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Sample records for corn streak virus

  1. Ipomoviruses: Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus, Cassava brown streak virus, and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ipomoviruses including Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus and Cassava brown streak virus are currently causing significant economic impact on crop production in several regions of the world. Only recently have results of detailed characterization of their whitefly transmissi...

  2. Tobacco streak virus isolated from lettuce.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, F S; Khodai Motlagh, M

    2009-05-01

    Tobacco streak virus (TSV) is an ilarvirus with a worldwide distribution. This virus infects many plants and causes significant yield losses. In this study, 300 samples of lettuce were collected from lettuce fields in Tehran Province. Infected plants show symptoms such as: mosaic, vein clearing, vein necrosis, yellowing and leaf distortion. DAS-ELISA (Double Antibody Sandwich-ELISA) was used with a polyclonal antiserum against TSV. Five isolates (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5), which are collected, respectively from Mohammad Abad (Karaj), Malek Abad (Karaj), Hashtgerd (Karaj), Tarand Balla (Varamin) and Deh mah sin (Pishva) were inoculated on 29 species of Cucurbitaceae, Amaranthaceae, Solanacea, Compositae, Leguminosae and Chenopodiacea. Chenopodium quinoa 6 days after inoculation showed necrotic local lesions. Gomphrena globosa 10 days after inoculation developed chlorotic local lesions. Systemic symptoms were produced in Datura stramonium. Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Kidney 5 days after inoculation developed necrotic local lesions. Nicotiana tabacum 7 days after inoculation showed necrotic and chlorotic local lesions. Nicotiana clevelandii 15 days after inoculation developed leaf distortion and vein necrosis. Lactuca sativa 10-15 days after inoculation developed leaf istortion and mosaic. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was performed using one primer pairs designed by DSMZ. An approximately 710 bp fragment was amplified with a specific primer.

  3. The diversity of Banana streak virus isolates in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Hart, D; Moult, S; Hull, R; Geering, A; Thomas, J

    2005-12-01

    In a study of the variation among isolates of Banana streak virus (BSV) in Uganda, 140 sequences were obtained from 49 samples by PCR across the conserved reverse transcriptase/RNaseH region of the genome. Pairwise comparison of these sequences suggested that they represented 15 different species and phylogenetic analyses showed that all species fell into three major clades based on 28% sequence difference. In addition to the Ugandan sequences, clade I also contained BSV species that are known as both integrated sequences and episomal viruses; clade II also contained integrated BSV sequences but which have not previously been identified as episomal viruses. Clade III comprised of Sugarcane bacilliform virus isolates and Ugandan BSV sequences and for which there is no evidence of integration. The possible reasons for the extraordinary levels of virus sequence variation and the potential origins and epidemiology of these viruses causing banana streak disease are discussed.

  4. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  5. Wheat streak mosaic virus resistance in eight wheat germplasm lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) disease is an important disease in wheat. Use of resistant cultivars is the most effective approach to reduce the yield losses caused by the disease. To identify new sources of resistance to WSMV, eight resistant wheat lines that were selected based on the results fr...

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of banana streak virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Hull, R

    1998-01-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV), a member of the Badnavirus group of plant viruses, causes severe problems in banana cultivation, reducing fruit yield and restricting plant breeding and the movement of germplasm. Current detection methods are relatively insensitive. In order to develop a PCR-based diagnostic method that is both reliable and sensitive, the genome of a Nigerian isolate of BSV has been sequenced and shown to comprise 7389 bp and to be organized in a manner characteristic of badnaviruses. Comparison of this sequence with those of other badnaviruses showed that BSV is a distinct virus. PCR with primers based on sequence data indicated that BSV sequences are present in the banana genome.

  7. Characterization of Brown Streak Virus-Resistant Cassava.

    PubMed

    Anjanappa, Ravi B; Mehta, Devang; Maruthi, M N; Kanju, Edward; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has become a major constraint to cassava production in East and Central Africa. The identification of new sources of CBSD resistance is essential to deploy CBSD mitigation strategies, as the disease is progressing westwards to new geographical areas. A stringent infection method based on top cleft-grafting combined with precise virus titer quantitation was utilized to screen 14 cassava cultivars and elite breeding lines. When inoculated with mixed infections of Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the scions of elite breeding lines KBH 2006/18 and KBH 2006/26 remained symptom-free during a 16-week period of virus graft inoculation, while susceptible varieties displayed typical CBSD infection symptoms at 4 weeks after grafting. The identified CBSD resistance was stable under the coinoculation of CBSV and UCBSV with cassava geminiviruses. Double-grafting experiments revealed that transmission of CBSV and UCBSV to CBSD-susceptible top scions was delayed when using intermediate scions of elite breeding lines KBH 2006/18 and KBH 2006/26. Nonetheless, comparison of virus systemic movement using scions from KBH2006/18 and a transgenic CBSD resistant 60444 line (60444-Hp9 line) showed that both CBSV and UCBSV move at undetectable levels through the stems. Further, protoplast-based assays of virus titers showed that the replication of CBSV is inhibited in the resistant line KBH2006/18, suggesting that the identified CBSD resistance is at least partially based on inhibition of virus replication. Our molecular characterization of CBSD resistance in cassava offers a robust virus-host system to further investigate the molecular determinants of CBSD resistance.

  8. Banana streak virus is very diverse in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Harper, Glyn; Hart, Darren; Moult, Sarah; Hull, Roger

    2004-03-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV) is a badnavirus that causes a viral leaf streak disease of banana and plantain (Musa spp.). Identified in essentially all Musa growing areas of the world, it has a deleterious effect on the productivity of infected plants as well as being a major constraint to Musa breeding programmes and germplasm dissemination. Banana is a staple food in Uganda which is, per capita, one of the worlds largest banana producers and consumers. BSV was isolated from infected plants sampled across the Ugandan Musa growing area and the isolates were analysed using molecular and serological techniques. These analyses showed that BSV is very highly variable in Uganda. They suggest that the variability is, in part, due to a series of introductions of banana into Uganda, each with a different complement of infecting viruses.

  9. Multiplex Real Time PCR For Detection of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TRIMV) are widespread throughout the southwestern Great Plains states. Using conventional diagnostics such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA), these two viruses are commonly found together in infected wheat samples. Methods for m...

  10. Genetic variants of Banana streak virus in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Jaufeerally-Fakim, Y; Khorugdharry, Ashwin; Harper, Glyn

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variations among isolates of Banana streak virus (BSV) were assessed using two sets of primers. The virus, found in banana accessions in Mauritius, was compared to a Nigerian isolate from cultivar Obino l'Ewai (BSOEV). On the basis of the observed size of amplicons, some Mauritius strains were different from l'Ewai BSOEV. Both Southern blot hybridization and the nucleotide sequences of the PCR products confirmed that they were of episomal BSV origin. An isolate of sugarcane bacilliform virus (SCBV) was found to be also very similar to the BSV isolated from banana samples. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that even the same size PCR products had differing sequences. The dendrogram placed the isolates from Mauritius in a cluster separate from BSV and SCBV from other geographical locations.

  11. Analyses of Twelve New Whole Genome Sequences of Cassava Brown Streak Viruses and Ugandan Cassava Brown Streak Viruses from East Africa: Diversity, Supercomputing and Evidence for Further Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Ndunguru, Joseph; Sseruwagi, Peter; Tairo, Fred; Stomeo, Francesca; Maina, Solomon; Djinkeng, Appolinaire; Kehoe, Monica; Boykin, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease is caused by two devastating viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) which are frequently found infecting cassava, one of sub-Saharan Africa’s most important staple food crops. Each year these viruses cause losses of up to $100 million USD and can leave entire families without their primary food source, for an entire year. Twelve new whole genomes, including seven of CBSV and five of UCBSV were uncovered in this research, doubling the genomic sequences available in the public domain for these viruses. These new sequences disprove the assumption that the viruses are limited by agro-ecological zones, show that current diagnostic primers are insufficient to provide confident diagnosis of these viruses and give rise to the possibility that there may be as many as four distinct species of virus. Utilizing NGS sequencing technologies and proper phylogenetic practices will rapidly increase the solution to sustainable cassava production. PMID:26439260

  12. Replicative intermediates of maize streak virus found during leaf development.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Julia B; Shepherd, Dionne N; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Rybicki, Edward P; Jeske, Holger

    2010-04-01

    Geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus utilize three replication modes: complementary-strand replication (CSR), rolling-circle replication (RCR) and recombination-dependent replication (RDR). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we now show for the first time that maize streak virus (MSV), the type member of the most divergent geminivirus genus, Mastrevirus, does the same. Although mastreviruses have fewer regulatory genes than other geminiviruses and uniquely express their replication-associated protein (Rep) from a spliced transcript, the replicative intermediates of CSR, RCR and RDR could be detected unequivocally within infected maize tissues. All replicative intermediates accumulated early and, to varying degrees, were already present in the shoot apex and leaves at different maturation stages. Relative to other replicative intermediates, those associated with RCR increased in prevalence during leaf maturation. Interestingly, in addition to RCR-associated DNA forms seen in other geminiviruses, MSV also apparently uses dimeric open circular DNA as a template for RCR.

  13. Genetic Diversity Among Banana streak virus Isolates from Australia.

    PubMed

    Geering, A D; McMichael, L A; Dietzgen, R G; Thomas, J E

    2000-08-01

    ABSTRACT Banana streak virus (BSV) is an important pathogen of bananas and plantains (Musa spp.) throughout the world. We have cloned and sequenced part of the genomes of four isolates of BSV from Australia, designated BSV-RD, BSV-Cav, BSV-Mys, and BSV-GF. These isolates originated from banana cvs. Red Dacca, Williams, Mysore, and Goldfinger, respectively. All clones contained a sequence covering part of open reading frame III and the intergenic region of the badnavirus genome. The sequences were compared with those of other badnaviruses, including BSV-Onne, a previously characterized isolate from Nigeria. The BSV-RD sequence was virtually identical to that of BSV-Onne, differing by only two nucleotides over 1,292 bp. However, BSV-Cav, -Mys, and -GF were divergent in nucleotide sequence. Phylogenetic analyses using conserved sequences in the ribonuclease H domain revealed that all BSV isolates were more closely related to each other than to any other badnavirus. BSV-Cav was most closely related to BSV-Onne, and there was 95.1% identity between the two amino acid sequences. Other relationships between the BSV isolates were less similar, with sequence identities ranging from 66.4 to 78.2%, which is a magnitude comparable to the distance between some of the recognized badnavirus species. Immunocapture-polymerase chain reaction assays have been developed, allowing specific detection and differentiation of the four isolates of BSV.

  14. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  15. Nuclear import of Maize fine streak virus proteins in Drosophila S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is a member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae and is transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifons. The virus replicates in both its plant host and in its insect vector. Nucleorhabdoviruses replicate in the nucleus and assemble at the inner nu...

  16. Stable Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus in wheat mediated by RNAi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is one of the major wheat viruses in the Great Plains of the United States. Cultural practices are the primary method of disease management, though not fully effective. Genetic resistance is available but is temperature sensitive. Alternative approaches to viral res...

  17. Economic impact of wheat streak mosaic virus in the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, is a major limiting factor in wheat production in the Texas Panhandle. It is the most frequently encountered virus in the region, affecting both shoot and root biomass, and consequently it can drastically red...

  18. Wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded NIa-Pro and coat protein are involved in virus superinfection exclusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross protection or superinfection exclusion (SE) is defined as the phenomenon whereby initial infection by one virus prevents subsequent infection by closely related viruses. The mechanisms of SE are just beginning to be understood. Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus: Tritimovirus; family: Poty...

  19. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of rice black-streaked dwarf virus segment 9 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Weng, Jian-Feng; Chen, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Lin; Han, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Zhuan-Fang; Li, Ming-Shun; Yong, Hong-Jun; Zhang, De-Gui; Zhang, Shi-Huang; Li, Xin-Hai

    2015-04-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is an economically important virus that causes maize rough dwarf disease and rice black-streaked dwarf disease in East Asia. To study RBSDV variation and recombination, we examined the segment 9 (S9) sequences of 49 RBSDV isolates from maize and rice in China. Three S9 recombinants were detected in Baoding, Jinan, and Jining, China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Chinese RBSDV isolates could be classified into two groups based on their S9 sequences, regardless of host or geographical origin. Further analysis suggested that S9 has undergone negative and purifying selection.

  20. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), through deep sequencing of sRNAs and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 only shares less than 90% sequence identity in three genomic ribonucleic...

  1. Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus identified in synthetic wheat lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is a significant pathogen in wheat that causes economic loss each year. WSMV is typically controlled using cultural practices such as the removal of volunteer wheat. Genetic resistance is limited. Until recently, no varieties have been available with major resista...

  2. Physiological responses of hard red winter wheat to infection by wheat streak mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) causes significant yield loss in hard red winter wheat in the U.S. Southern High Plains. Despite the prevalence of this pathogen, little is known about the physiological response of wheat to WSMV infection. A 2-year study was initiated to (i) investigate the effect o...

  3. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel sugarcane streak mastrevirus and an isolate of the A-strain of maize streak virus from sugarcane in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Adama; Dangora, Danladi B; Alegbejo, Matthew D; Kumar, P Lava; Alabi, Olufemi J

    2017-02-01

    Sugarcane and maize plants showing symptoms typical of those described for the so-called "African streak viruses" (AfSVs) were encountered during field surveys conducted from February to July 2015 to document viruses infecting both crops across the northern Guinea savannah region of Nigeria. As part of this study, two categories of complete mastrevirus-like genome sequences were obtained from nine samples (maize = 2; sugarcane = 7). In pairwise comparisons, the full-length genomes of the first sequence category (2,687 nt each; maize = 2; sugarcane = 2) shared 96 to 99% identity with global isolates of the A-strain of maize streak virus (MSV-A), indicating that sugarcane may also serve as a reservoir host to MSV-A. Analysis of the complete genomes belonging to the second sequence category (2,757 nt each; sugarcane = 5) showed that they shared 42 to 67% identity with their closest AfSV relatives, thus indicating that they represent sequences of a novel mastrevirus. Both sequence categories shared 61-62% sequence identity with each other. Further analysis revealed that the novel sugarcane-infecting virus, tentatively named as sugarcane chlorotic streak virus (SCSV), arose from a putative interspecific recombination event involving two grass-infecting mastreviruses, eragrostis streak virus and urochloa streak virus, as putative parental sequences. The results of this study add to the repertoire of diverse AfSVs present in cereal and sugarcane mixed cropping landscapes in the northern Guinea savannah region of Nigeria, with implications for disease epidemiology.

  4. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  5. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  6. Tomato necrotic streak virus, a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel plant virus has been identified infecting fresh market tomato plants in south and southeast Florida. The virus causes necrosis of tomato leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on tomato fruits. Symptomatic tomato plant tissue was used to mechanically inoculate tomato plant...

  7. Quantification of southern rice black streaked dwarf virus and rice black streaked dwarf virus in the organs of their vector and nonvector insect over time.

    PubMed

    Hajano, Jamal-U-Ddin; Wang, Biao; Ren, Yingdang; Lu, Chuantao; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-10-02

    Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) and rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are serious rice-infecting reoviruses, which are transmitted by different planthoppers in a persistent propagative manner. In this study, we quantitatively compared the spatial distribution of SRBSDV and RBSDV contents over time in their vector and nonvector insects using real time-PCR. Genome equivalent copies (GEC) were assessed every 2 days from 0 to 14 days after a 3-days acquisition access period (AAP) on infected plants. Results revealed 293.2±21.6 to 404.1±46.4 SRBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in whole body of white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) at day 0 and 12 and 513.5±88.4 to 816.8±110.7 RBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in the whole body of small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus) at day 0 and 14, respectively, after 3-days AAP. Highest GEC of both viruses were found in the gut of their respective vectors. Although SRBSDV was detected in the gut of SBPH, it did not spread into the hemolymph or other organs. After an 8-day latent period, the transmission efficiency of SRBSDV and RBSDV by their respective vectors was significantly positively correlated with GEC in the salivary gland (r(2)=0.7808, P=0.0036 and r(2)=0.9351, P<0.0001, respectively, at α=0.05). Together, these results confirm that accumulation of >200 SRBSDV or RBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in the gut of vector, indicated threshold for further spread and the virus content in the salivary gland was significantly correlated with transmission efficiency by their respective vectors.

  8. Winter wheat cultivars with temperature sensitive resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus do not recover from early season infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus, all vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, frequently cause devastating losses to winter wheat production throughout the central and western Great Plains. Resistant 'Mace' and 'RonL' are commercially ...

  9. Wheat Genotypes With Combined Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, Wheat Mosaic Virus, and Triticum Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Rojas, Lina Maria Aguirre; Khalaf, Luaay Kahtan; Zhang, Guorong; Fritz, Allan K; Whitfield, Anna E; Smith, C Michael

    2017-01-13

    The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, (WCM) is a global pest of bread wheat that reduces yields significantly. In addition, WCM carries Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus), the most significant wheat virus in North America; High Plains wheat mosaic virus (HPWMoV, genus Emaravirus, formerly High plains virus); and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, family Potyviridae, genus Poacevirus). Viruses carried by WCM have reduced wheat yields throughout the U.S. Great Plains for >50 yr, with average yield losses of 2-3% and occasional yield losses of 7-10%. Acaricides are ineffective against WCM, and delayed planting of winter wheat is not feasible. Five wheat breeding lines containing Cmc4, a WCM resistance gene from Aegilops tauschii, and Wsm2, a WSMV resistance gene from wheat germplasm CO960293-2 were selected from the breeding process and assessed for phenotypic reaction to WCM feeding, population increase, and the degree of WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection. Experiments determined that all five lines are resistant to WCM biotype 1 feeding and population increase, and that two breeding lines contain resistance to WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection as well. These WCM-, WSMV-, HPWMoV-, and TriMV-resistant genotypes can be used improve management of wheat yield losses from WCM-virus complexes.

  10. A Virus-Derived Stacked RNAi Construct Confers Robust Resistance to Cassava Brown Streak Disease.

    PubMed

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Ilyas, Muhammad; Wagaba, Henry; Fauquet, Claude M; Miano, Douglas; Alicai, Titus; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) threatens food and economic security for smallholder farmers throughout East and Central Africa, and poses a threat to cassava production in West Africa. CBSD is caused by two whitefly-transmitted virus species: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) (Genus: Ipomovirus, Family Potyviridae). Although varying levels of tolerance have been achieved through conventional breeding, to date, effective resistance to CBSD within East African cassava germplasm has not been identified. RNAi technology was utilized to integrate CBSD resistance into the Ugandan farmer-preferred cassava cultivar TME 204. Transgenic plant lines were generated expressing an inverted repeat construct (p5001) derived from coat-protein (CP) sequences of CBSV and UCBSV fused in tandem. Northern blots using probes specific for each CP sequence were performed to characterize 169 independent transgenic lines for accumulation of CP-derived siRNAs. Transgenic plant lines accumulating low, medium and high levels of siRNAs were bud graft challenged with the virulent CBSV Naliendele isolate alone or in combination with UCBSV. Resistance to CBSD in the greenhouse directly correlated to levels of CP-derived siRNAs as determined by visual assessment of leaf and storage root symptoms, and RT-PCR diagnosis for presence of the pathogens. Low expressing lines were found to be susceptible to CBSV and UCBSV, while medium to high accumulating plant lines were resistant to both virus species. Absence of detectable virus in the best performing p5001 transgenic lines was further confirmed by back-inoculation via sap or graft challenge to CBSD susceptible Nicotiana benthamiana and cassava cultivar 60444, respectively. Data presented shows robust resistance of transgenic p5001 TME 204 lines to both CBSV and UCBSV under greenhouse conditions. Levels of resistance correlated directly with levels of transgene derived siRNA expression such that the

  11. A Virus-Derived Stacked RNAi Construct Confers Robust Resistance to Cassava Brown Streak Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Ilyas, Muhammad; Wagaba, Henry; Fauquet, Claude M.; Miano, Douglas; Alicai, Titus; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2017-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) threatens food and economic security for smallholder farmers throughout East and Central Africa, and poses a threat to cassava production in West Africa. CBSD is caused by two whitefly-transmitted virus species: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) (Genus: Ipomovirus, Family Potyviridae). Although varying levels of tolerance have been achieved through conventional breeding, to date, effective resistance to CBSD within East African cassava germplasm has not been identified. RNAi technology was utilized to integrate CBSD resistance into the Ugandan farmer-preferred cassava cultivar TME 204. Transgenic plant lines were generated expressing an inverted repeat construct (p5001) derived from coat-protein (CP) sequences of CBSV and UCBSV fused in tandem. Northern blots using probes specific for each CP sequence were performed to characterize 169 independent transgenic lines for accumulation of CP-derived siRNAs. Transgenic plant lines accumulating low, medium and high levels of siRNAs were bud graft challenged with the virulent CBSV Naliendele isolate alone or in combination with UCBSV. Resistance to CBSD in the greenhouse directly correlated to levels of CP-derived siRNAs as determined by visual assessment of leaf and storage root symptoms, and RT-PCR diagnosis for presence of the pathogens. Low expressing lines were found to be susceptible to CBSV and UCBSV, while medium to high accumulating plant lines were resistant to both virus species. Absence of detectable virus in the best performing p5001 transgenic lines was further confirmed by back-inoculation via sap or graft challenge to CBSD susceptible Nicotiana benthamiana and cassava cultivar 60444, respectively. Data presented shows robust resistance of transgenic p5001 TME 204 lines to both CBSV and UCBSV under greenhouse conditions. Levels of resistance correlated directly with levels of transgene derived siRNA expression such that the

  12. Molecular characterization of Banana streak virus isolate from Musa Acuminata in China.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun; Wang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhi-Xin

    2011-12-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV), a member of genus Badnavirus, is a causal agent of banana streak disease throughout the world. The genetic diversity of BSVs from different regions of banana plantations has previously been investigated, but there are relatively few reports of the genetic characteristic of episomal (non-integrated) BSV genomes isolated from China. Here, the complete genome, a total of 7722bp (GenBank accession number DQ092436), of an isolate of Banana streak virus (BSV) on cultivar Cavendish (BSAcYNV) in Yunnan, China was determined. The genome organises in the typical manner of badnaviruses. The intergenic region of genomic DNA contains a large stem-loop, which may contribute to the ribosome shift into the following open reading frames (ORFs). The coding region of BSAcYNV consists of three overlapping ORFs, ORF1 with a non-AUG start codon and ORF2 encoding two small proteins are individually involved in viral movement and ORF3 encodes a polyprotein. Besides the complete genome, a defective genome lacking the whole RNA leader region and a majority of ORF1 and which encompasses 6525bp was also isolated and sequenced from this BSV DNA reservoir in infected banana plants. Sequence analyses showed that BSAcYNV has closest similarity in terms of genome organization and the coding assignments with an BSV isolate from Vietnam (BSAcVNV). The corresponding coding regions shared identities of 88% and -95% at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated BSAcYNV shared the closest geographical evolutionary relationship to BSAcVNV among sequenced banana streak badnaviruses.

  13. Lucerne transient streak virus; a Recently Detected Virus Infecting Alfafa (Medicago sativa) in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ahmed; Al-Shahwan, Ibrahim M.; Abdalla, Omer A.; Al-Saleh, Mohammed A.; Amer, Mahmoud A.

    2017-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the status of Lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in three high-yielding alfalfa regions in central Saudi Arabia (Riyadh, Qassim, and Hail) during 2014. Three hundred and eight symptomatic alfalfa, and seven Sonchus oleraceus samples were collected. DAS-ELISA indicated that 59 of these samples were positive to LTSV. Two isolates of LTSV from each region were selected for molecular studies. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of LTSV in the selected samples using a specific primer pair. Percentage identity and homology tree comparisons revealed that all Saudi isolates were more closely related to each other but also closely related to the Canadian isolate-JQ782213 (97.1–97.6%) and the New Zealand isolate-U31286 (95.8–97.1%). Comparing Saudi isolates of LTSV with ten other sobemoviruses based on the coat protein gene sequences confirmed the distant relationship between them. Eleven out of fourteen plant species used in host range study were positive to LTSV. This is the first time to document that Trifolium alexandrinum, Nicotiana occidentalis, Chenopodium glaucum, and Lathyrus sativus are new host plant species for LTSV and that N. occidentalis being a good propagative host for it. PMID:28167887

  14. Lucerne transient streak virus; a Recently Detected Virus Infecting Alfafa (Medicago sativa) in Central Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ahmed; Al-Shahwan, Ibrahim M; Abdalla, Omer A; Al-Saleh, Mohammed A; Amer, Mahmoud A

    2017-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the status of Lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in three high-yielding alfalfa regions in central Saudi Arabia (Riyadh, Qassim, and Hail) during 2014. Three hundred and eight symptomatic alfalfa, and seven Sonchus oleraceus samples were collected. DAS-ELISA indicated that 59 of these samples were positive to LTSV. Two isolates of LTSV from each region were selected for molecular studies. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of LTSV in the selected samples using a specific primer pair. Percentage identity and homology tree comparisons revealed that all Saudi isolates were more closely related to each other but also closely related to the Canadian isolate-JQ782213 (97.1-97.6%) and the New Zealand isolate-U31286 (95.8-97.1%). Comparing Saudi isolates of LTSV with ten other sobemoviruses based on the coat protein gene sequences confirmed the distant relationship between them. Eleven out of fourteen plant species used in host range study were positive to LTSV. This is the first time to document that Trifolium alexandrinum, Nicotiana occidentalis, Chenopodium glaucum, and Lathyrus sativus are new host plant species for LTSV and that N. occidentalis being a good propagative host for it.

  15. Effects of single and double infections of winter wheat by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus on yield determinants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. It is transmitted by wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella Keifer) which also transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Wheat mosaic virus. In a gree...

  16. A possible scenario for the evolution of Banana streak virus in banana.

    PubMed

    Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Chabannes, Matthieu; Duroy, Pierre-Olivier; Muller, Emmanuelle

    2014-06-24

    Outbreaks of Banana streak virus (BSV) have been recorded worldwide where Musa spp. is grown during the last 20 years with no convincing evidence of epidemics. Epidemics were previously reported in Uganda where BSV is currently endemic. BSV is a plant pararetrovirus of the family Caulimoviridae, genus Badnavirus it causes chlorosis leaf streak disease. The information currently available on banana streak disease makes it possible to identify a complex of distinct BSV species each causing the same disease. BSV exists in two states: one as an episomal form, infecting plant cells; the other as viral DNA integrated within the B genome of banana (endogenous BSV-eBSV) forming a viral genome for de novo viral particles. Both forms can be infectious in banana plants. The BSV phylogeny is polyphyletic with BSV distributed in two clades. Clade 1 clusters BSV species that occur worldwide and may have an eBSV counterpart, whereas Clade 3 only comprises BSV species from Uganda. Clearly, two distinct origins explain such BSV diversity. However, the epidemiology/outbreaks of BSV remains unclear and the role of eBSV needs to be clarified. In this review, the biodiversity of BSV is explained and discussed in the light of field and molecular epidemiology data. A scheme is proposed for the co-evolution of BSV and banana based on old or recent infection hypotheses related to African domestication sites and banana dissemination to explain the disease context.

  17. Effect of temperature on wheat streak mosaic virus replication and movement in resistant and susceptible wheat cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an economically important virus causing annual average yield losses of ~2-3% in winter wheat across the Great Plains. Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors that influences disease development and severity. The objective of this study was t...

  18. Wheat streak mosaic virus P1: Defining the minimal region required for the suppression of RNA silencing activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the most economically important wheat virus in the Great Plains region of USA. WSMV is the type species of the genus Tritimovirus in the family Potyviridae, and is transmitted by the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer. Previously, we reported that WSMV P1 f...

  19. Comparative analysis of virus-derived small RNAs within cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) infected with cassava brown streak viruses.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Ilyas, Muhammad; Alicai, Titus; Rey, Marie E C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-04-02

    Infection of plant cells by viral pathogens triggers RNA silencing, an innate antiviral defense mechanism. In response to infection, small RNAs (sRNAs) are produced that associate with Argonaute (AGO)-containing silencing complexes which act to inactivate viral genomes by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Deep sequencing was used to compare virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in cassava genotypes NASE 3, TME 204 and 60444 infected with the positive sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the causal agents of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). An abundance of 21-24nt vsRNAs was detected and mapped, covering the entire CBSV and UCBSV genomes. The 21nt vsRNAs were most predominant, followed by the 22 nt class with a slight bias toward sense compared to antisense polarity, and a bias for adenine and uracil bases present at the 5'-terminus. Distribution and frequency of vsRNAs differed between cassava genotypes and viral genomes. In susceptible genotypes TME 204 and 60444, CBSV-derived sRNAs were seen in greater abundance than UCBSV-derived sRNAs. NASE 3, known to be resistant to UCBSV, accumulated negligible UCBSV-derived sRNAs but high populations of CBSV-derived sRNAs. Transcript levels of cassava homologues of AGO2, DCL2 and DCL4, which are central to the gene-silencing complex, were found to be differentially regulated in CBSV- and UCBSV-infected plants across genotypes, suggesting these proteins play a role in antiviral defense. Irrespective of genotype or viral pathogen, maximum populations of vsRNAs mapped to the cytoplasmic inclusion, P1 and P3 protein-encoding regions. Our results indicate disparity between CBSV and UCBSV host-virus interaction mechanisms, and provide insight into the role of virus-induced gene silencing as a mechanism of resistance to CBSD.

  20. Immunodiagnosis of episomal Banana streak MY virus using polyclonal antibodies to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Kumar, P Vignesh; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    A cryptic Badnavirus species complex, known as banana streak viruses (BSV) poses a serious threat to banana production and genetic improvement worldwide. Due to the presence of integrated BSV sequences in the banana genome, routine detection is largely based on serological and nucleo-serological diagnostic methods which require high titre specific polyclonal antiserum. Viral structural proteins like coat protein (CP) are the best target for in vitro expression, to be used as antigen for antiserum production. However, in badnaviruses precise CP sequences are not known. In this study, two putative CP coding regions (p48 and p37) of Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) were identified in silico by comparison with caulimoviruses, retroviruses and Rice tungro bacilliform virus. The putative CP coding region (p37) was in vitro expressed in pMAL system and affinity purified. The purified fusion protein was used as antigen for raising polyclonal antiserum in rabbit. The specificity of antiserum was confirmed in Western blots, immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antigen coated plate-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA). The antiserum (1:2000) was successfully used in ACP-ELISA for specific detection of BSMYV infection in field and tissue culture raised banana plants. The antiserum was also utilized in immuno-capture PCR (IC-PCR) based indexing of episomal BSMYV infection. This is the first report of in silico identification of putative CP region of BSMYV, production of polyclonal antiserum against recombinant p37 and its successful use in immunodetection.

  1. Cassava brown streak virus has a rapidly evolving genome: implications for virus speciation, variability, diagnosis and host resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alicai, Titus; Ndunguru, Joseph; Sseruwagi, Peter; Tairo, Fred; Okao-Okuja, Geoffrey; Nanvubya, Resty; Kiiza, Lilliane; Kubatko, Laura; Kehoe, Monica A.; Boykin, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is a major staple food for about 800 million people in the tropics and sub-tropical regions of the world. Production of cassava is significantly hampered by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). The disease is suppressing cassava yields in eastern Africa at an alarming rate. Previous studies have documented that CBSV is more devastating than UCBSV because it more readily infects both susceptible and tolerant cassava cultivars, resulting in greater yield losses. Using whole genome sequences from NGS data, we produced the first coalescent-based species tree estimate for CBSV and UCBSV. This species framework led to the finding that CBSV has a faster rate of evolution when compared with UCBSV. Furthermore, we have discovered that in CBSV, nonsynonymous substitutions are more predominant than synonymous substitution and occur across the entire genome. All comparative analyses between CBSV and UCBSV presented here suggest that CBSV may be outsmarting the cassava immune system, thus making it more devastating and harder to control. PMID:27808114

  2. A simplified method for simultaneous detection of Rice stripe virus and Rice black-streaked dwarf virus in insect vector.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Xi; Xu, Jianxiang; Ji, Yinghua; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are transmitted by their common vector small brown planthopper (SBPH) that cause serious crop losses in China. A simple reverse transcription-PCR method was developed for the simultaneous detection of RSV and RBSDV in single SBPH. Three primers targeted to RSV-RNA4 and RBSDV-S2 segments were designed to amplify respectively 1114-bp and 414-bp fragments in a reaction. The method is reliable, rapid and inexpensive for detecting the two viruses in vector, which could facilitate better forecasting and control of the virus diseases. Using this method, it was found that SBPH could carry RSV and RBSDV simultaneously.

  3. Necrotic streak disease of tomato in Florida caused by a new ilarvirus species related to Tulare apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel ilarvirus for which the name Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is proposed was detected in Florida tomato plants beginning in October 2013. Symptoms including necrosis of leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on fruits were observed. This report provides an overview o...

  4. Genomic and biological characterization of Tomato necrotic streak virus, a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus infecting tomato in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is a recently described ilarvirus that was detected in tomato in Florida. The full TomNSV genome sequence revealed it to be a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus with little nucleotide identity to other previously reported tomato-infecting ilarviruses. Experimental hos...

  5. Development and validation of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphisms for wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) can cause significant yield loss in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of North America. A recently identified WSMV resistance gene, Wsm2, was mapped to chromosome 3BS in germplasm line ‘CO960293–2’. Effective genetic markers tightly linked to the gene ...

  6. Transcriptome of the plant virus vector Graminella nigrifrons, and the molecular interactions of Maize fine streak rhabdovirus transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Leafhoppers (Hemiptera:Cicadellidae) are plant-phloem feeders that are known for their ability to vector plant pathogens. The black-faced leafhopper (Graminella nigrifrons) has been identified as the only known vector for the Maize fine streak virus (MFSV), an emerging plant pathogen in...

  7. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  8. Synergism between southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus and rice ragged stunt virus enhances their insect vector acquisition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Wang, Han; Zhou, Guohui

    2014-07-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a tentative species in the genus Fijivirus, family Reoviridae, is a novel rice virus transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera). Since its discovery in 2001, SRBSDV has spread rapidly throughout eastern and southeastern Asia and caused large rice losses in China and Vietnam. Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) (genus Oryzavirus, family Reoviridae) is a common rice virus vectored by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens). RRSV is also widely distributed in eastern and southeastern Asia but has not previously caused serious problems in China owing to its low incidence. With SRBSDV's spread, however, RRSV has become increasingly common in China, and is frequently found in co-infection with SRBSDV. In this study, we show that SRBSDV and RRSV interact synergistically, the first example of synergism between plant viruses in the family Reoviridae. Rice plants co-infected with both viruses displayed enhanced stunting, earlier symptoms, and higher virus titers compared with singly infected plants. Furthermore, white-backed and brown planthoppers acquired SRBSDV and RRSV, respectively, from co-infected plants at higher rates. We propose that increased RRSV incidence in Chinese fields is partly due to synergism between SRBSDV and RRSV.

  9. Impact of Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus co-infection of wheat on transmission rates by wheat curl mites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are transmitted by the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer). Previous work has shown that different mite genotypes transmit TriMV at different rates. The objective of this research was to determine if mite genotypes differ...

  10. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  11. The c-terminus of wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multifunctional viral coat proteins (CPs) play important roles in the virus life-cycle. The CP determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus transpo...

  12. Molecular interactions and immune responses between maize fine streak virus and the leafhopper vector G. nigrifrons through differential expression and RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is an emerging virus of maize that is transmitted by an insect vector, the leafhopper called Graminella nigrifrons. Virus transmission by the leafhopper requires that the virus enter into and multiply in insect cells, tissues and organs before being transmitted to a ne...

