratory concretes were conducted to evaluate various methods for predicting concrete strengths at 28 days based on procedures for accelerated strength development or measurement of strength of normally cure...

  5. Evaluation of consolidation in concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-01-01

    Petrographic examinations of specimens from two recently constructed concrete pavements suggested that complete consolidation of the concrete may not have been achieved. Consequently, a quantitative evaluation of the degree of consolidation in these ...

  6. Concrete performance using low-degradation aggregates.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    The durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC) has long been identified as a concern by transportation communities around the United States. In this study, the long-term performance of two batches of concrete incorporating either low-degradation (L...

  7. Modeling damage in concrete pavements and bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    This project focused on micromechanical modeling of damage in concrete under general, multi-axial loading. A : continuum-level, three-dimensional constitutive model based on micromechanics was developed. The model : accounts for damage in concrete by...

  8. Evaluation of concrete patching materials : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-01-01

    The project evaluated numerous repairs on portland cement concrete pavements and bridge decks made with a number of laboratory accepted, proprietary patching materials and portland cement concrete mixtures of different designs. It was ascertained tha...

  9. Concrete pavement construction basics : tech notes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    This tech note has been produced for developers, consultants, and engineers planning concrete pavement construction projects, superintendents and supervisors who want a basic training aid and reference, and crew members new to the concrete paving ind...

  10. Evaluation of concrete inlay for continuously reinforced concrete pavement rehabilitation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    In 1996, WisDOT constructed a concrete inlay test section on I43 in Manitowoc County. The existing pavement was CRCP constructed in 1978 and was badly deteriorated with punchouts. In the area of the 2777foot test section, the existing paveme...

  11. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions. PMID:28787998

  12. Bond-slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using electro-mechanical impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yabin; Li, Dongsheng; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Lim, Ing; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure is a type of structure that takes the advantages of both steel and concrete materials, showing improved strength, ductility, and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete structures. The interface between concrete and steel profiles governs the interaction between these two materials under loading, however, debonding damage between these two materials may lead to severe degradation of the load transferring capacity which will affect the structural performance significantly. In this paper, the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique using piezoceramic transducers was experimentally investigated to detect the bond-slip occurrence of the concrete-encased composite structure. The root-mean-square deviation is used to quantify the variations of the impedance signatures due to the presence of the bond-slip damage. In order to verify the validity of the proposed method, finite element model analysis was performed to simulate the behavior of concrete-steel debonding based on a 3D finite element concrete-steel bond model. The computed impedance signatures from the numerical results are compared with the results obtained from the experimental study, and both the numerical and experimental studies verify the proposed EMI method to detect bond slip of a concrete-encased composite structure.

  13. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-03-18

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions.

  14. ConcreteWorks v3 training/user manual (P1) : ConcreteWorks software (P2).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-01

    ConcreteWorks is designed to be a user-friendly software package that can help concrete : professionals optimize concrete mixture proportioning, perform a concrete thermal analysis, and : increase the chloride diffusion service life. The software pac...

  15. Laterally Loaded Partially Prestressed Concrete Piles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    of an extensive test program onl laterali y ioadeu. partially pr- estressed concrete fender piles. The study Included service load range as well ats...12,000-psi design strength). Configura- tion G utilized 14 r:- estress strand, in an unsymmetric pattern. To provide a uniform concrete prestress of 540...sudden loss in load carrying capacity directly related to the loss of concrete area. The compression concrete fractured longitudinally and along the

  16. Probabilistic design of fibre concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukl, R.; Novák, D.; Sajdlová, T.; Lehký, D.; Červenka, J.; Červenka, V.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced computer simulation is recently well-established methodology for evaluation of resistance of concrete engineering structures. The nonlinear finite element analysis enables to realistically predict structural damage, peak load, failure, post-peak response, development of cracks in concrete, yielding of reinforcement, concrete crushing or shear failure. The nonlinear material models can cover various types of concrete and reinforced concrete: ordinary concrete, plain or reinforced, without or with prestressing, fibre concrete, (ultra) high performance concrete, lightweight concrete, etc. Advanced material models taking into account fibre concrete properties such as shape of tensile softening branch, high toughness and ductility are described in the paper. Since the variability of the fibre concrete material properties is rather high, the probabilistic analysis seems to be the most appropriate format for structural design and evaluation of structural performance, reliability and safety. The presented combination of the nonlinear analysis with advanced probabilistic methods allows evaluation of structural safety characterized by failure probability or by reliability index respectively. Authors offer a methodology and computer tools for realistic safety assessment of concrete structures; the utilized approach is based on randomization of the nonlinear finite element analysis of the structural model. Uncertainty of the material properties or their randomness obtained from material tests are accounted in the random distribution. Furthermore, degradation of the reinforced concrete materials such as carbonation of concrete, corrosion of reinforcement, etc. can be accounted in order to analyze life-cycle structural performance and to enable prediction of the structural reliability and safety in time development. The results can serve as a rational basis for design of fibre concrete engineering structures based on advanced nonlinear computer analysis. The presented

  17. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  18. Portland cement concrete air content study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-04-20

    This study took the analysis of Portland cement concrete air content. Based on the information gathered, this study hold the results were : 1) air-entrained concrete was more durable than non-air entrained concrete all other factors being equal; 2) A...

  19. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT IN AGED CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of radon generation and transport in Florida concretes sampled from 12- to 45-year-old residential slabs. It also compares measurements from old concrete samples to previous measurements on newly poured Florida residential concretes....

  20. Field validation of recycled concrete fines usage.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    The amount of recycled concrete fines permitted in concrete mixing water is limited by ASTM C 1602 to 5.0 percent of the mixing : water, by mass, in order to avoid detrimental effects on concrete properties. Depending upon the exact nature of the rec...

  1. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  2. FIELD STUDIES OF IMPREGNATED CONCRETE PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The follow-on study (initiated in June 1980) continued to monitor performance of 1,400 ft of impregnated concrete pipe installed in several Texas cities. The performance of concrete pipe has been compared with that of sulfur-impregnated concrete pipe; hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treat...

  3. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000 psi...

  4. Molecular Survey of Concrete Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several studies have shown that bacteria can deteriorate concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different microbial communities associated with concrete biofilms using 16S rRNA g...

  5. Mechanical properties of concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste as coarse aggregate replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Faisal Sheikh; Azmi, Nurul Bazilah; Sumandi, Khairul Azwa Syafiq Mohd; Mazenan, Puteri Natasya

    2017-10-01

    Many construction and development activities today consume large amounts of concrete. The amount of construction waste is also increasing because of the demolition process. Much of this waste can be recycled to produce new products and increase the sustainability of construction projects. As recyclable construction wastes, concrete and ceramic can replace the natural aggregate in concrete because of their hard and strong physical properties. This research used 25%, 35%, and 45% recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste as coarse aggregate in producing concrete. Several tests, such as concrete cube compression and splitting tensile tests, were also performed to determine and compare the mechanical properties of the recycled concrete with those of the normal concrete that contains 100% natural aggregate. The concrete containing 35% RCA and 35% ceramic waste showed the best properties compared with the normal concrete.

  6. Evaluation of ilmenite serpentine concrete and ordinary concrete as nuclear reactor shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulfaraj, Waleed H.; Kamal, Salah M.

    1994-07-01

    The present study involves adapting a formal decision methodology to the selection of alternative nuclear reactor concretes shielding. Multiattribute utility theory is selected to accommodate decision makers' preferences. Multiattribute utility theory (MAU) is here employed to evaluate two appropriate nuclear reactor shielding concretes in terms of effectiveness to determine the optimal choice in order to meet the radiation protection regulations. These concretes are Ordinary concrete (O.C.) and Ilmenite Serpentile concrete (I.S.C.). These are normal weight concrete and heavy heat resistive concrete, respectively. The effectiveness objective of the nuclear reactor shielding is defined and structured into definite attributes and subattributes to evaluate the best alternative. Factors affecting the decision are dose received by reactor's workers, the material properties as well as cost of concrete shield. A computer program is employed to assist in performing utility analysis. Based upon data, the result shows the superiority of Ordinary concrete over Ilmenite Serpentine concrete.

  7. Corium molecular biomarkers reveal a beneficial effect on hoof transcriptomics in peripartal dairy cows supplemented with zinc, manganese, and copper from amino acid complexes and cobalt from cobalt glucoheptonate.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J S; Batistel, F; Garrett, E F; Elhanafy, M M; Tariq, M R; Socha, M T; Loor, J J

    2016-12-01

    Supplying trace minerals in more bioavailable forms such as amino acid complexes (AAC) could help ameliorate the incidence of hoof disorders in peripartal dairy cows. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementing metal AAC during the peripartal period on expression of 28 genes in corium tissue related to claw composition, oxidative stress, inflammation, chemotaxis, and transcriptional regulation. Forty-four multiparous Holstein cows received a common diet from -30 to 30 d relative to parturition and were assigned to receive an oral bolus containing either inorganic trace minerals (INO) or AAC (i.e., organic) Zn, Mn, Cu, and Co to achieve supplemental levels of 75, 65, 11, and 1 ppm, respectively, in the total diet dry matter. Inorganic trace minerals were provided in sulfate form, and AAC were supplied via Availa Zn, Availa Mn, Availa Cu, and COPRO (Zinpro Corp., Eden Prairie, MN). Locomotion score was recorded before enrollment and weekly throughout the experiment. Incidence of hoof health problems at 30 d in milk was evaluated before a hoof biopsy in a subset of cows (INO=10; AAC=9). Locomotion score did not differ between treatments in the prepartum or postpartum period. The incidence of heel horn erosion was lower in AAC cows, but the incidence of sole ulcers did not differ. Downregulation of KRT5, CTH, CALML5, and CYBB, and upregulation of BTD in AAC cows indicated a decrease in the need for activation of cellular pathways to regenerate corium tissue and increase biotin availability in the sole claw. These molecular changes in the sole could have been triggered by the lower incidence of heel erosion in response to AAC. Among the genes associated with oxidative stress, the AAC cows had greater expression of NFE2L2, a transcription factor that regulates the antioxidant response, and the antioxidant enzyme SOD1. Among genes associated with inflammation, AAC cows had greater expression of TLR4, and lower expression of TLR2, IL1B, and TNF

  8. Early Reading and Concrete Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk, Cindy L. Howes; Goldstein, David

    1980-01-01

    Indicated that early readers are more likely to be advanced in cognitive development than are nonearly-reading peers. After one year of formal reading instruction, early readers maintained their advantage in reading achievement. Measures of concrete operations were found to predict reading achievement for early and nonearly readers. (Author/DB)

  9. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  10. Concrete patching guide : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-09-01

    Maintenance personnel often select a material for patching concrete based on what they have used in the past. However, each patching job has particular demands, which may be different from what was required in past applications. Also, the list of ava...

  11. Fold-up concrete construction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-01-01

    The fold-up method of concrete construction is a relatively new method of precasting a variety of structural shapes on a single flat surface and then folding portions up to form a three-dimensional shape. Structural members as beams, girders, columns...

  12. Concrete Finisher Program. Apprenticeship Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the concrete finishing program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  13. Research notes : concrete patching guide.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-05-01

    Maintenance personnel often select a material for patching concrete based on what they have used in the past. However, each patching job has particular demands, which may be different from what was required in past applications. Also, the list of ava...

  14. Roller-compacted concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) gets its name from the heavy vibratory steel drum and rubber-tired rollers used to help compact it into its final form. RCC has similar strength properties and consists of the same basic ingredients as conventional con...

  15. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Knox, Lerry

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  16. A review on the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Anting Guntor, Nickholas; Syazani Leman, Alif

    2017-11-01

    Road authorities manage a large population of ageing bridges, a substantial number of which fail to meet the current requirements either due to deterioration and other structural deficiencies or as a result of the escalating demands imposed by increased traffic. This problem is related to the dynamic load from vehicles. This problem can be solved by producing a type of concrete that can reduce the amplitude of oscillation or vibration such as rubberized concrete. Green construction has been a very important aspect in concrete production field in the last decade. One of the most problematic waste materials is scrap tires. The use of scrap tires in civil engineering is increasing by producing rubberized concrete. Rubberized concrete is a type of concrete that is mixed with rubber. The purpose of this review is to justify the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Several parameters named physical, chemical and mechanical properties were measured to ensure the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Rubberized concrete has similar workability to normal concrete. The rubber reduced the density and compressive strength of the concrete while increased the flexural strength, water absorption and damping ratio. The used of rubber in concrete beyond 20% is not recommended due to decreasing in compressive strength. Rubberized concrete recommended to be used in circumstances where vibration damping was required such as in bridge construction as shock-wave absorber.

  17. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  18. Microbiologically induced deterioration of concrete - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shiping; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sanchez-Silva, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically induced deterioration (MID) causes corrosion of concrete by producing acids (including organic and inorganic acids) that degrade concrete components and thus compromise the integrity of sewer pipelines and other structures, creating significant problems worldwide. Understanding of the fundamental corrosion process and the causal agents will help us develop an appropriate strategy to minimize the costs in repairs. This review presents how microorganisms induce the deterioration of concrete, including the organisms involved and their colonization and succession on concrete, the microbial deterioration mechanism, the approaches of studying MID and safeguards against concrete biodeterioration. In addition, the uninvestigated research area of MID is also proposed. PMID:24688488

  19. A prospective cohort study of digital cushion and corium thickness. Part 1: Associations with body condition, lesion incidence, and proximity to calving.

    PubMed

    Newsome, R F; Green, M J; Bell, N J; Bollard, N J; Mason, C S; Whay, H R; Huxley, J N

    2017-06-01

    Claw horn disruption lesions (CHDL) are a major cause of lameness in dairy cattle and are likely a result of excessive forces being applied to the germinal epithelium that produces the claw horn. The digital cushion is a connective tissue structure, containing depots of adipose tissue, that sits beneath the distal phalanx and has been shown to be thicker in fatter cows. Body condition score (BCS) loss is a risk factor for CHDL, and one possible explanation is that fat is mobilized from the digital cushion during negative energy balance, causing the digital cushion to thin and lose force-dissipating capacity, leading to disruption of claw horn growth. This prospective cohort study investigated the association between measures of body fat and sole soft tissue (SST) thickness (a combined measure of the corium and digital cushion beneath the distal phalanx) in a longitudinal manner. The SST of 179 cows in 2 high-yielding dairy herds were measured at 5 assessment points between 8 wk before and 35 wk postcalving. The BCS, back fat thickness (BFT), and lesion incidence were recorded. Data were analyzed in a 4-level mixed effects regression model, with the outcome being SST thickness beneath the flexor tuberosity of the distal phalanx. Data from 827 assessment points were available for analysis. The overall mean of SST was 4.99 mm (standard deviation: 0.95). The SST was thickest 8 wk before calving (5.22 mm, standard deviation: 0.91) and thinnest 1 wk postcalving (4.68 mm, standard deviation: 0.87), suggesting an effect of calving on SST. The BFT was positively correlated with SST in the model with a small effect size (a 10 mm decrease in BFT corresponded with a 0.13 mm decrease in SST), yet the nadir of BFT was 11.0 mm at 9 to 17 wk postcalving (when SST was ∼4.95 mm), rather than occurring with the nadir of SST immediately after calving. The SST also varied with other variables [e.g., cows that developed a sole ulcer or severe sole hemorrhage during the study had

  20. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strainsmore » due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.« less

  1. A review on carbonation study in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Rao, N.; Meena, T.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the authors have reviewed the carbonation studies which are a vital durability property of concrete. One of the major causes for deterioration and destruction of concrete is carbonation. The mechanism of carbonation involves the penetration carbon dioxide (CO2) into the concrete porous system to form an environment by reducing the pH around the reinforcement and initiation of the corrosion process. The paper also endeavours to focus and elucidate the gravity of importance, the process and chemistry of carbonate and how the various parameters like water/cement ratio, curing, depth of concrete cones, admixtures, grade of concrete, strength of concrete, porosity and permeability effect carbonation in concrete. The role of Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCMs) like Ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) and Silica Fume (SF) has also been reviewed along with the influence of depth of carbonation.