  13. A simple, novel and high efficiency sap inoculation method to screen for tobacco streak virus.

    PubMed

    Sundaresha, S; Sreevathsa, Rohini; Balol, Gurupada B; Keshavareddy, G; Rangaswamy, K T; Udayakumar, M

    2012-10-01

    A rapid and efficient sap inoculation method for tobacco streak virus (TSV) was developed in sunflower. Sap from TSV-infected sunflower plants was freshly extracted in phosphate buffer and diluted serially from 10(-1) to 10(-8). Two-day old seedlings of sunflower were injured at the meristem and immersed in the sap for 10 min, maintained at 20 °C for 2-3 days and shifted to greenhouse. The surviving seedlings in the respective sap dilution were scored for symptoms of sunflower necrosis disease (SND). SND symptoms were seen in 80 % of the seedlings inoculated with a sap dilution of 10(-5). ELISA and RT-PCR analysis of coat protein and movement protein of TSV confirmed SND symptoms. The methodology was also found to be reproducible when the sap from the infected plants was inoculated onto healthy plants. The main aim of the study was to develop a primary screening strategy for the selection of transgenics developed for SND resistance. This methodology can also be extended for the analysis of resistance against other viruses.

  14. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  15. Complete genome sequence and in planta subcellular localization of maize fine streak virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Wei; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Willie, Kristen J; Reed, Sharon; Goodin, Michael; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2005-05-01

    The genome of the nucleorhabdovirus maize fine streak virus (MFSV) consists of 13,782 nucleotides of nonsegmented, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA. The antigenomic strand consisted of seven open reading frames (ORFs), and transcripts of all ORFs were detected in infected plants. ORF1, ORF6, and ORF7 had significant similarities to the nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein (G), and polymerase (L) genes of other rhabdoviruses, respectively, whereas the ORF2, ORF3, ORF4, and ORF5 proteins had no significant similarities. The N (ORF1), ORF4, and ORF5 proteins localized to nuclei, consistent with the presence of nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in these proteins. ORF5 likely encodes the matrix protein (M), based on its size, the position of its NLS, and the localization of fluorescent protein fusions to the nucleus. ORF2 probably encodes the phosphoprotein (P) because, like the P protein of Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV), it was spread throughout the cell when expressed alone but was relocalized to a subnuclear locus when coexpressed with the MFSV N protein. Unexpectedly, coexpression of the MFSV N and P proteins, but not the orthologous proteins of SYNV, resulted in accumulations of both proteins in the nucleolus. The N and P protein relocalization was specific to cognate proteins of each virus. The subcellular localizations of the MFSV ORF3 and ORF4 proteins were distinct from that of the SYNV sc4 protein, suggesting different functions. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative study of the cellular localizations of plant rhabdoviral proteins. This study indicated that plant rhabdoviruses are diverse in genome sequence and viral protein interactions.

  16. Substitution of conserved cysteine residues in Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substitutions in the amino-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) HC-Pro were evaluated for effects on transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Alanine substitution at cysteine residues 16, 46 and 49 abolished vector transmission. Although alanine substitution a...

  17. New Experimental Hosts of Tobacco streak virus and Absence of True Seed Transmission in Leguminous Hosts.

    PubMed

    Vemana, K; Jain, R K

    2010-10-01

    Of 70 plant species tested, 50 species were susceptible to Tobacco streak virus (TSV) on sap inoculation. Both localized (necrotic and chlorotic spots) and systemic (necrotic spots, axillary shoot proliferation, stunting, total necrosis and wilt) symptoms are observed by majority of plant species. Eleven new experimental hosts were identified viz., Amaranthus blitum var. oleracea (Chaulai sag), Celosia cristata (Cocks comb), Beta vulgaris var. bengalensis (Palak/Indian spinach), Calendula officinalis (Pot marigold), Chrysanthemum indicum, Cosmos sulphurens (Yellow cosmos), Citrullus lunatus (Watermelon), Lagenaria siceraria (Bottle gourd), Coriandrum sativum (Coriander), Hibiscus subderiffa var. subderiffa (Roselle) and Portulaca oleraceae (Little hogweed). Detected groundnut seed infection with TSV for the first time by Direct antigen coated immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) using whole seed. The seed infection ranged from 18.9 to 28.9% among the seeds collected from naturally infected and sap inoculated groundnut varieties (JL 24, TMV 2, Prasuna, Kadiri 6, Kadiri 9, Anantha and Kadiri 7 Bold) belonging to spanish and virginia types. Further, TSV was detected both in pod shell and seed testa and none of the samples showed the presence of TSV either in cotyledon or embryo. Grow-out and bio-assay tests proved the absence of seed transmission in groundnut and other legume crops. Hence, TSV isolate was not a true seed transmission case under Indian conditions in legumes.

  18. Genetic structure of rice black-streaked dwarf virus populations in China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao; Zheng, Fang-Qiang; Tang, Wei; Zhu, Qin-Qin; Li, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Guang-Min; Liu, Huan-Ting; Liu, Bao-Shen

    2013-12-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus belonging to the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae. The genome of RBSDV consists of ten dsRNA segments. Although RBSDV has caused significant economic losses to rice and maize production in the past few years in China, its molecular diversity and evolution remain largely unknown. To elucidate the factor(s) underlying the evolution of RBSDV, we determined segment 8 (S8; carrying ORF8 encoding the minor core capsid protein) sequences of 101 samples and segment 10 (S10; carrying ORF10 encoding the major capsid protein) sequences of 103 samples. The results show that both ORF8 and ORF10 are under negative selection. The S8 of three isolates and S10 of two isolates are recombinants. The RBSDV population in China can be classified into three groups according to S8 sequences or into two groups according to S10 sequences, irrespective of host or geographical origin. Of the RBSDV isolates with both S8 and S10 sequences available, 17 are between-group reassortants and 30 are between-subgroup reassortants. The RBSDV subpopulations from different geographical regions and hosts show frequent gene flow within or between subpopulations. The RBSDV population from maize is in a state of expansion. In this study, no new emergent population was detected. Taken together, the results indicate that, in addition to recombination and negative selection, reassortment and gene flow are important factors that drive evolution of RBSDV in China.

  19. RNAi-mediated resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf virus in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed M S; Bian, Shiquan; Wang, Muyue; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Bingwei; Liu, Qiaoquan; Zhang, Changquan; Tang, Shuzhu; Gu, Minghong; Yu, Hengxiu

    2016-11-30

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae, causes significant economic losses in rice production in China and many other Asian countries. Development of resistant varieties by using conventional breeding methods is limited, as germplasm with high level of resistance to RBSDV have not yet been found. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RBSDV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi) technology. RBSDV non-structural protein P7-2, encoded by S7-2 gene, is a potential F-box protein and involved in the plant-virus interaction through the ubiquitination pathway. P8, encoded by S8 gene, is the minor core protein that possesses potent active transcriptional repression activity. In this study, we transformed rice calli using a mini-twin T-DNA vector harboring RNAi constructs of the RBSDV genes S7-2 or S8, and obtained plants harboring the target gene constructs and the selectable marker gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT). From the offspring of these transgenic plants, we obtained selectable marker (HPT gene)-free plants. Homozygous T5 transgenic lines which harbored either S7-2-RNAi or S8-RNAi exhibited high level resistance against RBSDV under field infection pressure from indigenous viruliferous small brown planthoppers. Thus, our results showed that RNA interference with the expression of S7-2 or S8 genes seemed an effective way to induce high level resistance in rice against RBSD disease.

  20. Recombination hotspots and host susceptibility modulate the adaptive value of recombination during maize streak virus evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maize streak virus -strain A (MSV-A; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae), the maize-adapted strain of MSV that causes maize streak disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa, probably arose between 100 and 200 years ago via homologous recombination between two MSV strains adapted to wild grasses. MSV recombination experiments and analyses of natural MSV recombination patterns have revealed that this recombination event entailed the exchange of the movement protein - coat protein gene cassette, bounded by the two genomic regions most prone to recombination in mastrevirus genomes; the first surrounding the virion-strand origin of replication, and the second around the interface between the coat protein gene and the short intergenic region. Therefore, aside from the likely adaptive advantages presented by a modular exchange of this cassette, these specific breakpoints may have been largely predetermined by the underlying mechanisms of mastrevirus recombination. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed artificial, low-fitness, reciprocal chimaeric MSV genomes using alternating genomic segments from two MSV strains; a grass-adapted MSV-B, and a maize-adapted MSV-A. Between them, each pair of reciprocal chimaeric genomes represented all of the genetic material required to reconstruct - via recombination - the highly maize-adapted MSV-A genotype, MSV-MatA. We then co-infected a selection of differentially MSV-resistant maize genotypes with pairs of reciprocal chimaeras to determine the efficiency with which recombination would give rise to high-fitness progeny genomes resembling MSV-MatA. Results Recombinants resembling MSV-MatA invariably arose in all of our experiments. However, the accuracy and efficiency with which the MSV-MatA genotype was recovered across all replicates of each experiment depended on the MSV susceptibility of the maize genotypes used and the precise positions - in relation to known recombination hotspots - of the breakpoints

  1. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus: a white-backed planthopper-transmitted fijivirus threatening rice production in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guohui; Xu, Donglin; Xu, Dagao; Zhang, Maoxin

    2013-09-09

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a non-enveloped icosahedral virus with a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments, is a novel species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae) first recognized in 2008. Rice plants infected with this virus exhibit symptoms similar to those caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus. Since 2009, the virus has rapidly spread and caused serious rice losses in East and Southeast Asia. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding this disease, especially about the functions of the viral genes, rice-virus-insect interactions, and epidemiology and control measures. The virus can be efficiently transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent circulative propagative manner but cannot be transmitted by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Rice, maize, Chinese sorghum (Coix lacryma-jobi) and other grass weeds can be infected via WBPH. However, only rice plays a major role in the virus infection cycle because of the vector's preference. In Southeast Asia, WBPH is a long-distance migratory rice pest. The disease cycle can be described as follows: SRBSDV and its WBPH vector overwinter in warm tropical or sub-tropical areas; viruliferous WBPH adults carry the virus from south to north via long-distance migration in early spring, transmit the virus to rice seedlings in the newly colonized areas, and lay eggs on the infected seedlings; the next generation of WBPHs propagate on infected seedlings, become viruliferous, disperse, and cause new disease outbreaks. Several molecular and serological methods have been developed to detect SRBSDV in plant tissues and individual insects. Control measures based on protection from WBPH, including seedbed coverage, chemical seed treatments, and chemical spraying of seedlings, have proven effective in China.

  2. Replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA of lucerne transient streak virus are supported in divergent hosts by cocksfoot mottle virus and turnip rosette virus.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, O P; Sinha, R C; Gellatly, D L; Ivanov, I; AbouHaidar, M G

    1993-04-01

    Cocksfoot mottle sobemovirus supports replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA (sat-RNA) of lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in two monocotyledonous species, Triticum aestivum and Dactylis glomerata. Additionally, LTSV sat-RNA replicates effectively in the presence of turnip rosette sobemovirus in Brassica rapa, Raphanus raphanistrum and Sinapsis arvensis, but not in Thlaspi arvense or Nicotiana bigelovii, indicating that host species markedly influence this interaction. Previous reports of the association between LTSV sat-RNA and helper sobemoviruses were limited to dicotyledonous hosts. Our results demonstrate that the biological interaction between these two entities spans divergent dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species.

  3. Subpopulation level variation of banana streak viruses in India and common evolution of banana and sugarcane badnaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Vignesh Kumar, P; Geetanjali, A Swapna; Pun, Khem Bahadur; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Genome sequences of three episomal Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) isolates sampled from triploid banana hybrids (Chini Champa: AAB; Malbhog: AAB and Monthan: ABB), grown in North-East and South India are reported in this study by sequence-independent improved rolling circle amplification (RCA). RCA coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism revealed diverse restriction profiles of five BSMYV isolates. Nucleotide substitution rates of BSMYV subpopulation and Banana streak OL virus subpopulation was 7.13 × 10(-3) to 1.59 × 10(-2) and 2.65 × 10(-3) to 5.49 × 10(-3), respectively, for the different coding regions. Analysis of the genetic diversity of banana and sugarcane badnaviruses revealed a total of 32 unique recombination events among banana and sugarcane badnaviruses (inter BSV-SCBV), in addition to the extensive recombination with in banana streak viruses and sugarcane bacilliform viruses (intra-BSV and intra-SCBV). Many unique fragments were shown to contain similar ruminant sequence fragments which indicated the possibility that the two groups of badnaviruses or their ancestors to colonise same host before making the host shift. The distribution of recombination events, hot-spots (intergenic region and C-terminal of ORF3) as well as cold-spots (distributed in ORF3) displayed the mirroring of recombination traces in both group of badnaviruses. These results support the hypothesis of relatedness of banana and sugarcane badnaviruses and the host and geographical shifts that followed the fixation of the species complex appear to be a recent event.

  4. Wheat streak mosaic virus infects systemically despite extensive coat protein deletions: identification of virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement determinants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral coat proteins function in virion assembly and virus biology in a tightly coordinated manner with a role for virtually every amino acid. In this study, we demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) (genus Tritimovirus; family Potyviridae) is unusually tolerant o...

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence and taxonomy of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus, member of a novel genus in the family Potyviridae.

    PubMed

    Xu, D-L; Zhou, G-H; Xie, Y-J; Mock, R; Li, R

    2010-06-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a Pakistani isolate of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV-PAK) is determined to be 9782 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail, and it comprises a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3130 amino acid residues. The deduced polyprotein is likely to be cleaved at nine putative protease sites by three viral proteases to ten mature proteins. Conserved motifs of orthologous proteins of other potyviruses are identified in corresponding positions of SCSMV-PAK. The genomic organization is virtually identical to the genera Ipomovirus, Potyvirus, Rymovirus, and Tritimovirus in the family Potyviridae. Sequence analyses indicate that the SCSMV-PAK genomic sequence is different from those of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus, two viruses with very similar symptoms and host range to SCSMV-PAK. SCSMV-PAK shares 52.7% identity with Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) and 26.4-31.5% identities with species of the existing genera and unassigned viruses in the Potyviridae at the polyprotein sequence level. Phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein and deduced mature protein amino acid sequences reveal that SCSMV, together with TriMV, forms a distinct group in the family at the genus level. Therefore, SCSMV should represent a new genus, Susmovirus, in the Potyviridae.

  6. Strand-specific real-time RT-PCR quantitation of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs using high temperature reverse transcription

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to analyze the replicative RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MVSF) within maize tissue was complicated by the lack of specificity during cDNA generation using standard reverse transcriptase protocols. Real-time qRT-PCR using cDNA generated by priming with random hexamers does not dist...

  7. Strand-specific real-time RT-PCR quantitation of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs using high temperature reverse transcription

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to analyze the replicative RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) within maize tissue was complicated by the lack of specificity during cDNA generation using standard reverse transcriptase protocols. Real-time qRT-PCR using cDNA generated by priming with random hexamers does not dist...

  8. [Corn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa History for Young People, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on corn. Iowa is the number one corn producing state in the United States. The featured articles in the issue concern, among other topics, Iowa children who live on farms, facts and statistics about corn, the Mesquakie Indians and corn shelling, corn hybrids, a short story, and the corn palaces of Sioux City. Activities,…

  9. Phylogeny of Banana Streak Virus reveals recent and repetitive endogenization in the genome of its banana host (Musa sp.).

    PubMed

    Gayral, Philippe; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line

    2009-07-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV) is a plant dsDNA pararetrovirus (family Caulimoviridae, genus badnavirus). Although integration is not an essential step in the BSV replication cycle, the nuclear genome of banana (Musa sp.) contains BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs). Some BSV EPRVs are infectious by reconstituting a functional viral genome. Recent studies revealed a large molecular diversity of episomal BSV viruses (i.e., nonintegrated) while others focused on BSV EPRV sequences only. In this study, the evolutionary history of badnavirus integration in banana was inferred from phylogenetic relationships between BSV and BSV EPRVs. The relative evolution rates and selective pressures (d(N)/d(S) ratio) were also compared between endogenous and episomal viral sequences. At least 27 recent independent integration events occurred after the divergence of three banana species, indicating that viral integration is a recent and frequent phenomenon. Relaxation of selective pressure on badnaviral sequences that experienced neutral evolution after integration in the plant genome was recorded. Additionally, a significant decrease (35%) in the EPRV evolution rate was observed compared to BSV, reflecting the difference in the evolution rate between episomal dsDNA viruses and plant genome. The comparison of our results with the evolution rate of the Musa genome and other reverse-transcribing viruses suggests that EPRVs play an active role in episomal BSV diversity and evolution.

  10. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus alters insect vectors' host orientation preferences to enhance spread and increase rice ragged stunt virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Xu, Donglin; Pu, Lingling; Zhou, Guohui

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a tentative species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae), has spread rapidly and caused serious rice losses in eastern and southeastern Asia. With this virus spread, Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV, genus Oryzavirus, family Reoviridae) became more common in southern China, usually in co-infection with the former. SRBSDV and RRSV are transmitted by two different species of planthoppers, white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) and brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens), respectively, in a persistent, circulative, propagative manner. In this study, using a Y-shape olfactometer-based device, we tested the host preference of three types of macropterous WBPH adults for healthy or SRBSDV-infected rice plants. The results showed that virus-free WBPHs significantly preferred infected rice plants to healthy plants, whereas both the viruliferous and nonviruliferous WBPHs preferred healthy plants to infected plants. In additional tests, we found that the BPHs significantly preferred healthy plants when they were virus free, whereas RRSV-carrying BPHs preferred SRBSDV-infected rice plants. From these findings, we propose that plant viruses may alter host selection preference of vectors to enhance their spread and that of insects vectoring another virus to result in co-infection with more than one virus.

  11. Multiplex RT-PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of both RNA and DNA viruses infecting cassava and the common occurrence of mixed infections by two cassava brown streak viruses in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Abarshi, M M; Mohammed, I U; Jeremiah, S C; Legg, J P; Kumar, P Lava; Hillocks, R J; Maruthi, M N

    2012-01-01

    Uniplex and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocols were developed for the detection of cassava brown streak viruses (CBSVs) in single and mixed infections with cassava mosaic begomoviruses (CMBs) in a tropical crop plant, cassava (Manihot esculenta). CMBs contain ssDNA as their genome (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) while CBSVs are made up of positive sense ssRNA (genus Ipomovirus, family Potyviridae), and they cause the economically important cassava mosaic and cassava brown streak diseases, respectively, in sub-Saharan Africa. Diagnostic methodologies have long been available for CMBs but they are limited for CBSVs especially in mixed infections. In this study, the two CBSVs, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) occurring singly or in mixed infection with CMBs, African cassava mosaic virus and East African cassava mosaic virus were detected in a single RT-PCR using both previously described and newly designed virus-specific primers. These protocols were highly efficient for detecting CBSVs compared to the existing methods and have great potential to minimize sample handling and contamination. As well as improving the diagnosis of cassava viruses, the development of multiplex RT-PCR protocols have revealed the common occurrence of mixed infections by CBSV and CBSUV in cassava fields of Tanzania and Kenya, which was contrary to the common belief until recently that these two viruses have existed separately. These protocols have implications for diagnosis and epidemiological studies on cassava virus diseases in Eastern Africa.

  12. Mapping quantitative trait loci conferring resistance to rice black-streaked virus in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Luan, Junwen; Wang, Fei; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Juren

    2012-08-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is one of the most serious virus diseases of maize worldwide, and it causes great reduction of maize production. In China, the pathogen was shown to be rice black-streaked virus (RBSDV). Currently, MRDD has spread broadly and leads to significant loss in China. However, there has been little research devoted to this disease. Our aims were to identify the markers and loci underlying resistance to this virus disease. In this study, segregation populations were constructed from two maize elite lines '90110', which is highly resistant to MRDD and 'Ye478', which is highly susceptible to MRDD. The F(2) and BC(1) populations were used for bulk sergeant analysis (BSA) to identify resistance-related markers. One hundred and twenty F(7:9) RILs were used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping through the experiment of multiple environments over 3 years. Natural occurrence and artificial inoculation were both used and combined to determine the phenotype of plants. Five QTL, qMRD2, qMRD6, qMRD7, qMRD8 and qMRD10 were measured in the experiments. The qMRD8 on chromosome 8 was proved to be one major QTL conferring resistance to RBSDV disease in almost all traits and environments, which explained 12.0-28.9 % of the phenotypic variance for disease severity in this present study.

  13. Evolution of endogenous sequences of banana streak virus: what can we learn from banana (Musa sp.) evolution?

    PubMed

    Gayral, Philippe; Blondin, Laurence; Guidolin, Olivier; Carreel, Françoise; Hippolyte, Isabelle; Perrier, Xavier; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line

    2010-07-01

    Endogenous plant pararetroviruses (EPRVs) are viral sequences of the family Caulimoviridae integrated into the nuclear genome of numerous plant species. The ability of some endogenous sequences of Banana streak viruses (eBSVs) in the genome of banana (Musa sp.) to induce infections just like the virus itself was recently demonstrated (P. Gayral et al., J. Virol. 83:6697-6710, 2008). Although eBSVs probably arose from accidental events, infectious eBSVs constitute an extreme case of parasitism, as well as a newly described strategy for vertical virus transmission in plants. We investigated the early evolutionary stages of infectious eBSV for two distinct BSV species-GF (BSGFV) and Imové (BSImV)-through the study of their distribution, insertion polymorphism, and structure evolution among selected banana genotypes representative of the diversity of 60 wild Musa species and genotypes. To do so, the historical frame of host evolution was analyzed by inferring banana phylogeny from two chloroplast regions-matK and trnL-trnF-as well as from the nuclear genome, using 19 microsatellite loci. We demonstrated that both BSV species integrated recently in banana evolution, circa 640,000 years ago. The two infectious eBSVs were subjected to different selective pressures and showed distinct levels of rearrangement within their final structure. In addition, the molecular phylogenies of integrated and nonintegrated BSVs enabled us to establish the phylogenetic origins of eBSGFV and eBSImV.

  14. Temperature-dependent Wsm1 and Wsm2 gene-specific blockage of viral long-distance transport provides resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are economically important viral pathogens of wheat. Wheat cultivars Mace with the resistance gene Wsm1 and Snowmass with the resistance gene Wsm2 are resistant to WSMV and TriMV, and WSMV, respectively. Viral resistance in both cult...

  15. Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus generated by expression of an artificial polycistronic microRNA in wheat.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Muhammad; Millar, Anthony A; Wood, Craig C; Larkin, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is a persistent threat to wheat production, necessitating novel approaches for protection. We developed an artificial miRNA strategy against WSMV, incorporating five amiRNAs within one polycistronic amiRNA precursor. Using miRNA sequence and folding rules, we chose five amiRNAs targeting conserved regions of WSMV but avoiding off-targets in wheat. These replaced the natural miRNA in each of five arms of the polycistronic rice miR395, producing amiRNA precursor, FanGuard (FGmiR395), which was transformed into wheat behind a constitutive promoter. Splinted ligation detected all five amiRNAs being processed in transgenic leaves. Resistance was assessed over two generations. Three types of response were observed in T(1) plants of different transgenic families: completely immune; initially resistant with resistance breaking down over time; and initially susceptible followed by plant recovery. Deep sequencing of small RNAs from inoculated leaves allowed the virus sequence to be assembled from an immune transgenic, susceptible transgenic, and susceptible non-transgenic plant; the amiRNA targets were fully conserved in all three isolates, indicating virus replication on some transgenics was not a result of mutational escape by the virus. For resistant families, the resistance segregated with the transgene. Analysis in the T(2) generation confirmed the inheritance of immunity and gave further insights into the other phenotypes. Stable resistant lines developed no symptoms and no virus by ELISA; this resistance was classified as immunity when extracts failed to transmit from inoculated leaves to test plants. This study demonstrates the utility of a polycistronic amiRNA strategy in wheat against WSMV.

  16. Whole-genome expression analysis of Rice black-streaked dwarf virus in different plant hosts and small brown planthopper.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiufang; Ni, Haiping; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lan, Ying; Ren, Chunmei; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-11-10

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) can infect a number of gramineous plants and cause severe crop yield losses in southeast Asian countries. The virus is transmitted by small brown planthopper (SBPH) in a persistent circulative manner. The interactions between RBSDV and its different hosts remain unknown. Besides, how the virus adjusts itself to infect different hosts is unclear. In the present study, the relative RNA levels of the thirteen RBSDV genes in rice, maize, wheat, and SBPH were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. P7-1 and P10 genes were predominantly expressed whereas P8 and P7-2 genes were expressed at low levels in plant hosts. Similar to the expression in rice, P7-1 was the most abundantly expressed gene and P8 was expressed at the lowest level in SBPH, indicating that RBSDV adopts the same strategy to infect distinct hosts. The high expression levels of the P7-1 gene in both plants and insect suggest that it can be used as the target gene for disease diagnostics. However, the expression levels of some genes varied from host to host. P5-1, P6 and P9-1, the components of the RBSDV viroplasm, are differentially expressed in different hosts. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the quantity of the P9-1 protein was more abundant in SBPH than in plant hosts. These data indicate that the virus may adjust its own gene expression to replicate in different hosts. Analysis of time course of gene expression revealed that P7-1 stands out as the only gene highly expressed at the earliest time point and its expression precedes all others throughout infection from 8 to 24days post-inoculation. The high expression levels of the P7-1 gene suggest that it plays a significant role in RBSDV-host interactions.

  17. [cDNA cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of rice black-streaked dwarf virus segment 7].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yongwang; Zhou, Jie; Zhuang, Binquan; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2003-08-01

    Using primers designed from the terminal sequences of maize rough dwarf virus S6, a 2.2 kb cDNA fragment was amplified by RT-PCR from maize plants showing maize rough dwarf disease. Sequence analysis shows that the full length of this cDNA is 2193bp. It contains two open reading frames that encoded two polypeptides with molecular weight of 41.0kD and 36.3kD, respectively. Results of multi-sequences alignment suggest that, this cDNA sequence has significant similarity to rice black-streaked dwarf virus S7, much higher than to MRDV S6. The ORFs were cloned into expression vectors, pET21-d (ORF1) or pGEX-KG (ORF2), respectively, and then transformed to BL21(DE3)-gold. After induction with IPTG, both proteins were highly expressed. The recombinant proteins were purified and high titer antisera of these two proteins were prepared.

  18. Influence of rice black streaked dwarf virus on the ecological fitness of non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Xing; He, Xiao-Chan; Zheng, Xu-Song; Yang, Ya-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Xian

    2014-08-01

    Rice black streak dwarf virus (RBSDV) is transmitted by the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen). Non-vector rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), shares the same host rice plants with SBPH in paddy fields. The changes in nutritional composition of rice plants infected by RBSDV and the ecological fitness of BPH feeding on the infected plants were studied under both artificial climate chamber and field conditions. Contents of 16 detected amino acids and soluble sugar in RBSDV infected rice plants were higher than those in the healthy ones. On the diseased plants BPH had significantly higher nymphal survival rates, nymphal duration of the males, weight of the female adults, as well as egg hatchability compared to BPH being fed on healthy plants. However, there was no obvious difference in female nymph duration, longevity and fecundity. Defense enzymes (superoxidase dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) and detoxifying enzymes (carboxylesterase, CAE and glutathione S-transferase, GST) in BPH adults fed on diseased plants had markedly higher activities. The results indicate rice plants infected by RBSDV improved the ecological fitness of the brown planthopper, a serious pest but not a transmitter of the RBSDV virus.

  19. Large accumulations of maize streak virus in the filter chamber and midgut cells of the leafhopper vector Cicadulina mbila.

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Gargani, Daniel; Lett, Jean M; Peterschmitt, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV, Mastrevirus, Geminiviridae) is persistently transmitted by Cicadulina mbila, apparently without propagation in its leafhopper vector. MSV was shown earlier by quantitative PCR to accumulate in the alimentary canal of C. mbila. We examined the alimentary canals of C. mbila leafhoppers that acquired MSV from diseased plants for various acquisition access periods (AAP) by immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (iCLSM) and by immunogold labelling transmission electron microscopy (iTEM). Following a 7-day AAP and a 7-day inoculation period (IP) on healthy seedlings, MSV was detected by iCLSM mainly in the filter chamber and anterior midgut. Using iTEM, large accumulations of MSV particles, usually enclosed in membranous vesicles, were detected only in cells of the midgut, inside and outside the filter chamber, following 14- or 30-day AAPs, and also following 7-day AAP and 7-day IP on healthy plants. No virus was detected in the control non-vector species C. chinaï. Coated pits or vesicles, typical of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were not observed. We discuss an alternative endocytosis pathway and suggest that the MSV accumulations are stored in endosomes in the midgut epithelial cells.

  20. Characterization of rice black-streaked dwarf virus- and rice stripe virus-derived siRNAs in singly and doubly infected insect vector Laodelphax striatellus.

    PubMed

    Li, Junmin; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Lv, Yuanda; Ji, Yongqiang; Sun, Liying; Chen, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Replication of RNA viruses in insect cells triggers an antiviral defense that is mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) which generates viral-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). However, it is not known whether an antiviral RNAi response is also induced in insects by reoviruses, whose double-stranded RNA genome replication is thought to occur within core particles. Deep sequencing of small RNAs showed that when the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus) was infected by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) (Reoviridae; Fijivirus), more viral-derived siRNAs accumulated than when the vector insect was infected by Rice stripe virus (RSV), a negative single-stranded RNA virus. RBSDV siRNAs were predominantly 21 and 22 nucleotides long and there were almost equal numbers of positive and negative sense. RBSDV siRNAs were frequently generated from hotspots in the 5'- and 3'-terminal regions of viral genome segments but these hotspots were not associated with any predicted RNA secondary structures. Under laboratory condition, L. striatellus can be infected simultaneously with RBSDV and RSV. Double infection enhanced the accumulation of particular genome segments but not viral coat protein of RBSDV and correlated with an increase in the abundance of siRNAs derived from RBSDV. The results of this study suggest that reovirus replication in its insect vector potentially induces an RNAi-mediated antiviral response.

  1. Analysis of Sogatella furcifera proteome that interact with P10 protein of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus

    PubMed Central

    Than, Win; Qin, Faliang; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is transmitted efficiently only by white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent propagative manner. Here we used a yeast two-hybrid system to investigate the interactions between the SRBSDV- P10 and the cDNA library of WBPH. Of 130 proteins identified as putative interactors, 28 were further tested in a retransformation analysis and β-galactosidase assay to confirm the interaction. The full-length gene sequences of 5 candidate proteins: vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7), vesicle transport V-SNARE protein (Vti1A), growth hormone-inducible transmembrane protein (Ghitm), nascent polypeptide-associated complex subunit alpha, and ATP synthase lipid-binding protein) were amplified by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and used in a GST fusion protein pull-down assay. Three of these proteins interacted with SRBSDV-P10 in vitro experiment GST pull-down assay. In a gene expression analysis of 3 different growth stages and 6 different tissue organs of S. furcifera, the mRNA level of VAMP7 was high in adult males and gut. Vti1A was abundant in adult female, and malpighian tubule, gut and ovary. Ghitm was predominantly found in adult male and the malpighian tubule. These research findings are greatly helpful to understand the interaction between SRBSDV and insect vector. PMID:27653366

  2. Understanding the immune system architecture and transcriptome responses to southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus in Sogatella furcifera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Tang, Nan; Gao, Xinlei; Guo, Dongyang; Chang, Zhaoxia; Fu, Yating; Akinyemi, Ibukun A.; Wu, Qingfa

    2016-01-01

    Sogatella furcifera, the white-backed planthopper (WBPH), has become one of the most destructive pests in rice production owing to its plant sap-sucking behavior and efficient transmission of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) in a circulative, propagative and persistent manner. The dynamic and complex SRBSDV-WBPH-rice plant interaction is still poorly understood. In this study, based on a homology-based genome-wide analysis, 348 immune-related genes belonging to 28 families were identified in WBPH. A transcriptome analysis of non-viruliferous (NVF) and viruliferous groups with high viral titers (HVT) and median viral titers (MVT) revealed that feeding on SRBSDV-infected rice plants has a significant impact on gene expression, regardless of viral titers in insects. We identified 278 up-regulated and 406 down-regulated genes shared among the NVF, MVT, and HVT groups and detected significant down-regulation of primary metabolism-related genes and oxidoreductase. In viruliferous WBPH with viral titer-specific transcriptome changes, 1,906 and 1,467 genes exhibited strict monotonically increasing and decreasing expression, respectively. The RNAi pathway was the major antiviral response to increasing viral titers among diverse immune responses. These results clarify the responses of immune genes and the transcriptome of WBPH to SRBSDV and improve our knowledge of the functional relationship between pathogen, vector, and host. PMID:27805032

  3. Sequence analysis of the complete genome of rice black-streaked dwarf virus isolated from maize with rough dwarf disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Fang, Shou-Guo; Xu, Jia-Ling; Sun, Li-Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin

    2003-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of 10 genomic segments (S1-S10) from an isolate of rice black-streaked dwarf virus causing rough dwarf disease on maize (RBSDV-Hbm) in China were determined, a total of 29,142 base pairs (bp). Each segment possessed the genus-specific termini with conserved nucleotide sequences of (+) 5'-AAGUUUUU......CAGCUNNNGUC-3' and a perfect or imperfect inverted repeat of seven to eleven nucleotides immediately adjacent to the terminal conserved sequence. While the coding strand of most RBSDV-Hbm segments contained one open reading frame (ORF), there were two non-overlapping ORFs in S7 and S9, and one small overlapping ORF downstream of the major ORF in S5. Homology comparisons suggest that S1 encodes a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), with 63.5% and 32.6% identity to the putative RdRp encoded by Fiji disease virus (FDV) and Nilaparvata lugens reovirus (NLRV), respectively. The proteins encoded by S2, S3, and S4 showed various degrees of similarity to those encoded by the corresponding segments of FDV or NLRV. In S5 and S6, low identities were found to those of FDV only, but not to NLRV. Sequence analyses showed that RBSDV-Hbm had the most similarities in the genome organizations and the coding assignments with a RBSDV isolated from rice in China, in which each pair of the corresponding segments shared sequence identities of 93.8-98.9% and 93.5-100% at nucleotide or amino acid levels, respectively. In addition, phylogenetic analyses suggested that RBSDV-Hbm had the closest evolutionary relationship to RBSDV in Fijivirus.

  4. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm.

  5. Molecular Genetic Analysis and Evolution of Segment 7 in Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanping; Wu, Jirong; Meng, Qingchang; Han, Xiaohua; Hao, Zhuanfang; Li, Mingshun; Yong, Hongjun; Zhang, Degui; Zhang, Shihuang; Li, Xinhai

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) causes maize rough dwarf disease or rice black-streaked dwarf disease and can lead to severe yield losses in maize and rice. To analyse RBSDV evolution, codon usage bias and genetic structure were investigated in 111 maize and rice RBSDV isolates from eight geographic locations in 2013 and 2014. The linear dsRNA S7 is A+U rich, with overall codon usage biased toward codons ending with A (A3s, S7-1: 32.64%, S7-2: 29.95%) or U (U3s, S7-1: 44.18%, S7-2: 46.06%). Effective number of codons (Nc) values of 45.63 in S7-1 (the first open reading frame of S7) and 39.96 in S7-2 (the second open reading frame of S7) indicate low degrees of RBSDV-S7 codon usage bias, likely driven by mutational bias regardless of year, host, or geographical origin. Twelve optimal codons were detected in S7. The nucleotide diversity (π) of S7 sequences in 2013 isolates (0.0307) was significantly higher than in 2014 isolates (0.0244, P = 0.0226). The nucleotide diversity (π) of S7 sequences in isolates from Jinan (0.0391) was higher than that from the other seven locations (P < 0.01). Only one S7 recombinant was detected in Baoding. RBSDV isolates could be phylogenetically classified into two groups according to S7 sequences, and further classified into two subgroups. S7-1 and S7-2 were under negative and purifying selection, with respective Ka/Ks ratios of 0.0179 and 0.0537. These RBSDV populations were expanding (P < 0.01) as indicated by negative values for Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D, and Fu and Li's F. Genetic differentiation was detected in six RBSDV subpopulations (P < 0.05). Absolute Fst (0.0790) and Nm (65.12) between 2013 and 2014, absolute Fst (0.1720) and Nm (38.49) between maize and rice, and absolute Fst values of 0.0085-0.3069 and Nm values of 0.56-29.61 among these eight geographic locations revealed frequent gene flow between subpopulations. Gene flow between 2013 and 2014 was the most frequent. PMID:26121638

  6. Dual transcriptome analysis reveals insights into the response to Rice black-streaked dwarf virus in maize

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Xu, Zhennan; Duan, Canxing; Chen, Yanping; Meng, Qingchang; Wu, Jirong; Hao, Zhuanfang; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Mingshun; Yong, Hongjun; Zhang, Degui; Zhang, Shihuang; Weng, Jianfeng; Li, Xinhai

    2016-01-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a viral infection that results in heavy yield losses in maize worldwide, particularly in the summer maize-growing regions of China. MRDD is caused by the Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV). In the present study, analyses of microRNAs (miRNAs), the degradome, and transcriptome sequences were used to elucidate the RBSDV-responsive pathway(s) in maize. Genomic analysis indicated that the expression of three non-conserved and 28 conserved miRNAs, representing 17 known miRNA families and 14 novel miRNAs, were significantly altered in response to RBSDV when maize was inoculated at the V3 (third leaf) stage. A total of 99 target transcripts from 48 genes of 10 known miRNAs were found to be responsive to RBSDV infection. The annotations of these target genes include a SQUAMOSA promoter binding (SPB) protein, a P450 reductase, an oxidoreductase, and a ubiquitin-related gene, among others. Characterization of the entire transcriptome suggested that a total of 28 and 1085 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected at 1.5 and 3.0 d, respectively, after artificial inoculation with RBSDV. The expression patterns of cell wall- and chloroplast-related genes, and disease resistance- and stress-related genes changed significantly in response to RBSDV infection. The negatively regulated genes GRMZM2G069316 and GRMZM2G031169, which are the target genes for miR169i-p5 and miR8155, were identified as a nucleolin and a NAD(P)-binding Rossmann-fold superfamily protein in maize, respectively. The gene ontology term GO:0003824, including GRMZM2G031169 and other 51 DEGs, was designated as responsive to RBSDV. PMID:27493226

  7. NAC transcription factor family genes are differentially expressed in rice during infections with Rice dwarf virus, Rice black-streaked dwarf virus, Rice grassy stunt virus, Rice ragged stunt virus, and Rice transitory yellowing virus

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Satoh, Kouji; Karim, Mohammad Rezaul; Harikrishna, Jennifer A.; Shimizu, Takumi; Sasaya, Takahide; Omura, Toshihiro; Haque, Mohammad A.; Hasan, Sayed M. Z.; Ahmad, Aziz; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    Expression levels of the NAC gene family were studied in rice infected with Rice dwarf virus (RDV), Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV), and Rice transitory yellowing virus (RTYV). Microarray analysis showed that 75 (68%) OsNAC genes were differentially regulated during infection with RDV, RBSDV, RGSV, and RRSV compared with the control. The number of OsNAC genes up-regulated was highest during RGSV infection, while the lowest number was found during RTYV infection. These phenomena correlate with the severity of the syndromes induced by the virus infections. Most of the genes in the NAC subgroups NAC22, SND, ONAC2, ANAC34, and ONAC3 were down-regulated for all virus infections. These OsNAC genes might be related to the health stage maintenance of the host plants. Interestingly, most of the genes in the subgroups TIP and SNAC were more highly expressed during RBSDV and RGSV infections. These results suggested that OsNAC genes might be related to the responses induced by the virus infection. All of the genes assigned to the TIP subgroups were highly expressed during RGSV infection when compared with the control. For RDV infection, the number of activated genes was greatest during infection with the S-strain, followed by the D84-strain and the O-strain, with seven OsNAC genes up-regulated during infection by all three strains. The Os12g03050 and Os11g05614 genes showed higher expression during infection with four of the five viruses, and Os11g03310, Os11g03370, and Os07g37920 genes showed high expression during at least three viral infections. We identified some duplicate genes that are classified as neofunctional and subfunctional according to their expression levels in different viral infections. A number of putative cis-elements were identified, which may help to clarify the function of these key genes in network pathways. PMID:26442000

  8. Simultaneous virus-specific detection of the two cassava brown streak-associated viruses by RT-PCR reveals wide distribution in East Africa, mixed infections, and infections in Manihot glaziovii.

    PubMed

    Mbanzibwa, D R; Tian, Y P; Tugume, A K; Mukasa, S B; Tairo, F; Kyamanywa, S; Kullaya, A; Valkonen, J P T

    2011-02-01

    The expanding cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) epidemic in East Africa is caused by two ipomoviruses (genus Ipomovirus; Potyviridae), namely, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) that was described recently. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based diagnostic method was developed in this study for simultaneous virus-specific detection of the two viruses. Results showed that CBSV and UCBSV are distributed widely in the highlands (> 1000 m above the sea level) of the Lake Victoria zone in Uganda and Tanzania and also in the Indian Ocean costal lowlands of Tanzania. Isolates of UCBSV from the Lake Victoria zone were placed to two phylogenetic clusters in accordance with their origin in Uganda or Tanzania, respectively. Mixed infections with CBSV and UCBSV were detected in many cassava plants in the areas surveyed. CBSV was also detected in the perennial species Manihot glaziovii (DNA-barcoded in this study) in Tanzania, which revealed the first virus reservoir other than cassava. The method for detection of CBSV and UCBSV described in this study has important applications for plant quarantine, resistance breeding of cassava, and studies on epidemiology and control of CBSD in East Africa.

  9. Characterization of the banana streak virus capsid protein and mapping of the immunodominant continuous B-cell epitopes to the surface-exposed N terminus.

    PubMed

    Vo, Jenny N; Campbell, Paul R; Mahfuz, Nur N; Ramli, Ras; Pagendam, Daniel; Barnard, Ross; Geering, Andrew D W

    2016-12-01

    This study identified the structural proteins of two badnavirus species, Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) and Banana streak OL virus (BSOLV), and mapped the distribution of continuous B-cell epitopes. Two different capsid protein (CP) isoforms of about 44 and 40 kDa (CP1 and CP2) and the virion-associated protein (VAP) were consistently associated with purified virions. For both viral species, the N terminus of CP2 was successfully sequenced by Edman degradation but that of CP1 was chemically blocked. De novo peptide sequencing of tryptic digests suggested that CP1 and CP2 derive from the same region of the P3 polyprotein but differ in the length of either the N or the C terminus. A three-dimensional model of the BSMYV-CP was constructed, which showed that the CP is a multi-domain structure, containing homologues of the retroviral capsid and nucleocapsid proteins, as well as a third, intrinsically disordered protein region at the N terminus, henceforth called the NID domain. Using the Pepscan approach, the immunodominant continuous epitopes were mapped to the NID domain for five different species of banana streak virus. Anti-peptide antibodies raised against these epitopes in BSMYV were successfully used for detection of native virions and denatured CPs in serological assays. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis of the virion surface using the anti-peptide antibodies confirmed that the NID domain is exposed on the surface of virions, and that the difference in mass of the two CP isoforms is due to variation in length of the NID domain.

  10. Molecular characterization of segments S7 to S10 of a southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus isolate from maize in northern China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao; Xu, Fei-fei; Zheng, Fang-qiang; Li, Xiang-dong; Liu, Bao-shen; Zhang, Chun-qing

    2011-02-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is a novel Fijivirus prevalent in rice in southern and central China, and northern Vietnam. Its genome has 10 segments of double-stranded RNA named S1 to S10 according to their size. An isolate of SRBSDV, JNi4, was obtained from naturally infected maize plants from Ji'ning, Shandong province, in the 2008 maize season. Segments S7 to S10 of JNi4 share nucleotide identities of 72.6%-73.1%, 72.3%-73%, 73.9%-74.5% and 77.3%-79%, respectively, with corresponding segments of Rice black-streaked dwarf virus isolates, and identities of 99.7%, 99.1%-99.7%, 98.9%-99.5%, and 98.6%-99.2% with those of SRBSDV isolates HN and GD. JNi4 forms a separate branch with GD and HN in the phylogenetic trees constructed with genomic sequences of S7 to S10. These results confirm the proposed taxonomic status of SRBSDV as a distinct species of the genus Fijivirus and indicate that JNi4 is an isolate of SRBSDV. Shandong is so far the northernmost region where SRBSDV is found in China.

  11. Reconstructing the History of Maize Streak Virus Strain A Dispersal To Reveal Diversification Hot Spots and Its Origin in Southern Africa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Monjane, Adérito L.; Harkins, Gordon W.; Martin, Darren P.; Lemey, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Shepherd, Dionne N.; Oluwafemi, Sunday; Simuyandi, Michelo; Zinga, Innocent; Komba, Ephrem K.; Lakoutene, Didier P.; Mandakombo, Noella; Mboukoulida, Joseph; Semballa, Silla; Tagne, Appolinaire; Tiendrébéogo, Fidèle; Erdmann, Julia B.; van Antwerpen, Tania; Owor, Betty E.; Flett, Bradley; Ramusi, Moses; Windram, Oliver P.; Syed, Rizwan; Lett, Jean-Michel; Briddon, Rob W.; Markham, Peter G.; Rybicki, Edward P.; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Maize streak virus strain A (MSV-A), the causal agent of maize streak disease, is today one of the most serious biotic threats to African food security. Determining where MSV-A originated and how it spread transcontinentally could yield valuable insights into its historical emergence as a crop pathogen. Similarly, determining where the major extant MSV-A lineages arose could identify geographical hot spots of MSV evolution. Here, we use model-based phylogeographic analyses of 353 fully sequenced MSV-A isolates to reconstruct a plausible history of MSV-A movements over the past 150 years. We show that since the probable emergence of MSV-A in southern Africa around 1863, the virus spread transcontinentally at an average rate of 32.5 km/year (95% highest probability density interval, 15.6 to 51.6 km/year). Using distinctive patterns of nucleotide variation caused by 20 unique intra-MSV-A recombination events, we tentatively classified the MSV-A isolates into 24 easily discernible lineages. Despite many of these lineages displaying distinct geographical distributions, it is apparent that almost all have emerged within the past 4 decades from either southern or east-central Africa. Collectively, our results suggest that regular analysis of MSV-A genomes within these diversification hot spots could be used to monitor the emergence of future MSV-A lineages that could affect maize cultivation in Africa. PMID:21715477

  12. Overexpression of rice black-streaked dwarf virus p7-1 in Arabidopsis results in male sterility due to non-dehiscent anthers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Yuan, Xia; Xu, Qiufang; Zhou, Tong; Fan, Yongjian; Zhou, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae, is propagatively transmitted by the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén). RBSDV causes rice black-streaked dwarf and maize rough dwarf diseases, which lead to severe yield losses in crops in China. Although several RBSDV proteins have been studied in detail, the functions of the nonstructural protein P7-1 are still largely unknown. To investigate the role of the P7-1 protein in virus pathogenicity, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants were generated in which the P7-1 gene was expressed under the control of the 35S promoter. The RBSDV P7-1-transgenic Arabidopsis plants (named P7-1-OE) were male sterility. Flowers and pollen from P7-1-transgenic plants were of normal size and shape, and anthers developed to the normal size but failed to dehisce. The non-dehiscent anthers observed in P7-1-OE were attributed to decreased lignin content in the anthers. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species levels were quite low in the transgenic plants compared with the wild type. These results indicate that ectopic expression of the RBSDV P7-1 protein in A. thaliana causes male sterility, possibly through the disruption of the lignin biosynthesis and H2O2-dependent polymerization pathways.

  13. Restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut determines incompetence of small brown planthopper as a vector of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Hongyan; Mao, Qianzhuo; Liu, Qifei; Wei, Taiyun

    2012-08-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a fijivirus, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper in a persistent-propagative manner. In this study, we found that another planthopper species, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), could acquire SRBSDV but not transmit it. To identify the transmission barrier for SRBSDV in SBPHs, sequential infection by SRBSDV in the organs of SBPHs was studied with immunofluorescence for viral antigens. SRBSDV initially entered the epithelial cells of the midgut, then viroplasms, the sites for viral replication, formed in the midgut of viruliferous SBPHs. Furthermore, SRBSDV spread within the midgut, but failed to disseminate from the midgut into the hemocoel or into the salivary glands. All these results indicated that the inability of SBPH to transmit SRBSDV could be due to the restriction of viral dissemination from the midgut of SBPH, which led to the failure of viral spread to the salivary glands for virus transmission.

  14. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that a dwarfing disease on different cereal crops in China is due to rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV).

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng-Wei; Yan, Jian; Qu, Zhi-cai; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Jia; Ye, Ming-Ming; Shen, Da-leng

    2002-10-01

    A viral disease with dwarfing symptoms is associated with severe damage of different cereal crops including rice, maize, wheat and sorghum grown in China. It is believed that the pathogenic agent of the disease on rice and sorghum is rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), however, the cause of maize dwarf disease in China is still inconclusive. In this report, dsRNA was isolated from virus particles obtained from the diseased plants of rice, maize, wheat and sorghum from two Chinese provinces. Full-length cDNAs of genome segments 9 (S9) and 10 (S 10) were obtained through a RT-PCR approach. Sequence analysis showed that the S9 sequences of Chinese isolates and Japanese RBSDV isolate were very similar to each other (89.1-89.6% identity at the nucleotide level, 92.3-92.9% and 95.8-98.6% identity at the amino acid level for ORF1 and ORF2, respectively). In addition, the S10 sequences of Chinese isolates and Japanese RBSDV were very similar to each other (93.0-95.4% identical nucleotides and 96.2-97.0% identical amino acids, respectively). However, there were lower similarities for S9 and S10 sequences between Chinese isolates and an Italian Maize Rough Dwarf Virus (MRDV) isolate. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Chinese viral isolates found to infect rice, maize, wheat and sorghum and leading to similar cereal dwarfing manifestations could be grouped to the same virus species, RBSDV.

  16. A One-Step Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the Detection and Quantitation of Sugarcane Streak Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Fu, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ru-Kai; Su, Jin-Wei; Gao, San-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is caused by the Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV; genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) which is common in some Asian countries. Here, we established a protocol of a one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) using the TaqMan probe for the detection of SCSMV in sugarcane. Primers and probes were designed within the conserved region of the SCSMV coat protein (CP) gene sequences. Standard single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) generated by PCR-based gene transcripts of recombinant pGEM-CP plasmid in vitro and total RNA extracted from SCSMV-infected sugarcane were used as templates of qRT-PCR. We further performed a sensitivity assay to show that the detection limit of the assay was 100 copies of ssRNA and 2 pg of total RNA with good reproducibility. The values obtained were approximately 100-fold more sensitive than those of the conventional RT-PCR. A higher incidence (68.6%) of SCSMV infection was detected by qRT-PCR than that (48.6%) with conventional RT-PCR in samples showing mosaic symptoms. SCSMV-free samples were verified by infection with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) or a combination of both. The developed qRT-PCR assay may become an alternative molecular tool for an economical, rapid, and efficient detection and quantification of SCSMV.

  17. Micropropagation by tissue culture triggers differential expression of infectious endogenous Banana streak virus sequences (eBSV) present in the B genome of natural and synthetic interspecific banana plantains.

    PubMed

    Côte, François X; Galzi, Serge; Folliot, Michel; Lamagnère, Yannick; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Musa balbisiana spp. contains several infectious endogenous sequences of Banana streak virus (eBSV). We have shown previously that in vitro micropropagation triggers the activation of infectious eBSOLV (endogenous sequences of Banana streak Obino l'Ewai virus) in the synthetic tetraploid interspecific hybrid FHIA21 (AAAB). In this work, we show that another synthetic tetraploid (AAAB) hybrid and two natural triploid (AAB) plantains are equally prone to the activation of infectious eBSOLV during tissue culture. These results are a strong indication that such activation is a general phenomenon in interspecific Musa cultivars, whether synthetic or natural. We also report the first in-depth study of the correlation between the duration of tissue culture and the level of activation of infectious eBSOLV, and show that specific and common activation patterns exist in these banana plants. We hypothesize that these patterns result from the concomitant activation of infectious eBSOLV and a decrease in the virus titre in neoformed plantlets, resulting from cell multiplication outcompeting virus replication. We provide experimental data supporting this hypothesis. No activation of infectious eBSGFV (endogenous sequences of Banana streak Goldfinger virus) by tissue culture was observed in the two natural AAB plantain cultivars studied here, whereas such activation occurred in the AAAB synthetic hybrid studied. We demonstrate that this differential activation does not result from differences in the structure of eBSGFV, as all banana genomes harbour eaBSGFV-7.

  18. A novel, in vivo, indoor method to preserve rice black-streaked dwarf virus in small brown planthopper using wheat seedling as a bridge host.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunmei; Cheng, Zhaobang; Yang, Liu; Miao, Qian; Fan, Yongjian; Zhou, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) naturally infects Gramineae plants through small brown planthopper (SBPH) as a vector. However, RBSDV cannot be transmitted to the SBPH offspring through transovarian transmission. Wheat plant, an important intermediate host in winter, is essential for the completion of the annual cycle of RBSDV in farm ecosystem. We developed a novel, in vivo, indoor method to preserve RBSDV in SBPH using wheat seedling as a bridge host. The temperature range of 23-27°C was initially selected to rear the insects and plants. Before initiating the scheme cycle, viruliferous SBPH was obtained by feeding the virus-free 1st to 2nd instar nymphs with RBSDV-infected rice plants. Four to six RBSDV-infected SBPH were placed per plant to inoculate wheat seedlings at two-to-four leaf stages. After 48 h of inoculation, the viruliferous SBPH were removed. Five mated, newly emerged virus-free SBPH females were then transferred onto each inoculated plant and allowed to lay eggs for 48 h. The newly hatched SBPH were raised on wheat seedlings until the 2nd instar nymph stage, and then transferred onto healthy rice seedlings for further development until 5th instar nymphs or adults. These newly obtained viruliferous SBPH can be used for inoculating new wheat seedlings in the succeeding maintenance cycles, or for further experiments. We discovered that the incubation period of RBSDV in wheat seedlings synchronized with the gestation period of SBPH eggs at four to six inoculated viruliferous SBPH per plant and lasted for approximately seven days. In addition, this period was optimal for enhancing the SBPH infection ratio because SBPH nymphs can only acquire the virus after they hatch. The RBSDV infection ratio of the SBPHs acquired through this method consistently exceeded 50%.

  19. Identification and profiling of conserved and novel microRNAs in Laodelphax striatellus in response to rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Min; Zhou, Yan-Ru; Sun, Zong-Tao; Wang, Xu; Xie, Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that play important roles in various biological processes. This study examined microRNA profiles of Laodelphax striatellus using the small RNA libraries derived from virus free (VF) and rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) infected (RB) insects. A total of 59 mature miRNAs (46 miRNA families) were identified as conserved insect miRNAs in both VF and RB libraries. Among these conserved miRNAs, 24 were derived from the two arms of 12 miRNA precursors. Nine conserved L. striatellus miRNAs were up-regulated and 12 were down-regulated in response to RBSDV infection. In addition, a total of 20 potential novel miRNA candidates were predicted in the VF and RB libraries. The miRNA transcriptome profiles and the identification of L. striatellus miRNAs differentially expressed in response to RBSDV infection will contribute to future studies to elucidate the complex miRNA-mediated regulatory network activated by pathogen challenge in insect vectors. PMID:26484150

  20. Genome-wide characterization of rice black streaked dwarf virus-responsive microRNAs in rice leaves and roots by small RNA and degradome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongtao; He, Yuqing; Li, Junmin; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs which typically function by guiding cleavage of target mRNAs. They play important roles in development, abiotic stress and responses to pathogens. Four small RNA libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from the leaves and roots of healthy rice and plants infected with Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV). Analysis of the deep sequencing results showed that the expression patterns of 14 miRNAs in leaves and 16 miRNAs in roots changed significantly in response to RBSDV infection. Some responses were similar in roots and leaves, but many miRNAs responded differently in different tissues. The results were confirmed for selected miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR. By using degradome sequencing, a total of 104 target transcripts for 17 conserved and 16 non-conserved miRNAs were shown to be responsive to RBSDV infection. Fifteen novel miRNAs were also identified by small RNA and degradome sequencing. The results provide new insights into the regulatory networks of miRNAs and their targets in different plant tissues in response to virus infection.

  1. Evidence that the proliferation stage of micropropagation procedure is determinant in the expression of banana streak virus integrated into the genome of the FHIA 21 hybrid (Musa AAAB).

    PubMed

    Dallot, S; Acuña, P; Rivera, C; Ramírez, P; Côte, F; Lockhart, B E; Caruana, M L

    2001-01-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV) is causing increasing concern in almost every producing area of banana and plantain (Musa spp.) worldwide. This situation appeared partially linked to some breeding lines and micropropagated hybrids. A complete BSV sequence integrated into the genome of a triploid plantain has been recently characterised and it has been hypothesised that it could give rise to infectious virus via recombination. In this study, we evaluated the effect of a routine micropropagation procedure on the expression of BSV in the FHIA 21 tetraploid hybrid. The widespread presence of integrated sequences and the absence of episomal BSV in thirty FHIA 21 "mother plants" selected for micropropagation were first confirmed by specific PCR and IC-PCR tests. The proliferation stage of the procedure, characterised by an intensive production of neoformed buds, appeared determinant in BSV expression whereas the rooting and acclimatisation stages had little or no effect. The duration in culture and the way of subdividing the clumps of proliferation influenced greatly the percentage of episomal BSV infections, reaching 58% of infected micropropagated lines after six in vitro subcultures. These data suggest that the expression of episomal BSV observed during the in vitro procedure is correlated with the presence of an integrated form.

  2. Streak camera meeting summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.; Bliss, David E.

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  3. Infection of rice plants by rice black streaked dwarf virus improves an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), of rice planthoppers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongxing; He, Xiaochan; Zheng, Xusong; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-10-01

    The effects of rice plants infected by rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) on the host preference, duration of immature stages, sex ratio, and adult longevity and parasitic capacity of an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang, of rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, were evaluated. Tests of response to plant volatiles using an olfactometer showed that A. nilaparvatae preferred rice plants harboring rice brown planthopper eggs over plants free of rice brown planthopper eggs. However, both the response to plant volatiles and the host selectivity test showed no significant differences in host preference between RBSDV-infected plants and healthy plants when both contained rice brown planthopper eggs. The developmental duration at immature stage of the male A. nilaparvatae in rice brown planthopper eggs on RBSDV-infected rice plants was significantly prolonged, and the parasitic capacity of rice brown planthopper eggs was significantly increased in comparison with the A. nilaparvatae parasite in rice brown planthopper eggs on healthy rice plants. There were no significant differences between RBSDV-infected rice plants and healthy rice plants in other ecological fitness parameters, including the developmental duration of female adults, female percentage, and adult longevity of A. nilaparvatae.

  4. Interaction between southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus minor core protein P8 and a rice zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Nian-Jun; Xue, Jin; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2017-01-25

    The fijivirus southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) causes one of the most serious viral diseases of rice in China and Vietnam. To better understand the molecular basis of SRBSDV infection, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a rice cDNA library was carried out using P8, a minor core protein of SRBSDV, as the bait. A rice Cys2His2-type zinc finger protein (OsZFP) was found to interact with SRBSDV P8. A strong interaction between SRBSDV P8 and OsZFP was then confirmed by pull-down assays, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that the in vivo interaction was specifically localized in the nucleus of plant cells. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was shown that both the NTP-binding region of P8 and the first two zinc fingers of OsZFP were crucial for their interaction in plant cells. The localization in the nucleus and activation of transcription in yeast supports the notion that OsZFP is a transcription factor. SRBSDV P8 may play an important role in fijiviral infection and symptom development by interfering with the host transcription activity of OsZFP.

  5. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  6. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  7. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  8. Wheat streak mosaic virus Infects Systemically despite Extensive Coat Protein Deletions: Identification of Virion Assembly and Cell-to-Cell Movement Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Frank; French, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Viral coat proteins function in virion assembly and virus biology in a tightly coordinated manner with a role for virtually every amino acid. In this study, we demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) is unusually tolerant of extensive deletions, with continued virion assembly and/or systemic infection found after extensive deletions are made. A series of deletion and point mutations was created in the CP cistron of wild-type and/or green fluorescent protein-tagged WSMV, and the effects of these mutations on cell-to-cell and systemic transport and virion assembly of WSMV were examined. Mutants with overlapping deletions comprising N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27, 36 to 84, 85 to 100, 48 to 100, and 36 to 100 or the C-terminal 14 or 17 amino acids systemically infected wheat with different efficiencies. However, mutation of conserved amino acids in the core domain, which may be involved in a salt bridge, abolished virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27 and 85 to 100 are required for efficient virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement, while the C-terminal 65 amino acids are dispensable for virion assembly but are required for cell-to-cell movement, suggesting that the C terminus of CP functions as a dedicated cell-to-cell movement determinant. In contrast, amino acids 36 to 84 are expendable, with their deletion causing no obvious effects on systemic infection or virion assembly. In total, 152 amino acids (amino acids 6 to 27 and 36 to 100 and the 65 amino acids at the C-terminal end) of 349 amino acids of CP are dispensable for systemic infection and/or virion assembly, which is rare for multifunctional viral CPs. PMID:24227854

  9. Population structure within lineages of Wheat streak mosaic virus derived from a common founding event exhibits stochastic variation inconsistent with the deterministic quasi-species model

    SciTech Connect

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C. . E-mail: dstenger@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Structure of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) populations derived from a common founding event and subjected to serial passage at high multiplicity of infection (MOI) was evaluated. The founding population was generated by limiting dilution inoculation. Lineages of known pedigree were sampled at passage 9 (two populations) and at passage 15, with (three populations) or without mixing (four populations) of lineages at passage 10. Polymorphism within each population was assessed by sequencing 17-21 clones containing a 1371 nt region (WSMV-Sidney 81 nts 8001-9371) encompassing the entire coat protein cistron and flanking regions. Mutation frequency averaged {approx}5.0 x 10{sup -4}/nt across all populations and ranged from 2.4 to 11.6 x 10{sup -4}/nt within populations, but did not consistently increase or decrease with the number of passages removed from the founding population. Shared substitutions (19 nonsynonymous, 10 synonymous, and 3 noncoding) occurred at 32 sites among 44 haplotypes. Only four substitutions became fixed (frequency = 100%) within a population and nearly one third (10/32) never achieved a frequency of 10% or greater in any sampled population. Shared substitutions were randomly distributed with respect to genome position, with transitions outnumbering transversions 5.4:1 and a clear bias for A to G and U to C substitutions. Haplotype composition of each population was unique with complexity of each population varying unpredictably, in that the number and frequency of haplotypes within a lineage were not correlated with number of passages removed from the founding population or whether the population was derived from a single or mixed lineage. The simplest explanation is that plant virus lineages, even those propagated at high MOI, are subject to frequent, narrow genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement that result in low effective population size and stochastic changes in population structure upon serial passage.

  10. Evaluation of Rice Resistance to Southern Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus and Rice Ragged Stunt Virus through Combined Field Tests, Quantitative Real-Time PCR, and Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenchao; Yu, Lu; Jin, Linhong; Wang, Wenli; Zhao, Qi; Ran, Longlu; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Guo, Rong; Wei, Yongtian; Yang, Zhongcheng; Liu, Enlong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2017-01-01

    Diseases caused by southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) and rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) considerably decrease grain yield. Therefore, determining rice cultivars with high resistance to SRBSDV and RRSV is necessary. In this study, rice cultivars with high resistance to SRBSDV and RRSV were evaluated through field trials in Shidian and Mangshi county, Yunnan province, China. SYBR Green I-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis was used to quantitatively detect virus gene expression levels in different rice varieties. The following parameters were applied to evaluate rice resistance: acre yield (A.Y.), incidence of infected plants (I.I.P.), virus load (V.L.), disease index (D.I.), and insect quantity (I.Q.) per 100 clusters. Zhongzheyou1 (Z1) and Liangyou2186 (L2186) were considered the most suitable varieties with integrated higher A.Y., lower I.I.P., V.L., D.I. and I.Q. features. In order to investigate the mechanism of rice resistance, comparative label-free shotgun liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic approaches were applied to comprehensively describe the proteomics of rice varieties’ SRBSDV tolerance. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-related proteins in Z1 and L2186 may result in the superior resistance of these varieties compared with Fengyouxiangzhan (FYXZ). PMID:28241456

  11. Asymmetric Spread of SRBSDV between Rice and Corn Plants by the Vector Sogatella furcifera (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Li, Fei; Han, Yongqiang; Yang, Lang; Liao, Xiaolan; Hou, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses are mostly transmitted by sucking insects via their piercing behaviors, which may differ due to host plant species and their developmental stages. We characterized the transmission of a fijivirus, southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), by the planthopper vector Sogatella furcifera Horváth (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), between rice and corn plants of varying developmental stages. SRBSDV was transmitted from infected rice to uninfected corn plants as efficiently as its transmission between rice plants, while was acquired by S. furcifera nymphs at a much lower rate from infected corn plants than from infected rice plants. We also recorded a high mortality of S. furcifera nymphs on corn plants. It is evident that young stages of both the virus donor and recipient plants added to the transmission efficiency of SRBSDV from rice to corn plants. Feeding behaviors of the vector recorded by electrical penetration graph showed that phloem sap ingestion, the behavioral event that is linked with plant virus acquisition, was impaired on corn plants, which accounts for the high mortality of and low virus acquisition by S. furcifera nymphs on corn plants. Our results reveal an asymmetric spread of SRBSDV between its two host plants and the underlying behavioral mechanism, which is of significance for assessing SRBSDV transmission risks and field epidemiology, and for developing integrated management approaches for SRBSDV disease.

  12. Asymmetric Spread of SRBSDV between Rice and Corn Plants by the Vector Sogatella furcifera (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Li, Fei; Han, Yongqiang; Yang, Lang; Liao, Xiaolan; Hou, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses are mostly transmitted by sucking insects via their piercing behaviors, which may differ due to host plant species and their developmental stages. We characterized the transmission of a fijivirus, southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), by the planthopper vector Sogatella furcifera Horváth (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), between rice and corn plants of varying developmental stages. SRBSDV was transmitted from infected rice to uninfected corn plants as efficiently as its transmission between rice plants, while was acquired by S. furcifera nymphs at a much lower rate from infected corn plants than from infected rice plants. We also recorded a high mortality of S. furcifera nymphs on corn plants. It is evident that young stages of both the virus donor and recipient plants added to the transmission efficiency of SRBSDV from rice to corn plants. Feeding behaviors of the vector recorded by electrical penetration graph showed that phloem sap ingestion, the behavioral event that is linked with plant virus acquisition, was impaired on corn plants, which accounts for the high mortality of and low virus acquisition by S. furcifera nymphs on corn plants. Our results reveal an asymmetric spread of SRBSDV between its two host plants and the underlying behavioral mechanism, which is of significance for assessing SRBSDV transmission risks and field epidemiology, and for developing integrated management approaches for SRBSDV disease. PMID:27760223

  13. Development and use of three monoclonal antibodies for the detection of rice black-streaked dwarf virus in field plants and planthopper vectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) causes great losses in rice, maize and wheat production in Asian countries. The use of serological methods for RBSDV detection depends on the availability of antibodies. In this study, three highly sensitive and specific murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against RBSDV antigens were produced using crude extracts from tumors of RBSDV-infected maize as the immunogen, and two serological assays, antigen-coated-plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA) and dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) were developed for RBSDV detection. Results All three MAbs reacted strongly and specifically with the crude extracts from RBSDV-infected plant and planthopper tissues. The detection endpoints of three MAbs (12E10, 18F10 and 5G5) in ACP-ELISA were respectively 1:40,960, 1:40,960, 1:81,920 (w/v, g mL-1) with the crude extract of infected maize, 1:10,240, 1:20,480, 1:20,480 (w/v, g mL-1) with the crude extract of infected rice, 1:5,120, 1:10,240, 1:10,240 (w/v, g mL-1) with the crude extract of infected wheat, 1:9,600, 1:9,600, 19,200 (individual planthopper/μL) with the crude extract of infected planthopper. The newly developed ACP-ELISA could detect the virus in the infected maize, wheat, rice tissue crude extracts diluted at 1:81,920, 1:20,480, 1:10,240 (w/v, g mL-1), respectively, and in individual viruliferous planthopper extract diluted at 1:19200 (individual planthopper/μL). The dot-ELISA was proved to detect the virus in the infected maize, wheat and rice tissue crude extracts diluted at 1:320 (w/v, g mL-1), and in individual viruliferous planthopper extract diluted at 1:1,600 (individual planthopper/μL), respectively. Field plants (915) and planthopper samples (594) from five provinces of China were screened for the presence of RBSDV using the two developed serological assays. The results indicated that 338 of the 915 plant samples and 19 of the 594 planthopper samples were infected by

  14. Molecular variation and expansion of a rice black-streaked dwarf virus population based on analysis of segment 1 in Jining, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Meng, Qingchang; Chen, Yanping; Wu, Jirong; Hao, Zhuanfang; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Degui; Li, Mingshun; Yong, Hongjun; Zhang, Shihuang; Li, Xinhai; Weng, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the variation in rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) in an area with high incidence of maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD), the RBSDV S1 segment in a collection of 100 maize isolates (sample population A100) from Jining, Shandong Province, was sequenced. An additional 21 maize and rice isolates (subpopulation B21) that were sampled from nine other geographic locations in China in 2012 and 2013 were used as a control. A total of 914 nucleotide mutations, including 239 singleton variable and 675 parsimony-informative sites were detected among the segment 1 (S1) sequences from A100. A total of 614 nucleotide mutation sites including 164 singleton variable and 450 parsimony-informative sites were detected among the S1 sequences from B21, while 97.55 % of the parsimony-informative sites from B21 were also detected in A100. The nucleotide sequence diversities of A100 (π = 0.0479) and B21 (π = 0.0396) were significantly different (P = 0.0002) but showed similar trends. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 121 RBSDV isolates could be classified into two groups based on their S1 sequences, independent of subpopulation, with a combination of host species and locations. A100 and B21 were under the same level of negative and purifying selection, with Ka/Ks ratios of 0.0337 and 0.0369, respectively. The combined RBSDV population, including 121 isolates, was expanding, with negative values for Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D, and Fu and Li's F in both A100 and B21, except Tajima's D in A100. Based on S1, the RBSDV population in China has long-term phytogeographic stability, and there do not appear to be any newly-emerging strains.

  15. Arabian Slope Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-508, 9 October 2003

    Arabia Terra is a vast, heavily cratered region in the martian northern hemisphere. Much of Arabia Terra is thickly blanketed by dust. From time to time, on steep slopes, the dust will avalanche or slide downhill, creating a streak. The majority of slope streaks are darker than their surroundings, but not all of them are dark. In Arabia, it is common to find bright and dark slope streaks, and to find them together. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example, taken from a crater near 10.5oN, 318.4oW. Why some streaks are bright and others are dark is not yet known. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  16. Elysium Mons Wind Streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-556, 26 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a wind streak formed behind a meteor impact crater on the lower north flank of the volcano, Elysium Mons. Winds blow down the volcano slope, toward the northeast (toward upper right), causing a tail of uneroded dust to be captured behind the crater. Thin, filamentary dark streaks (resembling pencil scratches in this image) can be seen on the surface of the bright wind streak; these may have formed by disruption of surface dust by passing dust devils. This picture is located near 27.7oN, 212.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  17. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  18. Cassava Brown Streak Virus (Potyviridae) Encodes a Putative Maf/HAM1 Pyrophosphatase Implicated in Reduction of Mutations and a P1 Proteinase That Suppresses RNA Silencing but Contains No HC-Pro ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mbanzibwa, Deusdedith R.; Tian, Yanping; Mukasa, Settumba B.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2009-01-01

    The complete positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome of Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV; genus Ipomovirus; Potyviridae) was found to consist of 9,069 nucleotides and predicted to produce a polyprotein of 2,902 amino acids. It was lacking helper-component proteinase but contained a single P1 serine proteinase that strongly suppressed RNA silencing. Besides the exceptional structure of the 5′-proximal part of the genome, CBSV also contained a Maf/HAM1-like sequence (678 nucleotides, 226 amino acids) recombined between the replicase and coat protein domains in the 3′-proximal part of the genome, which is highly conserved in Potyviridae. HAM1 was flanked by consensus proteolytic cleavage sites for ipomovirus NIaPro cysteine proteinase. Homology of CBSV HAM1 with cellular Maf/HAM1 pyrophosphatases suggests that it may intercept noncanonical nucleoside triphosphates to reduce mutagenesis of viral RNA. PMID:19386713

  19. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  20. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads

  1. Streak speckle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re Calegari, Gabriele; Ferri, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for fluid velocimetry based on a single-exposure analysis of the streak speckle pattern generated by sub-micron tracking particles illuminated with coherent light. It works in real-time and provides two dimensional velocity mappings in the direction orthogonal to the optical axis, independently of particle concentration and size. It is immune of any spurious light acting as undesired heterodyne signal and can probe velocities much higher (˜three orders of magnitude) than methods based on double-exposure analysis. The method has been tested by using rigid diffusers of different heterodyne strength and applied to map the flow of a confined fluid.