  2. Semantic Neighborhood Effects for Abstract versus Concrete Words

    PubMed Central

    Danguecan, Ashley N.; Buchanan, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that semantic effects may be task-specific, and thus, that semantic representations are flexible and dynamic. Such findings are critical to the development of a comprehensive theory of semantic processing in visual word recognition, which should arguably account for how semantic effects may vary by task. It has been suggested that semantic effects are more directly examined using tasks that explicitly require meaning processing relative to those for which meaning processing is not necessary (e.g., lexical decision task). The purpose of the present study was to chart the processing of concrete versus abstract words in the context of a global co-occurrence variable, semantic neighborhood density (SND), by comparing word recognition response times (RTs) across four tasks varying in explicit semantic demands: standard lexical decision task (with non-pronounceable non-words), go/no-go lexical decision task (with pronounceable non-words), progressive demasking task, and sentence relatedness task. The same experimental stimulus set was used across experiments and consisted of 44 concrete and 44 abstract words, with half of these being low SND, and half being high SND. In this way, concreteness and SND were manipulated in a factorial design using a number of visual word recognition tasks. A consistent RT pattern emerged across tasks, in which SND effects were found for abstract (but not necessarily concrete) words. Ultimately, these findings highlight the importance of studying interactive effects in word recognition, and suggest that linguistic associative information is particularly important for abstract words. PMID:27458422

  3. Semantic Neighborhood Effects for Abstract versus Concrete Words.

    PubMed

    Danguecan, Ashley N; Buchanan, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that semantic effects may be task-specific, and thus, that semantic representations are flexible and dynamic. Such findings are critical to the development of a comprehensive theory of semantic processing in visual word recognition, which should arguably account for how semantic effects may vary by task. It has been suggested that semantic effects are more directly examined using tasks that explicitly require meaning processing relative to those for which meaning processing is not necessary (e.g., lexical decision task). The purpose of the present study was to chart the processing of concrete versus abstract words in the context of a global co-occurrence variable, semantic neighborhood density (SND), by comparing word recognition response times (RTs) across four tasks varying in explicit semantic demands: standard lexical decision task (with non-pronounceable non-words), go/no-go lexical decision task (with pronounceable non-words), progressive demasking task, and sentence relatedness task. The same experimental stimulus set was used across experiments and consisted of 44 concrete and 44 abstract words, with half of these being low SND, and half being high SND. In this way, concreteness and SND were manipulated in a factorial design using a number of visual word recognition tasks. A consistent RT pattern emerged across tasks, in which SND effects were found for abstract (but not necessarily concrete) words. Ultimately, these findings highlight the importance of studying interactive effects in word recognition, and suggest that linguistic associative information is particularly important for abstract words.

  4. Design of reinforced areas of concrete column using quadratic polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Gunadi, Tjiang; Parung, Herman; Rachman Djamaluddin, Abd; Arwin Amiruddin, A.

    2017-11-01

    Designing of reinforced concrete columns mostly carried out by a simple planning method which uses column interaction diagram. However, the application of this method is limited because it valids only for certain compressive strenght of the concrete and yield strength of the reinforcement. Thus, a more applicable method is still in need. Another method is the use of quadratic polynomials as a basis for the approach in designing reinforced concrete columns, where the ratio of neutral lines to the effective height of a cross section (ξ) if associated with ξ in the same cross-section with different reinforcement ratios is assumed to form a quadratic polynomial. This is identical to the basic principle used in the Simpson rule for numerical integral using quadratic polynomials and had a sufficiently accurate level of accuracy. The basis of this approach to be used both the normal force equilibrium and the moment equilibrium. The abscissa of the intersection of the two curves is the ratio that had been mentioned, since it fulfill both of the equilibrium. The application of this method is relatively more complicated than the existing method but provided with tables and graphs (N vs ξN ) and (M vs ξM ) so that its used could be simplified. The uniqueness of these tables are only distinguished based on the compresssive strength of the concrete, so in application it could be combined with various yield strenght of the reinforcement available in the market. This method could be solved by using programming languages such as Fortran.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  6. Activation experiment for concrete blocks using thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Tanaka, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    Activation experiments for ordinary concrete, colemanite-peridotite concrete, B4C-loaded concrete, and limestone concrete are carried out using thermal neutrons. The results reveal that the effective dose for gamma rays from activated nuclides of colemanite-peridotite concrete is lower than that for the other types of concrete. Therefore, colemanite-peridotite concrete is useful for reducing radiation exposure for workers.

  7. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods. PMID:28772472

  8. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-26

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel-space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  9. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    PubMed

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An experiment on the use of disposable plastics as a reinforcement in concrete beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhury, Mostafiz R.

    1992-01-01

    Illustrated here is the concept of reinforced concrete structures by the use of computer simulation and an inexpensive hands-on design experiment. The students in our construction management program use disposable plastic as a reinforcement to demonstrate their understanding of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete beams. The plastics used for such an experiment vary from plastic bottles to steel reinforced auto tires. This experiment will show the extent to which plastic reinforcement increases the strength of a concrete beam. The procedure of using such throw-away plastics in an experiment to explain the interaction between the reinforcement material and concrete, and a comparison of the test results for using different types of waste plastics are discussed. A computer analysis to simulate the structural response is used to compare the test results and to understand the analytical background of reinforced concrete design. This interaction of using computers to analyze structures and to relate the output results with real experimentation is found to be a very useful method for teaching a math-based analytical subject to our non-engineering students.

  11. Comparative evaluation of concrete sealers and multiple layer polymer concrete overlays. Interim report no. 1.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-01-01

    The report presents comparisons of initial evaluations of several concrete sealers and multiple layer polymer concrete overlays. The sealers evaluated included a solvent-dlspersed epoxy, a water-dlspersed epoxy, a silane, and a high molecular weight ...

  12. Design and application of low compaction energy concrete for use in slip-form concrete paving.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    Slipform self-consolidating concrete (SFSCC) requires sufficient flowability in order to consolidate without the use of internal vibration. However, this concrete must also gain sufficient green strength in order to keep its shape immediately after s...

  13. Concrete pavement mixture design and analysis (MDA) : assessment of air void system requirements for durable concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    Concrete will suffer frost damage when saturated and subjected to freezing temperatures. Frost-durable concrete can be produced if a : specialized surfactant, also known as an air-entraining admixture (AEA), is added during mixing to stabilize micros...

  14. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Hyginus E.; Eziefula, Uchechi G.; Eziefula, Bennett I.

    2018-03-01

    This study compared the physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete. The constituent materials were batched by weight. The water-cement ratio and mix ratio selected for the experimental investigation were 0.55 and 1:2:4, respectively. The specimens were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Slump, density and compressive strength tests were carried out. The results showed that river sand concrete had greater density and compressive strength than quarry dust concrete for all curing ages. At 28 days of curing, river sand concrete exceeded the target compressive strength by 36%, whereas quarry dust concrete was less than the target compressive strength by 12%. Both river sand concrete and quarry dust concrete for the selected water/cement ratio and mix ratio are suitable for non-structural applications and lightly-loaded members where high strength is not a prerequisite.

  15. An alternative potentiometric method for determining chloride content in concrete samples from reinforced-concrete bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of chloride contents in ground concrete samples collected from reinforced concrete bridges and other structures exposed to deicing salts or seawater has become an important part of the inspection for such structures. Such an analysis provide...

  16. Laboratory evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has initiated a research project to investigate the use of recycled concrete as : aggregates (RCA) in Portland (hydraulic) cement concrete pavements (PCCP). The planned source for the RCA in t...

  17. Efforts to reduce reflective cracking of bituminous concrete overlays of Portland cement concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-01-01

    Studies of efforts in Virginia to reduce the incidence of reflection cracking when portland cement concrete pavements or bases are overlayed with asphaltic concrete are reported. The methods of reflection crack reduction discussed are: (1) The use of...

  18. Asphalt concrete overlays on CRCP : decision criteria, tack coat evaluation, and asphalt concrete mixture evaluation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the research undertaken within two areas of study of thin asphalt concrete (AC) overlays to rehabilitate : continuously reinforced concrete pavements (CRCP). The first one is the development of a decision tree for the project : s...

  19. Shear design expressions for concrete filled steel tube and reinforced concrete filled tube components.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    Concrete-filled steel tubes (CFSTs) and reinforced concrete-filled steel tubes (RCFSTs) are increasingly : used in transportation structures as piers, piles, caissons or other foundation components. While the axial : and flexural properties of CFTs h...

  20. Durability assessment of recycled concrete aggregates for use in new concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    The primary goal of this research project was to investigate the long-term durability of concrete incorporating : recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) through accelerated laboratory testing. Overall it was found that modifications to : standard aggregat...

  1. Using recycled concrete as aggregate in concrete pavements to reduce materials cost.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of using aggregate produced from crushed concrete pavement as a replacement for natural (virgin) coarse aggregate in pavement mixtures. A total of ten different concrete mixtures containi...

  2. Influence of reactive fillers on concrete corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimbayev, Sh M.; Tolypina, N. M.; Khakhaleva, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    Contact surfaces represent the weakest link in a conglomerate structure of materials. They ensure the diffusion of aggressive agents inside the material. To reduce the conductivity of contact surfaces it is advisable to use reactive fillers, which interact with cement matrix via certain mechanisms, which in turn, reduces the permeability of the contact layer and fosters durability of products. The interaction of reactive fillers with calcium hydroxide of a concrete liquid phase in a contact area leads to the formation of hydrated calcium silicates of a tobermorite group. Such compounds, being settled in pores and capillaries of a product, colmatage and clog them to some extent thus leading to diffusion delay (inhibition) with regard to aggressive components of external media inside porous material, which in turn inhibits the corrosion rate. The authors studied and compared the corrosion of cement concrete with a standard filler (quartz sand) and a reactive filler (perlite and urtit). The experiments confirmed the positive influence of active fillers on concrete corrosion resistance.

  3. Adding Concrete Syntax to a Prolog-Based Program Synthesis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Visser, Eelco

    2003-01-01

    Program generation and transformation systems manipulate large, pa- rameterized object language fragments. Support for user-definable concrete syntax makes this easier but is typically restricted to certain object and meta languages. We show how Prolog can be retrofitted with concrete syntax and describe how a seamless interaction of concrete syntax fragments with an existing legacy meta-programming system based on abstract syntax is achieved. We apply the approach to gradually migrate the schemas of the AUTOBAYES program synthesis system to concrete syntax. Fit experiences show that this can result in a considerable reduction of the code size and an improved readability of the code. In particular, abstracting out fresh-variable generation and second-order term construction allows the formulation of larger continuous fragments and improves the locality in the schemas.

  4. Characterization of concrete from Roman theatre and amphitheater in Emerita Augusta (Mérida, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota-Lopez, Maria Isabel; Fort, Rafael; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Pizzo, Antonio; Maderuelo-Sanz, Ruben; Meneses-Rodríguez, Juan Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The restoration of historical buildings is very important for the history and culture of the cities and their population. It requires an advanced knowledge of the building materials used for the construction of these structures. Previously to any intervention in historical buildings, it is necessary a historic-scientific study of the original material. Historic mortars or concretes can reveal us different composition and the dependence on the geographical location and the time period of its construction. Historical concretes are complex systems that contain aerial or hydraulic binders or a blend of them, with aggregates, not always crystalline, and others elements that interact with the binder. The use of different techniques for microstructural characterization of materials, like optical microscopy, X-ray diffractometry or petrophysical analysis, allows the determination of the composition and some properties of these concretes. However, each technique has its own limits and, in many cases, several characterization techniques must be used to obtain coherent and reliable results. The present study focuses on the compositional characterization of Roman concrete from Roman buildings for public spectacles of Emerita Augusta, Mérida, Spain. An advanced knowledge of the Roman concrete composition is required to get a reliable restoration and preservation of these ancient monuments. Various samples of concrete were extracted from different zones from this archaeological site. The concrete was studied through mineralogical analysis (petrographic microscope and XRD) and petrophysical properties determination (bulk and real density, open porosity, mercury porosimetry intrusion, compressive strength and Ultrasound propagation velocity). The results obtained allow us to know the original composition of the concrete and the provenance of the aggregates used in it. Acknowledgements: Community of Madrid for financing Geomateriales2 program (P2013/MIT2914), to the funding

  5. Economic analysis of recycling contaminated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, A.; Ayers, K.W.; Boren, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination and Decommissioning activities in the DOE complex generate large volumes of radioactively contaminated and uncontaminated concrete. Currently, this concrete is usually decontaminated, the contaminated waste is disposed of in a LLW facility and the decontaminated concrete is placed in C&D landfills. A number of alternatives to this practice are available including recycling of the concrete. Cost estimates for six alternatives were developed using a spreadsheet model. The results of this analysis show that recycling alternatives are at least as economical as current practice.

  6. Cement and Concrete Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Raki, Laila; Beaudoin, James; Alizadeh, Rouhollah; Makar, Jon; Sato, Taijiro

    2010-01-01

    Concrete science is a multidisciplinary area of research where nanotechnology potentially offers the opportunity to enhance the understanding of concrete behavior, to engineer its properties and to lower production and ecological cost of construction materials. Recent work at the National Research Council Canada in the area of concrete materials research has shown the potential of improving concrete properties by modifying the structure of cement hydrates, addition of nanoparticles and nanotubes and controlling the delivery of admixtures. This article will focus on a review of these innovative achievements.

  7. Fibre reinforced concrete exposed to elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, J.; Kohoutková, A.

    2017-09-01

    Although concrete when subject to fire performs very well, its behaviour and properties change dramatically under high temperature due to damaged microstructure and mesostructure. As fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) represents a complex material composed of various components with different response to high temperature, to determine its behaviour and mechanical properties in fire is a demanding task. The presented paper provides a summary of findings on the fire response of fibre FRC. Namely, the information on steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC), synthetic fibre reinforced concrete and hybrid (steel + synthetic) fibre reinforced concrete have been gathered from various contributions published up to date. The mechanical properties including the melting point and ignition point of fibres affect significantly the properties of concrete composites with addition of fibres. The combination of steel and synthetic fibres represents a promising alternative how to ensure good toughness of a concrete composite before heating and improve its residual mechanical behaviour and spalling resistance as well as the ductility after heating. While synthetic fibres increase concrete spalling resistance, steel fibres in a concrete mix leads to an improvement in both mechanical properties and resistance to heating effects.

  8. Bond behavior of self compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmalar, S.

    2018-03-01

    The success of an optimum design lies in the effective load transfer done by the bond forces at the steel-concrete interface. Self Compacting Concrete, is a new innovative concrete capable of filling intrinsic reinforcement and gets compacted by itself, without the need of external mechanical vibration. For this reason, it is replacing the conventional vibrated concrete in the construction industry. The present paper outlays the materials and methods adopted for attaining the self compacting concrete and describes about the bond behavior of this concrete. The bond stress-slip curve is similar in the bottom bars for both SCC and normal concrete whereas a higher bond stress and stiffness is experienced in the top and middle bars, for SCC compared to normal concrete. Also the interfacial properties revealed that the elastic modulus and micro-strength of interfacial transition zone [ITZ] were better on the both top and bottom side of horizontal steel bar in the SCC mixes than in normal vibrated concrete. The local bond strength of top bars for SCC is about 20% less than that for NC. For the bottom bars, however, the results were almost the same.

  9. Spall Damage of Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    structures prediction Structural response Cased charges Scabbing Tests Concrete walls--testing . emi -hardened Upgrading Conventional weapons Spall Weapon...recording devices in a trailer approximately 750 feet from the test pit. Up to 30 channels were recorded on a Sangamo Model III, 32-channel FM magnetic tape...6.7"’DEEP 23.6" N 21’.6" 0.114? 4000 0 73670636 RATx.000620 RAT%.000520 SHEILD WALL DESTROYED MAIM WALL 0.2611 4000 0.S9001025 RAT-.000S29 RATa.000S20

  10. Glassfibre Reinforced Concrete: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, P. J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Introduced to construction about 40 years ago, GRC has come of age. It is now widely used all over the world and in quantities very likely greater than most of the other types of fibre reinforced concrete, although it remains less known. A brief history of GRC is followed by review of the basic make-up of this complex composite. Methods of production are identified, properties reviewed and modes of fracture which are unique to GRC are explained. Benefits which are already available and exploited by its users are summarised and the wide spectrum of current applications of GRC is outlined.

  11. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  12. Laboratory and field evaluation of concrete paving curing effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-12-01

    Ensuring that sufficient water is available in hydrating concrete is of great importance to produce durable : concrete and achieve both short- and long-term performance of concrete pavement. Excessive early-age : evaporation from the surface of concr...

  13. Evaluation of bridge deck with shrinkage-compensating concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-04-01

    Concrete bridge decks are susceptible to premature cracking and to corrosion of reinforcing steel. Low-permeability : concrete does not always ensure durability if the concrete has excessive cracks that facilitate the intrusion of aggressive solution...

  14. Evaluation of consolidation problems in thicker Portland cement concrete pavements

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    Minimizing the amount of entrapped air in concrete is necessary to produce quality concrete with a longer pavement performance life, lower maintenance costs and fewer delays to the roadway users. Good quality concrete with low entrapped air content w...

  15. Internal curing of high-performance concrete for bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    High performance concrete (HPC) provides a long lasting, durable concrete that is typically used in bridge decks due to its low permeability, high abrasion resistance, freeze-thaw resistance and strength. However, this type of concrete is highly susc...

  16. Development of design parameters for virtual cement and concrete testing.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    The development, testing, and certification of new concrete mix designs is an expensive and time-consuming aspect : of the concrete industry. A software package, named the Virtual Concrete and Cement Testing Laboratory (VCCTL), : has been developed b...

  17. Self-Consolidating Concrete for Prestressed Bridge Girders : Research Brief

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-01

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is commonly used as an alternative to conventional concrete (CC) in precast, prestressed concrete (PSC) bridge girders. The high strength, highly workable mixture can flow through dense reinforcement to fill formwork...

  18. Application of ultra-high performance concrete to bridge girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    "Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a new class of concrete that has superior performance characteristics : compared to conventional concrete. The enhanced strength and durability properties of UHPC are mainly due to optimized : particle grada...