  2. Streaking into Middle School Science: The Dell Streak Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Susan Eudy

    2012-01-01

    A case study is conducted implementing the Dell Streak seven-inch android device into eighth grade science classes of one teacher in a rural middle school in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The purpose of the study is to determine if the use of the Dell Streaks would increase student achievement on standardized subject testing, if the…

  3. 9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., Chicago, Illinois), LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE BASEMENT, WAS ADDED IN THE EARLY 1930s. THIS WAS THE MILL'S FIRST ELECTRIC-POWERED MACHINERY. THE HAMMER MILL WAS USED TO PULVERIZE OATS, ALFALFA MEAL, AND CORN. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Virus distribution and detection in corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) after experimental infection with three different ferlavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Pees, Michael; Neul, Annkatrin; Müller, Kristin; Schmidt, Volker; Truyen, Uwe; Leinecker, Nadja; Marschang, Rachel E

    2016-01-15

    Ferlaviruses are important pathogens of snakes. However, factors influencing the pathogenicity of individual isolates as well as optimal protocols for virus detection in tissues of infected snakes have been insufficiently studied. The objectives of this study were to compare virus detection using previously described PCR and cell culture protocols following infection with three genetically distinct ferlaviruses in corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) as a model species. Groups of 12 corn snakes were each inoculated intratracheally with a genogroup A, B, or C ferlavirus. Tracheal washes and cloacal swabs were tested for virus shedding on days 16 and 28. Three animals were each euthanized on days 4, 16, 28, and 49. Beside immunohistochemistry of lung tissue, several organs (lung, intestine, pancreas, kidney, brain) were tested for the presence of ferlavirus. Distinct differences were noted in the pathogenicity of the three viruses, with a genotype B isolate causing the greatest pathology. PCR was more sensitive in comparison to cell culture, but results varied depending on the tissues. Ferlaviruses spread rapidly into the tissues, including the brain. Overall average detection rate was 72%, and was highest on day 16. There were differences between the groups, with the most virulent strain causing 100% positive samples at the end of the study. Some snakes were able to clear the infection. Shedding via cloaca was seen only on day 28. For ante-mortem sampling, a tracheal wash sample is recommended, for post mortem diagnosis, a pooled organ sample should be tested.

  5. Cerberus Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 May 2002) The Science Cerberus is a dark region on Mars that has shrunk down from a continuous length of about 1000 km to roughly three discontinuous spots a few 100 kms in length in less than 20 years. There are two competing processes at work in the Cerberus region that produce the bright and dark features seen in this THEMIS image. Bright dust settles out of the atmosphere, especially after global dust storms, depositing a layer just thick enough to brighten the dark surfaces. Deposition occurs preferentially in the low wind 'shadow zones' within craters and downwind of crater rims, producing the bright streaks. The direction of the streaks clearly indicates that the dominant winds come from the northeast. Dust deposition would completely blot out the dark areas if it were not for the action of wind-blown sand grains scouring the surface and lifting the dust back into the atmosphere. Again, the shadow zones are protected from the blowing sand, preserving the bright layer of dust. Also visible in this image are lava flow features extending from the flanks of the huge Elysium volcanoes to the northwest. Two shallow channels and a raised flow lobe are just barely discernable. The lava channel in the middle of the image crosses the boundary of the bright and dark surfaces without any obvious change in its morphology. This demonstrates that the bright dust layer is very thin in this location, perhaps as little as a few millimeters. The Story Mars is an ever-changing land of spectacular contrasts. This THEMIS image shows the Cerberus region of Mars, a dark area located near the Elysium volcanoes and fittingly named after the three-headed, dragon-tailed dog who guards the door of the underworld. Two opposing processes are at work here: a thin layer of dust falling from the atmosphere and/or dust storms creating brighter surface areas (e.g. the top left portion of this image) and dust being scoured away by the action of the Martian wind disturbing the sand

  6. Thrips-transmitted Viruses Infect a Number of Florida Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ilarviruses Tomato necrotic streak virus and Tobacco streak virus are present in south Florida. Both species cause economically significant disease in vegetable crop. Control of these viruses makes use of integrated pest management approaches....

  7. Transgenic corn plants expressing MDMV strain B coat protein are resistant to mixed infections of maize dwarf mosaic virus and maize chlorotic mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Murry, L E; Elliott, L G; Capitant, S A; West, J A; Hanson, K K; Scarafia, L; Johnston, S; DeLuca-Flaherty, C; Nichols, S; Cunanan, D

    1993-12-01

    The maize dwarf mosaic virus strain B (MDMV-B) coat protein (cp) gene was cloned into a monocot expression cassette and introduced into sweet corn cell suspension cultures via particle bombardment or electroporation. Transformed cells were selected on culture media containing 300 mg/l kanamycin, and plants were regenerated. Cells from all transformed lines expressed the cp gene; and one transgenic line synthesized approximately 100-200 micrograms MDMV-cp per gram fresh weight. Plants regenerated from this line were challenged with a virus inoculum concentration adjusted to produce symptoms in nontransgenic controls at six days post inoculation. In growth chamber studies, the presence of the MDMV-cp provided resistance to inoculations with MDMV-A or MDMV-B and to mixed inoculations of MDMV and maize chlorotic mottle virus.

  8. Comparison of Streak Tube Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R A; Andrews, D S; Bell, P M; Griffiths, R L; Huey, A W; McDonald, J W; de Dios, G V

    2004-11-04

    The performance of four streak tubes in six streak camera configurations is reported. Evaluations were made as part of a search for a streak tube to replace the obsolete RCA C73435 used in the ICF Program's optical streak cameras. Characteristics measured include linearity, spatial and temporal resolution, line-spread function, contrast transfer ratio (CTR), and dynamic range. Tubes evaluated are the RCA C73435, Photonis P510, Photek ST-Y, and Hamamatsu N8059. The RCA C73435 was evaluated in three camera configurations: large format CCD coupled directly to the streak tube, CCD directly coupled to an image intensifier tube (IIT), and the original configuration with a smaller CCD lens coupled to the IIT output. The Photonis and Photek tubes were characterized in configurations where they were directly coupled to large format CCDs. Optimum spatial resolution is achieved when the IIT is removed. Maximum dynamic range requires a configuration where a single photoelectron from the photocathode produces a signal that is {approx}5 times the CCD read noise. The Photonis P510 tube with the E2V CCD forms a well-optimized streak camera system.

  9. Streak camera dynamic range optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.D.; Lerche, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    The LLNL optical streak camera is used by the Laser Fusion Program in a wide range of applications. Many of these applications require a large recorded dynamic range. Recent work has focused on maximizing the dynamic range of the streak camera recording system. For our streak cameras, image intensifier saturation limits the upper end of the dynamic range. We have developed procedures to set the image intensifier gain such that the system dynamic range is maximized. Specifically, the gain is set such that a single streak tube photoelectron is recorded with an exposure of about five times the recording system noise. This ensures detection of single photoelectrons, while not consuming intensifier or recording system dynamic range through excessive intensifier gain. The optimum intensifier gain has been determined for two types of film and for a lens-coupled CCD camera. We have determined that by recording the streak camera image with a CCD camera, the system is shot-noise limited up to the onset of image intensifier nonlinearity. When recording on film, the film determines the noise at high exposure levels. There is discussion of the effects of slit width and image intensifier saturation on dynamic range. 8 refs.

  10. Proteome profile of maize (Zea Mays L.) leaf tissue at the flowering stage after long-term adjustment to rice black-streaked dwarf virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunpeng; Xu, Changzheng; Zhang, Juren

    2011-10-10

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a viral disease and causes great yield loss. To better understand the effects of MRDD on plant growth and metabolism, comparative proteomic analysis of leaves from virus-infected and normal plants was performed. In order to eliminate the interference of Ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase with low-abundance proteins, total proteins were pre-fractionated by 15% PEG and the proteins from supernatant and precipitated fractions were analyzed by 2-DE, subsequently. Out of approximately 1200 protein spots detected, less than 2% of the spots on the gels were overlapping between the fractions of precipitation and supernatant. We identified 91 differentially accumulated proteins that belong to multiple metabolic/biochemical pathways in plants. Further analysis of these identified proteins indicated that MRDD resulted in dramatic changes in the fundamental metabolism, including glycolysis and starch metabolism, and eventually the significant differences in morphology and development between virus-infected and normal plants. Moreover, MRDD occurrence increased the demands for G-proteins, antioxidant enzymes, lipoxygenases and UDP-glucosyltransferase BX9, which may play important roles in response of plant against virus infection. The results also suggested that MRDD is a complicated disease controlled by multigene participating in different pathways.

  11. Circular Scan Streak Tube Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1980-01-01

    A streak tube having circular scan was designed, built and tested. Continuous circular scan, easily derived from out of phase sine waves applied to the conventional deflection plates, permits the timing of pulses traveling long baselines. At the tube's output a circular array of 720 elements is scanned to provide 30 to 40 picosecond resolution. Initial difficulties with electron bombarded silicon arrays were circumvented by using microchannel plates within the streak tube to provide the needed electronic amplification and digital sensitivity and coupling the 720 element arrays to the electron beam by means of a phosphor on a fiber optics. Two ceramic body tubes with S-20 photocathodes were tested and delivered.

  12. Streaking into middle school science: The Dell Streak pilot project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Susan Eudy

    A case study is conducted implementing the Dell Streak seven-inch android device into eighth grade science classes of one teacher in a rural middle school in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The purpose of the study is to determine if the use of the Dell Streaks would increase student achievement on standardized subject testing, if the Streak could be used as an effective instructional tool, and if it could be considered an effective instructional resource for reviewing and preparing for the science assessments. A mixed method research design was used for the study to analyze both quantitative and qualitative results to determine if the Dell Streaks' utilization could achieve the following: 1. instructional strategies would change, 2. it would be an effective instructional tool, and 3. a comparison of the students' test scores and benchmark assessments' scores would provide statistically significant difference. Through the use of an ANOVA it was determined a statistically significant difference had occurred. A Post Hoc analysis was conducted to identify where the difference occurred. Finally a T-test determined was there was no statistically significance difference between the mean End-of-Grade tests and four quarterly benchmark scores of the control and the experimental groups. Qualitative research methods were used to gather results to determine if the Streaks were an effective instructional tool. Classroom observations identified that the teacher's teaching styles and new instructional strategies were implemented throughout the pilot project. Students had an opportunity to complete a questionnaire three times during the pilot project. Results revealed what the students liked about using the devices and the challenges they were facing. The teacher completed a reflective questionnaire throughout the pilot project and offered valuable reflections about the use of the devices in an educational setting. The reflection data supporting the case study was drawn

  13. Non-structural protein P6 encoded by rice black-streaked dwarf virus is recruited to viral inclusion bodies by binding to the viroplasm matrix protein P9-1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liying; Xie, Li; Andika, Ida Bagus; Tan, Zilong; Chen, Jianping

    2013-08-01

    Like other members of the family Reoviridae, rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV, genus Fijivirus) is thought to replicate and assemble within cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies, commonly called viroplasms. RBSDV P9-1 is the key protein for the formation of viroplasms, but little is known about the other proteins of the viroplasm or the molecular interactions amongst its components. RBSDV non-structural proteins were screened for their association with P9-1 using a co-immunoprecipitation assay. Only P6 was found to directly interact with P9-1, an interaction that was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that P6 and P9-1 co-localized in electron-dense inclusion bodies, indicating that P6 is a constituent of the viroplasm. In addition, non-structural protein P5 also localized to viroplasms and interacted with P6. In Sf9 cells, P6 was diffusely distributed throughout the cytoplasm when expressed alone, but localized to inclusions when co-expressed with P9-1, suggesting that P6 is recruited to viral inclusion bodies by binding to P9-1. P5 localized to the inclusions formed by P9-1 when co-expressed with P6 but did not when P6 was absent, suggesting that P5 is recruited to viroplasms by binding to P6. This study provides a model by which viral non-structural proteins are recruited to RBSDV viroplasms.

  14. Gated SIT Vidicon Streak Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, D. L.; Yates, G. J.; Black, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A recently developed prototype streak tube designed to produce high gain and resolution by incorporating the streak and readout functions in one envelope thereby minimizing photon-to-charge transformations and eliminating external coupling losses is presented. The tube is based upon a grid-gated Silicon-Intensified-Target Vidicon (SITV) with integral Focus Projection Scan (FPS) TV readout. Demagnifying electron optics (m=0.63) in the image section map the 40-mm-diameter photocathode image unto a 25-mm-diameter silicon target where gains >= 103 are achieved with only 10 KV accelerating voltage. This is compared with much lower gains (~ 50) at much higher voltages (~ 30 KV) reported for streak tubes using phosphor screens. Because SIT technology is well established means for electron imaging in vacuum, such fundamental problems as "backside thinning" required for electron imaging unto CCDs do not exist. The high spatial resolution (~ 30 1p/mm), variable scan formats, and high speed electrostatic deflection (250 mm2 areas are routinely rastered with 256 scan lines in 1.6 ms) available from FPS readout add versatility not available in CCD devices. Theoretical gain and spatial resolution for this design (developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and General Electric Co.) are compared with similar calculations and measured data obtained for RCA 73435 streaks fiber optically coupled to (1) 25-mm-diameter SIT FPS vidicons and (2) 40-mm-diameter MCPTs (proximity-focused microchannel plate image intensifier tubes) fiber optically coupled to 18-mm-diameter Sb2S3 FPS vidicons. Sweep sensitivity, shutter ratio, and record lengths for nanosecond duration (20 to 200 ns) streak applications are discussed.

  15. Wind vs. Dust Devil Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    22 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presents a fine illustration of the difference between streaks made by dust devils and streaks made by wind gusts. Dust devils are usually solitary, spinning vortices. They resemble a tornado, or the swirling motion of a familiar, Tasmanian cartoon character. Wind gusts, on the other hand, can cover a larger area and affect more terrain at the same time. The dark, straight, and parallel features resembling scrape marks near the right/center of this image are thought to have been formed by a singular gust of wind, whereas the more haphazard dark streaks that crisscross the scene were formed by dozens of individual dust devils, acting at different times. This southern summer image is located in Noachis Terra near 67.0oS, 316.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  16. Laminar streak enhancement using streamwise grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Carlos; Martín, Juan Ángel

    2011-11-01

    Laminar streak promotion in a flat plate boundary layer results in an increase of the stability of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves with respect to that of the 2D Blasius profile. This stabilization delays the laminar-turbulent transition, increasing the laminar phase of the flow. The stabilization effect is stronger for higher streak amplitudes, and therefore simple ways of generating high amplitude stable streaks are sought to be used as boundary layer flow control methods. In a recent experiment [Tallamelli & Franson,AIAA 2010-4291] high amplitude stable steady streaks have been produced using Miniature Vortex Generators (MGVs), where one array of MGVs is used to excite the streak and a second array is used downstream to enhance their amplitude. In this presentation we numerically explore the possibility of enhancing the streaks using a different passive mechanism: streamwise grooves carved in the plate. We will present some numerical simulations for different values of the spanwise period of the streaks and of the grooves, and we will show the combinations that provide maximum streak amplitude.

  17. Earth and planetary aeolian streaks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Zada, Aviv Lee; Blumberg, Dan Gabriel; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-03-01

    Wind streaks are abundant aeolian features that have been observed on planetary surfaces by remote sensing means. They have been widely studied, particularly on Mars and Venus and to a much lesser extent on Earth. In imagery, these streaks appear as elongated features that are easily distinguishable from their surroundings. Geomorphologically, these streaks have, thus far, been interpreted as the presence or absence of small loose particles on the surface, deposited or eroded, respectively, by wind. However, the use of different (optical and radar) remote-sensing tools to study wind streaks has led to uncertain interpretations of these features and has hindered their geomorphological definition. Since wind streaks indicate the prevailing wind direction at the time of their formation, they may be used to map near-surface winds and to estimate atmospheric circulation patterns. The aim of this article is to review the main studies focusing on wind streaks and to present the most up-to-date knowledge on this topic. Moreover, a new perspective for wind streak research is suggested: As 'wind streak' is a collective term for a variety of aeolian features that when viewed from above appear as distinctive albedo surface patterns, we suggest that the term should not be used to refer to a geomorphological feature. Since the definition of wind streaks is constrained to remote sensing rather than to geomorphology and is affected by the inherent biases of remote sensing methods, we suggest that 'wind streaks' should be used as a collective term for aeolian surfaces that are discernable from above as bright and dark patterns due to alterations in the characteristics of the surface or to the presence of bedforms. To better understand the mechanisms, time-frames, climate compatibility of wind streaks and the influences of remote sensing on their appearance, we have compiled a new database containing more than 2,900 Earth wind streaks. A comprehensive study of these Earth wind

  18. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  19. A distinct tospovirus causing necrotic streak on Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mehraban, Afshin; Botermans, Marleen; Verhoeven, J Th J; Meekes, Ellis; Saaijer, Janneke; Peters, Dick; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A tospovirus causing necrotic streaks on leaves was isolated from Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia. Infected samples reacted positively with tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) antiserum during preliminary serological tests. Further analysis revealed a close serological relationship to tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). A major part of the S-RNA segment, encompassing the nucleocapsid (N) protein gene, the 5' untranslated region and a part of the intergenic region 3' of the N gene, was cloned and sequenced. The deduced N protein sequence showed highest amino acid identity (82%) to that of TCSV, indicating that the virus represents a new tospovirus species, for which the name Alstroemeria necrotic streak virus (ANSV) is coined. Phylogenetic analysis based on the N protein sequence revealed that this Alstroemeria-infecting tospovirus clustered with tospoviruses from the American continent. Frankliniella occidentalis was identified as potential vector species for ANSV.

  20. Topographic measurements of slope streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusnikin, Eugene S.; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Zubarev, Anatoly E.; Patratiy, Vyacheslav D.; Krasilnikov, Sergey S.; Head, James W.; Karachevtseva, Irina P.

    2016-11-01

    Slope streaks are enigmatic, actively forming albedo features occurring on slopes in high-albedo, low-thermal-inertia, dust-rich equatorial regions on Mars. They are a specifically martian phenomenon with no direct analogs on the Earth. Their morphology suggests that the streaks are initiated at their upslope tips and propagate down to their termini; however, the physical mechanism of their formation is uncertain. We performed a large series of measurements of slopes associated with slope streaks using stereo pairs of high-resolution orbital images obtained by HiRISE camera and generated several digital elevation models for selected streaks. We found that: (1) slopes at the upslope streak tips range widely, however, there is a strong indication that streaks can be initiated only on slopes steeper than ∼20°; (2) slopes of the streak termini show an even wider range, with some streaks terminating at slopes as steep as their tips, while others propagate all the way down to horizontal surfaces; (3) the streaks can propagate stably for long (many hundreds of meters) distances and can turn, following the topographic gradient on ∼10°-15° slopes; (4) no uphill propagation of streaks is detected over baselines of tens of meters; (5) the slope streaks often propagate over 1-2 m high obstacles and can climb 1-2 m uphill over short (meters) distances. We used these findings to assess the viability of two classes of hypotheses about slope streak formation mechanisms proposed earlier: 1) "dry", some kind of run-away avalanche-like dry granular flow, and 2) "wet", some kind of run-away propagation of a front of percolating brines in the shallow subsurface. No specific observation unambiguously proves or rejects either of the two mechanisms. Several of our findings are readily explained by the "dry" mechanism and cannot be easily explained with any kind of "wet" mechanism, while other findings are closely consistent with the "wet" mechanism and are difficult to reconcile

  1. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below.

    The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans.

    Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  2. Ozone, jet streaks and severe weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechrist, Frank S.; Petersen, Ralph A.; Brill, Keith F.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    Data from three independent observing platforms are synthesized to study the role of jet streaks in severe weather. The three data types are: conventional radiosondes; 6.7 micron water vapor imagery from the GOES satellite; and total ozone imagery from Nimbus 7. Diagnoses are then made of potential vorticity, mid-tropospheric moisture, and total ozone at and below the level of jet streaks. Potential vorticity and total ozone distributions are both tracers of stratospheric air. Theoretically, both should respond to the transverse, vertical circulations expected in the vicinity of jet streaks. Both should increase due to the sinking above the left front quadrant of the streaks. Moisture, on the other hand, increases in the ascent under the left front quadrant. This study shows striking agreement between the three parameters independently observed from three different observing platforms. Moreover, the three severe weather case studies suggest a unique distribution of ozone, potential vorticity, and mid-tropospheric moisture relative to a jet streak. This, in turn, led to the creation of a new ozone/jet streak model which shows that the total ozone distribution provides a signature in the vicinity of jet streaks and permits identification of areas most likely to experience severe weather at a later time. The value of such observations to operational forecasting is discussed.

  3. Electro-optic Phase Grating Streak Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, F. J.

    2012-08-02

    The electro-optic phase grating streak spectrometer (EOPGSS) generates a time-resolved spectra equivalent to that obtained with a conventional spectrometer/streak camera combination, but without using a streak camera (by far the more expensive and problematic component of the conventional system). The EOPGSS is based on a phase, rather than an amplitude grating. Further, this grating is fabricated of electro-optic material such as, for example, KD*P, by either etching grooves into an E-O slab, or by depositing lines of the E-O material onto an optical flat. An electric field normal to the grating alters the material’s index of refraction and thus affects a shift (in angle) of the output spectrum. Ramping the voltage streaks the spectrum correspondingly. The streak and dispersion directions are the same, so a second (static, conventional) grating disperses the spectrum in the orthogonal direction to prevent different wavelengths from “overwriting” each other. Because the streaking is done by the grating, the streaked output spectrum is recorded with a time-integrating device, such as a CCD. System model, typical design, and performance expectations will be presented.

  4. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several important virus diseases of raspberry and black raspberry in the Pacific Northwest. Pollen-borne viruses include Raspberry bushy dwarf virus and Strawberry necrotic shock virus (aka Tobacco streak virus –Rubus isolate or Black raspberry latent virus). Strawberry necrotic shock viru...

  5. Streak instability in viscoelastic Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, Luca; Brandt, Luca; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The secondary instability of streaks and transition to turbulence in viscoelastic Couette flow are studied using direct numerical simulations (DNS). Viscoelasticity is modeled using the FENE-P constitutive equations, and both the polymer concentration and Weissenberg number are varied in order to assess their effect on transition at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 400 .The base streaks are obtained from nonlinear simulations of the Couette flow response to a streamwise vortex, and can be classified as quasi-Newtonian streaks according to the terminology introduced by Page & Zaki (2014). At every streak amplitude of interest, harmonic forcing is introduced to trigger the secondary instability and breakdown to turbulence. The critical amplitude of this forcing decreases at higher Weissenberg number and also with increasing polymer concentration. The results demonstrate the destabilizing effect of elasticity at moderate Reynolds numbers.

  6. Compact Optical Technique for Streak Camera Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Allen; Terence Davies; Frans Janson; Ronald Justin; Bruce Marshall; Oliver Sweningsen; Perry Bell; Roger Griffith; Karla Hagans; Richard Lerche

    2004-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation. To accurately reduce data from the streak cameras a temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for generating trains of precisely timed short-duration optical pulses that are suitable for temporal calibrations.

  7. CORN FLAVOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn is a large part of the modern diet through sweeteners, oil, processed foods, and animal-derived foods. In addition, corn is eaten directly in bread and cereal-type foods, snack foods, and foods made from masa flour. Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of grain processed by wet milling. Although pri...

  8. Gullies and Streaks on Crater wall Kaiser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies emergent from a specific layer in the wall of an ancient crater within a much larger crater, Kaiser. Located at 46.4oS, 341.4oW, this picture obtained in early southern summer also shows a plethora of dark, and in some places squiggly, streaks. The streaks are thought to have been formed by the passage of dust devils that removed or disrupted a thin coating of dust from the surface. Such streaks commonly form at martian middle latitudes in late spring and early summer. The gullies in the crater wall were likely eroded by a fluid, perhaps water. This picture was obtained in January 2002; it covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the upper left.

  9. Hot streak characterization in serpentine exhaust nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Darrell S.

    Modern aircraft of the United States Air Force face increasingly demanding cost, weight, and survivability requirements. Serpentine exhaust nozzles within an embedded engine allow a weapon system to fulfill mission survivability requirements by providing denial of direct line-of-sight into the high-temperature components of the engine. Recently, aircraft have experienced material degradation and failure along the aft deck due to extreme thermal loading. Failure has occurred in specific regions along the aft deck where concentrations of hot gas have come in contact with the surface causing hot streaks. The prevention of these failures will be aided by the accurate prediction of hot streaks. Additionally, hot streak prediction will improve future designs by identifying areas of the nozzle and aft deck surfaces that require thermal management. To this end, the goal of this research is to observe and characterize the underlying flow physics of hot streak phenomena. The goal is accomplished by applying computational fluid dynamics to determine how hot streak phenomena is affected by changes in nozzle geometry. The present research first validates the computational methods using serpentine inlet experimental and computational studies. A design methodology is then established for creating six serpentine exhaust nozzles investigated in this research. A grid independent solution is obtained on a nozzle using several figures of merit and the grid-convergence index method. An investigation into the application of a second-order closure turbulence model is accomplished. Simulations are performed for all serpentine nozzles at two flow conditions. The research introduces a set of characterization and performance parameters based on the temperature distribution and flow conditions at the nozzle throat and exit. Examination of the temperature distribution on the upper and lower nozzle surfaces reveals critical information concerning changes in hot streak phenomena due to changes

  10. ASTRiDE: Automated Streak Detection for Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Won

    2016-05-01

    ASTRiDE detects streaks in astronomical images using a "border" of each object (i.e. "boundary-tracing" or "contour-tracing") and their morphological parameters. Fast moving objects such as meteors, satellites, near-Earth objects (NEOs), or even cosmic rays can leave streak-like traces in the images; ASTRiDE can detect not only long streaks but also relatively short or curved streaks.

  11. Wind Streaks on Venus: Clues to Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Schubert, Gerald; Limonadi, Daniel; Bender, Kelly C.; Newman, William I.; Thomas, Peggy E.; Weitz, Catherine M.; Wall, Stephen D.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan images reveal surface features on Venus attributed to wind processes. Sand dunes, wind-sculpted hills, and more than 5830 wind streaks have been identified. The streaks serve as local "wind vanes," representing wind direction at the time of streak formation and allowing the first global mapping of near-surface wind patterns on Venus. Wind streaks are oriented both toward the equator and toward the west. When streaks associated with local transient events, such as impact cratering, are deleted, the westward component is mostly lost but the equatorward component remains. This pattern is consistent with a Hadley circulation of the lower atmosphere.

  12. Photonic streaking of attosecond pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Taec; Zhang, Chunmei; Ruchon, Thierry; Hergott, Jean-François; Auguste, Thierry; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Quéré, F.

    2013-08-01

    High harmonic radiation, produced when intense laser pulses interact with matter, is composed of a train of attosecond pulses. Individual pulses in this train carry information on ultrafast dynamics that vary from one half-optical-cycle to the next. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical photonic streaking measurement that provides direct experimental access to each attosecond pulse by mapping emission time onto propagation angle. This is achieved by inducing an ultrafast rotation of the instantaneous laser wavefront at the focus. We thus time-resolve attosecond pulse train generation, and hence the dynamics in the nonlinear medium itself. We apply photonic streaking to harmonic generation in gases and directly observe, for the first time, the influence of non-adiabatic electron dynamics and plasma formation on the generated attosecond pulse train. These experimental and numerical results also provide the first evidence of the generation of attosecond lighthouses in gases, which constitute ideal sources for attosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  13. Streaking of shake-up ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazourek, Renate; Nagele, Stefan; Feist, Johannes; Kaltenbäck, Andreas; Persson, Emil; Schneider, Barry I.; Collins, Lee A.; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    We investigate whether an apparent ``time delay'' between electrons ionized by an attosecond XUV pulse with and without shake-up excitation of the remaining ion can be extracted using XUV-IR streaking setups. The classical interpretation of attosecond streaking states that the release time of an electron can be directly mapped to the momentum shift which the electron acquires from the IR pulse. However, detailed quantum mechanical investigations show that the ionization and shake-up process itself are modified by the IR field, leading to additional momentum shifts of the ionized electrons which are not related to a real ``time delay.'' We address this problem for the helium atom for which we solve the full time-dependent Schr"odinger equation including all correlation effects.

  14. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  15. Understanding baseball team standings and streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, C.; Redner, S.

    2009-02-01

    Can one understand the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive-game winning and losing streaks self-reinforcing or can they be described statistically? We apply the Bradley-Terry model, which incorporates the heterogeneity of team strengths in a minimalist way, to answer these questions. Excellent agreement is found between the predictions of the Bradley-Terry model and the rank dependence of the average number team wins and losses in major-league baseball over the past century when the distribution of team strengths is taken to be uniformly distributed over a finite range. Using this uniform strength distribution, we also find very good agreement between model predictions and the observed distribution of consecutive-game team winning and losing streaks over the last half-century; however, the agreement is less good for the previous half-century. The behavior of the last half-century supports the hypothesis that long streaks are primarily statistical in origin with little self-reinforcing component. The data further show that the past half-century of baseball has been more competitive than the preceding half-century.

  16. Identification of rice black-streaked dwarf fijivirus in maize with rough dwarf disease in China.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Yu, J; Feng, J; Han, C; Li, D; Liu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Three virus isolates from maize with rough dwarf in different provinces in China were analyzed at the molecular level. When compared to an isolate from diseased rice plants in Hubei Province, all four isolates had identical genomic RNA electrophoretic profiles, which were composed of ten double-stranded (ds) RNAs. Full-length cDNAs of segment 10 (S10) from each of the four isolates were cloned by RT-PCR and the complete sequences were determined. Analysis of the sequences revealed that each consisted of 1801 nucleotides and contained a single open reading frame (ORF) which potentially encoded a protein with 558 amino acids. Further, the sequences showed more than 97.0% and 98.0% identity at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. In addition, their identities to rice black-streaked dwarf virus S10 were significantly higher than those to maize rough dwarf virus S10. Based on these results, it is suggested that the virus which causes this maize disease in China is rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

  17. The mevalonate pathway regulates primitive streak formation via protein farnesylation

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto-Uchida, Yoshimi; Yu, Ruoxing; Miyamura, Norio; Arima, Norie; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Suguru; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Nawa, Makiko; Kasama, Takeshi; Asaoka, Yoichi; Alois, Reiner Wimmer; Elling, Ulrich; Penninger, Josef M.; Nishina, Sachiko; Azuma, Noriyuki; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The primitive streak in peri-implantation embryos forms the mesoderm and endoderm and controls cell differentiation. The metabolic cues regulating primitive streak formation remain largely unknown. Here we utilised a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation system and a library of well-characterised drugs to identify these metabolic factors. We found that statins, which inhibit the mevalonate metabolic pathway, suppressed primitive streak formation in vitro and in vivo. Using metabolomics and pharmacologic approaches we identified the downstream signalling pathway of mevalonate and revealed that primitive streak formation requires protein farnesylation but not cholesterol synthesis. A tagging-via-substrate approach revealed that nuclear lamin B1 and small G proteins were farnesylated in embryoid bodies and important for primitive streak gene expression. In conclusion, protein farnesylation driven by the mevalonate pathway is a metabolic cue essential for primitive streak formation. PMID:27883036

  18. Corns and calluses

    MedlinePlus

    Calluses and corns ... Corns and calluses are caused by pressure or friction on skin. A corn is thickened skin on the top or side ... the bunion because it rubs against the shoe. Corns and calluses are not serious problems.

  19. Blisters, Calluses, and Corns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Blisters, Calluses, and Corns KidsHealth > For Kids > Blisters, Calluses, and Corns Print ... used to all of that stress. What's a Corn? Like calluses, corns are also areas of hard, ...

  20. Picosecond x-ray streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, V. I.; Bryukhnevich, Gennadii I.; Kolesov, G. V.; Lebedev, Vitaly B.; Miller, V. A.; Saulevich, S. V.; Shulika, A. N.

    1991-04-01

    The first multistage image converter with an X-ray photocathode (UMI-93 SR) was designed in VNIIOFI in 1974 [1]. The experiments carried out in IOFAN pointed out that X-ray electron-optical cameras using the tube provided temporal resolution up to 12 picoseconds [2]. The later work has developed into the creation of the separate streak and intensifying tubes. Thus, PV-003R tube has been built on base of UMI-93SR design, fibre optically connected to PMU-2V image intensifier carrying microchannel plate.

  1. Mass movement slope streaks imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Veverka, Joseph; Malin, Michael; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-10-01

    Narrow, fan-shaped dark streaks on steep Martian slopes were originally observed in Viking Orbiter images, but a definitive explanation was not possible because of resolution limitations. Pictures acquired by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft show innumerable examples of dark slope streaks distributed widely, but not uniformly, across the brighter equatorial regions, as well as individual details of these features that were not visible in Viking Orbiter data. Dark slope streaks (as well as much rarer bright slope streaks) represent one of the most widespread and easily recognized styles of mass movement currently affecting the Martian surface. New dark streaks have formed since Viking and even during the MGS mission, confirming earlier suppositions that higher contrast dark streaks are younger, and fade (brighten) with time. The darkest slope streaks represent ~10% contrast with surrounding slope materials. No small outcrops supplying dark material (or bright material, for bright streaks) have been found at streak apexes. Digitate downslope ends indicate slope streak formation involves a ground-hugging flow subject to deflection by minor topographic obstacles. The model we favor explains most dark slope streaks as scars from dust avalanches following oversteepening of air fall deposits. This process is analogous to terrestrial avalanches of oversteepened dry, loose snow which produce shallow avalanche scars with similar morphologies. Low angles of internal friction typically 10-30¡ for terrestrial loess and clay materials suggest that mass movement of (low-cohesion) Martian dusty air fall is possible on a wide range of gradients. Martian gravity, presumed low density of the air fall deposits, and thin (unresolved by MOC) failed layer depths imply extremely low cohesive strength at time of failure, consistent with expectations for an air fall deposit of dust particles. As speed increases during a dust avalanche, a

  2. Radar-visible wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Isolated knobs that are erosional remnants of central volcanoes or of folded rocks occur in several areas of the Altiplano are visible on both optical and images. The optically visible streaks occur in the immediate lee of the knobs, whereas the radar visible streaks occur in the zone downwind between the knobs. Aerial reconnaissance and field studies showed that the optically visible streaks consist of a series of small ( 100 m wide) barchan and barchanoid dunes, intradune sand sheets, and sand hummocks (large shrub coppice dunes) up to 15 m across and 5 m high. On LANDSAT images these features are poorly resolved but combine to form a bright streak. On the radar image, this area also appears brighter than the zone of the radar dark streak; evidently, the dunes and hummocks serve as radar reflectors. The radar dark streak consists of a relatively flat, smooth sand sheet which lacks organized aerolian bedforms, other than occasional ripples. Wind velocity profiles show a greater U value in the optically bright streak zone than in the radar dark streak.

  3. GHz modulation detection using a streak camera: Suitability of streak cameras in the AWAKE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, K.; Caldwell, A.; Reimann, O.; Muggli, P.

    2017-02-01

    Using frequency mixing, a modulated light pulse of ns duration is created. We show that, with a ps-resolution streak camera that is usually used for single short pulse measurements, we can detect via an FFT detection approach up to 450 GHz modulation in a pulse in a single measurement. This work is performed in the context of the AWAKE plasma wakefield experiment where modulation frequencies in the range of 80-280 GHz are expected.