  19. Prevention of derailments due to concrete tie rail seat deterioration

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-03-13

    Concrete tie rail seat abrasion/deterioration (RSA) has : been an issue since the inception of concrete ties. As a : result of recent derailments involving abraded concrete : ties on curved track, the Federal Railroad Administration : set up a task f...

  20. Recycled tires as coarse aggregate in concrete pavement mixtures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    The reuse potential of tire chips as coarse aggregates in pavement concrete was examined in this research by : investigating the effects of low- and high-volume tire chips on fresh and hardened concrete properties. One concrete : control mixture was ...

  1. Lightweight concrete: development of mild steel in tension.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-02-01

    Concrete with a unit weight between that of traditional lightweight : concrete (LWC) and normal weight concrete (NWC) : is not covered in the American Association of State Highway : Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Load and Resistance Factor : Desig...

  2. Acoustic emission techniques applied to conventionally reinforced concrete bridge girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-09-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) bridges generally operate at service-level loads except during discrete overload events that can reduce the integrity of the structure by initiating concrete cracks, widening or extending of existing concrete cracks, as well ...

  3. Improving Fatigue Strength of polymer concrete using nanomaterials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-30

    Polymer concrete (PC) is that type of concrete where the cement binder is replaced with polymer. PC is often used to improve friction and protect structural substrates in reinforced concrete and orthotropic steel bridges. However, its low fatigue per...

  4. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  5. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone), calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  6. Ground tire rubber (GTR) as a component material in concrete mixtures for paving concrete, phase 2 : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-02-01

    Using ground tire rubber (GTR) in : concrete mixtures is a possible solution : to mitigating flexibility and thermal : expansion issues with high-strength : concrete pavements. Florida State : University researchers designed concrete : mixtures using...

  7. Using Concrete Manipulatives in Mathematical Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Julie P.; Tiller, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Concrete, Representational, Abstract (CRA) instruction is a process for teaching and learning mathematical concepts. Starting with manipulation of concrete materials (counters, beans, Unifix cubes), the process moves students to the representational level (tallies, dots, stamps), and peaks at the abstract level, at which numbers and symbols are…

  8. Investigation of optimized graded concrete for Oklahoma.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the results of several novel test methods to investigate concrete for slip formed paving. These tests include the Box Test, a novel test to evaluate the response of concrete to vibration, the AIMS2, an automated test for aggregat...

  9. Concrete deck material properties : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold focus of this study was (a) to develop an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for causing : cracking in the concrete; and (b) to study the influence of the local materials on the performance of NYSDOTs HP : concrete mixture. R...

  10. Air void analyzer for plastic concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-01

    The two main test methods that measure the air content in plastic concrete are the pressure method and the volumetric : or roll-a-meter method. Although these methods report the total air in the concrete, they do not distinguish between : entrained a...

  11. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT THROUGH CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of radon generation and transport through Florida residential concretes for their contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Radium concentrations in the 11 concretes tested were all <2.5 pCi/g and radon emanation coefficients were all...

  12. Properties and uses of concrete, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene

    1992-01-01

    Concretes that can now be formed have properties which may make them valuable for lunar or space construction. These properties include high compressive strength, good flexural strength (when reinforced), and favorable responses to temperature extremes (even increased strength at low temperatures). These and other properties of concrete are discussed.

  13. Concrete Durability: A Multibillion-Dollar Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Fum -Containing Products 79 MDF Materials 85 Fiber-Reinforced Materials 85 Modified - Sulfur Concretes 87 References 88 APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES...construction. MODIFIED - SULFUR CONCRETES Molten sulfur-sand grouts have been used for many years in the constructLin of acid vats because of their

  14. Assessing the Concreteness of Relational Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Jonathan R.; Markman, Arthur B.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that people's ability to transfer abstract relational knowledge across situations can be heavily influenced by the concrete objects that fill relational roles. This article provides evidence that the concreteness of the relations themselves also affects performance. In 3 experiments, participants viewed simple relational…

  15. Concrete deck performance relative to air entrainment.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-12-01

    Damage to concrete due to freeze-thaw (F-T) action is a serious concern for agencies in cold regions of the United : States. The most effective method to protect concrete from F-T damage is through the addition of an air entraining : agent as an admi...

  16. Improved concrete railway crosstie design and performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-11-01

    The approach for the proposed concrete tie research under the NEXTRANS Center funding was to : characterize the abrasion demand on the concrete-tie rail seat, as well as the abrasion resistance of : different rail seat materials and designs (e.g. con...

  17. Lightweight concrete modification factor for shear friction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the results of a study initiated to examine the influence of concrete unit weight on the direct shear transfer across an interface of concretes cast at different times. This type of interface is common with structural precast co...

  18. "Concreteness Fading" Promotes Transfer of Mathematical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Nicole M.; Fyfe, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that educators should avoid concrete instantiations when the goal is to promote transfer. However, concrete instantiations may benefit transfer in the long run, particularly if they are "faded" into more abstract instantiations. Undergraduates were randomly assigned to learn a mathematical concept in one of three…

  19. Eigendeformation-Based Homogenization of Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    The inelastic behavior of concrete is modeled using three types of eigenstrains . The eigenstrains in the mortar phase include pore compaction (or...lock-in), rate-dependent damage and plasticity eigenstrains , whereas the inelastic behavior of aggregates is assumed to be governed by plasticity...3  3. Microscale Inelastic Properties of Concrete: Eigenstrain

  20. Addressing the Needs of the Concrete Reasoner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trifone, James D.

    1991-01-01

    The reasoning abilities to be expected of the concrete operational and formal operational student, the percentage of secondary science students that are capable of each type of reasoning pattern, and effective strategies to teach science to concrete reasoners are described. Implications for curriculum development are discussed. (KR)

  1. Durability of coconut shell powder (CSP) concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leman, A. S.; Shahidan, S.; Senin, M. S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Anak Guntor, N. A.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Khalid, F. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Razak, N. H. S.

    2017-11-01

    The rising cost of construction in developing countries like Malaysia has led concrete experts to explore alternative materials such as coconut shells which are renewable and possess high potential to be used as construction material. Coconut shell powder in varying percentages of1%, 3% and 5% was used as filler material in concrete grade 30 and evaluated after a curing period of 7 days and 28days respectively. Compressive strength, water absorption and carbonation tests were conducted to evaluate the strength and durability of CSP concrete in comparison with normal concrete. The test results revealed that 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete achieved a compressive strength of 47.65 MPa, 45.6 MPa and 40.55% respectively. The rate of water absorption of CSP concrete was recorded as 3.21%, 2.47%, and 2.73% for 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete respectively. Although CSP contained a carbon composition of 47%, the carbonation test showed that CSP no signs of carbon were detected inside the concrete. To conclude, CSP offers great prospects as it demonstrated relatively high durability as a construction material.

  2. Experimental investigation of photocatalytic effects of concrete in air purification adopting entire concrete waste reuse model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yidong; Chen, Wei; Jin, Ruoyu; Shen, Jiansheng; Smallbone, Kirsty; Yan, Chunyang; Hu, Lei

    2018-07-05

    This research investigated the capacities of recycled aggregate concrete adopting entire concrete waste reuse model in degrading NO 2. Two major issues within environmental sustainability were addressed: concrete waste reuse rate and mitigation of hazards substances in the polluted air. The study consisted of two stages: identification of proper replacement rates of recycled concrete wastes in new concrete mixture design, and the evaluation of photocatalytic performance of recycled aggregate concrete in degrading NO 2 . It was found that replacement rates up to 3%, 30%, and 50% for recycled power, recycled fine aggregate, and recycled coarse aggregate respectively could be applied in concrete mixture design without deteriorating concrete strength. Recycled aggregates contained both positive attributes ("internal curing") and negative effects (e.g., lower hardness) to concrete properties. It was found that 30%-50% of natural coarse aggregate replaced by recycled coarse aggregates coated with TiO 2 would significantly improve the photocatalytic performance of concrete measured by degradation rate of NO 2 . Micro-structures of recycled aggregates observed under microscope indicated that soaking recycled aggregates in TiO 2 solution resulted in whiskers that filled the porosity within recycled aggregates which enhanced concrete strength. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental Study on Permeability of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honglu; Liu, Rentai; Zheng, Zhuo; Liu, Haojie; Gao, Yan; Liu, Yankai

    2018-01-01

    To study the influencing factors on permeability of pervious concrete, by adding inorganic organic composite materials obtained experimental results show that different aggregate size, aggregate cement ratio of different, different water cement ratio on the permeability performance. The permeability of the concrete was tested by using the self - made permeable device. The experimental results showed that the permeation coefficient of the experiment was obtained and the factors influencing the permeability of the concrete were compared and analyzed. At the same time, the porosity of pervious concrete was measured, the influence of various variables on porosity was studied, and the influence of various factors on the permeability of voids was found. Finally, through comprehensive analysis of a variety of factors, the optimal water cement ratio is 0.28. At this time, the pervious performance of concrete is optimal.

  4. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out tomore » 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.« less

  5. Experimental Investigation on Pore Structure Characterization of Concrete Exposed to Water and Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Tang, Kaifeng; Qiu, Qiwen; Pan, Dong; Lei, Zongru; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the pore structure characterization of concrete exposed to deionised water and 5% NaCl solution was evaluated using mercury intrusion porosity (MIP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of calcium leaching, fly ash incorporation, and chloride ions on the evolution of pore structure characteristics were investigated. The results demonstrate that: (i) in ordinary concrete without any fly ash, the leaching effect of the cement products is more evident than the cement hydration effect. From the experimental data, Ca(OH)2 is leached considerably with the increase in immersion time. The pore structure of concrete can also be affected by the formation of an oriented structure of water in concrete materials; (ii) incorporation of fly ash makes a difference for the performance of concrete submersed in solutions as the total porosity and the pore connectivity can be lower. Especially when the dosage of fly ash is up to 30%, the pores with the diameter of larger than 100 nm show significant decrease. It demonstrates that the pore properties are improved by fly ash, which enhances the resistance against the calcium leaching; (iii) chlorides have a significant impact on microstructure of concrete materials because of the chemical interactions between the chlorides and cement hydrates. PMID:28788204

  6. Automatic semantic encoding in verbal short-term memory: evidence from the concreteness effect.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Guillermo; Castellà, Judit; Provencio, Violeta; Hitch, Graham J; Baddeley, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The concreteness effect in verbal short-term memory (STM) tasks is assumed to be a consequence of semantic encoding in STM, with immediate recall of concrete words benefiting from richer semantic representations. We used the concreteness effect to test the hypothesis that semantic encoding in standard verbal STM tasks is a consequence of controlled, attention-demanding mechanisms of strategic semantic retrieval and encoding. Experiment 1 analysed the effect of presentation rate, with slow presentations being assumed to benefit strategic, time-dependent semantic encoding. Experiments 2 and 3 provided a more direct test of the strategic hypothesis by introducing three different concurrent attention-demanding tasks. Although Experiment 1 showed a larger concreteness effect with slow presentations, the following two experiments yielded strong evidence against the strategic hypothesis. Limiting available attention resources by concurrent tasks reduced global memory performance, but the concreteness effect was equivalent to that found in control conditions. We conclude that semantic effects in STM result from automatic semantic encoding and provide tentative explanations for the interaction between the concreteness effect and the presentation rate.

  7. Imagining the truth and the moon: an electrophysiological study of abstract and concrete word processing.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Mitra, Priya; Coch, Donna

    2013-05-01

    Previous event-related potential studies have indicated that both a widespread N400 and an anterior N700 index differential processing of concrete and abstract words, but the nature of these components in relation to concreteness and imagery has been unclear. Here, we separated the effects of word concreteness and task demands on the N400 and N700 in a single word processing paradigm with a within-subjects, between-tasks design and carefully controlled word stimuli. The N400 was larger to concrete words than to abstract words, and larger in the visualization task condition than in the surface task condition, with no interaction. A marked anterior N700 was elicited only by concrete words in the visualization task condition, suggesting that this component indexes imagery. These findings are consistent with a revised or extended dual coding theory according to which concrete words benefit from greater activation in both verbal and imagistic systems. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Park, Ki-Bong

    2015-01-01

    High-calcium fly ash (FH) is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found. PMID:28793543

  9. Research on Durability of Recycled Ceramic Powder Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. C.; Fang, W.; Xu, K. C.; Xie, L.

    2017-06-01

    Ceramic was ground into powder with 325 mesh and used to prepare for concrete. Basic mechanical properties, carbonation and chloride ion penetration of the concrete tests were conducted. In addition, 6-hour electric fluxes of recycled ceramic powder concrete were measured under loading. The results showed that the age strength of ceramics powder concrete is higher than that of the ordinary concrete and the fly ash concrete. The ceramic powder used as admixture would reduce the strength of concrete under no consideration of its impact factor; under consideration of the impact factor for ceramic powder as admixture, the carbonation resistance of ceramic powder concrete was significantly improved, and the 28 day carbonation depth of the ceramic powder concrete was only 31.5% of ordinary concrete. The anti-chloride-permeability of recycled ceramic powder concrete was excellent.

  10. Repair of the DSS-14 Pedestal Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, D.

    1985-01-01

    About three years after the Goldstone Deep Space Station antenna was dedicated, grout under the hydrostatic bearing runner was found to be interacting with the runner, causing rust to form between the runner and the sole plates upon which it rests. The rust formed unevenly and the runner could not be kept flat so in 1969 the grout was removed and replaced with a Portland cement and sand dry pack grout that was less likely to produce rust. In the years that followed, oil leaking from the runner assembly caused progressive deterioration of the drypack grout. In 1982 over one thousand hours of spacecraft tracking time were lost due to this deterioration. A plan was developed to rehabilitate the bearing. The plan called for raising the rotating structure free from the concrete pedestal and placing it on three pairs of external support columns. With the weight of the structure transferred to the columns, the pads and runner could be removed and the repair started. The very successful repair included the replacement of a significant portion of the antenna pedestal.

  11. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  12. Strengthening method of concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inge, Wewin; Audrey; Nugroho, Sofie; Njo, Helen

    2018-03-01

    Building extension in Indonesia is not favored, and not many people know the advantages of the method because architects and engineers tend to lack the knowledge and experience. The aim of this paper is to explain a method on how to strengthen a concrete building structure that people can use/learn as a better way to cut potential cost and save time. The strengthening method explained in this paper is steel jacketing, providing a case study of this method in the extension of a restaurant located in Medan, Indonesia. In this study, engineers calculated that the tensile stress of the existing RC column and beam is not strong enough to reinforce the building extension applied load. Therefore, the steel jacketing method can be applied to improve the column and beam strength and ductility. The result of the case study proves that this is one of the best methods for building extension applied in Indonesia.

  13. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  14. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete with demolished waste concrete aggregate and clay brick aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocan; Lou, Cong; Du, Geng; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Zhiwu; Li, Liqin

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of the replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) with either recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) or recycled clay brick aggregate (RBA) on the compressive strengths of the hardened concrete. Two grades (C25 and C50) of concrete were investigated, which were achieved by using different water-to-cement ratios. In each grade concrete five different replacement rates, 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were considered. In order to improve the performance of the recycled aggregates in the concrete mixes, the RCA and RBA were carefully sieved by using the optimal degradation. In this way the largest reduction in the 28-day compressive strength was found to be only 7.2% and 9.6% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RCA, and 11% and 13% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RBA. In general, the concrete with RCA has better performance than the concrete with RBA. The comparison of the present experimental results with those reported in literature for hardened concrete with either RCA or RBA demonstrates the effectiveness in improving the compressive strength by using the optimal gradation of recycled aggregates.

  15. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-12-08

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete's compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  16. The influence of concrete mixture’s rheological properties on the quality of formed concrete surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daukšys, M.; Klovas, A.; Venčkauskas, L.

    2017-09-01

    This study mainly lays emphasis on examining the influence of concrete mixture rheological properties on the quality of formed concrete surfaces. Mixture’s fine aggregate change was taken into the consideration. Over the course of concrete mixture preparation the inner ratio of fine aggregate (sand: fraction of 0/1 and 0/4) was changed. The idea was to increase the quantity of fine particles in the total aggregate’s volume therefore quantity of sand (fraction 0/1) was increased. Six different concrete mixture’s compositions were designed as well as three specimens (concrete piles of 1m2 surface area) were casted. Rheological properties of concrete mixtures were analytically obtained and the quality of formed concrete surfaces was evaluated using image analysis method “BetonGUY 2.0”. As can be obtained from the dependence between concrete mixture rheological properties and its formed surface quality, the increase of concrete mixture’s yield stress and plastic viscosity reduces the quantity of air pores on formed concrete surfaces.

  17. The Influence of Addition of Plastiment-VZ to Concrete Characteristics in Riau Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuni Megasari, Shanti; Winayati

    2017-12-01

    Riau Province has an area of 8,702,000 ha consisting of 7,121.344,00 ha of forest and 3,867,000 ha in the form of peatlands. Peat structures are soft and have pores that make it easy to hold water. Peat water has a high color intensity, low pH, high organic content and has an acidic properties So it does not qualify as a mixture of concrete. To meet the needs of water in the concrete mix then water should be obtained from another place but it will require a greater cost and time. To resolve the issue, the advancement of concrete technology has resulted in admixture that can help in maintaining the quality of concrete. Plastiment-VZ is a plasticizer material that can increase workability of concrete without adding water. However, for the use in the field, the selection of admixture must be adjusted to the planned concrete situation and condition. Excessive use of admixture will also result in uneconomical concrete. The design of the job mix using the Department of Environment (DOE) method with compressive strength concrete plan fc ' = 25 MPa. The percentage of Plastiment-VZ addition is 0%, 0,05%; 0,10%; 0,15% and 0,20% to the weight of cement. The reduction of the amount of water in this study is 10% of the total amount of water. Specimens in each variation were made using cylinder mold with 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm high. After specimens are created and maintained, testing of compressive strength concrete held in 28 days. The test results show that the trend of average compressive strength has increased along with the addition of Plastiment-VZ percentage. The equation resulting from the average compressive strength is y = -362,7x2 + 133,3x + 28,10 with value R2 = 0,969. The highest average compressive strength value was obtained in the addition of 0,20% Plastiment-VZ at 40,76 MPa. Statistical testing with Analysis of Variance - ANOVA states that there is a very real interaction or treatment between the compressive strength of the concrete with the addition of

  18. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability ofmore » the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.« less

  19. Life Cycle Assessment of Completely Recyclable Concrete

    PubMed Central

    De Schepper, Mieke; Van den Heede, Philip; Van Driessche, Isabel; De Belie, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Since the construction sector uses 50% of the Earth’s raw materials and produces 50% of its waste, the development of more durable and sustainable building materials is crucial. Today, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) is mainly used in low level applications, namely as unbound material for foundations, e.g., in road construction. Mineral demolition waste can be recycled as crushed aggregates for concrete, but these reduce the compressive strength and affect the workability due to higher values of water absorption. To advance the use of concrete rubble, Completely Recyclable Concrete (CRC) is designed for reincarnation within the cement production, following the Cradle-to-Cradle (C2C) principle. By the design, CRC becomes a resource for cement production because the chemical composition of CRC will be similar to that of cement raw materials. If CRC is used on a regular basis, a closed concrete-cement-concrete material cycle will arise, which is completely different from the current life cycle of traditional concrete. Within the research towards this CRC it is important to quantify the benefit for the environment and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) needs to be performed, of which the results are presented in a this paper. It was observed that CRC could significantly reduce the global warming potential of concrete. PMID:28788174

  20. Self-cleaning geopolymer concrete - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsaffirah Zailan, Siti; Mahmed, Norsuria; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Sandu, Andrei Victor

    2016-06-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction materials for building technology. However, cement production releases high amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere that leads to increasing the global warming. Thus, an alternative, environmental friendly construction material such as geopolymer concrete has been developed. Geopolymer concrete applies greener alternative binder, which is an innovative construction material that replaces the Portland cement. This technology introduced nano-particles such as nanoclay into the cement paste in order to improve their mechanical properties. The concrete materials also have been developed to be functioned as self-cleaning construction materials. The self-cleaning properties of the concrete are induced by introducing the photocatalytic materials such as titania (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO). Self-cleaning concrete that contains those photocatalysts will be energized by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and accelerates the decomposition of organic particulates. Thus, the cleanliness of the building surfaces can be maintained and the air surrounding air pollution can be reduced. This paper briefly reviews about self-cleaning concrete.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of Completely Recyclable Concrete.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, Mieke; Van den Heede, Philip; Van Driessche, Isabel; De Belie, Nele

    2014-08-21

    Since the construction sector uses 50% of the Earth's raw materials and produces 50% of its waste, the development of more durable and sustainable building materials is crucial. Today, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) is mainly used in low level applications, namely as unbound material for foundations, e.g., in road construction. Mineral demolition waste can be recycled as crushed aggregates for concrete, but these reduce the compressive strength and affect the workability due to higher values of water absorption. To advance the use of concrete rubble, Completely Recyclable Concrete (CRC) is designed for reincarnation within the cement production, following the Cradle-to-Cradle (C2C) principle. By the design, CRC becomes a resource for cement production because the chemical composition of CRC will be similar to that of cement raw materials. If CRC is used on a regular basis, a closed concrete-cement-concrete material cycle will arise, which is completely different from the current life cycle of traditional concrete. Within the research towards this CRC it is important to quantify the benefit for the environment and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) needs to be performed, of which the results are presented in a this paper. It was observed that CRC could significantly reduce the global warming potential of concrete.

  2. Reusing recycled aggregates in structural concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Shicong

    The utilization of recycled aggregates in concrete can minimize environmental impact and reduce the consumption of natural resources in concrete applications. The aim of this thesis is to provide a scientific basis for the possible use of recycled aggregates in structure concrete by conducting a comprehensive programme of laboratory study to gain a better understanding of the mechanical, microstructure and durability properties of concrete produced with recycled aggregates. The study also explored possible techniques to of improve the properties of recycled aggregate concrete that is produced with high percentages (≧ 50%) of recycled aggregates. These techniques included: (a) using lower water-to-cement ratios in the concrete mix design; (b) using fly ash as a cement replacement or as an additional mineral admixture in the concrete mixes, and (c) precasting recycled aggregate concrete with steam curing regimes. The characteristics of the recycled aggregates produced both from laboratory and a commercially operated pilot construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling plant were first studied. A mix proportioning procedure was then established to produce six series of concrete mixtures using different percentages of recycled coarse aggregates with and without the use of fly ash. The water-to-cement (binder) ratios of 0.55, 0.50, 0.45 and 0.40 were used. The fresh properties (including slump and bleeding) of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) were then quantified. The effects of fly ash on the fresh and hardened properties of RAC were then studied and compared with those RAC prepared with no fly ash addition. Furthermore, the effects of steam curing on the hardened properties of RAC were investigated. For micro-structural properties, the interfacial transition zones of the aggregates and the mortar/cement paste were analyzed by SEM and EDX-mapping. Moreover, a detailed set of results on the fracture properties for RAC were obtained. Based on the experimental

  3. Molecular Survey of Concrete Sewer Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although bacteria are implicated in deteriorating concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different concrete biofilms by performing sequence analysis of 16S rDNA concrete clone libraries. ...

  4. 76 FR 34890 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...-0007, Notice No. 3] RIN 2130-AC01 Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties AGENCY: Federal Railroad... effective concrete crossties, for rail fastening systems connected to concrete crossties, and for automated inspections of track constructed with concrete crossties. The Track Safety Standards were amended via final...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.704 - Requirements for precast concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for precast concrete. 1926.704 Section 1926..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.704 Requirements for precast concrete. (a) Precast concrete wall units, structural framing...

  6. Introduction to Concrete Reinforcing. Instructor Edition. Introduction to Construction Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This module on concrete reinforcing is one of a series of modules designed to teach basic skills necessary for entry-level employment in this field. This module contains three instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) concrete reinforcing materials; (2) concrete reinforcing tools; and (3) concrete reinforcing basic skills. Each…

  7. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior. PMID:25243213

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of polyester polymer concrete using recycled aggregates from concrete sleepers.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I; Real, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  9. Developmental Inter-Relationships Among Concrete Operational Tasks: An Investigation of Piaget's Stage Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Wesley

    1977-01-01

    Two models of intertask relations, Wohlwill's divergent-decalage and reciprocal-interaction patterns, were evaluated for their fit to cross-classification tables which showed the joint classification of 101 children's performance on all possible pairs of eight concrete operational tasks. (SB)

  10. Physical Characteristics of Laboratory Tested Concrete as a Substituion of Gravel on Normal Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butar-butar, Ronald; Suhairiani; Wijaya, Kinanti; Sebayang, Nono

    2018-03-01

    Concrete technology is highly potential in the field of construction for structural and non-structural construction. The amount uses of this concrete material raise the problem of solid waste in the form of concrete remaining test results in the laboratory. This waste is usually just discarded and not economically valuable. In solving the problem, this experiment was made new materials by using recycle material in the form of recycled aggregate which aims to find out the strength characteristics of the used concrete as a gravel substitution material on the normal concrete and obtain the value of the substitution composition of gravel and used concrete that can achieve the strength of concrete according to the standard. Testing of concrete characteristic is one of the requirements before starting the concrete mixture. This test using SNI method (Indonesian National Standard) with variation of comparison (used concrete : gravel) were 15: 85%, 25: 75%, 35:65%, 50:50 %, 75: 25%. The results of physical tests obtained the mud content value of the mixture gravel and used concrete is 0.03 larger than the standard of SNI 03-4142-1996 that is equal to 1.03%. so the need watering or soaking before use. The water content test results show an increase in the water content value if the composition of the used concrete increases. While the specific gravity value for variation 15: 85% until 35: 65% fulfilled the requirements of SNI 03-1969-1990. the other variasion show the specifics gravity value included on the type of light materials.

  11. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength. PMID:28788279

  12. Effect of concrete strength gradation to the compressive strength of graded concrete, a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, M. Mirza Abdillah; Aylie, Han; Gan, Buntara Sthenly; Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Fauziyah, Shifa

    2017-09-01

    Concrete casting, compacting method, and characteristic of the concrete material determine the performance of concrete as building element due to the material uniformity issue. Previous studies show that gradation in strength exists on building member by nature and negatively influence the load carrying capacity of the member. A pilot research had modeled the concrete gradation in strength with controllable variable and observed that the weakest material determines the strength of graded concrete through uniaxial compressive loading test. This research intends to confirm the recent finding by a numerical approach with extensive variables of strength disparity. The finite element analysis was conducted using the Strand7 nonlinear program. The results displayed that the increase of strength disparity in graded concrete models leads to the slight reduction of models strength. A substantial difference in displacement response is encountered on the models for the small disparity of concrete strength. However, the higher strength of concrete mix in the graded concrete models contributes to the rise of material stiffness that provides a beneficial purpose for serviceability of building members.

  13. Investigation of concrete containing condensed silica fume.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-01-01

    The properties of hydraulic cement concretes containing silica fume were investigated to assess their suitability for use in overlays with s minimum thickness of 1 1/4 in. The properties studied were compressive and flexural strengths, bond strength,...

  14. Performance evaluation of precast prestressed concrete pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-11-01

    This report describes in detail an experimental investigation of an innovative precast prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) system used to rehabilitate a 1,000 ft. section of interstate highway located on the northbound lanes of I-57 near Charleston,...

  15. Performance of I-57 recycled concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    In 1986-1987 the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) constructed a demonstration project on I-57 near Effingham, Illinois to evaluate the viability : of recycling an existing jointed reinforced concrete pavement for use as its primary aggreg...

  16. Water bath accelerated curing of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1970-01-01

    Water bath methods for accelerating the strength development of portland cement concrete were investigated in a two phase study as follows. Phase I - Participation in a cooperative accelerated strength testing program sponsored by the American Societ...

  17. Non-destructive testing of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-11-01

    This research project was initiated to evaluate the performance of an ultrasonic testing device device in predicting compressive strengths from tests performed on samples of fresh concrete. : The initial phase of this study involved laboratory perora...

  18. Concrete barrier distress in La Grande, Oregon.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-04-01

    Several precast concrete barriers in eastern Oregon were noted to be deteriorating at an advanced rate. The ODOT : Research Unit took several core samples from the barriers and conducted analyses. Petrographic evaluations determined : that the strong...

  19. Reinforced concrete pipe cracks : acceptance criteria [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    Reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) is widely used by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) in installations expected to serve for periods of decades before replacement, and extremely slow deterioration of RCP can be accepted. However, cracks in...

  20. Partial-depth precast concrete patching.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed with partial-depth precast concrete patching to determine the feasibility of the method. In the experiments prefabricated slabs of various sizes, stockpiled near the pavement repair site were installed in machine cut holes ...

  1. Evaluation of crushed concrete base strength.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    This research project was conducted with two primary objectives, which include: 1) determine whether current Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) requirements for recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) provide adequate materials for a roadway ...

  2. Evaluation of fiber reinforced concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the physical properties of plastic and hardened fiber reinforced concrete using three basic types of fibers: steel, fiberglass and polypropylene. Fibers have been shown to increase flexural and tensile strength, d...

  3. Controlling conductivity of asphalt concrete with graphite.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    Electrically conductive asphalt concrete has a huge potential for various multifunctional applications such as : self-healing, self-sensing, and deicing. In order to utilize the full spectrum of applications of electrically conductive : asphalt compo...

  4. Rubberized asphalt concrete warranty pilot projects.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-11-01

    Between 2002 and 2004 Caltrans built five pilot projects through its rehabilitation program that contain : specifications for rubberized asphalt concrete (RAC) overlay and include a 5-year warranty on the RAC : materials and workmanship. The overall ...

  5. Long-life slab replacement concrete : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    Concrete slab replacement projects in Florida have demonstrated a high incidence of : replacement slab cracking. Causes of cracking have not been reliably determined. University of South Florida researchers : sought to identify the factors or : param...

  6. Polymer concrete overlay test program : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-12-01

    The results in this report were obtained during the test program which began in 1973. Physical properties of various polymer concretes are listed. They include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, bond strength, the modulus of elasticity...

  7. Polymer concrete overlay test program : users' manual.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-12-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide the reader with sufficient information to successfully place a polyester styrene polymer concrete overlay on a bridge deck. Although the binder is a resin, no detailed knowledge of polymer chemistry is needed ...

  8. Polymer concrete overlay test program : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1974-11-01

    This report describes work done on various combinations of monomers and polymer concrete mixes and identifies the mixes showing the greatest potential for use in bridge deck overlays . Presented are test results showing physical properties of various...

  9. Performance related specifications for bituminous concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the philosophy and evolution of performance related specifications. The properties of most .importance in the construction of asphaltic concrete pavements, as well as the associated specifications, are listed and discussed. The ...

  10. Bottom ash as aggregate replacement in concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the proposed study is to evaluate bottom ash as a partial or total replacement of the fine and coarse aggregate in : concrete. This program will characterize and evaluate available bottom ash sources as potential replacement of both ...

  11. Reinforcement alternatives for concrete bridge decks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-07-01

    The report investigates the application of various reinforcement types in concrete bridge decks as potential replacements or supplements to conventional steel reinforcement. Traditional epoxy coated reinforcement (ECS), stainless steel cald (SSC) rei...

  12. Cold weather paving requirements for bituminous concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-01-01

    Cold weather paving specifications were developed from work by Corlew and Dickson, who used a computer solution to predict the cooling rate of bituminous concrete. Virginia had used a minimum atmospheric temperature as a criterion; however, it was ev...

  13. Evaluation of new asphalt concrete density specification.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a new asphalt concrete density specification that utilizes a nuclear gauge and a control strip technique. The specification was studied on two field projects, and recommendations were made to improve ...

  14. Damage detection techniques for concrete applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-01

    New technological advances in nondestructive testing technology have created the opportunity to better utilize ultrasonic waves to aid in damage detection applications for concrete. This research utilizes an ultrasonic array device for nondestructive...

  15. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2009

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-04-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for four-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focus...

  16. Electrically conductive concrete : a laboratory study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-01-01

    In the cathodic protection of existing reinforced concrete bridge decks, there is a need for a simple secondary-anode system to facilitate the distribution of direct current over the structure being protected. It is believed that a durable, electrica...

  17. Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete [2007

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-07-01

    Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for 4-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focused ...

  18. Modeling of porous concrete elements under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchyna, B. H.; Famuliak, Yu. Ye.; Demchyna, Kh. B.

    2017-12-01

    It is known that cell concretes are almost immediately destroyed under load, having reached certain critical stresses. Such kind of destruction is called a "catastrophic failure". Process of crack formation is one of the main factors, influencing process of concrete destruction. Modern theory of crack formation is mainly based on the Griffith theory of destruction. However, the mentioned theory does not completely correspond to the structure of cell concrete with its cell structure, because the theory is intended for a solid body. The article presents one of the possible variants of modelling of the structure of cell concrete and gives some assumptions concerning the process of crack formation in such hollow, not solid environment.

  19. Doubling the Life of Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, Batric; Raja, Krishnan; Xi, Yumping

    Overall objective of the project was to study the fundamental properties of concrete (with and without steel reinforcement) with respect to chemical and physical parameters that can influence its structural integrity.

  20. Gates Precast Concrete User Project Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J.; Post, Brian K.; Roschli, Alex C.

    The primary objective of the project was to demonstrate the viability of using carbon fiber reinforced ABS plastic and the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology to rapidly manufacture molds for the precast concrete industry.

  1. Premature deterioration of jointed plain concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-29

    Six sections of jointed plain concrete pavements (JPCP)s throughout the state were selected as candidates for the evaluation of premature deterioration. The data used in performing the evaluation included manual and historic automated distress survey...

  2. Premature deterioration of jointed plain concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-29

    Six sections of jointed plain concrete pavements (JPCP)s throughout the state were selected as : candidates for the evaluation of premature deterioration. The data used in performing the evaluation included manual : and historic automated distress su...