  4. Corn insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, the major corn insect pests in South Dakota have been the larvae of corn rootworms (northern and western), European corn borer, and black cutworm. Bt-corn hybrids are effective against most of these pests. However, there are also minor or sporadic pests of corn in South Dakota includin...

  5. Streak Camera 101: Visualizing Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin

    2006-11-01

    Radiation generated by high-energy particle beams such as optical transition radiation (OTR) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) is widely used to characterize the beam properties. It has enabled dual-sweep streak cameras to visualize charged-particle beam dynamics. In this introductory paper, we will discuss properties of dual-sweep streak cameras and basic optics systems for imaging charged-particle bunches at different projection angles to produce top view, side view, and front view. Examples will be used to illustrate the beam dynamics that streak images reveal. We will also discuss practical considerations of optical transport line design to preserve spatial and temporal resolution of the camera system.

  6. High Performance Imaging Streak Camera for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Opachich, Y. P.; Kalantar, D.; MacPhee, A.; Holder, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Hatch, B.; Brown, C.; Landen, O.; Perfect, B. H.; Guidry, B.; Mead, A.; Charest, M.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Browning, D.; Silbernagel, C.; Brienza-Larsen, G.; Griffin, M.; Lee, J. J.; Haugh, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high EMI. A train of temporal UV timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented.

  7. Temporal Contrast Changes in Dark Slope Streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, H.; Phillips, C. B.; Fenton, L. K.; Brown, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Dark slope streaks on Mars, first observed in Viking images, provide insight into one of the most active and dynamic processes observed on the planet's surface. While various formation models have been suggested [1][2][3], dust avalanches seem to best explain streak origin and characteristics[4][5]. New dark streaks are observed to have the greatest contrast to their surroundings while older streaks have lower contrast, suggesting that streaks fade over time. One theory for this is atmospheric dust fallout slowly raising the albedo of the surface exposed by the dust avalanche, resulting in increased streak albedo over time until the streak becomes indistinguishable from the surrounding surface. In this study, we attempt an initial evaluation of changes in streak brightness relative to surroundings, with a first order correction for incidence angle[6] based on MOLA data. CRISM images were first identified for spatial and temporal overlap, then further selected for those image sets with well-matched viewing geometries. Locations included Nicholson Crater (CRISM images: frt0000c287_07_de165l, hrl0000d0f1_7_de165l, frt00018c69_07_de165l) and South of Nestus Valles (CRISM images: hrl00004a5e_07_de181l, hrl0000812a_07_de182l) as well as Naktong Vallis (CRISM images: hrl0000898d_07_de182l, hrl00005337_07_de182l) and an area in Lycus Sulci (CRISM images: hrl0000a52a_07_de166l, hrl0000ce5f_07_if175l). We focused on 1 micron wavelength CRISM images in order to reduce atmosphric interference. From here, brightness (observed radiance divided by solar irradiance at Mars divided by pi) values were collected along individual streaks, with measurements at multiple locations along the streak length and alongside at points of similar elevation to streak measurements to establish an average contrast ratio. Both on-streak and off-streak values were divided by the cosine of their respective local MOLA incidence angles to correct for brightness variation due to solar flux and

  8. Transgenic RNA interference (RNAi)-derived field resistance to cassava brown streak disease.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Odipio, John; Halsey, Mark; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Bua, Anton; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M; Alicai, Titus

    2012-12-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by the Ipomoviruses Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan Cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), is considered to be an imminent threat to food security in tropical Africa. Cassava plants were transgenically modified to generate small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from truncated full-length (894-bp) and N-terminal (402-bp) portions of the UCBSV coat protein (ΔCP) sequence. Seven siRNA-producing lines from each gene construct were tested under confined field trials at Namulonge, Uganda. All nontransgenic control plants (n = 60) developed CBSD symptoms on aerial tissues by 6 months after planting, whereas plants transgenic for the full-length ΔCP sequence showed a 3-month delay in disease development, with 98% of clonal replicates within line 718-001 remaining symptom free over the 11-month trial. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) diagnostics indicated the presence of UCBSV within the leaves of 57% of the nontransgenic controls, but in only two of 413 plants tested (0.5%) across the 14 transgenic lines. All transgenic plants showing CBSD were PCR positive for the presence of CBSV, except for line 781-001, in which 93% of plants were confirmed to be free of both pathogens. At harvest, 90% of storage roots from nontransgenic plants were severely affected by CBSD-induced necrosis. However, transgenic lines 718-005 and 718-001 showed significant suppression of disease, with 95% of roots from the latter line remaining free from necrosis and RT-PCR negative for the presence of both viral pathogens. Cross-protection against CBSV by siRNAs generated from the full-length UCBSV ΔCP confirms a previous report in tobacco. The information presented provides proof of principle for the control of CBSD by RNA interference-mediated technology, and progress towards the potential control of this damaging disease.

  9. Active Processes: Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    In a region of the south pole known informally as 'Ithaca' numerous fans of dark frost form every spring. HiRISE collected a time lapse series of these images, starting at Ls = 185 and culminating at Ls = 294. 'Ls' is the way we measure time on Mars: at Ls = 180 the sun passes the equator on its way south; at Ls = 270 it reaches its maximum subsolar latitude and summer begins.

    In the earliest image (figure 1) fans are dark, but small narrow bright streaks can be detected. In the next image (figure 2), acquired at Ls = 187, just 106 hours later, dramatic differences are apparent. The dark fans are larger and the bright fans are more pronounced and easily detectable. The third image in the sequence shows no bright fans at all.

    We believe that the bright streaks are fine frost condensed from the gas exiting the vent. The conditions must be just right for the bright frost to condense.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_002622_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 16-Feb-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.2 degrees latitude, 181.5 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 246.9 km (154.3 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.4 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 05:46 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 88 degrees, thus the sun was about 2 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 185.1 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  10. Temporal Contrast Changes in Dark Slope Streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, Heather; Phillips, C. B.; Brown, A.; Fenton, L.

    2013-01-01

    Dark slope streaks on Mars are among the most active and dynamic processes observed on the planet's surface. While various formation models have been suggested [1][2][3], dust avalanches seem to best explain streak origin and characteristics[4][5]. New streaks have the highest contrast suggesting they fade over time. One theory for this is atmospheric dust fallout slowly raising the albedo of the surface exposed by the dust avalanche, progressively increasing streak albedo until the streak becomes indistinguishable from the surrounding surface. In this study, we attempt an initial evaluation of changes in streak brightness relative to surroundings with a first order correction for incidence angle[6]. CRISM images were identified for spatial overlap and temporal range, then further selected for image sets with well-matched viewing geometries. The 1 micron wavelength band was used to reduce atmospheric interference and brightness values then collected at multiple locations within and alongside individual streaks, with on-streak/off-streak pairs at points of similar elevation. Values were then divided by the cosine of the corresponding MOLA incidence angle for brightness variation correction due to topography. Measurements for overlapping images established local and overall averages for the rate of change in contrast ratio. Results showed a range of trends including streaks that darkened, brightened, brightened then darkened or vice versa. We continue to explore the possibility of non-linear brightening as well as streak reactivation and localized events, surface characteristics, and topography. Further study will focus on these and other morphological changes observed from vast data sets of other instruments including the Mars Reconnaissance Orbter HiRISE and CTX, Mars Express HRSC, Mars Odyssey THEMIS (visible), and the Mars Global Surveyor MOC. [1] Morris (1982) JGR, 87, 1164-1178. [2] Ferguson and Lucchita (1984) NASA Tech. Memo., TM-86246, 188-190. [3] Miyamoto

  11. Shielding a streak camera from hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; Sorce, C.; Loughman, K.; Emig, J.; Bruns, C.; Back, C.; Bell, P. M.; Compton, S.; Hargrove, D.; Holder, J. P.; Landen, O. L.; Perry, T. S.; Shepherd, R.; Young, B. K.

    2004-10-01

    The targets used in the hot halfraum campaign at OMEGA create many hot electrons, which result in a large flux of hard x rays. The hard x rays produce a high background in the streak camera. The background was significantly reduced by wrapping the streak camera with a high-Z material; in this case, 1/8 in. of Pb. The large hard x-ray flux also adds noise to images from framing cameras which use charge-coupled devices.

  12. Identification of prevalent potyvirus on maize and johnsongrass in corn fields of Tehran province of Iran and a study on some of its properties.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, M R; Koohi-Habibi, M; Mosahebi, Gh; Hajieghrari, B

    2006-01-01

    . The isolates produced red-brown necrotic streaks on sudangrass (Sorghum sudanense) that lately changed in systemic necrosis. In host reaction studies on sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) cultivars, the virus isolates caused severe necrotic and killer reaction on sorghum cultivars Payam, Sepideh and Speed feed, but caused systemic mosaic and non-killer reaction on sorghum cultivars Kimia, KFS2, KFS3 and Jumbo. The present study showed that SCMV is the prevalent potyvirus and the main causal agent of mosaic and dwarf mosaic on maize plants in province. Since the virus is prevalent on johnsongrass plants in marginal areas of corn fields too, it seems that the origin of the virus on corn is from johnsongrass and the virus is a special strain of sugarcane mosaic virus that infects johnsongrass too.

  13. Semiclassical model for attosecond angular streaking.

    PubMed

    Smolarski, M; Eckle, P; Keller, U; Dörner, R

    2010-08-16

    Attosecond angular streaking is a new technique to achieve unsurpassed time accuracy of only a few attoseconds. Recently this has been successfully used to set an upper limit on the electron tunneling delay time in strong laser field ionization. The measurement technique can be modeled with either the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) or a more simple semiclassical approach that describes the process in two steps in analogy to the three-step model in high harmonic generation (HHG): step one is the tunnel ionization and step two is the classical motion in the strong laser field. Here we describe in detail a semiclassical model which is based on the ADK theory for the tunneling step, with subsequent classical propagation of the electron in the laser field. We take into account different ellipticities of the laser field and a possible wavelength-dependent ellipticity that is typically observed for pulses in the two-optical-cycle regime. This semiclassical model shows excellent agreement with the experimental result.

  14. Streak instability induced by bedload diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramian, Anaïs; Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The bed of an alluvial river is made of the sediment it transports. Its shape and size are controlled mostly by bedload transport which, at first order, entrains sediment grains along the flow. Gravity also pulls the moving grains towards the center of the channel, thus eroding the banks continually (Parker 1978). However, laboratory observations show that, due to the bed roughness, the trajectory of a transported grain fluctuates in the transverse direction (Seizilles et al. 2014). The bedload layer is therefore a collection of random walkers which diffuse towards the less active areas of the bed. In a river at equilibrium, bedload diffusion counteracts gravity to maintain the banks. If an initially flat bed of sediment is perturbed with longitudinal streaks, the flow-induced shear stress is weaker where the flow is shallower. Therefore, we expect bedload diffusion to induce a flux of sediment towards the crests of the perturbation. This positive feedback induces an instability which can generate new channels. We suggest that this mechanism could explain the transition from a single-thread river to a braided one.

  15. Streak image denoising and segmentation using adaptive Gaussian guided filter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhuocheng; Guo, Baoping

    2014-09-10

    In streak tube imaging lidar (STIL), streak images are obtained using a CCD camera. However, noise in the captured streak images can greatly affect the quality of reconstructed 3D contrast and range images. The greatest challenge for streak image denoising is reducing the noise while preserving details. In this paper, we propose an adaptive Gaussian guided filter (AGGF) for noise removal and detail enhancement of streak images. The proposed algorithm is based on a guided filter (GF) and part of an adaptive bilateral filter (ABF). In the AGGF, the details are enhanced by optimizing the offset parameter. AGGF-denoised streak images are significantly sharper than those denoised by the GF. Moreover, the AGGF is a fast linear time algorithm achieved by recursively implementing a Gaussian filter kernel. Experimentally, AGGF demonstrates its capacity to preserve edges and thin structures and outperforms the existing bilateral filter and domain transform filter in terms of both visual quality and peak signal-to-noise ratio performance.

  16. Visual and infrared observations of wind streaks on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterfreund, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Global correlations of the regions in which three Martian wind streak types (bright, dark, splotch-related) vary according to latitude, elevation, albedo, color, and predawn residual temperature provide constraints on models of streak formation and modification. Bright streaks are relatively stable and occur over a wide range of geographical surfaces. They are elevation-independent, suggesting that their formation is due to atmospheric dust fallout. Dark streaks appear variable from 20 to 40 deg S and at elevations between 3 and 7 km. They are associated with dark surfaces, having high thermal inertias. Splotch-related streaks occur at elevations between 0 and 6 km and at areas of either low or high thermal inertias, which is the cause of its modifying surface winds. Data are graphically presented, and the methods of data collection are fully explained. Regional studies of various types of streaks in Syrtis Major, Syria Planum, Oxia Palus, Mesogea and Pettit Craters, and Noachis confirm that the correlations found at the global level also occur at regional scales.

  17. Sea surface wind streaks in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Ming; Sha, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Wind streaks are often observed in Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. They are used to determine the sea surface wind direction for sea surface wind field retrievals. It is generally understood that visible wind streaks are caused by roll vortices in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. In this study, 227 X-band spaceborne SAR images of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired from the three FiNO platforms in the North Sea and Baltic Sea were thoroughly analyzed for a comprehensive understanding of the manifestation of wind streaks in SAR images. Approximately 48.0% of the 227 SAR images displayed wind streaks, among which 67.3%, 20.0%, and 12.7% occurred under unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions, respectively. The proportions indicate that wind streaks are more likely to be generated from thermal convection. Further investigations suggest that the inflection point and the wind shear may be essential for the appearance of wind streaks in SAR images under stable atmospheric conditions.

  18. Study of Geometric Parameters of Slope Streaks on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusnikin, Eugene; Kreslavsky, Mikhail; Karachevtseva, Irina; Zubarev, Anatoliy; Patratiy, Vyacheslav

    2015-04-01

    Slope streaks are a unique active phenomenon observed in low-latitude dusty regions on Mars. They are dark markings formed by an unknown type of run-away downslope propagation of surface disturbance. There are two kinds of hypotheses of their formation mechanism: "dry", involving granular follow, in particular, dust avalanche, and "wet", involving liquid flow, in particular, percolation of concentrated brines in shallow subsurface (1). Study of geometric characteristics of the slope streaks, especially their slopes, is a way to decipher their origin. We are carrying out an extensive set of measurements of geometric parameters of the slope streaks. We use stereo pairs of images obtained by High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard MRO orbital mission to Mars. These stereo pairs potentially allow geometric measurements (both horizontal and vertical) with accuracy on an order of a meter. Unfortunately, the digital terrain model is currently released for only one stereo pair in the regions of slope streak occurrence, and we have to work with raw, unprocessed stereo pairs. We perform direct photogrammetric measurements using PHOTOMOD software complex (http://www.racurs.ru/). We use our custom software to import "raw" HiRISE imgas (EDRs) and supplementary geometric information from SPICE into PHOTOMOD (2). We select tens to a hundred meters long segments in the beginning and the end of selected streaks and register length, azimuth, and slope of each segment. We also search for anomalously gentle parts of streaks. We analyze the obtained results by means of ESRI ArcGIS software. Our survey is in progress. So far we registered over a hundred of streaks. We found that the extent of the streaks varies from several meters to hundreds of meters. The streaks are formed in locales with a slope from 17 to 37 degrees. The lower boundary indicates that the streaks can propagate on slopes that are significantly gentler than the static angle of repose. Distal

  19. Streak detection and analysis pipeline for optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, J.; Granvik, M.; Torppa, J.; Muinonen, K.; Poikonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Säntti, T.; Komulainen, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel data processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of moving objects, either of natural (asteroids, meteors) or artificial origin (satellites, space debris). The monitoring of the space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data to support the development and validation of population models, and to build and maintain catalogues of orbital elements. The orbital catalogues are, in turn, needed for the assessment of close approaches (for asteroids, with the Earth; for satellites, with each other) and for the support of contingency situations or launches. For both types of populations, there is also increasing interest to detect fainter objects corresponding to the small end of the size distribution. We focus on the low signal-to-noise (SNR) detection of objects with high angular velocities, resulting in long and faint object trails, or streaks, in the optical images. The currently available, mature image processing algorithms for detection and astrometric reduction of optical data cover objects that cross the sensor field-of-view comparably slowly, and, particularly for satellites, within a rather narrow, predefined range of angular velocities. By applying specific tracking techniques, the objects appear point-like or as short trails in the exposures. However, the general survey scenario is always a 'track-before-detect' problem, resulting in streaks of arbitrary lengths. Although some considerations for low-SNR processing of streak-like features are available in the current image processing and computer vision literature, algorithms are not readily available yet. In the ESA-funded StreakDet (Streak detection and astrometric reduction) project, we develop and evaluate an automated processing pipeline applicable to single images (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) obtained with any observing scenario, including space-based surveys and both low- and high-altitude populations. The algorithmic

  20. Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

    2002-11-08

    We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

  1. Unsteady analysis of hot streak migration in a turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Davis, Roger L.; Edwards, David E.; Madavan, Nateri K.

    1990-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses are used to predict unsteady viscous rotor-stator interacting flow in the presence of a combustor hot streak. Predicted results are presented for a two-dimensional three-stator/four-rotor, a two-dimensional one-stator/one-rotor, and a three-dimensional one-stator/one-rotor simulation of hot streak migration through a turbine stage. Comparison of these results with experimental data demonstrates the capability of the three-dimensional procedure to capture most of the flow physics associated with hot streak migration including the effects of combustor hot streaks on turbine rotor surface temperatures. It is noted that blade count ratio has little effect on predicted time-averaged surface pressure and temperature distributions, but a substantial effect on the unsteady flow characteristics. It is shown that high-temperature hot streak fluid accumulates on the pressure surface of the rotor blades, resulting in a high time-averaged surface temperature 'hot spots'.

  2. Hitting Is Contagious in Baseball: Evidence from Long Hitting Streaks

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Joel R.; Maewal, Akhilesh; Gough, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is used to test the hypothesis that “hitting is contagious”. A statistical model is described to study the effect of a hot hitter upon his teammates’ batting during a consecutive game hitting streak. Box score data for entire seasons comprising streaks of length games, including a total observations were compiled. Treatment and control sample groups () were constructed from core lineups of players on the streaking batter’s team. The percentile method bootstrap was used to calculate confidence intervals for statistics representing differences in the mean distributions of two batting statistics between groups. Batters in the treatment group (hot streak active) showed statistically significant improvements in hitting performance, as compared against the control. Mean for the treatment group was found to be to percentage points higher during hot streaks (mean difference increased points), while the batting heat index introduced here was observed to increase by points. For each performance statistic, the null hypothesis was rejected at the significance level. We conclude that the evidence suggests the potential existence of a “statistical contagion effect”. Psychological mechanisms essential to the empirical results are suggested, as several studies from the scientific literature lend credence to contagious phenomena in sports. Causal inference from these results is difficult, but we suggest and discuss several latent variables that may contribute to the observed results, and offer possible directions for future research. PMID:23251507

  3. Elimination of five sugarcane viruses from sugarcane using in vitro culture of axillary bud and apical meristem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Procedures were developed for the in vitro elimination of Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV), Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) and Fiji disease virus (FDV) from infected sugarcane. In vitro shoot regeneration, elongation and virus el...

  4. Streak Camera Performance with Large-Format CCD Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R A; Andrews, D S; Bell, P M; Griffith, R L; McDonald, J W; Torres, P III; Vergel de Dios, G

    2003-07-08

    The ICF program at Livermore has a large inventory of optical streak cameras that were built in the 1970s and 1980s. The cameras include micro-channel plate image-intensifier tubes (IIT) that provide signal amplification and early lens-coupled CCD readouts. Today, these cameras are still very functional, but some replacement parts such as the original streak tube, CCD, and IIT are scarce and obsolete. This article describes recent efforts to improve the performance of these cameras using today's advanced CCD readout technologies. Very sensitive, large-format CCD arrays with efficient fiber-optic input faceplates are now available for direct coupling with the streak tube. Measurements of camera performance characteristics including linearity, spatial and temporal resolution, line-spread function, contrast transfer ratio (CTR), and dynamic range have been made for several different camera configurations: CCD coupled directly to the streak tube, CCD directly coupled to the IIT, and the original configuration with a smaller CCD lens coupled to the IIT output. Spatial resolution (limiting visual) with and without the IIT is 8 and 20 lp/mm, respectively, for photocathode current density up to 25% of the Child-Langmuir (C-L) space-charge limit. Temporal resolution (fwhm) deteriorates by about 20% when the cathode current density reaches 10% of the C-L space charge limit. Streak tube operation with large average tube current was observed by illuminating the entire slit region through a Ronchi ruling and measuring the CTR. Sensitivity (CCD electrons per streak tube photoelectron) for the various configurations ranged from 7.5 to 2,700 with read noise of 7.5 to 10.5 electrons. Optimum spatial resolution is achieved when the IIT is removed. Maximum dynamic range requires a configuration where a single photoelectron from the photocathode produces a signal that is 3 to 5 times the read noise.

  5. Performance of Laser Megajoule's x-ray streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, C.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Fronty, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Goulmy, C.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Rubbelynck, C.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Trosseille, C.

    2016-11-01

    A prototype of a picosecond x-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to provide plasma-diagnostic support for the Laser Megajoule. We report on the measured performance of this streak camera, which almost fulfills the requirements: 50-μm spatial resolution over a 15-mm field in the photocathode plane, 17-ps temporal resolution in a 2-ns timebase, a detection threshold lower than 625 nJ/cm2 in the 0.05-15 keV spectral range, and a dynamic range greater than 100.

  6. A wide dynamic range x-ray streak camera system

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Lihong; Yang Qinlao; Niu Hanben; Liao Hua; Zhou Junlan; Ding Yunkun

    2008-02-15

    An x-ray streak camera with wide dynamic range and a large slit photocathode of 30 mm length has been developed and calibrated. In order to achieve wide dynamic range, a conventional streak tube has been improved and the camera system has been designed without microchannel plate electron amplifier. As a result, a dynamic range of 922 is achieved in a single shot mode with laser pulse of 30 ps (full width at half maximum) at time resolution of better than 31 ps.

  7. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. I - Separate effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature. Test results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling are most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak injection location, streak-to-free stream density ratio and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios.

  8. Reliable and Repeatable Characterication of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D; Charest, M; Torres III, P; Charest, M

    2008-05-06

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  9. Reliable and Repeatable Characterization of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Charest Jr., Peter Torres III, Christopher Silbernagel, and Daniel Kalantar

    2008-10-31

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  10. Reliable and repeatable characterization of optical streak cameras.

    PubMed

    Charest, Michael R; Torres, Peter; Silbernagel, Christopher T; Kalantar, Daniel H

    2008-10-01

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  11. Processing Particle-Streak Imagery On A Personal Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes simple flow experiment in which streak images of particles suspended in fluid and illuminated for short times processed into maps of velocity vectors. In experiment, semiautomatic data-reduction scheme used which recovers significant image data more efficiently than currently available automatic scheme.

  12. Attosecond streaking of correlated two-electron transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazourek, Renate; Nagele, Stefan; Feist, Johannes; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Attosecond streaking is one of the most fundamental processes in attosecond science allowing for a mapping of temporal information to the energy domain. For the measurement of the release time of electrons in atomic photoemission a time-resolution on the sub-100 attosecond time scale could be achieved [Science 328, 1658 (2010)]. The measured time shifts contain timing (or spectral phase) information associated with the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith (EWS) time delay. Considerable additional time shifts caused by the probing infrared field could be identified on the single-particle level. In this contribution we adress the role of electron correlation in the streaking process. We study two-electron systems for which we solve the full time-dependent Schr"odinger equation. For final ionic states with small polarizability correlation effects beyond those of the one-photon transition already included in the EWS time delay are absent. However, for shake-up ionization we find an additional streaking time shift due to the correlated dynamics of the dressed bound electron and the streaked continuum electron.

  13. Our Mother Corn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathers, Sherry; And Others

    Developed to provide an understanding of the magnitude of the role of corn, referred to as Mother Corn in the cultures of the Seneca, Pawnee, and Hopi tribes, the student text provides information on the tribes' basic lifestyles and the way they grew and used corn in three different parts of the United States. The section on the origin of corn…

  14. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  15. Complete genome sequence of the alfalfa latent virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa latent virus (ALV) is a member of the carlavirus group and occurs symptomlessly in alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In the US it is prevalent in Nebraska and Wisconsin. The virus is recognized as a strain of Pea streak virus (PeSV) So far, no complete genomic sequence of PSV or ALV is availab...

  16. Triticum mosaic virus isolates in the southern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, a Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-resistant wheat variety RonL was found to have mosaic symptoms similar to WSMV. The virus inducing the symptoms was determined to be previously unknown and given the name Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV). Since, TriMV has been found in plant samples isolate...

  17. An Experimental Host Range of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus isolated from wheat. This study was conducted to determine an experimental host range for TriMV and identify species that could serve as differential hosts for isolating TriMV from Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV). Plants tested were mechan...

  18. Corn rootworms and Bt resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms have been a major pest of corn for many years. As their name suggests, corn rootworms damage corn plants by feeding on the roots. Western and northern corn rootworms have overcome practices farmers use to keep their population numbers down, such as insecticides and crop rotation. Cor...

  19. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  20. The development of an improved streak tube for fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.; Fisher, Y.; Jadwin, A.; Boni, R.; Jaanimagi, P. A.

    2016-11-01

    The fusion diagnostic community, including the National Ignition Facility, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Megajoule in France, and others require optical recording instruments with precise time resolution covering a dynamic range of many orders of magnitude. In 2012, LLE, Photek, and Sydor Instruments embarked on the re-design of an improved streak tube for fusion diagnostics. As a baseline we started with the Photek ST-Y streak tube which is a member of the RCA design dating back to 1957, because the tube body can accommodate a 35 mm long photocathode, and consequently more fibre coupled diagnostic channels than smaller designs. Electron optical modelling was carried out by both Paul Jaanimagi in the US and by Photek with different software packages in a parallel exercise. Our goal was to address some of the short-comings of this tube, the initial approach being to increase the field between the photocathode and extractor electrode from 700 to 1300 V/mm to reduce space charge effects and to improve time resolution. Many changes and modifications were made: the time resolution was improved to 5 ps, the usable cathode length was increased from 20 mm to 32 mm under high extraction field operation, and the off-axis spatial resolution was substantially improved compared to other tubes of this format. Several tubes have been built and tested in Sydor ROSS-5800 streak cameras.

  1. A new design of filter system in streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengyu; Bai, Yonglin

    2015-10-01

    In order to reduce the frequency of researchers routing in and out of the testing site and ensure the fluency of the testing we design a new filter system applied to the streak cameras. This system promotes streak cameras' abilities on spatial discrimination and time resolution. This paper focuses on the instruction of the piezoelectric motor's principle based on field-effect tubes. Filter wheel is driven by piezoelectric motor. It can effectively avoid the influences of high field produced by streak tube. Finally we achieve auto regulation at different gears and promote the efficiency of operations and guarantee the safety of researchers. CD4046 introduces the driven clock of this system and we use an inverter to get two synchronous inverted signals. These signals are amplified by field-effect tubes to more than 300V. The amplified ones are integrated at the output terminals to generate sinusoidal signal. The test shows that in this filter system piezoelectric motor operates at its resonance frequency under a control signal of 62.5 KHz. Its working current is 1.9A and driving power is almost 10W. By adjusting the gears, the filter wheel costs less than 2 seconds to calibrate. We accomplish the test in respected results.

  2. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, M. J.; Upadhyay, J.; Deshpande, P. P.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P.

    2010-08-15

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  3. Streak artifact reduction in cardiac cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Gilad; Naveh, Galit; Lessick, Jonathan; Altman, Ami

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam reconstructed cardiac CT images suffer from characteristic streak artifacts that affect the quality of coronary artery imaging. These artifacts arise from inhomogeneous distribution of noise. While in non-tagged reconstruction inhomogeneity of noise distribution is mainly due to anisotropy of the attenuation of the scanned object (e.g. shoulders), in cardiac imaging it is largely influenced by the non-uniform distribution of the acquired data used for reconstructing the heart at a given phase. We use a cardiac adaptive filter to reduce these streaks. In difference to previous methods of adaptive filtering that locally smooth data points on the basis of their attenuation values, our filter is applied as a function of the noise distribution of the data as it is used in the phase selective reconstruction. We have reconstructed trans-axial images without adaptive filtering, with a regular adaptive filter and with the cardiac adaptive filter. With the cardiac adaptive filter significant reduction of streaks is achieved, and thus image quality is improved. The coronary vessel is much more pronounced in the cardiac adaptive filtered images, in slab MIP the main coronary artery branches are more visible, and non-calcified plaque is better differentiated from vessel wall. This improvement is accomplished without altering significantly the border definition of calcified plaques.

  4. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M J; Upadhyay, J; Deshpande, P P; Sharma, M L; Navathe, C P

    2010-08-01

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  5. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-07-22

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV.

  6. Cell streak imaging cytometry for rare cell detection.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2015-02-15

    Detection of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells, have many clinical applications. To measure rare cells with increased sensitivity and improved data managements, we developed an imaging flow cytometer with a streak imaging mode capability. The new streak mode imaging mode utilizes low speed video to capture moving fluorescently labeled cells in a flow cell. Each moving cell is imaged on multiple pixels on each frame, where the cell path is marked as a streak line proportional to the length of the exposure. Finding rare cells (e.g., <1 cell/mL) requires measuring larger sample volumes to achieve higher sensitivity, therefore we combined streak mode imaging with a "wide" high throughput flow cell (e.g. flow rates set to 10 mL/min) in contrast to the conventional "narrow" hydrodynamic focusing cells typically used in cytometry that are inherently limited to low flow rates. The new flow cell is capable of analyzing 20 mL/min of fluorescently labeled cells. To further increase sensitivity, the signal to noise ratio of the images was also enhanced by combining three imaging methods: (1) background subtraction, (2) pixel binning, and (3) CMOS color channel selection. The streaking mode cytometer has been used for the analysis of SYTO-9 labeled THP-1 human monocytes in buffer and in blood. Samples of cells at 1 cell/mL and 0.1 cell/mL were analyzed in 30 mL with flow rates set to 10 mL/min and frame rates of 4 fps (frame per second). For the target of 1 cell/mL, an average concentration of 0.91 cell/mL was measured by cytometry, with a standard error of 0.03 (C(95) = 0.85-0.97). For the target of 0.1 cell/mL, an average concentration of 0.083 cell/mL was measured, with a standard error of 0.01 (C(95) = 0.065-0.102). Whole blood was also spiked with SYTO-9 labeled cells to a concentration of 10 cell/mL, and the average flow cytometry measurement was 8.7 cells/mL (i.e. 0.87 cells/mL in diluted blood) with a 95% CL of 8.1-9.2 cells/mL. This demonstrated the ability

  7. Streak camera based SLR receiver for two color atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Clarke, Christopher; Oldham, Thomas; Selden, Michael

    1993-01-01

    To realize accurate two-color differential measurements, an image digitizing system with variable spatial resolution was designed, built, and integrated to a photon-counting picosecond streak camera, yielding a temporal scan resolution better than 300 femtosecond/pixel. The streak camera is configured to operate with 3 spatial channels; two of these support green (532 nm) and uv (355 nm) while the third accommodates reference pulses (764 nm) for real-time calibration. Critical parameters affecting differential timing accuracy such as pulse width and shape, number of received photons, streak camera/imaging system nonlinearities, dynamic range, and noise characteristics were investigated to optimize the system for accurate differential delay measurements. The streak camera output image consists of three image fields, each field is 1024 pixels along the time axis and 16 pixels across the spatial axis. Each of the image fields may be independently positioned across the spatial axis. Two of the image fields are used for the two wavelengths used in the experiment; the third window measures the temporal separation of a pair of diode laser pulses which verify the streak camera sweep speed for each data frame. The sum of the 16 pixel intensities across each of the 1024 temporal positions for the three data windows is used to extract the three waveforms. The waveform data is processed using an iterative three-point running average filter (10 to 30 iterations are used) to remove high-frequency structure. The pulse pair separations are determined using the half-max and centroid type analysis. Rigorous experimental verification has demonstrated that this simplified process provides the best measurement accuracy. To calibrate the receiver system sweep, two laser pulses with precisely known temporal separation are scanned along the full length of the sweep axis. The experimental measurements are then modeled using polynomial regression to obtain a best fit to the data. Data

  8. Eleven years of breeding efforts to combat cassava brown streak disease

    PubMed Central

    Kawuki, Robert Sezi; Kaweesi, Tadeo; Esuma, Williams; Pariyo, Anthony; Kayondo, Ismail Siraj; Ozimati, Alfred; Kyaligonza, Vincent; Abaca, Alex; Orone, Joseph; Tumuhimbise, Robooni; Nuwamanya, Ephraim; Abidrabo, Philip; Amuge, Teddy; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Okao, Geoffrey; Wagaba, Henry; Adiga, Gerald; Alicai, Titus; Omongo, Christopher; Bua, Anton; Ferguson, Morag; Kanju, Edward; Baguma, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production is currently under threat from cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), a disease that is among the seven most serious obstacles to world’s food security. Three issues are of significance for CBSD. Firstly, the virus associated with CBSD, has co-evolved with cassava outside its center of origin for at least 90 years. Secondly, that for the last 74 years, CBSD was only limited to the low lands. Thirdly, that most research has largely focused on CBSD epidemiology and virus diversity. Accordingly, this paper focuses on CBSD genetics and/or breeding and hence, presents empirical data generated in the past 11 years of cassava breeding in Uganda. Specifically, this paper provides: 1) empirical data on CBSD resistance screening efforts to identify sources of resistance and/or tolerance; 2) an update on CBSD resistance population development comprising of full-sibs, half-sibs and S1 families and their respective field performances; and 3) insights into chromosomal regions and genes involved in CBSD resistance based on genome wide association analysis. It is expected that this information will provide a foundation for harmonizing on-going CBSD breeding efforts and consequently, inform the future breeding interventions aimed at combating CBSD. PMID:27795681

  9. Hot streaks and phantom cooling in a turbine rotor passage. II - Combined effects and analytical modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, Richard J.; Dring, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental documentation and analytical correlations demonstrating the effects of hot streak accumulation and phantom cooling on turbine rotor airfoil surface temperature are presented. Results are shown which quantify the impact of a nonuniform temperature profile at the entrance of a turbine due to combustor-generated hot and cold streaks, and cooling air discharged from the trailing edge of the upstream stator. Experimental results are shown for a range of controlling variables to identify where streak accumulation and phantom cooling were most likely to be strongest. These variables include streak-to-free stream density ratio, streak injection location, and coolant-to-free stream density and velocity ratios. Experimental results are shown for the combined effects of hot streak and stator coolant on the adiabatic recovery temperature of the rotor.

  10. On the nature and visibility of crater-associated streaks on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper considers Mariner 9 and Viking data that contradict Kuzmin's (1975) hypothesis that all crater-associated wind streaks on Mars are depositional and consist of unresolved barchan-like dunes. According to Kuzmin's hypothesis, any streak can appear either bright or dark relative to its surroundings depending on the sun's position. The spacecraft images, however, show examples of dark and light streaks visible at the same azimuth angle of the sun. Evidence that bright and dark streaks differ both in morphology and in character is considered. It is suggested that the common ragged dark streaks are probably erosion scars while most bright streaks probably represent accumulations of bright dust-storm fallout.

  11. Corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The corn blight problem is briefly described how the experiment was organized and conducted, the effect of the blight on the 1971 crop, and some conclusions that may be drawn as a result of the experiment. The information is based on preliminary reports of the Corn Blight Watch Steering Committee and incorporates much illustrative material conceived at Purdue University.