  3. Sustainable concrete pavements : a manual of practice.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-08-01

    Developed as a more detailed follow-up to a 2009 briefing document, Building Sustainable Pavement with Concrete, this guide provides a clear, concise, and cohesive discussion of pavement sustainability concepts and of recommended practices for maximi...

  4. Concrete slurry, wash and loss water mitigation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    This report presents an evaluation of wastewaters derived from concrete placement and maintenance and the : preparation of best management practices (BMPs). Investigation and documentation of existing practices was done : to ensure application to rea...

  5. Volume changes in unrestrained structural lightweight concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1964-08-01

    In this study a comparator-type measuring system was developed to accurately determine volume change characteristics of one structural lightweight concrete. The specific properties studied were the coefficient of linear thermal expansion and unrestra...

  6. Statistical analysis of ultrasonic measurements in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Po-Chih

    2002-05-01

    Stress wave techniques such as measurements of ultrasonic pulse velocity are often used to evaluate concrete quality in structures. For proper interpretation of measurement results, the dependence of pulse transit time on the average acoustic impedance and the material homogeneity along the sound path need to be examined. Semi-direct measurement of pulse velocity could be more convenient than through transmission measurement. It is not necessary to assess both sides of concrete floors or walls. A novel measurement scheme is proposed and verified based on statistical analysis. It is shown that Semi-direct measurements are very effective for gathering large amount of pulse velocity data from concrete reference specimens. The variability of measurements is comparable with that reported by American Concrete Institute using either break-off or pullout tests.

  7. Evaluation of self-consolidating concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    Conventional concrete tends to present a problem with regard to adequate consolidation in thin sections or areas of congested reinforcement, which leads to a large volume of entrapped air voids and compromises the strength and durability of the concr...

  8. Corrosion of steel in locally deficient concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-28

    This investigation confirmed prior noted trends of extensive preferential chloride intrusion at preexisitng cracks in a majority of cases of substructure members in Florida bridges built with low permeability conventional concrete.

  9. Evaluation of concrete pavement patching techniques.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1989-01-01

    This final report presents the results of a study undertaken to improve in concrete pavement patching techniques. Activities included an evaluation of the suitability of the impact hammer and maturity calculations for determining when a patch is read...

  10. High performance concrete pavement in Indiana.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    Until the early 1990s, curling and warping of Portland cement concrete pavement did not concern : pavement engineers in many transportation agencies. Since beginning construction of the interstate system in the : United States in the late 1950s throu...

  11. Grooving of concrete pavements : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-08-01

    This project was initiated by the Louisiana Department of Highways in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration to determine whether transverse diamond cut grooves of a certain style (Christensen Style 7) placed in hardened concrete in seve...

  12. Bonded concrete overlay performance in Illinois

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-04-01

    Two bonded concrete overlay rehabilitation projects were constructed in Illinois during the 1990's. The first project was constructed in 1994 and 1995 on Interstate 80, east of Moline. The second project was constructed in 1996 on Interstate 88 near ...

  13. Thin Bonded Concrete Overlay and Bonding Agents

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the construction procedures and initial performance evaluation of a four-inch Bonded Concrete Overlay placed on Interstate 80 near Moline, Illinois. Preconstruction testing consisted of Falling Weight Deflectometer, permeability ...

  14. Development of a Failure Theory for Concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-31

    The failure behavior of concrete materials is not completely understood because conventional test methods fail to assess the : material response independent of the sample size and shape. : To study the influence of strength affecting test conditions,...

  15. Multimedia package for LRFD concrete bridge design.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    This Project developed a Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) multimedia package to provide a practical introduction and an in-depth understanding of the technological advances in the design of concrete bridges. This package can be used to train ...

  16. Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    to greater compressive loads before induced shear failure occurs. Concrete columns were tested in compression to explore alter- native... columns were tested on the same day as the fiber-reinforced concrete columns . Load /deflection readings were taken with the load cell to determine the...ln) Figure 78. Ultimate load vs toughness for the different beam types tested . USACERLTR-98/81 141 £\\

  17. Structure formation control of foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya; Syrkin, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The process of predetermined foam concrete structure formation is considered to be a crucial issue from the point of process control and it is currently understudied thus defining the need for additional research. One of the effective ways of structure formation control in naturally hardening foam concrete is reinforcement with dispersed fibers or introduction of plasticizers. The paper aims at studying the patterns of influence of microreinforcing and plasticizing additives on the structure and performance properties of foam concrete. Preparation of foam concrete mix has been conducted using one-step technology. The structure of modified foam concrete has been studied by means of electron microscopy. The cellular structure of foam concrete samples with the additives is homogeneous; the pores are uniformly distributed over the total volume. It has been revealed that introduction of the Neolas 5.2 plasticizer and microreinforcing fibers in the foam concrete mixture in the amount of 0.4 - 0.1 % by weight of cement leads to reduction of the average pore diameter in the range of 45.3 to 30.2 microns and the standard deviation of the pore average diameter from 23.6 to 9.2 in comparison with the sample without additive. Introduction of modifying additives has stimulated formation of a large number of closed pores. Thus porosity of conditionally closed pores has increased from 16.06 % to 34.48 %, which has lead to increase of frost resistance brand of foam concrete from F15 to F50 and to reduction of its water absorption by weight by 20 %.

  18. The use of steel slag in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martauz, P.; Vaclavik, V.; Cvopa, B.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a research dealing with the use of unstable steel slag as a 100% substitute for natural aggregate in the production of concrete. Portland cement CEM I 42.5N and alkali activated hybrid cement H-CEMENT were used as the binder. The test results confirm the possibility to use steel slag as the filler in the production of concrete.

  19. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häussler-Combe, Ulrich; Panteki, Evmorfia; Kühn, Tino

    2015-09-01

    Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property - which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations - or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  20. Concrete Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Definitions and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.

    There are many improvements needed in concrete, especially for use in renewal and expansion of the world’s infrastructure. Nanomodification can help solve many of these problems. However, concrete has been slow to catch on to the nanotechnology revolution. There are several reasons for this lag in the nanoscience and nanotechnology of concrete (NNC). First is the lack of a complete basic understanding of chemical and physical mechanisms and structure at the nanometer length scale. Another reason is the lack of a broad understanding of what nanomodification means to concrete, which is a liquid-solid composite. NNC ideas need to profit from, but not be bound by, experience with other materials. As an illustration of these ideas, a specific application will be given of using nano-size molecules in solution to affect the viscosity of the concrete pore solution so that ionic diffusion is slowed. A molecular-based understanding would help move this project towards true nanotechnology. A final section of this paper lists some possibly fruitful focus areas for the nanoscience and nanotechnology of concrete.

  1. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S 11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete.

  2. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete. PMID:26989590

  3. Monitoring of Concrete Structures Using Ofdr Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henault, J. M.; Salin, J.; Moreau, G.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Bertand, J.; Taillade, F.; Quiertant, M.; Benzarti, K.

    2011-06-01

    Structural health monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors are able to provide relevant information on large structures, such as bridges, dikes, nuclear power plants or nuclear waste disposal facilities. The sensing chain includes an optoelectronic unit and a sensing cable made of one or more optical fibers. A new instrument based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), enables to perform temperature and strain measurements with a centimeter scale spatial resolution over hundred of meters and with a level of precision equal to 1 μstrain and 0.1 °C. Several sensing cables are designed with different materials targeting to last for decades in a concrete aggressive environment and to ensure an optimal transfer of temperature and strain from the concrete matrix to the optical fiber. Tests were carried out by embedding various sensing cables into plain concrete specimens and representative-scale reinforced concrete structural elements. Measurements were performed with an OFDR instrument; meanwhile, mechanical solicitations were imposed to the concrete element. Preliminary experiments are very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing system are comparable to values obtained with conventional sensors used in civil engineering and with the Strength of Materials Modelling. Moreover, the distributed sensing system makes it possible to detect and localize cracks appearing in concrete during the mechanical loading.

  4. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The (lack of) effect of dynamic visual noise on the concreteness effect in short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Castellà, Judit; Campoy, Guillermo

    2018-05-17

    It has been suggested that the concreteness effect in short-term memory (STM) is a consequence of concrete words having more distinctive and richer semantic representations. The generation and storage of visual codes in STM could also play a crucial role on the effect because concrete words are more imaginable than abstract words. If this were the case, the introduction of a visual interference task would be expected to disrupt recall of concrete words. A Dynamic Visual Noise (DVN) display, which has been proven to eliminate the concreteness effect on long-term memory (LTM), was presented along encoding of concrete and abstract words in a STM serial recall task. Results showed a main effect of word type, with more item errors in abstract words, a main effect of DVN, which impaired global performance due to more order errors, but no interaction, suggesting that DVN did not have any impact on the concreteness effect. These findings are discussed in terms of LTM participation through redintegration processes and in terms of the language-based models of verbal STM.

  6. Recently learned foreign abstract and concrete nouns are represented in distinct cortical networks similar to the native language.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Katja M; Macedonia, Manuela; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2017-09-01

    In the native language, abstract and concrete nouns are represented in distinct areas of the cerebral cortex. Currently, it is unknown whether this is also the case for abstract and concrete nouns of a foreign language. Here, we taught adult native speakers of German 45 abstract and 45 concrete nouns of a foreign language. After learning the nouns for 5 days, participants performed a vocabulary translation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Translating abstract nouns in contrast to concrete nouns elicited responses in regions that are also responsive to abstract nouns in the native language: the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle and superior temporal gyri. Concrete nouns elicited larger responses in the angular gyri bilaterally and the left parahippocampal gyrus than abstract nouns. The cluster in the left angular gyrus showed psychophysiological interaction (PPI) with the left lingual gyrus. The left parahippocampal gyrus showed PPI with the posterior cingulate cortex. Similar regions have been previously found for concrete nouns in the native language. The results reveal similarities in the cortical representation of foreign language nouns with the representation of native language nouns that already occur after 5 days of vocabulary learning. Furthermore, we showed that verbal and enriched learning methods were equally suitable to teach foreign abstract and concrete nouns. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4398-4412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Elastic Characterization of Concrete Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Ruiz, Abraham; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2001-03-01

    Many geographical locations share a common problem of high environmental humidity. It is thus desirable to build houses that can withstand strong water loading. In this work we study the evolution of High Performance Concrete as a function of hardening stage. The technique that we use is based on the propagation of resonant audio frequency modes of oscillation along the long axis of homemade HPC cylindrical samples. An audio generator fed piezoelectric (at one end of the rod) excites vibrations in the sample. Off resonance these vibrations do not propagate away from the piezoelectric site. On the other hand, when a resonance is reached the vibration extends all over the bar. A second piezoelectric is placed at the other extreme of the cylinder. We measure three parameters: the resonant frequency, speed of sound, and loss factor. To measure the resonant frequency we connect the two piezos to an oscilloscope in the x-y mode. At resonance the oscilloscope displays an ellipse and the audio generator reports the frequency. To measure the speed of sound, we excite the firs piezo with a pulse and measure the delay time in the second piezo. The loss factor can be extracted from the ratio of the exciting pulse and the measured one. From these parameters we calculate the Young modulus, the area moment of inertia and the effective density of the HPC. These quantities are measured twice a day during the 28-day hardening time.

  8. Development of MPS Method for Analyzing Melt Spreading Behavior and MCCI in Severe Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Akifumi; Li, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Spreading of molten core (corium) on reactor containment vessel floor and molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) are important phenomena in the late phase of a severe accident for assessment of the containment integrity and managing the severe accident. The severe accident research at Waseda University has been advancing to show that simulations with moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method (one of the particle methods) can greatly improve the analytical capability and mechanical understanding of the melt behavior in severe accidents. MPS models have been developed and verified regarding calculations of radiation and thermal field, solid-liquid phase transition, buoyancy, and temperature dependency of viscosity to simulate phenomena, such as spreading of corium, ablation of concrete by the corium, crust formation and cooling of the corium by top flooding. Validations have been conducted against experiments such as FARO L26S, ECOKATS-V1, Theofanous, and SPREAD for spreading, SURC-2, SURC-4, SWISS-1, and SWISS-2 for MCCI. These validations cover melt spreading behaviors and MCCI by mixture of molten oxides (including prototypic UO2-ZrO2), metals, and water. Generally, the analytical results show good agreement with the experiment with respect to the leading edge of spreading melt and ablation front history of concrete. The MPS results indicate that crust formation may play important roles in melt spreading and MCCI. There is a need to develop a code for two dimensional MCCI experiment simulation with MPS method as future study, which will be able to simulate anisotropic ablation of concrete.

  9. SU-E-T-90: Concrete Forward-Scatter Fractions for Radiotherapy Shielding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, S; Parsai, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is little instruction within the primary shielding guidance document NCRP 151 for vault designs where the primary beam intercepts the maze. We have conducted a Monte-Carlo study to characterize forward-scattered radiation from concrete barriers with the intent of quantifying what amount of additional shielding outside the primary beam is needed in this situation. Methods: We reproduced our vault in MCNP 5 and simulated spectra obtained from the literature and from our treatment planning system for 10 and 18 MV beams. Neutron and gamma-capture contributions were not simulated. Energy deposited was scored at isocenter in a water phantom, withinmore » various cells that comprised the maze, and within cells that comprised the vault door. Tracks were flagged that scattered from within the maze to the door and their contributions were tallied separately. Three different concrete mixtures found in the literature were simulated. An empirically derived analytic equation was used for comparison, utilizing patient scatter fractions to approximate the scatter from concrete. Results: Our simulated data confirms that maze-scattered radiation is a significant contribution to total photon dose at the door. It contributes between 20-35% of the photon shielding workload. Forward-scatter fractions for concrete were somewhat dependent on concrete composition and the relative abundance of higher-Z elements. Scatter fractions were relatively insensitive to changes in the primary photon spectrum. Analytic results were of the same magnitude as simulated results. Conclusions: Forward-scattered radiation from the maze barrier needs to be included in the photon workload for shielding calculations in non-standard vault designs. Scatter fractions will vary with concrete composition, but should be insensitive to spectral changes between machine manufacturers. Further plans for investigation include refined scatter fractions for various concrete compositions, scatter fraction

  10. A contactless ultrasonic surface wave approach to characterize distributed cracking damage in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ham, Suyun; Song, Homin; Oelze, Michael L; Popovics, John S

    2017-03-01

    We describe an approach that utilizes ultrasonic surface wave backscatter measurements to characterize the volume content of relatively small distributed defects (microcrack networks) in concrete. A simplified weak scattering model is used to demonstrate that the scattered wave field projected in the direction of the surface wave propagation is relatively insensitive to scatterers that are smaller than the propagating wavelength, while the scattered field projected in the opposite direction is more sensitive to sub-wavelength scatterers. Distributed microcracks in the concrete serve as the small scatterers that interact with a propagating surface wave. Data from a finite element simulation were used to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach, and also to optimize a testing configuration to collect data. Simulations were validated through experimental measurements of ultrasonic backscattered surface waves from test samples of concrete constructed with different concentrations of fiber filler (0.0, 0.3 and 0.6%) to mimic increasing microcrack volume density and then samples with actual cracking induced by controlled thermal cycles. A surface wave was induced in the concrete samples by a 50kHz ultrasonic source operating 10mm above the surface at an angle of incidence of 9°. Silicon-based miniature MEMS acoustic sensors located a few millimeters above the concrete surface both behind and in front of the sender were used to detect leaky ultrasonic surface waves emanating from concrete. A normalized backscattered energy parameter was calculated from the signals. Statistically significant differences in the normalized backscattered energy were observed between concrete samples with varying levels of simulated and actual cracking damage volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-01

    Replacing cracked concrete in roadways requires : lanes to be closed and traff c disrupted. One way : to reduce road closure time is to reduce concrete : curing time. To accelerate curing time, pavement : engineers mix a very low water-cement ratio w...

  12. Concrete pavement mixture design and analysis (MDA) : effect of aggregate systems on concrete mixture properties.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    For years, specifications have focused on the water to cement ratio (w/cm) and strength of concrete, despite the majority of the volume : of a concrete mixture consisting of aggregate. An aggregate distribution of roughly 60% coarse aggregate and 40%...

  13. Development of Mix Designs for RAP Concrete for Florida Concrete Test Road

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop mix designs for concrete incorporating Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) materials to be used in the Florida Concrete Test Road. Two different FDOT-approved RAP sources were selected and used in this stu...

  14. Aseismic safety analysis of a prestressed concrete containment vessel for CPR1000 nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Qingkang; Kong, Xianjing

    2017-01-01

    The containment vessel of a nuclear power plant is the last barrier to prevent nuclear reactor radiation. Aseismic safety analysis is the key to appropriate containment vessel design. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model with a semi-infinite elastic foundation and practical arrangement of tendons has been established to analyze the aseismic ability of the CPR1000 PCCV structure under seismic loads and internal pressure. A method to model the prestressing tendon and its interaction with concrete was proposed and the axial force of the prestressing tendons showed that the simulation was reasonable and accurate. The numerical results show that for the concrete structure, the location of the cylinder wall bottom around the equipment hatch and near the ring beam are critical locations with large principal stress. The concrete cracks occurred at the bottom of the PCCV cylinder wall under the peak earthquake motion of 0.50 g, however the PCCV was still basically in an elastic state. Furthermore, the concrete cracks occurred around the equipment hatch under the design internal pressure of 0.4MPa, but the steel liner was still in the elastic stage and its leak-proof function soundness was verified. The results provide the basis for analysis and design of containment vessels.

  15. Integrated approach to modeling long-term durability of concrete engineered barriers in LLRW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Roy, D.M.; Mann, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an integrated approach to developing a predictive computer model for long-term performance of concrete engineered barriers utilized in LLRW and ILRW disposal facilities. The model development concept consists of three major modeling schemes: hydration modeling of the binder phase, pore solution speciation, and transport modeling in the concrete barrier and service environment. Although still in its inception, the model development approach demonstrated that the chemical and physical properties of complex cementitious materials and their interactions with service environments can be described quantitatively. Applying the integrated model development approach to modeling alkali (Na and K) leaching from amore » concrete pad barrier in an above-grade tumulus disposal unit, it is predicted that, in a near-surface land disposal facility where water infiltration through the facility is normally minimal, the alkalis control the pore solution pH of the concrete barriers for much longer than most previous concrete barrier degradation studies assumed. The results also imply that a highly alkaline condition created by the alkali leaching will result in alteration of the soil mineralogy in the vicinity of the disposal facility.« less

  16. Analysis of Stress in Steel and Concrete in Cfst Push-Out Test Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzeszykowski, Bartosz; Szadkowska, Magdalena; Szmigiera, Elżbieta

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the analysis of stress in steel and concrete in CFST composite elements subjected to push-out tests. Two analytical models of stress distribution are presented. The bond at the interface between steel and concrete in the initial phase of the push-out test is provided by the adhesion. Until the force reach a certain value, the slip between both materials does not occur or it is negligibly small, what ensures full composite action of the specimen. In the first analytical model the full bond between both materials was assumed. This model allows to estimate value of the force for which the local loss of adhesion in given cross section begins. In the second model it was assumed that the bond stress distribution is constant along the shear transfer length of the specimen. Based on that the formulas for triangle distribution of stress in steel and concrete for the maximum push-out force were derived and compared with the experimental results. Both models can be used to better understand the mechanisms of interaction between steel and concrete in composite steel-concrete columns.

  17. Bond characteristics of reinforcing steel embedded in geopolymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirvel, Parthiban; Thangavelu, Manju; Gopalan, Rashmi; Raja Mohan Kaliyaperumal, Saravana

    2017-07-01

    The force transferring between reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete in reinforced concrete is influenced by several factors. Whereas, the study on bond behaviour of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is lagging. In this paper, an experimental attempt has been made to evaluate the geopolymer concrete bond with reinforcing steel of different diameter and embedded length using standard pull out test. The geopolymer concrete is made of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) as geopolymer source material (GSM). The tests were conducted to evaluate the development of bond between steel and concrete of grade M40 and M50 with 12 and 16 mm diameter reinforcing steel for geopolymer and cement concrete mixes and to develop a relation between bond strength and compressive strength. From the experimental results, it has been observed that the bond strength of the geopolymer concrete mixes was more compared to the cement concrete mixes and increases with the reduction in the diameter of the bar.

  18. Placement of mass concrete for cast-in-place concrete piling : the effects of heat of hydration of mass concrete for cast-in-place piles.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    This report describes models, ABAQUS and Schmidt, to predict the peak temperature in the center of cast-in-place concrete piling. Five concrete piles with varying diameters and made up of concrete mixes with different percentage of fly ash are used. ...

  19. Concrete shaver. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) for many of its nuclear facilities throughout the United States. These facilities must be dismantled and the demolition waste sized into manageable pieces for handling and disposal. The facilities undergoing D and D are typically chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. To facilitate this work, DOE requires a tool capable of removing the surface of radiologically contaminated concrete floors. Operating requirements for the tool include simple and economical operation, the capability of operating in ambient temperatures from 3 C to 40 C (37 F tomore » 104 F), and the ability to be easily decontaminated. The tool also must be safe for workers. The Marcrist Industries Limited concrete shaver is an electrically driven, self-propelled concrete and coating removal system. This technology consists of a 25-cm (10-in.)-wide diamond impregnated shaving drum powered by an electric motor and contains a vacuum port for dust extraction. The concrete shaver is ideal for use on open, flat, floor areas. The shaver may also be used on slightly curved surfaces. This shaver is self-propelled and produces a smooth, even surface with little vibration. The concrete shaver is an attractive alternative to traditional pneumatic scabbling tools, which were considered the baseline in this demonstration. The use of this tool reduces worker fatigue (compared to the baseline) due to lower vibration. The shaver is more than five times faster than the five-piston pneumatic scabbler at removing contamination from concrete. Because of this increased productivity, the shaver is 50% less costly to operate than baseline technologies. The DOE has successfully demonstrated the concrete shaver for decontaminating floors for free-release surveys prior to demolition work.« less

  20. Terrestrial Fe-oxide Concretions and Mars Blueberries: Comparisons of Similar Advective and Diffusive Chemical Infiltration Reaction Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    Abundant iron oxide concretions occurring in Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah and those discovered at Meridiani Planum, Mars share many common observable physical traits such as their spheriodal shapes, occurrence, and distribution patterns in sediments. Terrestrial concretions are products of interaction between oxygen-rich aquifer water and basin-derived reducing (iron-rich) water. Water-rock interaction simulations show that diffusion of oxygen and iron supplied by slow-moving water is a reasonable mechanism for producing observed concretion patterns. In short, southern Utah iron oxide concretions are results of Liesegang-type diffusive infiltration reactions in sediments. We propose that the formation of blueberry hematite concretions in Mars sediments followed a similar diagenetic mechanism where iron was derived from the alteration of volcanic substrate and oxygen was provided by the early Martian atmosphere. Although the terrestrial analog differs in the original host rock composition, both the terrestrial and Mars iron-oxide precipitation mechanisms utilize iron and oxygen interactions in sedimentary host rock with diffusive infiltration of solutes from two opposite sources. For the terrestrial model, slow advection of iron-rich water is an important factor that allowed pervasive and in places massive precipitation of iron-oxide concretions. In Mars, evaporative flux of water at the top of the sediment column may have produced a slow advective mass-transfer mechanism that provided a steady source and the right quantity of iron. The similarities of the terrestrial and Martian systems are demonstrated using a water-rock interaction simulator Sym.8, initially in one-dimensional systems. Boundary conditions such as oxygen content of water, partial pressure of oxygen, and supply rate of iron were varied. The results demonstrate the importance of slow advection of water and diffusive processes for producing diagenetic iron oxide concretions.

  1. Copolymer natural latex in concrete: Dynamic evaluation through energy dissipation of polymer modified concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andayani, Sih Wuri; Suratman, Rochim; Imran, Iswandi; Mardiyati

    2018-05-01

    Portland cement concrete have been used in construction due to its strength and ecomical value. But it has some limitations, such low flexural strength, low tensile strength, low chemical resistant and etc. Due to its limitations in flexural and tensile strength, Portland cement concrete more susceptible by seismic force. There are some methods for improving its limitations. Polymer addition into concrete mixture could be one of solution for improving the flexural and tensile strength, in aiming to get erthquake resistant properties. Also, the eartquake resistant could be achieved by improving energy dissipation capacity. In this research, the earthquake resistant evalution was approached from dynamic evaluation through energy dissipation capacity, after polymer addition as concrete additives. The polymers were natural latex (Indonesian naural resource) grafted with styrene and methacrylate, forming copolymer - natural latex methacrylate (KOLAM) and copolymer - natural latex styrene (KOLAS). They were added into concrete mixture resulting polymer modified concrete. The composition of polymer are 1%, 5% and 10% weight/weight of cement. The higher capacity of energy dissipation will give more capability in either absorbing or dissipating energy, and it was predicted would give better earthquake resistant.. The use of KOLAM gave better performance than KOLAS in energy dissipation capacity. It gave about 46% for addition of 1% w/w compared to Portland cement concrete. But for addition 5% w/w and 10% w/w, they gave about 7% and 5% higher energy dissipation capacity. The KOLAM addition into concrete mixture would reduce the maximum impact load with maximumabout 35% impact load reducing after 1% w/w addition. The higher concentration of KOLAM in concrete mixture, lower reducing of impact load, they were about 4% and 3% for KOLAM 5% and 10%. For KOLAS addition in any compositions, there were no positive trend either in energy dissipation capacity or impact load properties

  2. Review on supplymentary cementitious materials used in inorganic polymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasreddy, K.; Srinivasan, K.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a review on various supplementary cementitious materials generated from industries are used in concrete, which one is considered a waste material. These materials are rich in aluminosilicates and are activated by sodium/potassium based alkaline solution to form geopolymer concrete. When these geopolymer concrete is used in civil engineering applications has showed better or similar mechanical properties and durability properties than ordinary Portland cement concrete. This paper also given the overview on sodium hydroxide (NaOH) & sodium silicate solution (Na2SiO3) ratios, curing adopted for different geopolymer concretes and the effect of adding fibres in geopolymer concretes.

  3. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  4. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Yang, L.; Chiang, K.–T.

    2013-07-01

    Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs) at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i) borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii) borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii) borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv) 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or less)when the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  5. Preliminary study of tin slag concrete mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd Jamil; Mansor, Ishak; Pauzi Ismail, Mohamad; Sani, Suhairy; Azmi, Azhar; Sayuti, Shaharudin; Zaidi Ibrahim, Mohd; Adli Anuar, Abul; Rahim, Abdul Adha Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The study focuses on practices to facilitate tin smelting industry to reduce radioactive waste product (Tin Slag) by diluting its radioactivity to a safe level and turning it to a safer infrastructural building product. In the process the concrete mix which include Portland cement, sand, tin slag, water and plasticizer are used to produce interlocking brick pavements, piles and other infrastructural products. The mixing method follows DOE (UK) standard method of mixing targeted at in selected compressive strength suitable for its function and durability. A batching machine is used in the mixing and six test cubes are produced for the test. The testing equipment used are a compressional machine, ultrasonic measurement and a Geiger Muller counter to evaluate of the concrete mix to find the lowest emission of radiation surface dose without compromising the strength of concrete mix. The result obtained indicated the radioactivity of tin slag in the mixing process has reduced to background level that is 0.5μSv/h while the strength and workability of the concrete has not been severely affected. In conclusion, the concrete mix with tin slag has shown the potential it can be turned into a safe beneficial infrastructural product with good strength.

  6. Hydrophobization of Concrete Using Granular Nanostructured Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurtsova, Y. N.; Strokova, V. V.; Labuzova, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    The possibility of giving hydrophobical properties to the fine-grained concrete matrix by using a granular nanostructured aggregate (GNA) with a hydrophobizing additive is investigated in this work. GNA is obtained by granulating the silica raw material with an alkaline component. The introduction of a hydrophobizing additive into the raw mix of GNA allows to encapsulate it reducing the negative effect on hydration processes, the intensity of migration of moisture and efflorescence in concrete and, consequently, improving the performance characteristics of fine-grained concrete products. The hydrophobizing ability of a solution of sodium polysilicates formed in the core of GNA during concrete heat and moisture treatment is proved. The analysis of IR spectra after the impregnation of cement stone samples with a solution of sodium polysilicates showed an increase in the degree of hydration and the formation of framework water aluminosilicates. Atmospheric processes modelling showed that the use of GNA on the basis of gaize with calcium stearate and on the basis of fly ash with GKZh-11 makes it possible to increase the resistance of fine-grained concrete to the atmospheric effect of the medium, namely, the outwashing of readily soluble compounds.

  7. Industrial waste utilization for foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Gokul; Anand, K. B.

    2018-02-01

    Foam concrete is an emerging and useful construction material - basically a cement based slurry with at least 10% of mix volume as foam. The mix usually containing cement, filler (usually sand) and foam, have fresh densities ranging from 400kg/m3 to 1600kg/m3. One of the main drawbacks of foam concrete is the large consumption of fine sand as filler material. Usage of different solid industrial wastes as fillers in foam concrete can reduce the usage of fine river sand significantly and make the work economic and eco-friendly. This paper aims to investigate to what extent industrial wastes such as bottom ash and quarry dust can be utilized for making foam concrete. Foam generated using protein based agent was used for preparing and optimizing (fresh state properties). Investigation to find the influence of design density and air-void characteristics on the foam concrete strength shows higher strength for bottom ash mixes due to finer air void distribution. Setting characteristics of various mix compositions are also studied and adoption of Class C flyash as filler demonstrated capability of faster setting.

  8. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)more » is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.« less

  9. Acoustic inspection of concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark E.; Dion, Gary N.; Costley, R. Daniel

    1999-02-01

    The determination of concrete integrity, especially in concrete bridge decks, is of extreme importance. Current systems for testing concrete structures are expensive, slow, or tedious. State of the art systems use ground penetrating radar, but they have inherent problems especially with ghosting and signal signature overlap. The older method of locating delaminations in bridge decks involves either tapping on the surface with a hammer or metal rod, or dragging a chain-bar across the bridge deck. Both methods require a `calibrated' ear to determine the difference between good sections and bad sections of concrete. As a consequence, the method is highly subjective, different from person to person and even day to day for a given person. In addition, archival of such data is impractical, or at least improbable, in most situations. The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory has constructed an instrument that implements the chain-drag method of concrete inspection. The system is capable of real-time analysis of recorded signals, archival of processed data, and high-speed data acquisition so that post-processing of the data is possible for either research purposes or for listening to the recorded signals.

  10. Concrete Slump Classification using GLCM Feature Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andayani, Relly; Madenda, Syarifudin

    2016-05-01

    Digital image processing technologies have been widely applies in analyzing concrete structure because the accuracy and real time result. The aim of this study is to classify concrete slump by using image processing technique. For this purpose, concrete mix design of 30 MPa compression strength designed with slump of 0-10 mm, 10-30 mm, 30-60 mm, and 60-180 mm were analysed. Image acquired by Nikon Camera D-7000 using high resolution was set up. In the first step RGB converted to greyimage than cropped to 1024 x 1024 pixel. With open-source program, cropped images to be analysed to extract GLCM feature. The result shows for the higher slump contrast getting lower, but higher correlation, energy, and homogeneity.

  11. Mesoscale simulation of concrete spall failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knell, S.; Sauer, M.; Millon, O.; Riedel, W.

    2012-05-01

    Although intensively studied, it is still being debated which physical mechanisms are responsible for the increase of dynamic strength and fracture energy of concrete observed at high loading rates, and to what extent structural inertia forces on different scales contribute to the observation. We present a new approach for the three dimensional mesoscale modelling of dynamic damage and cracking in concrete. Concrete is approximated as a composite of spherical elastic aggregates of mm to cm size embedded in an elastic cement stone matrix. Cracking within the matrix and at aggregate interfaces in the μm range are modelled with adaptively inserted—initially rigid—cohesive interface elements. The model is applied to analyse the dynamic tensile failure observed in Hopkinson-Bar spallation experiments with strain rates up to 100/s. The influence of the key mesoscale failure parameters of strength, fracture energy and relative weakening of the ITZ on macromechanic strength, momentum and energy conservation is numerically investigated.

  12. Nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Albert S.; Du, Jia-Ji; Hawkins, Niel M.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear fracture process zones in an impacted unnotched concrete bend specimen, a prenotched ceramic bend specimen, and an unnotched ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimen were estimated through hybrid experimental numerical analysis. Aggregate bridging in concrete, particulate bridging in ceramics, and fiber bridging in ceramic/ceramic composite are modeled by Barenblatt-type cohesive zones which are incorporated into the finite-element models of the bend specimens. Both generation and propagation analyses are used to estimate the distribution of crack closure stresses in the nonlinear fracture process zones. The finite-element models are then used to simulate fracture tests consisting of rapid crack propagation in an impacted concrete bend specimen, and stable crack growth and strain softening in a ceramic and ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimens.

  13. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers

    PubMed Central

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP’s effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production. PMID:28787905

  14. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers.

    PubMed

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F

    2016-02-08

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP's effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  15. Impact analyses for negative flexural responses (hogging) in railway prestressed concrete sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Ishida, T.; Remennikov, AM

    2016-09-01

    By nature, ballast interacts with railway concrete sleepers in order to provide bearing support to track system. Most train-track dynamic models do not consider the degradation of ballast over time. In fact, the ballast degradation causes differential settlement and impact forces acting on partial and unsupported tracks. Furthermore, localised ballast breakages underneath railseat increase the likelihood of centrebound cracks in concrete sleepers due to the unbalanced support under sleepers. This paper presents a dynamic finite element model of a standard-gauge concrete sleeper in a track system, taking into account the tensionless nature of ballast support. The finite element model was calibrated using static and dynamic responses in the past. In this paper, the effects of centre-bound ballast support on the impact behaviours of sleepers are highlighted. In addition, it is the first to demonstrate the dynamic effects of sleeper length on the dynamic design deficiency in concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will benefit the rail maintenance criteria of track resurfacing in order to restore ballast profile and appropriate sleeper/ballast interaction.