  12. PRODUCING HIGH CORN YIELDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Coll. of Agriculture.

    RESOURCE MATERIAL ON CORN PRODUCTION FOR HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE AND ADULT FARMER CLASSES WAS DESIGNED BY A STATE LEVEL GROUP OF SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, SUPERVISORS, AND TEACHERS TO HELP SOLVE PROBLEMS THAT CONFRONT CORN PRODUCERS AT PLANTING TIME. THE SUBJECT MATTER CONCERNS PLANTING TIME, DEPTH, ROW WIDTH,…

  13. Transition due to streamwise streaks in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Transition induced by stationary streaks undergoing transient growth in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer flow is studied using numerical computations. While the possibility of strong transient growth of small-amplitude stationary perturbations in supersonic boundary layer flows has been demonstrated in previous works, its relation to laminar-turbulent transition cannot be established within the framework of linear disturbances. Therefore, this paper investigates the nonlinear evolution of initially linear optimal disturbances that evolve into finite amplitude streaks in the downstream region, and then studies the modal instability of those streaks as a likely cause for the onset of bypass transition. The nonmodal evolution of linearly optimal stationary perturbations in a supersonic, Mach 3 flat plate boundary layer is computed via the nonlinear plane-marching parabolized stability equations (PSE) for stationary perturbations, or equivalently, the perturbation form of parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. To assess the effect of the nonlinear finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane-marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by the spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of transition is estimated using an N -factor criterion based on modal amplification of the secondary instabilities of the streaks. In the absence of transient growth disturbances, first mode instabilities in a Mach 3, zero pressure gradient boundary layer reach N =10 at Rex≈107 . However, secondary instability modes of the stationary streaks undergoing transient growth are able to achieve the same N -factor at Rex<2 ×106 when the initial streak amplitude is sufficiently large. In contrast to the streak instabilities in incompressible flows, subharmonic instability modes with twice the fundamental spanwise wavelength of the streaks are found to have higher amplification ratios than the streak instabilities at fundamental

  14. Characteristics of a streak disturbance induced by an isolated roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed

    2012-11-01

    A detailed description of a streak disturbance introduced in a Blasius boundary layer by an isolated roughness element will be presented. This work is motivated by the desire to understand the dependence of the evolution/instability of streamwise-oriented streaks (which play a key role in bypass transition) on the method by which they are generated. The proper scaling of the streamwise evolution of the streak disturbance energy is examined. This expands upon established Rek2scaling (White et al., Physics of Fluids, 2005) of streak disturbances induced by spanwise-periodic roughness element arrays. Examining different roughness heights, k, and employing a method that accounts for the streamwise growth of the streak's wall-normal and spanwise scales, it is found that the streak energy density scales with Rek7/ 3 , in the case of an isolated roughness element. The data used in the analysis are acquired using hotwire anemometry throughout a three-dimensional domain located downstream of a single cylindrical roughness element. These measurements are complemented by smokewire visualizations, which capture clearly three distinct disturbance states, dependent upon roughness element height; namely, stable streaks, streaks with intermittent turbulent bursts, and turbulent disturbances. Correspondence is established between these states and the streamwise evolution of the streak energy and the cross-stream disturbance profiles. NSF Grant: CMMI 0932546.

  15. Defrosting Polar Dunes--Dark Spots and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The first time that the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)team saw dark spots on defrosting dune surfaces was in August and September of 1998. At that time, it was the north polar seasonal frost cap that was subliming away (more recent images from 1999 have shown the south polar frosts). This picture (above) shows a small portion of the giant dune field that surrounds the north polar region, as it appeared on August 23, 1998. At the time, it was early northern spring and the dunes were still covered with winter frost.

    Dark spots had appeared on the north polar dunes, and many of them exhibited a radial or semi-radial pattern of dark streaks and streamers. At first, there was speculation that the streaks indicated that the defrosting process might somehow involve explosions! The dark spots seemed to resemble small craters with dark, radial ejecta. It seemed possible that frozen carbon dioxide trapped beneath water ice might somehow heat up, turn to gas, expand, and then 'explode' in either a small blast or at least a 'puff' of air similar to that which comes from the blowhole of a surfacing whale or seal.

    The image shown here changed the earlier impression. The dark spots and streaks do not result from explosions. The spots--though not well understood--represent the earliest stages of defrosting on the sand dunes. The streaks, instead of being caused by small explosions, are instead the result of wind. In this picture, the fine, dark streaks show essentially identical orientations from spot to spot (e.g., compare the spots seen in boxes (a) and (b)). Each ray of dark material must result from wind blowing from a particular direction--for example, all of the spots in this picture exhibit a ray that points toward the upper left corner of the image, and each of these rays indicates the same wind regime. Each spot also has a ray pointing toward the lower right and top/upper-right. These, too, must indicate periods when the wind was strong

  16. Streaked radiography measurements of convergent ablator performance (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other ablator rocket parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. A regularization technique has been used to determine the ablator density profile {rho}(r) at each time step; moments of {rho}(r) then provide the areal density, average radius, and mass of the unablated, or remaining, ablator material, with the velocity determined from the time derivative of the average radius. The technique has been implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility.

  17. Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages, viruses which infect and lyse bacterial cells, can provide a natural method to reduce bacterial pathogens on produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails is most likely to be effective against bacterial pathogens on produce commodities, and minimize the development of...

  18. Field Level RNAi-Mediated Resistance to Cassava Brown Streak Disease across Multiple Cropping Cycles and Diverse East African Agro-Ecological Locations

    PubMed Central

    Wagaba, Henry; Beyene, Getu; Aleu, Jude; Odipio, John; Okao-Okuja, Geoffrey; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Munga, Theresia; Obiero, Hannington; Halsey, Mark E.; Ilyas, Muhammad; Raymond, Peter; Bua, Anton; Taylor, Nigel J.; Miano, Douglas; Alicai, Titus

    2017-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) presents a serious threat to cassava production in East and Central Africa. Currently, no cultivars with high levels of resistance to CBSD are available to farmers. Transgenic RNAi technology was employed to combat CBSD by fusing coat protein (CP) sequences from Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) to create an inverted repeat construct (p5001) driven by the constitutive Cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Twenty-five plant lines of cultivar TME 204 expressing varying levels of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were established in confined field trials (CFTs) in Uganda and Kenya. Within an initial CFT at Namulonge, Uganda, non-transgenic TME 204 plants developed foliar and storage root CBSD incidences at 96–100% by 12 months after planting. In contrast, 16 of the 25 p5001 transgenic lines showed no foliar symptoms and had less than 8% of their storage roots symptomatic for CBSD. A direct positive correlation was seen between levels of resistance to CBSD and expression of transgenic CP-derived siRNAs. A subsequent CFT was established at Namulonge using stem cuttings from the initial trial. All transgenic lines established remained asymptomatic for CBSD, while 98% of the non-transgenic TME 204 stake-derived plants developed storage roots symptomatic for CBSD. Similarly, very high levels of resistance to CBSD were demonstrated by TME 204 p5001 RNAi lines grown within a CFT over a full cropping cycle at Mtwapa, coastal Kenya. Sequence analysis of CBSD causal viruses present at the trial sites showed that the transgenic lines were exposed to both CBSV and UCBSV, and that the sequenced isolates shared >90% CP identity with transgenic CP sequences expressed by the p5001 inverted repeat expression cassette. These results demonstrate very high levels of field resistance to CBSD conferred by the p5001 RNAi construct at diverse agro-ecological locations, and across the vegetative cropping cycle

  19. Microprocessor-controlled, wide-range streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Amy E. Lewis, Craig Hollabaugh

    2006-09-01

    Bechtel Nevada/NSTec recently announced deployment of their fifth generation streak camera. This camera incorporates many advanced features beyond those currently available for streak cameras. The arc-resistant driver includes a trigger lockout mechanism, actively monitors input trigger levels, and incorporates a high-voltage fault interrupter for user safety and tube protection. The camera is completely modular and may deflect over a variable full-sweep time of 15 nanoseconds to 500 microseconds. The camera design is compatible with both large- and small-format commercial tubes from several vendors. The embedded microprocessor offers Ethernet connectivity, and XML [extensible markup language]-based configuration management with non-volatile parameter storage using flash-based storage media. The camera’s user interface is platform-independent (Microsoft Windows, Unix, Linux, Macintosh OSX) and is accessible using an AJAX [asynchronous Javascript and XML]-equipped modem browser, such as Internet Explorer 6, Firefox, or Safari. User interface operation requires no installation of client software or browser plug-in technology. Automation software can also access the camera configuration and control using HTTP [hypertext transfer protocol]. The software architecture supports multiple-simultaneous clients, multiple cameras, and multiple module access with a standard browser. The entire user interface can be customized.

  20. Parametric frequency upconversion, optical fiber transmission, and streak camera recording

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.E.; Rotter, M.D.

    1987-01-30

    The use of optical fiber for the transmission of information over relatively long distances is being recognized as the only viable solution to many data transmission problems, particularly those requiring high information density and faithful temporal content. This necessary reliance upon the optical carrier has meant that the image-tube based optical streak camera is often the instrument of choice for recording single-shot multi-parameter events with high temporal resolution. However, current photocathode technology is incompatible with the trend of the optical fiber industry toward the use of the 1300 to 1600 nm wavelength regime. To retain the advantages of optical streak-camera recording and optical fiber transmission, a way must be found to ''upconvert'' the optical carrier to higher energy. This report describes the use of an intense lazer pump beam coincident with the IR signal into a non-linear crystal (LiIO/sub 3/) to increase the signal's frequency. A beam splitter is used to separate the signal from the pump beam at the detector. The physical theory underlying this process is described. (JDH)

  1. Microprocessor-controlled wide-range streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Amy E.; Hollabaugh, Craig

    2006-08-01

    Bechtel Nevada/NSTec recently announced deployment of their fifth generation streak camera. This camera incorporates many advanced features beyond those currently available for streak cameras. The arc-resistant driver includes a trigger lockout mechanism, actively monitors input trigger levels, and incorporates a high-voltage fault interrupter for user safety and tube protection. The camera is completely modular and may deflect over a variable full-sweep time of 15 nanoseconds to 500 microseconds. The camera design is compatible with both large- and small-format commercial tubes from several vendors. The embedded microprocessor offers Ethernet connectivity, and XML [extensible markup language]-based configuration management with non-volatile parameter storage using flash-based storage media. The camera's user interface is platform-independent (Microsoft Windows, Unix, Linux, Macintosh OSX) and is accessible using an AJAX [asynchronous Javascript and XML]-equipped modem browser, such as Internet Explorer 6, Firefox, or Safari. User interface operation requires no installation of client software or browser plug-in technology. Automation software can also access the camera configuration and control using HTTP [hypertext transfer protocol]. The software architecture supports multiple-simultaneous clients, multiple cameras, and multiple module access with a standard browser. The entire user interface can be customized.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Alfalfa latent virus

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jonathan; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of the Alfalfa latent carlavirus (ALV) was obtained by primer walking and Illumina RNA sequencing. The virus differs substantially from the Czech ALV isolate and the Pea streak virus isolate from Wisconsin. The absence of a clear nucleic acid-binding protein indicates ALV divergence from other carlaviruses. PMID:25883281

  3. Wigner-Smith time delay and its application to attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Cory; Su, Jing; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka

    2015-05-01

    Attosecond streaking experiments have been suggested as a means for observing temporal delays in photoemission, but the interpretation of the time delays observed in such experiments is still debated. Using a calculation of the streaking delays as a field-weighted sum over finite-range delays accumulated over the duration of the streaking pulse length, we provide further analysis into the role the Coulomb potential plays in the observed, so-called ``streaking delay.'' To this end, we make use of cut-off Coulomb and single active electron (SAE) potentials to calculate field-free Wigner-Smith-like time delays accumulated over small intervals of time to formulate an analytical model for the calculation of the streaking delays for hydrogenic atoms, as well as for SAE model potentials for noble gases. Our results indicate that in most cases, the influence of the streaking field on the short-range parts of the potential is a small effect. This allows for the representation of the streaking delay as the sum of the Wigner-Smith (WS) delay from scattering theory and the coupling between the streaking and Coulomb fields. We acknowledge the following support: C.G., J.S., and A.B: U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program (Award No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), A.J.-B.: U.S. NSF (Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  4. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-05-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  5. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  6. Kepler Corn Maze

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dell'Osso Family Farm, located on the outskirts of Lathrop, California held the grand opening of their corn maze that was designed with a NASA theme. The maze is part of a nation-wide group of ...

  7. Argentina corn yield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate corn yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the corn-growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1965 to 1980 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

  8. Sub-picosecond streak camera measurements at LLNL: From IR to x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Steward, R; Lee, E W; Cross, R R; Springer, P T

    2003-12-21

    An ultra fast, sub-picosecond resolution streak camera has been recently developed at the LLNL. The camera is a versatile instrument with a wide operating wavelength range. The temporal resolution of up to 300 fs can be achieved, with routine operation at 500 fs. The streak camera has been operated in a wide wavelength range from IR to x-rays up to 2 keV. In this paper we briefly review the main design features that result in the unique properties of the streak camera and present its several scientific applications: (1) Streak camera characterization using a Michelson interferometer in visible range, (2) temporally resolved study of a transient x-ray laser at 14.7 nm, which enabled us to vary the x-ray laser pulse duration from {approx}2-6 ps by changing the pump laser parameters, and (3) an example of a time-resolved spectroscopy experiment with the streak camera.

  9. Betting Decision Under Break-Streak Pattern: Evidence from Casino Gaming.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lawrence Hoc Nang; So, Amy Siu Ian; Law, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive bias is prevalent among gamblers, especially those with gambling problems. Grounded in the heuristics theories, this study contributes to the literature by examining a cognitive bias triggered by the break streak pattern in the casino setting. We postulate that gamblers tend to bet on the latest outcome when there is a break-streak pattern. Moreover, three determinants of the betting decision under break-streak pattern, including the streak length of the alternative outcome, the frequency of the latest outcome, and gender, were identified and examined in this study. A non-participatory observational study was conducted among the Cussec gamblers in a casino in Macao. An analysis of 1229 bets confirms our postulation, particularly when the streak of the alternative outcome is long, the latest outcome is frequent, and the gamblers are females. The findings provide meaningful implications for casino management and public policymakers regarding the minimization of gambling harm.

  10. Satellite Observations of Plume-like Streaks in a Cloud Field in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Lewis; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Seaman, Curtis J.; Stocks, Brian; Rabin, Robert M.

    2016-09-01

    On the afternoon of 28 October 2013, plume-like streaks were detected by geostationary and polar orbiting satellites over eastern Ontario, Canada. These streaks were characterized by enhanced reflectivity in the visible bands and warmer brightness temperatures at 3.9 µm. These streaks were part of a low-level liquid water cloud layer. Due to the similarity of the streaks to plume-like features in marine stratocumulus caused by smoke from the stacks of ships, so-called ship tracks, a local source of emitted aerosols was suspected and subsequently identified as the burning of logging residue. This event provides further support for the ability of locally enhanced aerosol loading to alter microphysical characteristics of clouds. Ship tracks, pollution plumes from industrial burning, and pyro-cumulus are known examples of this type of interaction. In addition, the plume-like streaks could be used indirectly to identify the location of the source of the emitted particles.

  11. The enigmatic primitive streak: prevailing notions and challenges concerning the body axis of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    The primitive streak establishes the antero-posterior body axis in all amniote species. It is thought to be the conduit through which mesoderm and endoderm progenitors ingress and migrate to their ultimate destinations. Despite its importance, the streak remains poorly defined and one of the most enigmatic structures of the animal kingdom. In particular, the posterior end of the primitive streak has not been satisfactorily identified in any species. Unexpectedly, and contrary to prevailing notions, recent evidence suggests that the murine posterior primitive streak extends beyond the embryo proper. In its extraembryonic site, the streak creates a node-like cell reservoir from which the allantois, a universal caudal appendage of all amniotes and the future umbilical cord of placental mammals, emerges. This new insight into the fetal/umbilical relationship may explain the etiology of a large number of umbilical-associated birth defects, many of which are correlated with abnormalities of the embryonic midline. PMID:19609969

  12. Lipid droplets in atherosclerotic fatty streaks of human aorta

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P. Dieter; Insull, William

    1970-01-01

    Preparations of lipid droplets and droplet-free tissue residue (cytoplasm + membranes + nuclei) were obtained by homogenization and centrifugal separation from intimal fatty streak lesions of aortic atherosclerosis of 21 adults who had died suddenly. Neutral lipids and phospholipids were analyzed by quantitative thin-layer chromatography and cholesteryl ester fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography. Optical properties of droplets were evaluated by differential counting and sizing procedures with the polarizing microscope. The droplets occurred in mixtures of two forms distinguished by their optical properties, anisotropic (i.e. liquid crystals) and isotropic (true liquids). Both forms had average diameters of about 1.8 μ, with a range of 0.5-5μ. The proportions of the two forms varied with temperature as individual droplets changed their form; anisotropic forms averaged 83.7% at °C and 37.8% at 37°C, with isotropic forms being 16.3 and 62.2% respectively. The proportions of anisotropic forms at 22°C decreased with age. These forms were not separated for chemical analysis. The droplets contained about half the lipid in the lesions. The composition of the lipids of the droplet mixture was remarkably uniform and strikingly different from that of the droplet-free residue, respectively: cholesteryl esters 94.9% vs. 38.7%, free cholesterol 1.7% vs. 18.6%, total phospholipids 1.0% vs. 38.6%, and triglycerides 2.4% vs. 4.0%. The proportions of individual phospholipids, with the exception of lysolecithin, were also different between the preparations. In the droplets only the proportions of lecithin correlated positively with the proportion of anisotropic forms (at 22°C). Droplet cholesteryl esters were particularly rich in oleic acid and when compared to residue esters had more palmitoleic (+0.7%), oleic (+12.3%), and eicosatrienoic (+2.4%) and less palmitic (-2.2%), linoleic (-12.4%), and arachidonic (-1.6%) acids. The proportions of most individual fatty acids of

  13. 21 CFR 184.1321 - Corn gluten.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... glutelin. Corn gluten is a byproduct of the wet milling of corn for starch. The gluten fraction is washed... conversion of the starch in whole or various fractions of dry milled corn to corn syrups. (b) The...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1321 - Corn gluten.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... glutelin. Corn gluten is a byproduct of the wet milling of corn for starch. The gluten fraction is washed... conversion of the starch in whole or various fractions of dry milled corn to corn syrups. (b) The...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1321 - Corn gluten.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... glutelin. Corn gluten is a byproduct of the wet milling of corn for starch. The gluten fraction is washed... conversion of the starch in whole or various fractions of dry milled corn to corn syrups. (b) The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1321 - Corn gluten.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... glutelin. Corn gluten is a byproduct of the wet milling of corn for starch. The gluten fraction is washed... conversion of the starch in whole or various fractions of dry milled corn to corn syrups. (b) The...

  17. Framework to Delay Corn Rootworm Resistance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This proposed framework is intended to delay the corn rootworm pest becoming resistant to corn genetically engineered to produce Bt proteins, which kill corn rootworms but do not affect people or wildlife. It includes requirements on Bt corn manufacturers.

  18. Detection of episomal banana streak badnavirus by IC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Dahal, G; Thottappilly, G; Hull, R

    1999-04-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based strategy to detect episomal banana streak badnavirus (BSV) in banana and plantain plants that carry integrated BSV sequences was developed. Antisera used in immuno-capture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) are capable of binding a large number of BSV serotypes. The primers used for PCR are capable of annealing to and amplifying across the aspartic protease-reverse transcriptase domain boundaries of both episomal and integrated BSV sequences and result in similar or identical sequence size fragments from either template. However, we show that under the conditions selected for IC-PCR, nuclear, mitochondrial or chloroplast genomic sequences are not amplified and thus only captured episomal BSV is amplified. IC-PCR is suitable for the large-scale screening of Musa for episomal BSV which is necessary for germplasm movement.

  19. The new design of the THz streak camera at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgisyan, I.; Juranic, P. N.; Ischebeck, R.; Stepanov, A.; Schlott, V.; Pradervand, C.; Patthey, L.; Radovic, M.; Abela, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Monoszlai, B.; Ivanov, R.; Peier, P.; Liu, J.; Togashi, T.; Owada, S.; Ogawa, K.; Katayama, T.; Yabashi, M.; Rivkin, L.

    2015-05-01

    SwissFEL is the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility under construction at the Paul Scherrer institute (PSI), aiming to provide users with X-ray pulses of lengths down to 2 femtoseconds at standard operation. The measurement of the length of the FEL pulses and their arrival time relative to the experimental laser is crucial for the pump-probe experiments carried out in such facilities. This work presents a new device that measures hard X-ray FEL pulses based on the THz streak camera concept. It describes the prototype setup called pulse arrival and length monitor (PALM) developed at PSI and tested in Spring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA) in Japan. Based on the first results obtained from the measurements, we introduce the new improved design of the second generation PALM setup that is currently under construction and will be used in SwissFEL photon diagnostics.

  20. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  1. Illusory Streaks from Corners and Their Perceptual Integration.

    PubMed

    Roncato, Sergio; Guidi, Stefano; Parlangeli, Oronzo; Battaglini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual grouping appears both as organized forms of real figural units and as illusory or "phantom" figures. The phenomenon is visible in the Hermann grid and in configurations which generate color spreading, e.g., "neon effects." These configurations, generally regular repetitive patterns, appear to be crossed by illusory bands filled with a brighter shade or a colored tinge connecting the various loci of illusory effects. In this work, we explore a particular new illusion showing a grouping effect. It manifests as illusory streaks irradiating from the vertexes of angular contours and connecting pairs of figures nearby. It is only clearly visible when more than one figure is shown, and takes the shape of a net crossing their corners. Although the grouping effect is vivid, the local source of the illusion is completely hidden. Theories explaining this effect as due to the irradiation of illusory streaks (mainly that of Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985a,b) do not fully explain the figural patterns presented here. Illusory effects have already been documented at the angles of various figures, causing them to alter in amplitude and brightness; however, the figure illustrated here appears to have different features and location. Phenomenological observations and an experiment were conducted to assess the role played by geometric and photometric parameters in this illusion. Results showed that sharp angles, in low contrast with the surround, are the main source of the illusion which, however, only becomes visible when at least two figures are close together. These findings are discussed with respect to theories of contour processing and perceptual grouping, and in relation to other illusions.

  2. Illusory Streaks from Corners and Their Perceptual Integration

    PubMed Central

    Roncato, Sergio; Guidi, Stefano; Parlangeli, Oronzo; Battaglini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual grouping appears both as organized forms of real figural units and as illusory or “phantom” figures. The phenomenon is visible in the Hermann grid and in configurations which generate color spreading, e.g., “neon effects.” These configurations, generally regular repetitive patterns, appear to be crossed by illusory bands filled with a brighter shade or a colored tinge connecting the various loci of illusory effects. In this work, we explore a particular new illusion showing a grouping effect. It manifests as illusory streaks irradiating from the vertexes of angular contours and connecting pairs of figures nearby. It is only clearly visible when more than one figure is shown, and takes the shape of a net crossing their corners. Although the grouping effect is vivid, the local source of the illusion is completely hidden. Theories explaining this effect as due to the irradiation of illusory streaks (mainly that of Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985a,b) do not fully explain the figural patterns presented here. Illusory effects have already been documented at the angles of various figures, causing them to alter in amplitude and brightness; however, the figure illustrated here appears to have different features and location. Phenomenological observations and an experiment were conducted to assess the role played by geometric and photometric parameters in this illusion. Results showed that sharp angles, in low contrast with the surround, are the main source of the illusion which, however, only becomes visible when at least two figures are close together. These findings are discussed with respect to theories of contour processing and perceptual grouping, and in relation to other illusions. PMID:27445922

  3. Streaking and Wigner time delays in photoemission from atoms and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U.

    2011-09-15

    Streaked photoemission metrology allows the observation of an apparent relative time delay between the detection of photoelectrons from different initial electronic states. This relative delay is obtained by recording the photoelectron yield as a function of the delay between an ionizing ultrashort extended ultraviolet pulse and a streaking infrared (IR) pulse. Theoretically, photoemission delays can be defined based on (i) the phase shift the photoelectron wave function accumulates during the release and propagation of the photoelectron (''Wigner delay'') and, alternatively, (ii) the streaking trace in the calculated photoemission spectrum (''streaking delay''). We investigate the relation between Wigner and streaking delays in the photoemission from atomic and solid-surface targets. For solid targets and assuming a vanishing IR skin depth, both Wigner and streaking delays can be interpreted as an average propagation time needed by photoelectrons to reach the surface, while the two delays differ for nonvanishing skin depths. For atomic targets, the difference between Wigner and streaking delays depends on the range of the ionic potential.

  4. Emissivity spectrum of a large "dark streak" from themis infrared imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Brumby, Steven P.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    'Dark streaks', also known as 'slope streaks', are unusual surface features found on Mars that are known to appear and fade away on timescales of years. Various explanations have been proposed for their origin and composition, including dry avalanches and wet debris or precipitates from brines. Previous investigations have been based on analysis of panchromatic imagery and altimetry from Viking and Mars Global Surveyor missions. We have obtained an infrared emissivity spectrum of a large dark streak on the north western edge of Olympus Mons, using imagery from the THEMIS instrument on the Mars Odyssey 2001 spacecraft.

  5. Ultra Fast X-ray Streak Camera for TIM Based Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, E; Shepherd, R; Fulkerson, E S; James, L; Emig, J; Norman, D

    2012-05-02

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The LLNL ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  6. Improvements in Off-Center Focusing in an X-ray Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J W; Weber, F; Holder, J P; Bell, P M

    2003-07-17

    Due to the planar construction of present x-ray streak tubes significant off-center defocusing is observed in both static and dynamic images taken with one-dimensional resolution slits. Based on the streak tube geometry curved photocathodes with radii of curvature ranging from 3.5 to 18 inches have been fabricated. We report initial off-center focusing performance data on the evaluation of these ''improved'' photocathodes in an X-ray streak camera and an update on the theoretical simulations to predict the optimum cathode curvature.

  7. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Holder, J. P.; Kalantar, D. K.; MacPhee, A. G.; Telford, S.

    2010-10-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  8. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, J R; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Holder, J P; Kalantar, D K; MacPhee, A G; Telford, S

    2010-10-01

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  9. Secondary instability analysis of pre-transitional streaks in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M. J. Philipp; Zaki, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    In the presence of free-stream vortical disturbances, laminar boundary layers develop streamwise-elongated perturbations of high amplitude, commonly known as Klebanoff streaks. The regions of shear surrounding these primary structures provide the potential for the growth of secondary instabilities which ultimately initiate bypass transition. By means of linear analysis, we examine the secondary instability which precedes the formation of turbulent spots. The base state is extracted from direct numerical simulations of the bypass process. The simulation setup is similar to the work of Jacobs & Durbin (2001), where transition is triggered by broadband free-stream vortical forcing. The velocity field therefore includes a spectrum of streaks with different structures and amplitudes. The stability analysis can nevertheless identify the streaks which indeed develop secondary instabilities and break down to turbulence. The predictions of linear theory, in particular the instability wavelength and phase speed, are compared to the streak instabilities recorded in the DNS of the full bypass process.

  10. Indiana Corn Dry Mill

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this project is to perform engineering, project design, and permitting for the creation and commercial demonstration of a corn dry mill biorefinery that will produce fuel-grade ethanol, distillers dry grain for animal feed, and carbon dioxide for industrial use.

  11. Foliar diseases of corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf blights and spots caused by fungi are some of the most destructive diseases of corn in the US and around the world. Correct identification of the disease is very important in determining the best means of control. For example, gray leaf spot of maize can be caused by one of at least two species...

  12. CORN, LP Goldfield Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 19, 2015 letter from EPA approves the petition from CORN, LP, Goldfield facility, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel (D-code 6) RINs under the RFS pro

  13. Streak detection and analysis pipeline for space-debris optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jenni; Poikonen, Jonne; Säntti, Tero; Komulainen, Tuomo; Torppa, Johanna; Granvik, Mikael; Muinonen, Karri; Pentikäinen, Hanna; Martikainen, Julia; Näränen, Jyri; Lehti, Jussi; Flohrer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    We describe a novel data-processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of moving objects, either of natural (asteroids, meteors) or artificial origin (satellites, space debris). The monitoring of the space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data, to support the development and validation of population models and to build and maintain catalogues of orbital elements. The orbital catalogues are, in turn, needed for the assessment of close approaches (for asteroids, with the Earth; for satellites, with each other) and for the support of contingency situations or launches. For both types of populations, there is also increasing interest to detect fainter objects corresponding to the small end of the size distribution. The ESA-funded StreakDet (streak detection and astrometric reduction) activity has aimed at formulating and discussing suitable approaches for the detection and astrometric reduction of object trails, or streaks, in optical observations. Our two main focuses are objects in lower altitudes and space-based observations (i.e., high angular velocities), resulting in long (potentially curved) and faint streaks in the optical images. In particular, we concentrate on single-image (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) and low-SNR detection of objects. Particular attention has been paid to the process of extraction of all necessary information from one image (segmentation), and subsequently, to efficient reduction of the extracted data (classification). We have developed an automated streak detection and processing pipeline and demonstrated its performance with an extensive database of semisynthetic images simulating streak observations both from ground-based and space-based observing platforms. The average processing time per image is about 13 s for a typical 2k-by-2k image. For long streaks (length >100 pixels), primary targets of the pipeline, the detection sensitivity (true positives) is about 90% for

  14. Pedestal Craters and Wind Streaks, South Medusae Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mars is a desert planet in which wind has a considerable effect on the landscape. Bright and dark wind streaks in this image indicate past movement of fine sediment across the landscape from upper left toward lower right. Two impact craters that look like flowers or starfish are seen in the lower portion of the image. The ejecta deposits of these craters are raised above the surrounding terrain, and indicate that wind has deflated a layer of material (that is, blown it away, thus lowering the surface) that was present at the time that the craters formed. The craters were formed by impacts of meteorites into the earlier, higher surface, and the rocks and gravel thrown out when they formed protected some of this former layer from the wind's effects. This picture--showing part of the Medusae Fossae region near the martian equator--was taken in early April 1999 and covers an area only 1 kilometer (0.62 miles)wide. Illumination is from the lower right.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  15. Intial synchroscan streak camera imaging at the A0 photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Ruan, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    At the Fermilab A0 photoinjector facility, bunch-length measurements of the laser micropulse and the e-beam micropulse have been done in the past with a single-sweep module of the Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera with an intrinsic shot-to-shot trigger jitter of 10 to 20 ps. We have upgraded the camera system with the synchroscan module tuned to 81.25 MHz to provide synchronous summing capability with less than 1.5-ps FWHM trigger jitter and a phase-locked delay box to provide phase stability of {approx}1 ps over 10s of minutes. This allowed us to measure both the UV laser pulse train at 244 nm and the e-beam via optical transition radiation (OTR). Due to the low electron beam energies and OTR signals, we typically summed over 50 micropulses with 1 nC per micropulse. We also did electron beam bunch length vs. micropulse charge measurements to identify a significant e-beam micropulse elongation from 10 to 30 ps (FWHM) for charges from 1 to 4.6 nC. This effect is attributed to space-charge effects in the PC gun as reproduced by ASTRA calculations. Chromatic temporal dispersion effects in the optics were also characterized and will be reported.

  16. Polar Dunes In Summer Exhibit Frost Patches, Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mars Global Surveyor passes over the north polar region of the red planet twelve times each day, offering many opportunities to observe how the polar cap frosts and dunes are changing as the days goby. Right now it is summer in the north. This picture, taken the second week of April 1999, shows darks and dunes and remnant patches of bright frost left over from the winter that ended in July 1998. Dark streaks indicate recent movement of sand. The picture covers an area only 1.4 kilometers (0.9 miles)across and is illuminated from the upper right.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  17. An Optical Streaking Method for Measuring Femtosecond Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Bane, Karl L.F.; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    The measurement of the ultra-short electron bunch length on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In the x-ray free electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, generation of a sub-ten femtoseconds electron beam with 20pC charge is possible, but direct measurements are very difficult due to the resolution limit of the present diagnostics. We propose a new method here based on the measurement of the electron beam energy modulation induced from laser-electron interaction in a short wiggler. A typical optical streaking method requires a laser wavelength much longer than the electron bunch length. In this paper a laser with its wavelength shorter than the electron bunch length has been adopted, while the slope on the laser intensity envelope is used to distinguish the different periods. With this technique it is possible to reconstruct the bunch longitudinal profile from a single shot measurement. Generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses at femtoseconds (fs) scale is of great interest within synchrotron radiation and free electron laser (FEL) user community. One of the simple methods is to operate the FEL facility at low charge. At the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we have demonstrated the capability of generating ultrashort electron-beam (e-beam) with a duration of less than 10 fs fwhm using 20 pC charge. The x-ray pulses have been delivered to the x-ray users with a similar or even shorter pulse duration. However, The measurement of such short electron or x-ray pulse length at the fs time-scale constitutes a challenging problem. A standard method using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) transverse deflector has been established at LCLS, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as 25 fs fwhm. With this device, the electrons are transversely deflected by the high-frequency time-variation of the deflecting fields. Increasing the deflecting voltage and rf frequency

  18. Spatial relationships among the cellular tapetum, visual streak and rod density in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Uehara, Masato

    2015-02-01

    The dog visual system is well suited to dim light conditions due to rod-dominated retina and the reflective tapetum. The topographical distributions of rods and thickness of the tapetum of the dog were quantified in retinal whole mounts stained with thionine, and spatial relationships among the tapetum, rod density and visual streak of high ganglion cell density were elucidated. The relationship between the retina and tapetum was analyzed in parasagittal sections stained with thionine or hematoxylin-eosin. The tapetum was thick in its center, and the thickest part consisted of 9 to 12 tapetal cell layers. Rod density ranged from 200,000 to 540,000/mm(2). Maximum rod density was found in the area dorsal to the visual streak, and the density in that area was significantly higher than the rod density in the visual streak and accorded spatially with the thickest part of the tapetum. The horizontal visual streak was found over the horizontal line through the optic disc in the temporal half and extended slightly into the nasal half. The central area of the highest density of ganglion cells was approximately located midway between the nasal and temporal ends of the visual streak. The visual streak was located within the tapetal area, but ventrally to the thick part of the tapetum.

  19. New observations of Bolivian wind streaks by JPL Airborne SAR: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar system (AIRSAR) was deployed to South America to collect multi-parameter radar data over pre-selected targets. Among the sites targeted was a series of wind streaks located in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The objective of this investigation is to study the effect of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle on the visibility of wind streaks in radar data. Because this is a preliminary evaluation of the recently acquired data we will focus on one scene and, thus, only on the effects of wavelength and polarization. Wind streaks provide information on the near-surface prevailing winds and on the abundance of winderodible material, such as sand. The potential for a free-flyer radar system that could provide global radar images in multiple wavelengths, polarizations, and incidence angles requires definition of system parameters for mission planning. Furthermore, thousands of wind streaks were mapped from Magellan radar images of Venus; their interpretation requires an understanding of the interaction of radar with wind streaks and the surrounding terrain. Our experiment was conducted on wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia to address these issues.

  20. Seasonal and secular variation of wind streaks on Mars - An analysis of Mariner 9 and Viking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1979-01-01

    Viking orbiter observations extending over 1 Martian year have been used in conjunction with Mariner 9 data obtained in 1971-1972 to study the seasonal and secular behavior of several kinds of wind streaks. Most bright streaks, inferred to consist of dust storm fallout in the lees of obstacles, have changed very little in form or orientation over a period of 3 Martian years. Some are extremely stable and have experienced no effective eolian action over the 3 years. A few bright streaks changed rapidly during global dust storms; these streaks are located in areas subject to both global and topographic winds. Viking images have shown for the first time that dark, erosional streaks are stable from the time of their formation after major dust storms until the onset of the next episode of major storm activity. Available evidence shows that the large, dark streaks in Oxia Palus consist of material deflated from dune fields within the associated craters. These streaks lengthened secularly since 1972; changes appear to occur episodically during southern summer. The great majority of all streaks reflect winds during the period from late southern spring to early southern fall, although some changes occur throughout the year. The global pattern of wind streaks and the variability of the streaks thus depend strongly upon the current south-north asymmetry of seasons on Mars.