  16. Concrete pavement quality control testing requirements needed for the super air meter : technical summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-10-01

    Concrete freeze-thaw durability is prominently linked to the air void system : within the concrete. Concrete pavements in Kansas undergo repetitive : freeze-thaw cycles. Total air content measurements currently used on fresh : concrete do not provide...

  17. Report E : self-consolidating concrete (SCC) for infrastructure elements - hardened mechanical properties and durability performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    Concrete is one of the most produced and utilized materials in the world. Due to : the labor intensive and time consuming nature of concrete construction, new and : innovative concrete mixes are being explored. Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is on...

  18. Report of concrete pavement evaluation : project 105 C-4181-01 Donahoo Road, Wyandotte County.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    The physical properties of hardened concrete cores and fresh concrete test results were compared with aggregate : gradation workability differences. The concrete cores were taken from a rural two-lane concrete road in northeastern Kansas : constructe...

  19. Concrete pavement quality control testing requirements needed for the super air meter : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-10-01

    Concrete freeze-thaw durability is prominently linked to the air void system within the concrete. : Concrete pavements in Kansas undergo repetitive freeze-thaw cycles. Total air content measurements : currently used on fresh concrete do not provide a...

  20. Ultra-high performance concrete for Michigan bridges, material performance : phase I.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-13

    One of the latest advancements in concrete technology is Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). UHPC is : defined as concretes attaining compressive strengths exceeding 25 ksi (175 MPa). It is a fiber-reinforced, denselypacked : concrete material wh...

  1. Neural correlates of concreteness in semantic categorization.

    PubMed

    Pexman, Penny M; Hargreaves, Ian S; Edwards, Jodi D; Henry, Luke C; Goodyear, Bradley G

    2007-08-01

    In some contexts, concrete words (CARROT) are recognized and remembered more readily than abstract words (TRUTH). This concreteness effect has historically been explained by two theories of semantic representation: dual-coding [Paivio, A. Dual coding theory: Retrospect and current status. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 45, 255-287, 1991] and context-availability [Schwanenflugel, P. J. Why are abstract concepts hard to understand? In P. J. Schwanenflugel (Ed.), The psychology of word meanings (pp. 223-250). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1991]. Past efforts to adjudicate between these theories using functional magnetic resonance imaging have produced mixed results. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we reexamined this issue with a semantic categorization task that allowed for uniform semantic judgments of concrete and abstract words. The participants were 20 healthy adults. Functional analyses contrasted activation associated with concrete and abstract meanings of ambiguous and unambiguous words. Results showed that for both ambiguous and unambiguous words, abstract meanings were associated with more widespread cortical activation than concrete meanings in numerous regions associated with semantic processing, including temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. These results are inconsistent with both dual-coding and context-availability theories, as these theories propose that the representations of abstract concepts are relatively impoverished. Our results suggest, instead, that semantic retrieval of abstract concepts involves a network of association areas. We argue that this finding is compatible with a theory of semantic representation such as Barsalou's [Barsalou, L. W. Perceptual symbol systems. Behavioral & Brain Sciences, 22, 577-660, 1999] perceptual symbol systems, whereby concrete and abstract concepts are represented by similar mechanisms but with differences in focal content.

  2. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B. V.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/sq in mix and a 4.5 kip/sq in mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/sq in. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  4. Shrinkage stress in concrete under dry-wet cycles: an example with concrete column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Luosun, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of shrinkage stress in concrete structures under dry-wet environments. In the modeling, an integrative model for autogenous and drying shrinkage predictions of concrete under dry-wet cycles is introduced first. Second, a model taking both cement hydration and moisture diffusion into account synchronously is used to calculate the distribution of interior humidity in concrete. Using the above two models, the distributions of shrinkage strain and stress in concrete columns made by normal and high strength concrete respectively under dry-wet cycles are calculated. The model results show that shrinkage gradient along the radial direction of the column from the center to outer surface increases with age as the outer circumference suffers to dry. The maximum and minimum shrinkage occur at the outer surface and the center of the column, respectively, under drying condition. As wetting starts, the shrinkage strain decreases with increase of interior humidity. The closer to the wetting face, the higher the humidity and the lower the shrinkage strain, as well as the lower the shrinkage stress. As results of the dry-wet cycles acting on the outer circumference of the column, cyclic stress status is developed within the area close to the outer surface of the column. The depth of the influencing zone of dry-wet cyclic action is influenced by concrete strength and dry-wet regime. For low strength concrete, relatively deeper influencing zone is expected compared with that of high strength concrete. The models are verified by concrete-steel composite ring tests and a good agreement between model and test results is found.

  5. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  6. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be appliedmore » to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If

  7. Concrete: Potential material for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    To build a permanent orbiting space station in the next decade is NASA's most challenging and exciting undertaking. The space station will serve as a center for a vast number of scientific products. As a potential material for the space station, reinforced concrete was studied, which has many material and structural merits for the proposed space station. Its cost-effectiveness depends on the availability of lunar materials. With such materials, only 1 percent or less of the mass of a concrete space structure would have to be transported from earth.

  8. Evaluation and Repair of Concrete Slabs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    materials can also be used in conjunction with a separate bonding agent to improve the bonding between the newly placed cement- based material and the existing...and the strength of the affected member. Damage can range from small cracks to total failure. " Based on the capacity of the member and the nature and...conically shaped, with the base of the cone on the concrete surface, and the j point in the concrete. At the tip of the point is usually a particle of

  9. Determination of Stone-Mastic Asphalt Concrete Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastremsky, D. A.; Abaidullina, T. N.; Chepur, P. V.

    2018-05-01

    The paper is focused on determination of durability of the stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) concrete, containing various stabilizing additives: "Armidon" (authors’ development) and "Viatop". At the first stage of experiments, the APA method was used to determine the rutting in the SMA containing these additives. Strength test for only top layers of asphalt concrete surface is insufficient for the calculation of the pavement fatigue resistance limits. Due to this fact, a comprehensive approach was employed which incorporates the interaction of the surface and subgrade natural soil. To analyze the road surface stress-strain state and to determine the durability margin, a numerical model was used (describes the processes of fatigue life). The model was developed basing on the finite element method (FEM) in the ANSYS program. Conducted studies and numerical calculations allowed obtaining the minimum and maximum stress values in the structure affected zones and in the zones of plastic deformations occurrence in artificial and natural bases. It allows predicting deformation processes during repeated wheel loads caused by moving vehicles. In course of studies, the results of static stresses in the pavement were also obtained.

  10. Mechanistic design of concrete crossties and fastening systems - Phase 1.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-28

    The objective of this project is the development and deployment of resilient concrete crossties and fastening systems for heavy haul freight, intercity passenger, and rail transit applications. : For a variety of reasons, concrete crossties are a dom...

  11. Synthesis of concrete bridge piles prestressed with CFRP systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-06-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation frequently constructs prestressed concrete piles for use in bridge : foundations. Such prestressed concrete piles are typically built with steel strands that are highly susceptible to : environmental degradation...

  12. 6. DETAIL OF CONCRETE CYLINDER AND CONCRETEENCASED BEAM ON WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF CONCRETE CYLINDER AND CONCRETE-ENCASED BEAM ON WEST SIDE OF PIER 5 IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF FOOTBRIDGE. - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  13. Use of reclaimed asphalt pavement in concrete pavement slabs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the feasibiltiy of using RAP as aggregate replacement in concrete for use in pavement. Four different RAPs from FDOT approved RAP sources were used. Concrete mixtures with 0%, 20%, 40%, 70%, and 100% aggregate replacement by RAP ...

  14. Performance of self-consolidating concrete in prestressed girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-04-01

    A structural investigation of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in AASHTO Type I precast, : prestressed girders was performed. Six test girders were subjected to transfer length and : flexural testing. Three separate concrete mixtures, two girders pe...

  15. Pervious concrete physical characteristics and effectiveness in stormwater pollution reduction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the physical/chemical and water flow characteristics of various previous concrete mixes made of different concrete materials and their effectiveness in attenuating water pollution. Four pervious concr...

  16. Investigation of deterioration of joints in concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    Premature deterioration of concrete at the joints in concrete pavements and parking lots has been reported across the northern states. The : distress is first observed as shadowing when microcracking near the joints traps water, later exhibiting as s...

  17. Impact of aggregate gradation on properties of portland cement concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-01

    Increasingly, aggregates in South Carolina are failing to meet the standard requirements for gradation for use in portland cement concrete. The effect of such failed aggregate gradations on concrete properties and the consequent effect on short- and ...

  18. Freeze-thaw performance testing of whole concrete railroad ties.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-01

    Freezing and thawing durability tests of prestressed concrete ties are normally performed according to ASTM C666 specifications. Small specimens are cut from the shoulders of concrete ties and tested through 300 cycles of freezing and thawing. Saw-cu...

  19. Internally cured concrete for pavement and bridge deck applications : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    High-strength-high-performance concrete (HSHPC) is used for rapid repair of concrete : bridge decks and pavement. However, HSHPC has very high early shrinkage, often leading to : cracking, made worse by high ambient temperatures and a large surface a...

  20. Investigation of best practices for maintenance of concrete bridge railings.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-01-01

    Biodeterioration on concrete surfaces of vertical elements of bridges represents a serious challenge to : the highway infrastructure in Louisiana. This report aims to document the causes of biodeterioration of : concrete surfaces and to document curr...

  1. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2 : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-10-01

    Thousands of Florida bridges have steel-reinforced concrete piling foundations standing : in salt water. Over time, chloride ions in the water can migrate through the concrete to : attack the steel inside. The Florida Department of Transportation (FD...

  2. Corrosion Propagation of Rebar Embedded in High Performance Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazim, Manzurul

    The FDOT has been using supplementary cementitious materials while constructing steel reinforced concrete marine bridge structures for over 3 decades. Previous findings indicated that such additions in concrete mix make the concrete more durable. To better understand corrosion propagation of rebar in high performance concrete: mature concrete samples that were made (2008/2009) with Portland cement, a binary mix, a ternary mix and recently prepared (April 2016 with 50% OPC + 50% slag and 80% OPC + 20% Fly ash) concrete samples were considered. None of these concretes had any admixed chloride to start with. An accelerated chloride transport process was used to drive chloride ions into the concrete so that chlorides reach and exceed the chloride threshold at the rebar surface and initiate corrosion. Electrochemical measurements were taken at regular intervals (during and after the electro-migration process) to observe the corrosion propagation in each sample.

  3. Investigation of deterioration of joints in concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Premature deterioration of concrete at the joints in concrete pavements and parking lots has been reported across the northern states. The distress may first appear as shadowing when microcracking near the joints traps water, or as cracks parallel to...

  4. Pervious concrete physical characteristics and effectiveness in stormwater pollution reduction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the physical/chemical and water flow characteristics of various previous concrete : mixes made of different concrete materials and their effectiveness in attenuating water pollution. Four pervious con...

  5. Optimizing cementious content in concrete mixtures for required performance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-01-01

    "This research investigated the effects of changing the cementitious content required at a given water-to-cement ratio (w/c) on workability, strength, and durability of a concrete mixture. : An experimental program was conducted in which 64 concrete ...

  6. Enhanced Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete with Atomic Polymer Technology

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    The atomic polymer technology in form of mesoporous inorganic polymer (MIP) can effectively improve material durability and performance of concrete by dramatically increase inter/intragranular bond strength of concrete at nano-scale. The strategy of ...

  7. Type A polymer concrete overlay field trials : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-12-01

    On July 31 and August 1, 1982, the Oregon State Highway Division successfully placed a methyl methacrylate polymer concrete overlay on a portion of one span of a major interchange ramp in Portland, Oregon. Two proprietary polymer concretes were used ...

  8. Type A polymer concrete overlay field trials : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-12-01

    This report describes placement and subsequent performance of two methyl methacrylate polymer concrete overlays. Performance is evaluated as to: 1) the mixing and placement characteristics of the methyl methacrylate polymer concretes as overlay mater...

  9. Measurement of early age shrinkage of Virginia concrete mixtures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    Concrete volume changes throughout its service life. The total in-service volume change is the resultant of applied loads and shrinkage. When loaded, concrete undergoes an instantaneous elastic deformation and a slow inelastic deformation called cree...

  10. Preliminary study to develop standard acceptance tests for pervious concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-05-01

    Pervious concrete pavements are permeable pavement systems that are desired for their role in stormwater management and runoff control. Increased popularity in pervious concrete pavement applications has raised the need for the development of quality...

  11. Nondestructive Measurements Using Mechanical Waves in Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-02-01

    "This study evaluated various techniques that use mechanical waves for the evaluation of critical concrete properties, : such as proper consolidation of the concrete during placement and strength development; changes in modulus; and the detection : o...

  12. Fatigue testing of wood-concrete composite beams.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Currently, wood-concrete composite structural members are usually applied in building structures. There are a relatively small number (in the low 100s) of known bridge applications involving wood-concrete composites. A problem with using these novel ...

  13. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  14. Roller compacted concrete : field evaluation and mixture optimization.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC) as an economical, fast construction and sustainable materials has attracted increasing attention for pavement construction. The growth of roller-compacted concrete pavement used in different regions is impeded by conce...

  15. Understanding and mitigating effects of chloride deicer exposure on concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-09-01

    Field and laboratory investigations were conducted to examine the effects of chloride deicers on concrete : bridge decks and to identify and evaluate best practices and products to mitigate such effects. The concrete bridge decks : exposed to KAc or ...

  16. Predicting camber, deflection, and prestress losses in prestressed concrete members.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-07-01

    Accurate predictions of camber and prestress losses for prestressed concrete bridge girders are essential to minimizing the frequency and cost of construction problems. The time-dependent nature of prestress losses, variable concrete properties, and ...

  17. Strength of masonry blocks made with recycled concrete aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Pierre; Dalati, Rouba El

    The idea of recycling concrete of demolished buildings aims at preserving the environment. Indeed, the reuse of concrete as aggregate in new concrete mixes helped to reduce the expenses related to construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and, especially, to protect the environment by reducing the development rate of new quarries. This paper presents the results of an experimental study conducted on masonry blocks containing aggregates resulting from concrete recycling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of recycled aggregates on compressive strength of concrete blocks. Tests were performed on series of concrete blocks: five series each made of different proportions of recycled aggregates, and one series of reference blocks exclusively composed of natural aggregates. Tests showed that using recycled aggregates with addition of cement allows the production of concrete blocks with compressive strengths comparable to those obtained on concrete blocks made exclusively of natural aggregates.

  18. Pilot project for maximum heat of mass concrete : [research summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Hardening cement releases heat, and because concrete is a thermal insulator, heat near the surface dissipates into its surroundings more quickly than heat deeper in the mass. Because concrete contracts as it cools, tension can build between surface a...

  19. Low-permeability concretes containing slag and silica fume.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1993-01-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion causes significant deterioration in transportation structures where uncoated reinforcing steel is used. Concretes having a very low permeability are used to prevent the intrusion of chlorides into concrete to the level of t...

  20. Design and construction guidelines for thermally insulated concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    The report describes the construction and design of composite pavements as a viable design strategy to use an : asphalt concrete (AC) wearing course as the insulating material and a Portland cement concrete (PCC) structural : layer as the load-carryi...

  1. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and : transverse mild steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams : exhibit earl...

  2. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and transverse mild : steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams exhibit early-...

  3. Iowa task report : US 18 concrete overlay construction under traffic.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-05-01

    The National Concrete Pavement Technology Center, Iowa Department of Transportation, and Federal Highway Administration set out to demonstrate and document the design and construction of portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays on two-lane roadways wh...

  4. Comparison of winter temperature profiles in asphalt and concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) determine which pavement type, asphalt or concrete, has : higher surface temperatures in winter and 2) compare the subsurface temperatures under asphalt and : concrete pavements to determine the pavement typ...

  5. Development of an embeddable reference electrode for reinforced concrete structures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-01-01

    There is a concern that none of the existing concrete-embeddable reference electrodes that are being used as a convenient means for monitoring the condition of the reinforcing steel in concrete bridges or the operation of cathodic protection systems ...

  6. Investigation of fiber-reinforced self-consolidating concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-05-01

    The rising cost of materials and labor, as well as the demand for faster construction, has prompted development of cheaper, faster alternatives to conventional building techniques. Self-consolidating concrete (SCC), a high performance concrete charac...

  7. Longitudinal cracking in widened portland cement concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-02-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation constructed certain concrete pavements with lane widths greater : than the standard 12 feet in order to reduce stress and deflection caused by vehicle tires running near the edge of : the concrete slabs. Man...

  8. Internally cured concrete for pavement and bridge deck applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-07-01

    A laboratory and field testing program was conducted to evaluate the performance and usability of internally : cured concrete (ICC) using lightweight aggregates for bridge decks and concrete pavement slabs under Florida : conditions. The laboratory t...

  9. Portland-cement concrete rheology and workability : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    Methods for determining the workability of freshly mixed Portland-cement concrete with : slumps less than 5 1 mm (2 in) were investigated. Four potential methods to determine the : workability of concrete were proposed for evaluation and development....