  1. Effects of Hot Streak Shape on Rotor Heating in a High-Subsonic Single-Stage Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Gundy-Burlet, Karen L.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data have shown that combustor temperature non-uniformities can lead to the excessive heating of first-stage rotor blades in turbines. This heating of the rotor blades can lead to thermal fatigue and degrade turbine performance. The results of recent studies have shown that variations in the circumferential location (clocking) of the hot streak relative to the first-stage vane airfoils can be used to minimize the adverse effects of the hot streak. The effects of the hot streak/airfoil count ratio on the heating patterns of turbine airfoils have also been evaluated. In the present investigation, three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations have been performed for a single-stage high-pressure turbine operating in high subsonic flow. In addition to a simulation of the baseline turbine, simulations have been performed for circular and elliptical hot streaks of varying sizes in an effort to represent different combustor designs. The predicted results for the baseline simulation show good agreement with the available experimental data. The results of the hot streak simulations indicate: that a) elliptical hot streaks mix more rapidly than circular hot streaks, b) for small hot streak surface area the average rotor temperature is not a strong function of hot streak temperature ratio or shape, and c) hot streaks with larger surface area interact with the secondary flows at the rotor hub endwall, generating an additional high temperature region.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1262 - Corn silk and corn silk extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corn silk and corn silk extract. 184.1262 Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1262 Corn silk and corn silk extract. (a) Corn silk is the fresh styles and stigmas of Zea mays L. collected when the corn is in milk....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1262 - Corn silk and corn silk extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corn silk and corn silk extract. 184.1262 Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1262 Corn silk and corn silk extract. (a) Corn silk is the fresh styles and stigmas of Zea mays L. collected when the corn is in milk....

  4. 21 CFR 184.1262 - Corn silk and corn silk extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corn silk and corn silk extract. 184.1262 Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1262 Corn silk and corn silk extract. (a) Corn silk is the fresh styles and stigmas of Zea mays L. collected when the corn is in milk....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1262 - Corn silk and corn silk extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corn silk and corn silk extract. 184.1262 Section... Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1262 Corn silk and corn silk extract. (a) Corn silk is the fresh styles and stigmas of Zea mays L. collected when the corn is in milk. The filaments are extracted with dilute ethanol...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1262 - Corn silk and corn silk extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corn silk and corn silk extract. 184.1262 Section... SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1262 Corn silk and corn silk extract. (a) Corn silk is the fresh styles and stigmas of Zea mays L. collected when the corn is in milk....

  7. Complete Genomic Sequence of Maize Rough Dwarf Virus, a Fijivirus Transmitted by the Small Brown Planthopper.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mingfang; Xie, Li; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jianping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2016-02-04

    The nucleotide sequences of the 10 genomic segments of an Italian isolate of maize rough dwarf virus (MRDV) were determined. This first complete genomic sequence of MRDV will help understand the phylogenetic relationships among group 2 fijiviruses and especially the closely related rice black-streaked dwarf virus, which is also found to naturally infect maize.

  8. Streak Imaging Flow Cytometer for Rare Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Ossandon, Miguel; Prickril, Ben; Rasooly, Avraham

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for simple and affordable techniques for cytology for clinical applications, especially for point-of-care (POC) medical diagnostics in resource-poor settings. However, this often requires adapting expensive and complex laboratory-based techniques that often require significant power and are too massive to transport easily. One such technique is flow cytometry, which has great potential for modification due to the simplicity of the principle of optical tracking of cells. However, it is limited in that regard due to the flow focusing technique used to isolate cells for optical detection. This technique inherently reduces the flow rate and is therefore unsuitable for rapid detection of rare cells which require large volume for analysis.To address these limitations, we developed a low-cost, mobile flow cytometer based on streak imaging. In our new configuration we utilize a simple webcam for optical detection over a large area associated with a wide-field flow cell. The new flow cell is capable of larger volume and higher throughput fluorescence detection of rare cells than the flow cells with hydrodynamic focusing used in conventional flow cytometry. The webcam is an inexpensive, commercially available system, and for fluorescence analysis we use a 1 W 450 nm blue laser to excite Syto-9 stained cells with emission at 535 nm. We were able to detect low concentrations of stained cells at high flow rates of 10 mL/min, which is suitable for rapidly analyzing larger specimen volumes to detect rare cells at appropriate concentration levels. The new rapid detection capabilities, combined with the simplicity and low cost of this device, suggest a potential for clinical POC flow cytometry in resource-poor settings associated with global health.

  9. The evolution of amniote gastrulation: the blastopore-primitive streak transition.

    PubMed

    Stower, Matthew J; Bertocchini, Federica

    2017-03-01

    In the animal kingdom, gastrulation, the process by which the primary germ layers are formed involves a dramatic transformation in the topology of the cells that give rise to all of the tissues of the adult. Initially formed as a mono-layer, this tissue, the epiblast, becomes subdivided through the internalization of cells, thereby forming a two (bi-laminar) or three (tri-laminar) layered embryo. This morphogenetic process coordinates the development of the fundamental body plan and the three-body axes (antero-posterior, dorso-ventral, and left-right) and begins a fundamental segregation of cells toward divergent developmental fates. In humans and other mammals, as well as in avians, gastrulating cells internalize along a structure, called the primitive streak, which builds from the periphery toward the center of the embryo. How these morphogenetic movements are orchestrated and evolved has been a question for developmental biologists for many years. Is the primitive streak a feature shared by the whole amniote clade? Insights from reptiles suggest that the primitive streak arose independently in mammals and avians, while the reptilian internalization site is a structure half-way between an amphibian blastopore and a primitive streak. The molecular machinery driving primitive streak formation has been partially dissected using mainly the avian embryo, revealing a paramount role of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in streak formation. How did the employment of this machinery evolve? The reptilian branch of the amniote clade might provide us with useful tools to investigate the evolution of the amniote internalization site up to the formation of the primitive streak. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e262. doi: 10.1002/wdev.262 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Mars Eolian Geology at Airphoto Scales: The Large Wind Streaks of Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    More than 27,000 pictures at aerial photograph scales (1.5-12 m/pixel) have been acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) since September 1997. The pictures are valuable for testing hypotheses about geologic history and processes of Mars. Of particular interest are eolian features connected to surface albedo patterns. This work is focused on low-albedo wind streaks, some over 100 km long, in western Arabia Terra. Each streak is widest where it originates at an impact crater (typically 25-150 km diameter). The streaks taper downwind. Within the associated craters there is a lower-albedo surface that, in nearly all observed cases, includes barchan dunes indicative of transport in the same direction as the wind streaks. Upwind of the dunes there is usually an outcrop of layered material that might have served as a source for dune sand. MOC images show that the west Arabia streaks consist of a smooth-surfaced, multiple-meters-thick, mantle (smooth at 1.5 m/pixel) that appears to be superposed on local surfaces. No dunes are present, indicating that down-streak transport of sediment via saltation and traction have not occurred. Two models might explain the observed properties: (1) the streaks consist of dark silt- and clay-sized grains deflated from the adjacent crater interiors and deposited from suspension or (2) they are remnants (protected in the lee of impact crater rims) of a formerly much larger, regional covering of low albedo, smooth-surfaced mantle. The latter hypothesis is based on observation of low albedo mantled surfaces occurring south of west Arabia in Terra Meridiani. For reasons yet unknown, a large fraction of the martian equatorial regions are covered by low albedo, mesa-forming material that lies unconformably atop eroded layered and cratered terrain. Both hypotheses are being explored via continued selective targeting of new MOC images as well as analyses of the new data.

  11. The sedimentology and dynamics of crater-affiliated wind streaks in western Arabia Terra, Mars and Patagonia, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Yamamoto, A.; Berman, D.C.; Zimbelman, J.R.; Kargel, J.S.; Sasaki, S.; Jinguo, Y.; Miyamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Wind streaks comprise recent aeolian deposits that have been extensively documented on Venus, Earth and Mars. Martian wind streaks are among the most abundant surface features on the planet and commonly extend from the downwind margins of impact craters. Previous studies of wind streaks emerging from crater interior deposits suggested that the mode of emplacement was primarily related to the deposition of silt-sized particles as these settled from plumes. We have performed geologic investigations of two wind streaks clusters; one situated in western Arabia Terra, a region in the northern hemisphere of Mars, and another in an analogous terrestrial site located in southern Patagonia, Argentina, where occurrences of wind streaks emanate from playas within maar craters. In both these regions we have identified bedforms in sedimentary deposits on crater floors, along wind-facing interior crater margins, and along wind streaks. These observations indicate that these deposits contain sand-sized particles and that sediment migration has occurred via saltation from crater interior deposits to wind streaks. In Arabia Terra and in Patagonia wind streaks initiate from crater floors that contain lithic and evaporitic sedimentary deposits, suggesting that the composition of wind streak source materials has played an important role in development. Spatial and topographic analyses suggest that regional clustering of wind streaks in the studied regions directly correlates to the areal density of craters with interior deposits, the degree of proximity of these deposits, and the craters' rim-to-floor depths. In addition, some (but not all) wind streaks within the studied clusters have propagated at comparable yearly (Earth years) rates. Extensive saltation is inferred to have been involved in its propagation based on the studied terrestrial wind streak that shows ripples and dunes on its surface and the Martian counterpart changes orientation toward the downslope direction where it

  12. Synthetic streak images (x-t diagrams) from high-speed digital video records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Modern digital video cameras have entirely replaced the older photographic drum and rotating-mirror cameras for recording high-speed physics phenomena. They are superior in almost every regard except, at speeds approaching one million frames/s, sensor segmentation results in severely reduced frame size, especially height. However, if the principal direction of subject motion is arranged to be along the frame length, a simple Matlab code can extract a row of pixels from each frame and stack them to produce a pseudo-streak image or x-t diagram. Such a 2-D image can convey the essence of the large volume of information contained in a high-speed video sequence, and can be the basis for the extraction of quantitative velocity data. Examples include streak shadowgrams of explosions and gunshots, streak schlieren images of supersonic cavity-flow oscillations, and direct streak images of shock-wave motion in polyurea samples struck by gas-gun projectiles, from which the shock Hugoniot curve of the polymer is measured. This approach is especially useful, since commercial streak cameras remain very expensive and rooted in 20th-century technology.

  13. Distinct Wnt-driven primitive streak-like populations reflect in vivo lineage precursors

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Anestis; Huang, Yali; Blin, Guillaume; Skylaki, Stavroula; Wymeersch, Filip; Osorno, Rodrigo; Economou, Costas; Karagianni, Eleni; Zhao, Suling; Lowell, Sally; Wilson, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    During gastrulation, epiblast cells are pluripotent and their fate is thought to be constrained principally by their position. Cell fate is progressively restricted by localised signalling cues from areas including the primitive streak. However, it is unknown whether this restriction accompanies, at the individual cell level, a reduction in potency. Investigation of these early transition events in vitro is possible via the use of epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), self-renewing pluripotent cell lines equivalent to the postimplantation epiblast. Strikingly, mouse EpiSCs express gastrulation stage regional markers in self-renewing conditions. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of cells expressing such lineage markers. We show that undifferentiated EpiSC cultures contain a major subfraction of cells with reversible early primitive streak characteristics, which is mutually exclusive to a neural-like fraction. Using in vitro differentiation assays and embryo grafting we demonstrate that primitive streak-like EpiSCs are biased towards mesoderm and endoderm fates while retaining pluripotency. The acquisition of primitive streak characteristics by self-renewing EpiSCs is mediated by endogenous Wnt signalling. Elevation of Wnt activity promotes restriction towards primitive streak-associated lineages with mesendodermal and neuromesodermal characteristics. Collectively, our data suggest that EpiSC pluripotency encompasses a range of reversible lineage-biased states reflecting the birth of pioneer lineage precursors from a pool of uncommitted EpiSCs similar to the earliest cell fate restriction events taking place in the gastrula stage epiblast. PMID:24595287

  14. Impact of laser phase and amplitude noises on streak camera temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wlotzko, V.; Uhring, W.; Summ, P.

    2015-09-15

    Streak cameras are now reaching sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In cumulative acquisition mode, this resolution does not entirely rely on the electronic or the vacuum tube performances but also on the light source characteristics. The light source, usually an actively mode-locked laser, is affected by phase and amplitude noises. In this paper, the theoretical effects of such noises on the synchronization of the streak system are studied in synchroscan and triggered modes. More precisely, the contribution of band-pass filters, delays, and time walk is ascertained. Methods to compute the resulting synchronization jitter are depicted. The results are verified by measurement with a streak camera combined with a Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid state laser oscillator and also a fiber oscillator.

  15. Fast phosphor picosecond streak tube for ultrafast laser diagnostics in repetitive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageeva, N. V.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Ivanova, S. R.; Kulechenkova, T. P.; Levina, G. P.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Makushina, V. A.; Schelev, M. Ya; Shashkov, E. V.; Scaballanovich, T. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Vereschagin, A. K.; Vereschagin, K. A.; Vorobiev, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    The well-established PIF-01/S1/P43 picosecond streak tube, designed 30 years ago and still manufactured at the A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, was modified by replacing its traditional P43 phosphor screen with a P47 one having approximately three orders of magnitude shorter decay time. The experimental measurements of this decay time were provided by PIF-01/S1/P47 image tube photocathode irradiation either with a single or a train of 8 ps laser pulses separated by 8 ns from each other at a 1.08 μm wavelength. The results of our preliminary measurements of P47-BH phosphor (manufactured by Phosphor Technology Ltd) indicate the possibility of employing the PIF-01/S1/P47 streak tube for synchrotron diagnostics at a units megahertz repetition rate without the negative influence of ‘ghost images’ from the previous streak records.

  16. Variable features on Mars V - Evidence for crater streaks produced by wind erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution television pictures obtained by Mariner 9 are presented as evidence to show that the ragged dark streaks which appeared behind many dark craters several months after the end of the 1971 global dust storm resulted from wind erosion of a thin surface veneer consisting of dust-storm fallout. The pictures were taken over an area near the border between Mare Serpentis and Pandorae Fretum (approximately 30 deg S, 335 deg W). The high-resolution pictures are compared with low-resolution views of the same area, and it is shown that one very long dark streak is interrupted by a rille. It is concluded that this interruption proves that the dark streaks were produced by the present erosional mechanism.

  17. Establishing alfalfa in corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to recent agricultural statistics, alfalfa was planted on 0.44 million acres and harvested from 2.2 million acres, and corn silage was planted and harvested from 1.0 million acres per year in Wisconsin. Because both crops are often grown in rotation, alfalfa could be interseeded at corn pl...

  18. Establishing alfalfa in silage corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to recent agricultural statistics, alfalfa was planted on 0.44 million acres and harvested from 2.2 million acres and silage corn was planted and harvested from 1.0 million acres per year in Wisconsin. Because both crops are often grown in rotation, alfalfa could be interseeded at corn pla...

  19. System for photometric calibration of optoelectronic imaging devices especially streak cameras

    DOEpatents

    Boni, Robert; Jaanimagi, Paul

    2003-11-04

    A system for the photometric calibration of streak cameras and similar imaging devices provides a precise knowledge of the camera's flat-field response as well as a mapping of the geometric distortions. The system provides the flat-field response, representing the spatial variations in the sensitivity of the recorded output, with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than can be achieved in a single submicrosecond streak record. The measurement of the flat-field response is carried out by illuminating the input slit of the streak camera with a signal that is uniform in space and constant in time. This signal is generated by passing a continuous wave source through an optical homogenizer made up of a light pipe or pipes in which the illumination typically makes several bounces before exiting as a spatially uniform source field. The rectangular cross-section of the homogenizer is matched to the usable photocathode area of the streak tube. The flat-field data set is obtained by using a slow streak ramp that may have a period from one millisecond (ms) to ten seconds (s), but may be nominally one second in duration. The system also provides a mapping of the geometric distortions, by spatially and temporarily modulating the output of the homogenizer and obtaining a data set using the slow streak ramps. All data sets are acquired using a CCD camera and stored on a computer, which is used to calculate all relevant corrections to the signal data sets. The signal and flat-field data sets are both corrected for geometric distortions prior to applying the flat-field correction. Absolute photometric calibration is obtained by measuring the output fluence of the homogenizer with a "standard-traceable" meter and relating that to the CCD pixel values for a self-corrected flat-field data set.

  20. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

    2010-02-18

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

  1. Self-sustaining process through streak generation in a flat-plate boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Thomas; Aider, Jean-Luc; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2009-10-02

    The existence of a self-sustaining process between streamwise vortices and streaks has been suggested at moderate Reynolds numbers. Such a mechanism has never been demonstrated experimentally. Using small cylinders as vortex generators to create streamwise counterrotating vortices, we show, through the characterization of the spatial transient growth of the energy of the longitudinal and spanwise velocity perturbations, that such a mechanism exists above a given Reynolds number. From instantaneous particle image velocimetry fields in a horizontal plane, we show that the self-sustaining process can also be associated with the longitudinal destabilization of streamwise streaks.

  2. Linear stability of optimal streaks in the log-layer of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizard, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The importance of secondary instability of streaks for the generation of vortical structures attached to the wall in the logarithmic region of turbulent channels is studied. The streaks and their linear instability are computed by solving equations associated with the organized motion that include an eddy-viscosity modeling the effect of incoherent fluctuations. Three friction Reynolds numbers, Reτ = 2000, 3000, and 5000, are investigated. For all flow cases, optimal streamwise vortices (i.e., having the highest potential for linear transient energy amplification) are used as initial conditions. Due to the lift-up mechanism, these optimal perturbations lead to the nonlinear growth of streaks. Based on a Floquet theory along the spanwise direction, we observe the onset of streak secondary instability for a wide range of spanwise wavelengths when the streak amplitude exceeds a critical value. Under neutral conditions, it is shown that streak instability modes have their energy mainly concentrated in the overlap layer and propagate with a phase velocity equal to the mean streamwise velocity of the log-layer. These neutral log-layer modes exhibit a sinuous pattern and have characteristic sizes that are proportional to the wall distance in both streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with the Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis (A. Townsend, the structure of turbulent shear flow, Cambridge university press, 1976 2nd edition). In particular, for a distance from the wall varying from y+ ≈ 100 (in wall units) to y ≈ 0.3h, where h is half the height of the channel, the neutral log-layer modes are self-similar with a spanwise width of λz ≈ y/0.3 and a streamwise length of λx ≈ 3λz, independently of the Reynolds number. Based on this observation, it is suggested that compact vortical structures attached to the wall can be ascribed to streak secondary instabilities. In addition, spatial distributions of fluctuating vorticity components show that the onset

  3. Management of corn leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) and corn stunt disease in sweet corn using reflective mulch.

    PubMed

    Summers, C G; Stapleton, J J

    2002-04-01

    Plastic reflective mulches significantly reduced populations of corn leafhopper, Dalbulus maidis (DeLong & Wolcott), adults and the incidence of corn stunt disease caused by Spiroplasma kunkelii (CSS) in late planted sweet corn (Zea mays L.). The reflective mulches were more effective than were either foliar or soil applied insecticides in managing both the leafhopper and the pathogen it transmits. Yields of marketable ears were 1.5 to 2 times greater in reflective mulch plots than from fallow plots. This was due to larger ears (individual ear weight and length) rather than an increase in the number of ears. The use of reflective mulches provides an alternative strategy to insecticides in the management of both D. maidis and corn stunt disease. Such a strategy may prove useful to growers in Latin America and to limited resource growers and organic growers in the United States who wish to grow corn without the use of insecticides.

  4. Screening for corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) resistance to transgenic Bt corn in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, and northern corn rootworms (NCR), D. barberi Smith & Lawrence, are major economic pests of corn in much of the U.S. Corn Belt. Western corn rootworm resistance to transgenic corn expressing Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) endotoxins has been confi...

  5. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... beef cuts. 319.102 Section 319.102 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Meats, Unsmoked and Smoked § 319.102 Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts. In preparing “Corned Beef Round” and other corned beef cuts, except “Corned Beef Briskets,” the curing solution shall...

  6. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... beef cuts. 319.102 Section 319.102 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Meats, Unsmoked and Smoked § 319.102 Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts. In preparing “Corned Beef Round” and other corned beef cuts, except “Corned Beef Briskets,” the curing solution shall...

  7. Using Maize chlorotic dwarf virus to explore future frontiers in plant virology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV) causes a chlorosis and stunting disease of corn throughout the Midwest United States. It is a waikavirus transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifrons. Although waikaviruses are economically important viruses in corn and rice, little is known about the viru...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1865 - Corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corn syrup. 184.1865 Section 184.1865 Food and....1865 Corn syrup. (a) Corn syrup, commonly called “glucose sirup” or “glucose syrup,” is obtained by partial hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or enzymes. It may also occur in...

  9. Corn Culture: A Story of Intelligent Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Jude

    2008-01-01

    Scientists are not sure of how corn was created. There were two competing genetic theories about how corn came to be. One theory maintains that corn had been teased out of a wheatlike grass called teosinte (genus Zea), and the other contends that one now-extinct ancestor of corn had crossed with another grass, "Tripsacum," several millennia ago.…

  10. 9 CFR 319.100 - Corned beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corned beef. 319.100 Section 319.100... Corned beef. “Corned Beef” shall be prepared from beef briskets, navels, clods, middle ribs, rounds... A or Subchapter B. Canned product labeled “Corned Beef” shall be prepared so that the weight of...

  11. Characterization and Functionality of Corn Germ Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the functional properties of protein extracted from wet-milled corn germ and identify potential applications of the recovered protein. Corn germ comprises 12% of the total weight of normal dent corn and about 29% of the corn protein (moisture-free and oil- free ...

  12. Cassava virus diseases: biology, epidemiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Legg, James P; Lava Kumar, P; Makeshkumar, T; Tripathi, Leena; Ferguson, Morag; Kanju, Edward; Ntawuruhunga, Pheneas; Cuellar, Wilmer

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz.) is the most important vegetatively propagated food staple in Africa and a prominent industrial crop in Latin America and Asia. Its vegetative propagation through stem cuttings has many advantages, but deleteriously it means that pathogens are passed from one generation to the next and can easily accumulate, threatening cassava production. Cassava-growing continents are characterized by specific suites of viruses that affect cassava and pose particular threats. Of major concern, causing large and increasing economic impact in Africa and Asia are the cassava mosaic geminiviruses that cause cassava mosaic disease in Africa and Asia and cassava brown streak viruses causing cassava brown streak disease in Africa. Latin America, the center of origin and domestication of the crop, hosts a diverse set of virus species, of which the most economically important give rise to cassava frog skin disease syndrome. Here, we review current knowledge on the biology, epidemiology, and control of the most economically important groups of viruses in relation to both farming and cultural practices. Components of virus control strategies examined include: diagnostics and surveillance, prevention and control of infection using phytosanitation, and control of disease through the breeding and promotion of varieties that inhibit virus replication and/or movement. We highlight areas that need further research attention and conclude by examining the likely future global outlook for virus disease management in cassava.

  13. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle E.; Binder, Thomas P.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  14. Isolation and expression analysis of peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) promoter in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Maiti, I B; Shepherd, R J

    1998-03-17

    A promoter fragment from peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) was identified and later modified to have duplicated enhancer domain. The FLt promoter with its single or double enhancer domains, fused with the GUS reporter gene to form chimeric gene constructs, showed a high level of expression of these genes in cells and transgenic plants. The FLt promoter with its double enhancer domain gives an average threefold greater expression of genes compared to the FLt promoter with its single enhancer domain in transgenic plants. In young seedlings the expression was in the order root > leaf > stem. The histochemical GUS assay in young seedlings showed more activity in root tips and leaf midribs, veins, and other vascular tissues. The expression from the PClSV FLt promoter was compared with that from the figwort mosaic virus promoter in transgenic plants. These constitutive promoters were comparable in respect to GUS expression level.

  15. Streak camera measurements of laser pulse temporal dispersion in short graded-index optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillips, G.E.

    1981-08-28

    Streak camera measurements were used to determine temporal dispersion in short (5 to 30 meter) graded-index optical fibers. Results show that 50-ps, 1.06-..mu..m and 0.53-..mu..m laser pulses can be propagated without significant dispersion when care is taken to prevent propagation of energy in fiber cladding modes.

  16. A time-dependent vector field topology based on streak surfaces.

    PubMed

    Uffinger, Markus; Sadlo, Filip; Ertl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    It was shown recently how the 2D vector field topology concept, directly applicable to stationary vector fields only, can be generalized to time-dependent vector fields by replacing the role of stream lines by streak lines. The present paper extends this concept to 3D vector fields. In traditional 3D vector field topology separatrices can be obtained by integrating stream lines from 0D seeds corresponding to critical points. We show that in our new concept, in contrast, 1D seeding constructs are required for computing streak-based separatrices. In analogy to the 2D generalization we show that invariant manifolds can be obtained by seeding streak surfaces along distinguished path surfaces emanating from intersection curves between codimension-1 ridges in the forward and reverse finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. These path surfaces represent a time-dependent generalization of critical points and convey further structure in time-dependent topology of vector fields. Compared to the traditional approach based on FTLE ridges, the resulting streak manifolds ease the analysis of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) with respect to visual quality and computational cost, especially when time series of LCS are computed. We exemplify validity and utility of the new approach using both synthetic examples and computational fluid dynamics results.

  17. Two-color spatial and temporal temperature measurements using a streaked soft x-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. S.; Benstead, J.; Ahmed, M. F.; Morton, J.; Guymer, T. M.; Soufli, R.; Pardini, T.; Hibbard, R. L.; Bailey, C. G.; Bell, P. M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Regan, S. P.; Agliata, T.; Jungquist, R.; Schmidt, D. W.; Kot, L. B.; Garbett, W. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Skidmore, J. W.; Gullikson, E.; Salmassi, F.

    2016-11-01

    A dual-channel streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed and used on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility. This streaked imager creates two images of the same x-ray source using two slit apertures and a single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror. Thin filters are used to create narrow band pass images at 510 eV and 360 eV. When measuring a Planckian spectrum, the brightness ratio of the two images can be translated into a color-temperature, provided that the spectral sensitivity of the two images is well known. To reduce uncertainty and remove spectral features in the streak camera photocathode from this photon energy range, a thin 100 nm CsI on 50 nm Al streak camera photocathode was implemented. Provided that the spectral shape is well-known, then uncertainties on the spectral sensitivity limits the accuracy of the temperature measurement to approximately 4.5% at 100 eV.

  18. Evaluation of banana hybrids for tolerance to black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Puerto Rico, bananas (including plantains) are important agricultural commodities; their combined production totaled 133,500 tons in 2008. Black leaf streak (BLS) and Sigatoka leaf spot diseases, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and M. musicola, respectively, are responsible for significant los...

  19. Simultaneous velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography of laser-launched plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-launched, miniature, pseudo-one-dimensional flyer plates are evaluated by three distinct optical techniques that may be incorporated into an optical diagnostic system to give a complete understanding of the plate performance. These techniques are: velocity interferometry, streak photography, and pulsed laser stereo photography. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Diagravitropism in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The diagravitropic behavior of Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots grown in darkness provides an opportunity for comparison of two qualitatively different gravitropic systems. As with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism is shown to require the presence of the root cap, have a similar time course for the onset of curvature, and a similar presentation time. In contrast with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism appears to have a more limited requirement for calcium, for it is insensitive to the elution of calcium by EGTA and insensitive to the subsequent addition of a calcium/EGTA complex. These results are interpreted as indicating that whereas the same sensing system is shared by the two types of gravitropism, separate transductive systems are involved, one for diagravitropism, which is relatively independent of calcium, and one for positive gravitropism, which is markedly dependent on calcium.

  1. Jet streak modification via diabatic heating during periods of intense cool-season precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Market, Patrick Shawn

    The propagation of a jet streak in the presence of predominately stable latent heat release is examined. Unlike many prior studies which emphasized latent heat release due to mesoscale convective system activity this work addresses cool season mid-latitude weather systems in which stable latent heat release played a significant role. In both cool and warm seasons, the result is the same: the amplification of a pre-existing jet streak, or the in situ development of a new jet streak. The former situation is more typical of the cool season when thermal gradients and the jet stream are both stronger and more conducive to the transient baroclinic waves which engender streaks in the jet stream flow, while the latter development tends to be the product of a warm season environment when the background thermal and flow patterns are weaker. In this work, the development of a pre-existing straight- line jet streak upstream of its prior location (``backbuilding'') presumably due to latent heat release is studied. Both dry and moist adiabatic simulations with a mesoscale numerical model indicate that backbuilding occurs in the absence of latent heat release (dry run) due to confluence but is enhanced when such heating is included (moist run). This is due to the latent heat release and consequent warming of the column in which it occurs, thus altering the height gradient. Such a process causes accelerations in the flow. Moreover, the mid-tropospheric nature of the stable latent heating causes the backbuilding to be maximized in the mid-troposphere (500 to 400 hPa). Isentropic coordinate analyses of the model output are employed in the estimation of latent heating and ageostrophic wind components. In terms of sensible weather, the propagating jet streak tends to initiate precipitation in its right entrance region because of the induced ascent. In the present case, the latent heat release associated with this precipitation acted to anchor the jet streak in place and even build

  2. Laboratory Simulations and Spectral Analyses of Recurring Slope Streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, B.; Irvin, B.; Hibbitts, C.; Mushkin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Low albedo streaks on Martian slopes have been cited as possible evidence for present-day intermittent and repeated surface flow of water, or brine (Mushkin et al., 2010). Also termed as Recurring Slope Lineae (1), such streaks can grow, fade, and recur repeatedly on the same slopes. Although distinguishable by being darker than surrounding terrain slope streaks have no diagnostic spectral absorption features (2). A leading hypothesis is formation by multiple wetting and drying events. Laboratory investigations have previously explored this possibility (e.g 3). When wetted with brines, soils darken, but as the sample dries, it brightens again. Wetting also results in absorption bands near 1.5 and 2 microns, which are not detected in spectra of slope streaks. Additionally, dried brines of most salts such as MgSO4, or other sulfates and many chlorides are brighter than Martian soils. However, iron chlorides are a salt that have lower albedo than most other salts and may present a mechanism for darkening slope streaks without inducing a spectral absorption feature. To explore this hypothesis, we have begun to conduct experiments investigating the spectra of iron chloride chloride solutions wetting palagonite and subsequently drying under Martian atmospheric conditions. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that FeIII chloride dried onto palagonite has no absorption features in the NIR and SWIR and remains dark and red. However, these chlorides will oxidize under terrestrial conditions forming Fe2O3 as they dry. We have constructed an environmental chamber that mimics Martian oxygen fugacity though a combination of vacuum and N2 purging, allowing for sample wetting and drying while concurrently taking spectra from 0.4 to 2.4 microns. Results from this experimental setup under Martian atmospheric conditions will be presented. References: (1) McEwen et al., (2011) Science, 333, 740-743, (2) Mushkin et al., (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22201, doi: 10.1029/2010GL044535

  3. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hares, J. D.; Hassett, J.; Hatch, B. W.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Datte, P. S.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K. W.; Rekow, V. V.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  4. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited).

    PubMed

    MacPhee, A G; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L; Hares, J D; Hassett, J; Hatch, B W; Meadowcroft, A L; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Datte, P S; Landen, O L; Palmer, N E; Piston, K W; Rekow, V V; Hilsabeck, T J; Kilkenny, J D

    2016-11-01

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  5. 21 CFR 155.131 - Canned field corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned field corn. 155.131 Section 155.131 Food... Canned field corn. (a) Identity. (1) Canned field corn conforms to the definition and standard of... corn by § 155.130(a), except that the corn ingredient consists of succulent field corn or a mixture...

  6. 21 CFR 155.131 - Canned field corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned field corn. 155.131 Section 155.131 Food... Canned field corn. (a) Identity. (1) Canned field corn conforms to the definition and standard of... corn by § 155.130(a), except that the corn ingredient consists of succulent field corn or a mixture...

  7. 21 CFR 155.131 - Canned field corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned field corn. 155.131 Section 155.131 Food... Canned field corn. (a) Identity. (1) Canned field corn conforms to the definition and standard of... corn by § 155.130(a), except that the corn ingredient consists of succulent field corn or a mixture...

  8. 21 CFR 155.131 - Canned field corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned field corn. 155.131 Section 155.131 Food... Canned field corn. (a) Identity. (1) Canned field corn conforms to the definition and standard of... corn by § 155.130(a), except that the corn ingredient consists of succulent field corn or a mixture...

  9. 21 CFR 155.131 - Canned field corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned field corn. 155.131 Section 155.131 Food... Canned field corn. (a) Identity. (1) Canned field corn conforms to the definition and standard of... corn by § 155.130(a), except that the corn ingredient consists of succulent field corn or a mixture...

  10. Mach-zehnder based optical marker/comb generator for streak camera calibration

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Edward Kirk

    2015-03-03

    This disclosure is directed to a method and apparatus for generating marker and comb indicia in an optical environment using a Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) modulator. High speed recording devices are configured to record image or other data defining a high speed event. To calibrate and establish time reference, the markers or combs are indicia which serve as timing pulses (markers) or a constant-frequency train of optical pulses (comb) to be imaged on a streak camera for accurate time based calibration and time reference. The system includes a camera, an optic signal generator which provides an optic signal to an M-Z modulator and biasing and modulation signal generators configured to provide input to the M-Z modulator. An optical reference signal is provided to the M-Z modulator. The M-Z modulator modulates the reference signal to a higher frequency optical signal which is output through a fiber coupled link to the streak camera.

  11. Upgrades to the VISAR-streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) system on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, A. M.; Millot, M.; Seppala, L. G.; Frieders, G.; Zeid, Z.; Christensen, K.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is a critical diagnostic in Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density research as it has the ability to track shock fronts or interfaces moving 0.1-100 km/s with great accuracy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the VISAR has recently been used successfully for implosion tuning and equation of state measurements. However, the initial design of the companion Streaked Optical Pyrometer (SOP) to measure spectral radiance - hence shock temperature - suffers from large background levels and poor spatial resolution. We report on an upgrade to improve the spatial resolution in the 560-640nm band by using custom lenses and replacing the Dove prism with a K-mirror and implementing a gating-circuit for the streak camera to reduce background signal. We envision that upgraded SOP will provide high quality data collection matching NIF VISAR's standards.

  12. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  13. Recording the synchrotron radiation by a picosecond streak camera for bunch diagnostics in cyclic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vereshchagin, A K; Vorob'ev, N S; Gornostaev, P B; Kryukov, S S; Lozovoi, V I; Smirnov, A V; Shashkov, E V; Schelev, M Ya; Dorokhov, V L; Meshkov, O I; Nikiforov, D A

    2016-02-28

    A PS-1/S1 picosecond streak camera with a linear sweep is used to measure temporal characteristics of synchrotron radiation pulses on a damping ring (DR) at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Novosibirsk). The data obtained allow a conclusion as to the formation processes of electron bunches and their 'quality' in the DR after injection from the linear accelerator. The expediency of employing the streak camera as a part of an optical diagnostic accelerator complex for adjusting the injection from a linear accelerator is shown. Discussed is the issue of designing a new-generation dissector with a time resolution up to a few picoseconds, which would allow implementation of a continuous bunch monitoring in the DR during mutual work with the electron-positron colliders at the BINP. (acoustooptics)

  14. A novel compact high speed x-ray streak camera (invited).

    PubMed

    Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2008-10-01

    Conventional in-line high speed streak cameras have fundamental issues when their performance is extended below a picosecond. The transit time spread caused by both the spread in the photoelectron (PE) "birth" energy and space charge effects causes significant electron pulse broadening along the axis of the streak camera and limits the time resolution. Also it is difficult to generate a sufficiently large sweep speed. This paper describes a new instrument in which the extraction electrostatic field at the photocathode increases with time, converting time to PE energy. A uniform magnetic field is used to measure the PE energy, and thus time, and also focuses in one dimension. Design calculations are presented for the factors limiting the time resolution. With our design, subpicosecond resolution with high dynamic range is expected.

  15. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Quevedo, H. J. McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  16. A comparison of flat-field measurement techniques for optical streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.S.; Wiedwald, J.D.