  10. Improved analysis tool for concrete pavement : [project summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-10-01

    University of Florida researchers developed 3D-FE models to more accurately predict the behavior of concrete slabs. They also followed up on a project to characterize strain gauge performance for a Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) concrete...

  11. Diagnostic evaluation and repair of deteriorated concrete bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-12-01

    Concrete bridge deck degradation has been observed in several bridges located in north Mississippi. In this study a : survey was conducted to collect and document instances of deterioration in concrete bridges located throughout the State. The : main...

  12. Diagnostic evaluation and repair of deteriorated concrete bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-12-01

    Concrete bridge deck degradation has been observed in several bridges located in north Mississippi. In this study a survey was conducted to collect and document instances of deterioration in concrete bridges located throughout the State. The main cau...

  13. 12. View underside of bridge, showing concrete tee beam deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View underside of bridge, showing concrete tee beam deck spans supported by concrete piles, looking southwest - Colonel Alexander Scammell Memorial Bridge, Spanning Bellamy River at U.S. Route 4, Dover, Strafford County, NH

  14. Laboratory fatigue evaluation of continuously fiber-reinforced concrete pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-09-01

    Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the worlds most versatile construction material. PCC has : been in use in the United States for over 100 years. PCC pavement is generally constructed as : either continually reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) or ...

  15. Simplified equation for Young's modulus of CNT reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, RameshBabu; Gifty Honeyta A, Maria

    2017-12-01

    This research investigation focuses on finite element modeling of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced concrete matrix for three grades of concrete namely M40, M60 and M120. Representative volume element (RVE) was adopted and one-eighth model depicting the CNT reinforced concrete matrix was simulated using FEA software ANSYS17.2. Adopting random orientation of CNTs, with nine fibre volume fractions from 0.1% to 0.9%, finite element modeling simulations replicated exactly the CNT reinforced concrete matrix. Upon evaluations of the model, the longitudinal and transverse Young's modulus of elasticity of the CNT reinforced concrete was arrived. The graphical plots between various fibre volume fractions and the concrete grade revealed simplified equation for estimating the young's modulus. It also exploited the fact that the concrete grade does not have significant impact in CNT reinforced concrete matrix.

  16. AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING OF CONCRETE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING OF CONCRETE KSC-375C-10036.31 108-KSC-375C-10036.31, P-21426, ARCHIVE-04502 Aerial oblique of Shuttle runway facilities. Pouring concrete on runway. Direction north - altitude 100'.

  17. Evaluation of various coarse aggregate concretes : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-10-01

    This study was initiated to determine the properties of concrete using three types of coarse aggregate. The coarse aggregates evaluated in this study included silicious gravel, the standard aggregate for concrete in the state, with sandstone and lime...

  18. Implementation of the concrete maturity meter for Maryland : December 2011.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    The process of waiting for concrete to attain its desired strength for certain construction : applications can pose one of two problems. The concrete strength may be overestimated, : which creates a safety concern for workers and the general public. ...

  19. Implementation of the concrete maturity meter for Maryland : November 2011.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-11-01

    The process of waiting for concrete to attain its desired strength for certain construction : applications can pose one of two problems. The concrete strength may be overestimated, : which creates a safety concern for workers and the general public. ...

  20. Concrete debris assessment for road construction activities : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but related issues of importance to FDOT were investigated: (1) the possible impact of : recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) used as road base on the subsurface environment and (2) the : management of concrete grinding residuals (CGR) resu...

  1. Assessing the need for intermediate diaphragms in prestressed concrete bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-03-01

    Reinforced concrete intermediate diaphragms (IDs) are currently being used in prestressed concrete (PC) girder bridges in Louisiana. Some of the advantages of providing IDs are disputed in the bridge community; the use of IDs increases the cost and t...

  2. Electrochemical chloride extraction : influence of concrete surface on treatment.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-10-01

    One bridge restoration technique available for reducing corrosion-induced concrete deterioration, which removes : chloride ions while simultaneously realkalizing the concrete adjacent to the steel, is electrochemical chloride extraction : (ECE). Stud...

  3. Electrochemical Chloride Extraction : Influence of Concrete Surface on Treatment

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-09-01

    One bridge restoration technique available for reducing corrosion-induced concrete deterioration, which removes chloride ions while simultaneously realkalizing the concrete adjacent to the steel, is electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). Studies ...

  4. Investigation of concrete containing slag : Hampton River Bridge.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-01-01

    The study evaluated the properties of concretes containing slag in a 50% replacement of the portland cement to assess their suitability as an alternative to the portland cement concretes normally used in the construction of bridge substructures. For ...

  5. Experimental investigation of FRCM/concrete interfacial debonding.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-07-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study conducted to understand the stress-transfer mechanism of fiber reinforced concrete matrix (FRCM) composites externally bonded to a concrete substrate for strengthening applications. The FRCM c...

  6. Testing guide for implementing concrete paving quality control procedures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-03-01

    Construction of portland cement concrete pavements is a complex process. A small fraction of the concrete pavements constructed in the : United States over the last few decades have either failed prematurely or exhibited moderate to severe distress. ...

  7. Tremie Concrete for Bridge Piers and Other Massive Underwater Placements

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-09-01

    This study reviewed the placement of mass concrete under water using a tremie. Areas investigated included (a) Mixture design of tremie concrete including the use of pozzolanic replacement of portions of the cement; (b) Flow patterns and flow related...

  8. Application of Roller Compacted Concrete in Colorado's Roadways

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC) is a no-slump concrete mixture that is transported, placed, and compacted with : the same construction equipment as asphalt pavement. RCCs were used to construct three sections of pavement in : Weld County Road 28 (WCR...

  9. High Performance Concrete (HPC) bridge project for SR 43.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and test high performance concrete mixtures, made of locally available materials, having : durability characteristics that far exceed those of conventional concrete mixtures. Based on the results from the...

  10. Review of a bituminous concrete statistical specification : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-01-01

    The statistically oriented specification for bituminous concrete production reviewed in this report was used as a basis for acceptance of more than one million tons of bituminous concrete in 1970. Data obtained from this system were analyzed for grad...

  11. Performance and acceptance of self-consolidating concrete : final report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is an important emerging material that can be used for many applications related to transportation infrastructure. SCC has an advantage over conventional concrete in that it can be easily placed without vibration or ...

  12. Subbase and subgrade performance investigation for concrete pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    Recently, TxDOT has become increasingly aware of the rising cost associated with the use of asphalt : concrete bond breakers to meet the FHWA requirement of using a permanently stabilized, nonerodable : subbase layer below the concrete slab. The main...

  13. Cost-effective and rapid concrete repair techniques.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-02-08

    Concrete is a principal component of many transportation structures. While highly durable, a : variety of processes degrade and damage concrete. Replacement is expensive. Many cases : warrant repair instead of replacement. Since many damage processes...

  14. Concrete debris assessment for road construction activities : summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-09-01

    University of Florida researchers studied the possible : impact of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) used in : roadway base layers on the acid/base balance of the : subsurface environment. They also examined a related : issue: management of concrete ...

  15. Report of the workshop on nanotechnology for cement and concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-09-05

    "Concrete as a material is the most commonly used material (other than water) on the planet. : Its significance to the basic infrastructure of modern civilization is immeasurable, and it is : difficult to imagine life without it. However, concrete as...

  16. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Investigation of silica fume concrete bridge deck overlay failures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-02-23

    Many of these microsilica-modified concrete or silica fume concrete (SFC) bridge deck overlays across the State of Wyoming are suffering from premature distress that includes random cracking, loss of bond and delaminations. To determine the most like...

  18. Sustainability and durability analysis of reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáková, A.; Broukalová, I.; Kohoutková, A.; Vašková, J.

    2017-09-01

    The article describes an assessment of reinforced concrete structures in terms of durability and sustainable development. There is a short summary of findings from the literature on evaluation methods for environmental impacts and also about corrosive influences acting on the reinforced concrete structure, about factors influencing the durability of these structures and mathematical models describing the corrosion impacts. Variant design of reinforced concrete structure and assessment of these variants in terms of durability and sustainability was performed. The analysed structure was a concrete ceiling structure of a parking house for cars. The variants differ in strength class of concrete and thickness of concrete slab. It was found that in terms of durability and sustainable development it is significantly preferable to use higher class of concrete. There are significant differences in results of concrete structures durability for different mathematical models of corrosive influences.

  19. Implementation of the concrete maturity meter for Maryland : research summary.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    Problem: : The process of waiting for concrete to attain its desired strength for certain : construction applications can pose one of two problems. The concrete strength : may be overestimated, which creates a safety concern for workers and the gener...

  20. Extending the usage of high volume fly ash in concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-07-01

    Concrete is the worlds most consumed man-made material. Unfortunately, the production of Portland cement, the active ingredient in : concrete, generates a significant amount of carbon dioxide. For each pound of cement produced, approximately one p...

  1. The Behavior and Durability of Self-Consolidating Concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-05-01

    This report focuses on the production of self-consolidating concrete using local materials from Las Vegas, Nevada. Tests were conducted on eight self-consolidating concrete mixtures having two different percentages of fly-ash replacement (25% and 35%...

  2. Using recycled concrete in MDOT's transportation infrastructure : manual of practice.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-08-01

    "Crushed concrete aggregate (CCA) is granular material manufactured by removing, crushing, and : processing old concrete for reuse as an aggregate source in new construction. Although the Michigan : Department of Transportation (MDOT) has used CCA si...

  3. Manipulating Objects and Telling Words: A Study on Concrete and Abstract Words Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Flumini, Andrea; Cimatti, Felice; Marocco, Davide; Scorolli, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments (E1–E2–E3–E4) investigated whether different acquisition modalities lead to the emergence of differences typically found between concrete and abstract words, as argued by the words as tools (WAT) proposal. To mimic the acquisition of concrete and abstract concepts, participants either manipulated novel objects or observed groups of objects interacting in novel ways (Training 1). In TEST 1 participants decided whether two elements belonged to the same category. Later they read the category labels (Training 2); labels could be accompanied by an explanation of their meaning. Then participants observed previously seen exemplars and other elements, and were asked which of them could be named with a given label (TEST 2). Across the experiments, it was more difficult to form abstract than concrete categories (TEST 1); even when adding labels, abstract words remained more difficult than concrete words (TEST 2). TEST 3 differed across the experiments. In E1 participants performed a feature production task. Crucially, the associations produced with the novel words reflected the pattern evoked by existing concrete and abstract words, as the first evoked more perceptual properties. In E2–E3–E4, TEST 3 consisted of a color verification task with manual/verbal (keyboard–microphone) responses. Results showed the microphone use to have an advantage over keyboard use for abstract words, especially in the explanation condition. This supports WAT: due to their acquisition modality, concrete words evoke more manual information; abstract words elicit more verbal information. This advantage was not present when linguistic information contrasted with perceptual one. Implications for theories and computational models of language grounding are discussed. PMID:21716582

  4. Effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Egba, Ernest Ituma

    2017-11-01

    Corrosion of steel is a damaging agent that reduces the functional and structural responsibilities of reinforced concrete structures. Accordingly, reinforced concrete members in the environments that are prone to concrete carbonation or chloride attack coupled with high temperature and relative humidity suffer from accelerated corrosion of reinforcing material. Also, literature proves that climate influences corrosion of concrete, and suggests investigation of impact of corrosion on concrete based on climate zone. Therefore, this paper presents the effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behavior, using bond strength of concrete as a case study. Concrete specimens were prepared form concrete mix that was infested with 3.5 kgm-3 of sodium chloride to accelerate corrosion. The specimens were cured sodium chloride solution 3.5% by weight of water for 28 days before placing them in the exposure conditions. Pull-out tests were conducted at time intervals for one year to measure the impact of exposure condition and corrosion on bond strength of concrete. The results show reduction of bond strength of concrete by 32%, 28% and 8% after one year of subjection of the specimens to the unsheltered natural climate, sheltered natural climate, and laboratory ambient environment respectively. The findings indicate that the climate influences corrosion, which reduces the interlocking bond between the reinforcing bar and the adjacent concrete.

  5. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  6. CONCRETE BLOCKS' ADVERSE EFFECTS ON INDOOR AIR AND RECOMMENDED SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air infiltration through highly permeable concrete blocks can allow entry of various serious indoor air pollutants. An easy approach to avoiding these pollutants is to select a less–air-permeable concrete block. Tests show that air permeability of concrete blocks can vary by a fa...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 3201.42 Section 3201.42... Designated Items § 3201.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.87 - Wood and concrete stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wood and concrete stains. 3201.87 Section 3201.87... Designated Items § 3201.87 Wood and concrete stains. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to be applied as a finish for concrete and wood surfaces and that contain dyes or pigments to change the color...

  9. 7 CFR 3201.87 - Wood and concrete stains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wood and concrete stains. 3201.87 Section 3201.87... Designated Items § 3201.87 Wood and concrete stains. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to be applied as a finish for concrete and wood surfaces and that contain dyes or pigments to change the color...

  10. 7 CFR 3201.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 3201.42 Section 3201.42... Designated Items § 3201.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage...

  11. 7 CFR 3201.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 3201.42 Section 3201.42... Designated Items § 3201.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage...

  12. 8. Photocopied August 1978. BREAKING CONCRETE BARS, JULY 1898. TESTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopied August 1978. BREAKING CONCRETE BARS, JULY 1898. TESTING MACHINE USED BY VON SCHON IN EXPERIMENTS ON METHODS OF MIXING CONCRETE AND ON CONCRETE AGGREGATES WHICH USED LOCAL MATERIALS. (4) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  13. Latex modified fibrous concrete : experimental feature : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-03-01

    In November 1980, a contractor requested permission to use a 1.5 inch thick Latex Modified Fibrous Concrete (LMFC) overlay in lieu of a 2.5 inch low slump concrete (Iowa System) or a 2.5 inch unreinforced latex modified concrete. The overlays were to...

  14. Introduction to Concrete Finishing. Instructor Edition. Introduction to Construction Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based introductory course in concrete finishing to students who have chosen to explore careers in construction. The following topics are covered in the course's three instructional units: concrete materials, concrete tools, and applied skills. Each unit contains some or…

  15. 7 CFR 2902.36 - Concrete and asphalt release fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete and asphalt release fluids. 2902.36 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.36 Concrete and asphalt release fluids. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to provide a lubricating barrier between the composite surface materials (e.g., concrete or...

  16. Comparative testing of nondestructive examination techniques for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Smith, Cyrus M.

    2014-03-01

    A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor (LWR) plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of three primary properties, its inexpensiveness, its structural strength, and its ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of LWR plants include containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Comparative testing of the various NDE concrete measurement techniques requires concrete samples with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. These samples can be artificially created under laboratory conditions where the various properties can be controlled. Other than NPPs, there are not many applications where critical concrete structures are as thick and reinforced. Therefore, there are not many industries other than the nuclear power plant or power plant industry that are interested in performing NDE on thick and reinforced concrete structures. This leads to the lack of readily available samples of thick and heavily reinforced concrete for performing NDE evaluations, research, and training. The industry that typically performs the most NDE on concrete structures is the bridge and roadway industry. While bridge and roadway structures are thinner and less reinforced, they have a good base of NDE research to support their field NDE programs to detect, identify, and repair concrete failures. This paper will summarize the initial comparative testing of two concrete samples with an emphasis on how these techniques could perform on NPP concrete structures.

  17. Microsilica modified concrete for bridge deck overlays : construction report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-10-01

    The study objective was to see if microsilica concrete (MC) is a viable alternative to the latex modified concrete (LMC) usually used on bridge deck overlays in Oregon. The study addresses MC overlays placed in 1989 on Portland cement concrete (PCC) ...

  18. Low Shrinkage Cement Concrete Intended for Airfield Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małgorzata, Linek

    2017-10-01

    The work concerns the issue of hardened concrete parameters improvement intended for airfield pavements. Factors which have direct or indirect influence on rheological deformation size were of particular interest. The aim of lab testing was to select concrete mixture ratio which would make hardened concrete less susceptible to influence of basic operating factors. Analyses included two research groups. External and internal factors were selected. They influence parameters of hardened cement concrete by increasing rheological deformations. Research referred to innovative cement concrete intended for airfield pavements. Due to construction operation, the research considered the influence of weather conditions and forced thermal loads intensifying concrete stress. Fresh concrete mixture parameters were tested and basic parameters of hardened concrete were defined (density, absorbability, compression strength, tensile strength). Influence of the following factors on rheological deformation value was also analysed. Based on obtained test results, it has been discovered that innovative concrete, made on the basis of modifier, which changes internal structure of concrete composite, has definitely lower values of rheological deformation. Observed changes of microstructure, in connection with reduced deformation values allowed to reach the conclusion regarding advantageous characteristic features of the newly designed cement concrete. Applying such concrete for airfield construction may contribute to extension of its operation without malfunction and the increase of its general service life.

  19. 7 CFR 2902.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 2902.42 Section 2902.42... Items § 2902.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage caused by...

  20. 7 CFR 2902.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 2902.42 Section 2902.42... Items § 2902.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage caused by...