    1988-08-01

    A technique for calibrating the flat-field response and geometric distortion of optical steak cameras using high-power lasers and electro-optic pulse shaping hardware was reported previously. The laser hardware provides a temporally-flat light pulse that can be used to calibrate streak cameras operating with sweep durations of 3- 10 ns. Although this technique is successful, the hardware involved is expensive and the process is complex. Based on the analysis of calibrations made at these fast sweep rates, we developed a new technique to measure the flat-field response of an optical streak camera using an array of visible light emitting diodes (LED) and a slow (/approximately/10..mu..s) sweep generator. We will discuss the new slow technique, and will present a comparison between calibration measurements made using the two techniques. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Protocol for observing molecular dipole excitations by attosecond self-streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, Georg; Nagele, Stefan; Sato, Shunsuke A.; Pazourek, Renate; Wais, Michael; Lemell, Christoph; Tong, Xiao-Min; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    We propose a protocol to probe the ultrafast evolution and dephasing of coherent electronic excitation in molecules in the time domain by the intrinsic streaking field generated by the molecule itself. Coherent electronic motion in the endohedral fullerene Ne@C 60 is initiated by a moderately intense femtosecond UV-visible pulse leading to coherent oscillations of the molecular dipole moment that persist after the end of the laser pulse. The resulting time-dependent molecular near field is probed through the momentum modulation of photoemission from the central neon atom by a time-delayed attosecond XUV pulse. Our ab initio time-dependent density functional theory and classical trajectory simulations predict that this self-streaking signal accurately traces the molecular dipole oscillations in real time. We discuss the underlying processes and give an analytical model that captures the essence of our ab initio simulations.

  18. Stability and accuracy of the sweep rate measurements for LLNL optical streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.S.

    1989-08-04

    Precise pulse shaping is vital for present and future high-power lasers that will attempt to achieve low-entropy laser-fusion implosions. Multichannel, streak-camera-based systems are used to make such measurements. Such systems must be accurately calibrated in order to correct for time-base and flat-field variations. We use an on-line calibration system in order to measure the sweep rate, and in our recent work we have evaluated the accuracy of this measurement technique. By analyzing a large number of calibrations, and the effect of noise on our measurement technique, we have concluded that the sweep rate for our streak camera systems is reproducible to a least {plus minus}1.2% and that our measurement technique contributes an additional {plus minus}0.5% uncertainty in the measurement. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Recording the synchrotron radiation by a picosecond streak camera for bunch diagnostics in cyclic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagin, A. K.; Vorob'ev, N. S.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Dorokhov, V. L.; Kryukov, S. S.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Meshkov, O. I.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Shashkov, E. V.; Schelev, M. Ya

    2016-02-01

    A PS-1/S1 picosecond streak camera with a linear sweep is used to measure temporal characteristics of synchrotron radiation pulses on a damping ring (DR) at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Novosibirsk). The data obtained allow a conclusion as to the formation processes of electron bunches and their 'quality' in the DR after injection from the linear accelerator. The expediency of employing the streak camera as a part of an optical diagnostic accelerator complex for adjusting the injection from a linear accelerator is shown. Discussed is the issue of designing a new-generation dissector with a time resolution up to a few picoseconds, which would allow implementation of a continuous bunch monitoring in the DR during mutual work with the electron-positron colliders at the BINP.

  20. Effects of diabatic heating on the ageostrophic circulation of an upper tropospheric jet streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, D. A.; Johnson, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interaction between the mass circulation within a mesoscale convective complex (MCC) and a direct mass circulation in the entrance region of an upper tropospheric polar jet streak was examined within the isentropic structure to investigate mechanisms responsible for linking these two scales of motion. The results establish that latent heating in the MCC modifies the direct mass circulation in the jet streak entrance region through the diabatically induced components of ageostrophic motion analyzed within isentropic coordinates. Within the strong mesoscale mass circulation of each MCC, strong horizontal mass flux convergence into the MCC at low levels is balanced by strong horizontal mass flux divergence away from the convergence at upper levels. Locations of large diabatic heating rates correspond well to the MCC position for each case; diabatic heating forces the upward vertical branch for the mesoscale mass circulation.

  1. Rice Responses and Resistance to Planthopper-Borne Viruses at Transcriptomic and Proteomic Levels.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Zhao, Wan; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important cereal crops in the world, especially in Asian areas. Rice virus diseases are considered as the most serious threat to rice yields. Most rice viruses are transmitted by hemipteran insects such as planthoppers and leafhoppers. In Asia five rice viruses are transmitted mainly by three planthopper species in a persistent manner: Rice stripe virus, Rice black-streaked dwarf virus, Rice ragged stunt virus, Rice grassy stunt virus, and Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus. In rice antivirus studies, several individual genes have been shown to function in rice resistance to viruses. Since plant responses to viral infection are complex, system-level omic studies are required to fully understand the responses. Recently more and more omic studies have appeared in the literatures on relationships between planthoppers and viruses, employing microarray, RNA-Seq, small RNA deep sequencing, degradome sequencing, and proteomic analysis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge and progress of omic studies in rice plant responses and resistance to four planthopper-borned viruses. We also discuss progress in the omic study of the interactions of planthoppers and rice viruses. Future research directions and translational applications of fundamental knowledge of virus-vector-rice interactions are proposed.

  2. Resistance to Bt corn by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the U.S. corn belt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic Bt corn hybrids that produce insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner have become the standard insect management tactic across the United States Corn Belt. Widespread planting of Bt corn creates intense selection pressure for target insects to develop resis...

  3. Field-based assessment of resistance to Bt Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of corn and is managed with Bt corn that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Beginning in 2009, severe injury to Bt corn producing Cry3Bb1 was observed in some cornfields ...

  4. 77 FR 10617 - Wellsboro & Corning Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Wellsboro & Corning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Wellsboro & Corning Railroad, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Wellsboro & Corning Railroad Company Wellsboro & Corning Railroad, LLC (WCLLC), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Wellsboro & Corning Railroad Company...

  5. Utilisation of Corn (Zea mays) Bran and Corn Fiber in the Production of Food Components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past decade, the demand for ethanol has increased dramatically. Demand for other products of corn milling, such as starches and sweeteners, is also expected to increase. With the increase in demand for industrial and food use of corn, the production of byproducts, such as corn fiber, corn...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1321 - Corn gluten.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... byproduct of the wet milling of corn for starch. The gluten fraction is washed to remove residual water soluble proteins. Corn gluten is also produced as a byproduct during the conversion of the starch in...

  7. Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-18

    turbine vane. The overall objective was to understand the turbulent mixing in a complex flow and develop tools to determine the non uniform temperature...distribution incident on a downstream turbine rotor. Magnetic resonance velocimetry provided the three component velocity distribution throughout a...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade The

  8. Changes Over a Martian Year -- New Dark Slope Streaks in Lycus Sucli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Now in its Extended Mission, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is into its second Mars year of systematic observations of the red planet. With the Extended Mission slated to run through April 2002, the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) is being used, among other things, to look for changes that have occurred in the past martian year. Because Mars is farther from the Sun than Earth, its year is longer--about 687 Earth days.

    The two pictures shown here cover the same portion of Lycus Sulci, a rugged, ridged terrain north of the giant Olympus Mons volcano. The interval between the pictures span 92% of a martian year (August 2, 1999 to April 27, 2001). Dark streaks considered to result from the avalanching of dry, fine, bright dust are seen in both images. The disruption of the surface by the avalanching materials is thought to cause them to appear darker than their surroundings, just as the 1997 bouncing of Mars Pathfinder's airbags and the tire tracks made by the Sojourner rover left darkened markings indicating where the martian soil had been disrupted and disturbed. The arrows in the April 2001 picture indicate eight new streaks that formed on these slopes in Lycus Sulci since August 1999. These observations suggest that a new streak forms approximately once per martian year per kilometer (about 0.62 miles) along a slope.

    In both images, north is toward the top/upper right and sunlight illuminates each from the left. Dark (as well bright) slope streaks are most common in the dust-covered martian regions of Tharsis, Arabia, and Elysium.

  9. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  10. Streak-camera recording of simultaneous optical and x-ray signals

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Medecki, H.; Phillips, G.E.; Thomas, S.W.

    1981-04-20

    An S-1 optical streak camera with 10-ps (optical) temporal resolution simultaneously records reflected 1.06-..mu..m laser light and suprathermal (> 30 keV) x rays from laser fusion targets. To make these measurements, the camera x-ray sensitivity is increased 30-fold without significant loss of temporal resolution by increasing the effective slit width from the normal 50 ..mu..m to 1500 ..mu..m. The measurement system is described and sample data are presented.

  11. 2-ps Hard X-Ray Streak Camera Measurements at Sector 7 Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chollet, M.; Ahr, B.; Walko, D.A.; Rose-Petruck, C.; Adams, B.

    2011-08-02

    A hard X-ray streak camera capable of 2-ps time resolution is in operation at the Sector 7 beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. It is used for laser-pump, X-ray probe experiments using the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system installed on the beamline. This streak camera, combined with standardized and prealigned experimental setups, can perform time-resolved liquid-phase absorption spectroscopy, reflectivity, and diffraction experiments.

  12. Streaking Artifact Reduction for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping of Sources with Large Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hongjiang; Dibb, Russell; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Yawen; Xu, Jianrong; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI technique for measuring tissue magnetic susceptibility in 3D. While there are numerous algorithms developed to solve this ill-posed inverse problem, estimating susceptibility maps with a wide range of values is still problematic. In cases such as large veins, contrast agent uptake, and intracranial hemorrhages, extreme susceptibility values in focal areas cause severe streaking artifacts. To enable the reduction of these artifacts while preserving subtle susceptibility contrast, a two-level QSM reconstruction algorithm (STAR-QSM) was developed in this study by tuning a regularization parameter to automatically reconstruct both large and small susceptibility values. Compared to current state-of-the-art QSM methods such as iLSQR, STAR-QSM significantly reduced streaking artifacts while preserving sharp boundaries for blood vessels of mouse brains in vivo and fine anatomical details of high resolution mouse brains ex vivo. Brain image data from patients with cerebral hematoma and multiple sclerosis further illustrated the superiority of this method in reducing streaking artifacts caused by large susceptibility sources while maintaining sharp anatomical details. STAR-QSM is implemented in STI Suite, a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. PMID:26313885

  13. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Benstead, J.; Moore, A. S.; Ahmed, M. F.; ...

    2016-05-27

    Here, a new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF’s x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters weremore » used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300–510 eV and 200–400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.« less

  14. A streaked X-ray spectroscopy platform for rapidly heated, near-solid density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Junquist, R. K.; Nelson, D. J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A picosecond, time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy platform was developed to study the thermal line emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing buried aluminum or iron layers. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1ω or 2ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. The experimental platform combines time-integrating and time-resolved x-ray spectrometers. Picosecond time resolution was achieved with a pair of ultrafast x-ray streak cameras coupled to high-throughput Hall spectrometers. Time-integrated spectra were collected on each shot to correct the streaked data for variations in x-ray photocathode spectral sensitivity. The time-integrated spectrometer uses three elliptical crystals to disperse x rays with energies between 800 and 2100 eV with moderate (E/ΔE ˜ 450) resolving power. The streaked spectrometers accept four interchangeable conical crystals with higher resolving power (E/ΔE ˜ 650) to measure the brightest thermal lines in the 1300 to 1700 eV spectral range.

  15. High-Throughput Single-Cell Cultivation on Microfluidic Streak Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Dong, Libing; Zhao, Jian-Kang; Hu, Xiaofang; Shen, Chaohua; Qiao, Yuxin; Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Yapei; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the microfluidic streak plate (MSP), a facile method for high-throughput microbial cell separation and cultivation in nanoliter sessile droplets. The MSP method builds upon the conventional streak plate technique by using microfluidic devices to generate nanoliter droplets that can be streaked manually or robotically onto petri dishes prefilled with carrier oil for cultivation of single cells. In addition, chemical gradients could be encoded in the droplet array for comprehensive dose-response analysis. The MSP method was validated by using single-cell isolation of Escherichia coli and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The robustness of the MSP work flow was demonstrated by cultivating a soil community that degrades polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cultivation in droplets enabled detection of the richest species diversity with better coverage of rare species. Moreover, isolation and cultivation of bacterial strains by MSP led to the discovery of several species with high degradation efficiency, including four Mycobacterium isolates and a previously unknown fluoranthene-degrading Blastococcus species. PMID:26850294

  16. Development of intelligent control system for X-ray streak camera in diagnostic instrument manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Wu, Shengli; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Yuman; Gao, Guilong; Liang, Lingliang; Wen, Wenlong

    2015-11-01

    An intelligent control system for an X ray streak camera in a diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIM) is proposed and implemented, which can control time delay, electric focusing, image gain adjustment, switch of sweep voltage, acquiring environment parameters etc. The system consists of 16 A/D converters and 16 D/A converters, a 32-channel general purpose input/output (GPIO) and two sensors. An isolated DC/DC converter with multi-outputs and a single mode fiber were adopted to reduce the interference generated by the common ground among the A/D, D/A and I/O. The software was designed using graphical programming language and can remotely access the corresponding instrument from a website. The entire intelligent control system can acquire the desirable data at a speed of 30 Mb/s and store it for later analysis. The intelligent system was implemented on a streak camera in a DIM and it shows a temporal resolution of 11.25 ps, spatial distortion of less than 10% and dynamic range of 279:1. The intelligent control system has been successfully used in a streak camera to verify the synchronization of multi-channel laser on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility.

  17. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems.

  18. Optical fiducial timing system for X-ray streak cameras with aluminum coated optical fiber ends

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, David G.; Campbell, E. Michael; MacGowan, Brian J.; Medecki, Hector

    1988-01-01

    An optical fiducial timing system is provided for use with interdependent groups of X-ray streak cameras (18). The aluminum coated (80) ends of optical fibers (78) are positioned with the photocathodes (20, 60, 70) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). The other ends of the optical fibers (78) are placed together in a bundled array (90). A fiducial optical signal (96), that is comprised of 2.omega. or 1.omega. laser light, after introduction to the bundled array (90), travels to the aluminum coated (82) optical fiber ends and ejects quantities of electrons (84) that are recorded on the data recording media (52) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). Since both 2.omega. and 1.omega. laser light can travel long distances in optical fiber with only a slight attenuation, the initial arial power density of the fiducial optical signal (96) is well below the damage threshold of the fused silica or other material that comprises the optical fibers (78, 90). Thus the fiducial timing system can be repeatably used over long durations of time.

  19. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  20. Picosecond Streaked K-Shell Spectroscopy of Near Solid-Density Aluminum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω or 2 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 ×1019W/Wcm2 cm2 . A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the Al Heα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E/E ΔE 700). Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Line widths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. It was observed that the resonance line tends toward lower photon energies at high electron densities. The measured shifts will be compared to predicted shifts from Stark-operator calculations at the inferred plasma conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the office of Fusion Energy Sciences Award Number DE-SC0012317, and the Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Grant Number DE-NA0002135.

  1. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benstead, J.; Moore, A. S.; Ahmed, M. F.; Morton, J.; Guymer, T. M.; Pardini, T.; Soufli, R.; Hibbard, R. L.; Bailey, C. G.; Bell, P. M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Reagan, S.; Agliata, T.; Jungquist, R.; Schmidt, D. W.; Kot, L. B.; Garbett, W. J.; Rubbery, M. S.; Skidmore, J. W.; Gullikson, E.; Salmassi, F.

    2016-05-27

    Here, a new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF’s x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters were used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300–510 eV and 200–400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.

  2. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Benstead, J; Moore, A S; Ahmed, M F; Morton, J; Guymer, T M; Soufli, R; Pardini, T; Hibbard, R L; Bailey, C G; Bell, P M; Hau-Riege, S; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Reagan, S; Agliata, T; Jungquist, R; Schmidt, D W; Kot, L B; Garbett, W J; Rubery, M S; Skidmore, J W; Gullikson, E; Salmassi, F

    2016-05-01

    A new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF's x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters were used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300-510 eV and 200-400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.

  3. High-Throughput Single-Cell Cultivation on Microfluidic Streak Plates.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Dong, Libing; Zhao, Jian-Kang; Hu, Xiaofang; Shen, Chaohua; Qiao, Yuxin; Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Yapei; Ismagilov, Rustem F; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Du, Wenbin

    2016-02-05

    This paper describes the microfluidic streak plate (MSP), a facile method for high-throughput microbial cell separation and cultivation in nanoliter sessile droplets. The MSP method builds upon the conventional streak plate technique by using microfluidic devices to generate nanoliter droplets that can be streaked manually or robotically onto petri dishes prefilled with carrier oil for cultivation of single cells. In addition, chemical gradients could be encoded in the droplet array for comprehensive dose-response analysis. The MSP method was validated by using single-cell isolation of Escherichia coli and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The robustness of the MSP work flow was demonstrated by cultivating a soil community that degrades polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cultivation in droplets enabled detection of the richest species diversity with better coverage of rare species. Moreover, isolation and cultivation of bacterial strains by MSP led to the discovery of several species with high degradation efficiency, including four Mycobacterium isolates and a previously unknown fluoranthene-degrading Blastococcus species.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1865 - Corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corn syrup. 184.1865 Section 184.1865 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1865 Corn syrup. (a) Corn syrup, commonly called “glucose sirup” or “glucose syrup,” is obtained by partial hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1865 - Corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corn syrup. 184.1865 Section 184.1865 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1865 Corn syrup. (a) Corn syrup, commonly called “glucose sirup” or “glucose syrup,” is obtained by partial hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1865 - Corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corn syrup. 184.1865 Section 184.1865 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1865 Corn syrup. (a) Corn syrup, commonly called “glucose sirup” or “glucose syrup,” is obtained by partial hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1857 - Corn sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corn sugar. 184.1857 Section 184.1857 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1857 Corn sugar. (a) Corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly... monohydrate form and is produced by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1857 - Corn sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corn sugar. 184.1857 Section 184.1857 Food and....1857 Corn sugar. (a) Corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly called D-glucose or dextrose... by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or enzymes, followed...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1857 - Corn sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corn sugar. 184.1857 Section 184.1857 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1857 Corn sugar. (a) Corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly... monohydrate form and is produced by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1857 - Corn sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corn sugar. 184.1857 Section 184.1857 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1857 Corn sugar. (a) Corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly... monohydrate form and is produced by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1857 - Corn sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corn sugar. 184.1857 Section 184.1857 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1857 Corn sugar. (a) Corn sugar (C6H12O6, CAS Reg. No. 50-99-7), commonly... monohydrate form and is produced by the complete hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1865 - Corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corn syrup. 184.1865 Section 184.1865 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1865 Corn syrup. (a) Corn syrup, commonly called “glucose sirup” or “glucose syrup,” is obtained by partial hydrolysis of corn starch with safe and suitable acids or...

  13. The 1971 corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The successful fulfillment of the objectives for the 1971 corn blight watch experiment is reported. The objectives were: (1) detect the development and spread of corn blight during the growing season across the Corn Belt; (2) assess different levels of infection in the Corn Belt; (3) amplify data acquired by ground observations to better appraise current blight status and the probable impact on crop production; and (4) estimate through extrapolation the applicability of these techniques to similar situations occurring in the future.

  14. Development of a Data Reduction Algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL) II: Improving Measurement of Lengths of Detected Streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-Youp; Choi, Jin; Roh, Dong-Goo; Park, Maru; Jo, Jung Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Park, Young-Sik; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Jang-Hyun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Jun; Cho, Sungki; Choi, Eun-Jung

    2016-09-01

    As described in the previous paper (Park et al. 2013), the detector subsystem of optical wide-field patrol (OWL) provides many observational data points of a single artificial satellite or space debris in the form of small streaks, using a chopper system and a time tagger. The position and the corresponding time data are matched assuming that the length of a streak on the CCD frame is proportional to the time duration of the exposure during which the chopper blades do not obscure the CCD window. In the previous study, however, the length was measured using the diagonal of the rectangle of the image area containing the streak; the results were quite ambiguous and inaccurate, allowing possible matching error of positions and time data. Furthermore, because only one (position, time) data point is created from one streak, the efficiency of the observation decreases. To define the length of a streak correctly, it is important to locate the endpoints of a streak. In this paper, a method using a differential convolution mask pattern is tested. This method can be used to obtain the positions where the pixel values are changed sharply. These endpoints can be regarded as directly detected positional data, and the number of data points is doubled by this result.

  15. Low Albedo Surfaces and Eolian Sediment: Mars Orbiter Camera Views of Western Arabia Terra Craters and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution (1.5 to 12 m/pixel) Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images obtained September 1997 through June 2001 indicate that the large, dark wind streaks of western Arabia Terra each originate at a barchan dune field on a crater floor. The streaks consist of a relatively thin coating of sediment deflated from the dune fields and their vicinity. This sediment drapes a previous mantle that more thickly covers nearly all of western Arabia Terra. No dunes or eolian bedforms are found within the dark wind streaks, nor do any of the intracrater dunes climb up crater walls to provide sand to the wind streaks. The relations between dunes, wind streak, and subjacent terrain imply that dark-toned grains finer than those which comprise the dunes are lifted into suspension and carried out of the craters to be deposited on the adjacent terrain. Such grains are most likely in the silt size range (3.9-62.5 micrometers). The streaks change in terms of extent, relative albedo, and surface pattern over periods measured in years, but very little evidence for recent eolian activity (dust plumes, storms, dune movement) has been observed.

  16. Occurrence and yield effects of wheat infected with Triticum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) infects wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. This study determined the occurrence of TriMV at three locations over three years and yield effects of wheat mechanically infected with TriMV. Wheat infection with TriMV, Wheat streak...

  17. "King Corn": Teaching the Food Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, Tim

    2012-01-01

    "King Corn" is in so many ways the story of how government food policy has entirely remade the food landscape in the United States over the last 40 years. From the massive expansion of the number of acres of corn grown across the country, to the ever-increasing ways that corn is incorporated into the food production process, to the…

  18. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION CANNED VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Vegetables § 155.130 Canned corn. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned sweet corn is the product prepared from clean, sound kernels...

  19. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION CANNED VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Vegetables § 155.130 Canned corn. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned sweet corn is the product prepared from clean, sound kernels...

  20. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION CANNED VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Vegetables § 155.130 Canned corn. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned sweet corn is the product prepared from clean, sound kernels...

  1. Geographic information systems in corn rootworm management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp. Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of corn (Zea mays) in the United States and Europe. Control measures for corn rootworms (CRW) were historically based upon chemical pesticides and crop rotation. Pesticide use created environmental and economic concerns. In...

  2. The Dynamics and Environmental Influence on Interactions Between Cassava Brown Streak Disease and the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, S C; Ndyetabula, I L; Mkamilo, G S; Haji, S; Muhanna, M M; Chuwa, C; Kasele, S; Bouwmeester, H; Ijumba, J N; Legg, J P

    2015-05-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) is currently the most significant virus disease phenomenon affecting African agriculture. In this study, we report results from the most extensive set of field data so far presented for CBSD in Africa. From assessments of 515 farmers' plantings of cassava, incidence in the Coastal Zone of Tanzania (46.5% of plants; 87% of fields affected) was higher than in the Lake Zone (22%; 34%), but incidences for both zones were greater than previous published records. The whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, was more abundant in the Lake Zone than the Coastal Zone, the reverse of the situation reported previously, and increased B. tabaci abundance is driving CBSD spread in the Lake Zone. The altitudinal "ceiling" previously thought to restrict the occurrence of CBSD to regions <1,000 masl has been broken as a consequence of the greatly increased abundance of B. tabaci in mid-altitude areas. Among environmental variables analyzed, minimum temperature was the strongest determinant of CBSD incidence. B. tabaci in the Coastal and Lake Zones responded differently to environmental variables examined, highlighting the biological differences between B. tabaci genotypes occurring in these regions and the superior adaptation of B. tabaci in the Great Lakes region both to cassava and low temperature conditions. Regression analyses using multi-country data sets could be used to determine the potential environmental limits of CBSD. Approaches such as this offer potential for use in the development of predictive models for CBSD, which could strengthen country- and continent-level CBSD pandemic mitigation strategies.

  3. Utilisation of corn (Zea mays) bran and corn fiber in the production of food components.

    PubMed

    Rose, Devin J; Inglett, George E; Liu, Sean X

    2010-04-30

    The milling of corn for the production of food constituents results in a number of low-value co-products. Two of the major co-products produced by this operation are corn bran and corn fiber, which currently have low commercial value. This review focuses on current and prospective research surrounding the utilization of corn fiber and corn bran in the production of potentially higher-value food components. Corn bran and corn fiber contain potentially useful components that may be harvested through physical, chemical or enzymatic means for the production of food ingredients or additives, including corn fiber oil, corn fiber gum, cellulosic fiber gels, xylo-oligosaccharides and ferulic acid. Components of corn bran and corn fiber may also be converted to food chemicals such as vanillin and xylitol. Commercialization of processes for the isolation or production of food products from corn bran or corn fiber has been met with numerous technical challenges, therefore further research that improves the production of these components from corn bran or corn fiber is needed.

  4. Sustainable Corn Stover Harvest Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn stover has been identified as an important initial source of biomass for conversion to ethanol and other biofuels. This poster presentation outlines on-going cooperative research being conducted near Ames, IA. Our university partner is responsible for developing the one-pass harvester and our I...

  5. Our Mother Corn. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathers, Sherry; And Others

    Designed to accompany the preceding student text (which deals with the role of corn in the Seneca, Pawnee, and Hopi tribes), the teaching guide contains a suggested sequence of activities and needed supplementary information along with an indication of the student text they follow. Sections include: farming notes; basic needs activities; house…

  6. Improved corn protein based articles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing higher value uses for zein (corn protein), a potential major co-product of the bio-ethanol industry, will improve the economics of this business. Historically, zein was predominantly used in the textile fiber industry. Unfortunately the techniques used at that time to modify the zein cann...

  7. Compatibility with corn: N credits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productive and efficient short rotations of alfalfa and corn are needed to reduce energy inputs, produce food, feed, and energy, and yield the environmental quality benefits from the perennial legume. After decades of research, however, farmers and their advisors still question how much fertility ...

  8. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo; Wang, Michael

    2015-11-04

    Corn oil recovery and conversion to biodiesel has been widely adopted at corn ethanol plants recently. The US EPA has projected 2.6 billion liters of biodiesel will be produced from corn oil in 2022. Corn oil biodiesel may qualify for federal renewable identification number (RIN) credits under the Renewable Fuel Standard, as well as for low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity credits under California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Because multiple products [ethanol, biodiesel, and distiller’s grain with solubles (DGS)] are produced from one feedstock (corn), however, a careful co-product treatment approach is required to accurately estimate GHG intensities of both ethanol and corn oil biodiesel and to avoid double counting of benefits associated with corn oil biodiesel production. This study develops four co-product treatment methods: (1) displacement, (2) marginal, (3) hybrid allocation, and (4) process-level energy allocation. Life-cycle GHG emissions for corn oil biodiesel were more sensitive to the choice of co-product allocation method because significantly less corn oil biodiesel is produced than corn ethanol at a dry mill. Corn ethanol life-cycle GHG emissions with the displacement, marginal, and hybrid allocation approaches are similar (61, 62, and 59 g CO2e/MJ, respectively). Although corn ethanol and DGS share upstream farming and conversion burdens in both the hybrid and process-level energy allocation methods, DGS bears a higher burden in the latter because it has lower energy content per selling price as compared to corn ethanol. As a result, with the process-level allocation approach, ethanol’s life-cycle GHG emissions are lower at 46 g CO2e/MJ. Corn oil biodiesel life-cycle GHG emissions from the marginal, hybrid allocation, and process-level energy allocation methods were 14, 59, and 45 g CO2e/MJ, respectively. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to investigate the influence corn oil yield, soy biodiesel, and

  9. Influence of corn oil recovery on life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol and corn oil biodiesel

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhichao; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo; ...

    2015-11-04

    Corn oil recovery and conversion to biodiesel has been widely adopted at corn ethanol plants recently. The US EPA has projected 2.6 billion liters of biodiesel will be produced from corn oil in 2022. Corn oil biodiesel may qualify for federal renewable identification number (RIN) credits under the Renewable Fuel Standard, as well as for low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity credits under California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Because multiple products [ethanol, biodiesel, and distiller’s grain with solubles (DGS)] are produced from one feedstock (corn), however, a careful co-product treatment approach is required to accurately estimate GHG intensities of bothmore » ethanol and corn oil biodiesel and to avoid double counting of benefits associated with corn oil biodiesel production. This study develops four co-product treatment methods: (1) displacement, (2) marginal, (3) hybrid allocation, and (4) process-level energy allocation. Life-cycle GHG emissions for corn oil biodiesel were more sensitive to the choice of co-product allocation method because significantly less corn oil biodiesel is produced than corn ethanol at a dry mill. Corn ethanol life-cycle GHG emissions with the displacement, marginal, and hybrid allocation approaches are similar (61, 62, and 59 g CO2e/MJ, respectively). Although corn ethanol and DGS share upstream farming and conversion burdens in both the hybrid and process-level energy allocation methods, DGS bears a higher burden in the latter because it has lower energy content per selling price as compared to corn ethanol. As a result, with the process-level allocation approach, ethanol’s life-cycle GHG emissions are lower at 46 g CO2e/MJ. Corn oil biodiesel life-cycle GHG emissions from the marginal, hybrid allocation, and process-level energy allocation methods were 14, 59, and 45 g CO2e/MJ, respectively. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to investigate the influence corn oil yield, soy biodiesel, and defatted DGS displacement

  10. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm2/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  11. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Mark D; Oliver, Bryan V; Droemer, Darryl W; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm(2)/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +∕- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  12. Modes on a short SPEAR bunch as observed with a streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Sabersky, A.P.; Donald, M.H.R.

    1981-02-01

    The longitudinal structure of electron bunches in the storage ring SPEAR on a single pass was studied with time resolution approx. 10 ps. The measuring instrument used is an image-converter streak camera, a specialized device heretofore used mostly by laser workers. Unexpectedly, under some conditions the charge in a single RF bucket breaks up into two short sub-bunches which seem to rotate about a common center in energy-phase space. No evidence is seen for other, higher-frequency structure on the bunches.

  13. Capsule Ablator Inflight Performance Measurements Via Streaked Radiography Of ICF Implosions On The NIF*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Mackinnon, A.; MacPhee, A.; Meezan, N.; Olson, R.; Hicks, D.; LePape, S.; Izumi, N.; Fournier, K.; Barrios, M. A.; Ross, S.; Pak, A.; Döppner, T.; Kalantar, D.; Opachich, K.; Rygg, R.; Bradley, D.; Bell, P.; Hamza, A.; Dzenitis, B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B.; LaFortune, K.; Widmayer, C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Edwards, M. J.; Atherton, J.; Moses, E. I.

    2016-03-01

    Streaked 1-dimensional (slit imaging) radiography of 1.1 mm radius capsules in ignition hohlraums was recently introduced on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and gives an inflight continuous record of capsule ablator implosion velocities, shell thickness and remaining mass in the last 3-5 ns before peak implosion time. The high quality data delivers good accuracy in implosion metrics that meets our requirements for ignition and agrees with recently introduced 2-dimensional pinhole radiography. Calculations match measured trajectory across various capsule designs and laser drives when the peak laser power is reduced by 20%. Furthermore, calculations matching measured trajectories give also good agreement in ablator shell thickness and remaining mass.

  14. Inoculation and virulence assay for bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak of rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Bogdanove, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) cause bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak in rice, respectively. Despite being very closely related, the pathogens colonize different tissues and cause distinct diseases. The diseases are economically important and also serve as model systems for studying plant-bacterial interactions. Here we describe protocols for Xoo and Xoc inoculation and disease scoring methods that are appropriate to their different modes of infection. These methods are routinely used to evaluate pathogen virulence or host responses under controlled environmental conditions.

  15. Design of a streaked radiography instrument for ICF ablator tuning measurements.

    PubMed

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Spears, B K; Celliers, P M; Holder, J P; Landen, O L; Geissel, M; Kellogg, J W; Bennett, G R; Edens, A D; Atherton, B W; Leeper, R J

    2008-10-01

    A streaked radiography diagnostic has been proposed as a technique to determine the ablator mass remaining in an inertial confinement fusion ignition capsule at peak velocity. This instrument, the "HXRI-5," has been designed to fit within a National Ignition Facility Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator. The HXRI-5 will be built at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and initial testing will be done at the SNL Z-Beamlet Facility. In this paper, we will describe the National Ignition Campaign requirements for this diagnostic, the instrument design, and the planned test experiments.

  16. Study of the Performance of a Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Temperature Measurement of Shocked Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huige; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Dong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) is developed and calibrated for the measurement of the temperature of shocked materials. In order to achieve a higher relative sensitivity, a one-channel scheme is adopted for the system. The system is calibrated with a shocked step-shaped aluminum sample in the SG-III prototype laser facility. The relation between the count number in the detection system and the sample temperature is thus obtained, which can be adopted to infer the temperature of any shocked materials in future experiments.

  17. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  18. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  19. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  20. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  1. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  2. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  3. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  4. 7 CFR 810.401 - Definition of corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of corn. 810.401 Section 810.401... GRAIN United States Standards for Corn Terms Defined § 810.401 Definition of corn. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole kernels of shelled dent corn and/or shelled flint corn (Zea mays...

  5. 7 CFR 810.401 - Definition of corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of corn. 810.401 Section 810.401... GRAIN United States Standards for Corn Terms Defined § 810.401 Definition of corn. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole kernels of shelled dent corn and/or shelled flint corn (Zea mays...

  6. 7 CFR 810.401 - Definition of corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of corn. 810.401 Section 810.401... GRAIN United States Standards for Corn Terms Defined § 810.401 Definition of corn. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole kernels of shelled dent corn and/or shelled flint corn (Zea mays...

  7. 7 CFR 810.401 - Definition of corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of corn. 810.401 Section 810.401... GRAIN United States Standards for Corn Terms Defined § 810.401 Definition of corn. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole kernels of shelled dent corn and/or shelled flint corn (Zea mays...

  8. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  9. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  10. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  11. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  12. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  13. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  14. 7 CFR 810.401 - Definition of corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of corn. 810.401 Section 810.401... GRAIN United States Standards for Corn Terms Defined § 810.401 Definition of corn. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole kernels of shelled dent corn and/or shelled flint corn (Zea mays...

  15. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is...

  16. 21 CFR 137.275 - Yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn meal. 137.275 Section 137.275 Food and... Related Products § 137.275 Yellow corn meal. Yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.250 for white corn meal except that cleaned yellow corn is used instead...

  17. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  18. 75 FR 48321 - Corning Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Corning Natural Gas Corporation; Notice of Application August 4, 2010. Take notice that on July 26, 2010, Corning Natural Gas Corporation (Corning), 330 W. William Street, Corning... Natural Gas Act (NGA) requesting the determination of a service area with which Corning may,...

  19. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Effect of transgenic corn hybrids and a soil insecticide on corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) beetle emergence in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern, Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence, and western corn rootworms, D. virgifera virgifera LeConte, are economic pests of corn, Zea mays L. (Poaceae) in North Dakota. Many area corn growers rely on transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) corn hybrids to manage corn rootworms. Our objective was...

  1. Shock treatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bond, Austin; Rughoonundun, Hema; Petersen, Eric; Holtzapple, Carol; Holtzapple, Mark

    2017-01-27

    Corn stover digestibility was enhanced via shock treatment. A slurry of lime-treated corn stover was placed in a partially filled closed vessel. From the ullage space, either a shotgun shell was fired into the slurry, or a gas mixture was detonated. Various conditions were tested (i.e., pressures, depth, solids concentrations, gas mixtures). A high pressurization rate (108,000 MPa/s shotgun shells; 4,160,000 MPa/s hydrogen/oxygen detonation) was the only parameter that improved enzymatic digestibility. Stoichiometric propane/air deflagration had a low pressurization rate (37.2 MPa/s) and did not enhance enzymatic digestibility. Without shock, enzymatic conversion of lime-treated corn stover was 0.80 g glucan digested/g glucan fed with an enzyme loading of 46.7 mg protein/g glucan. With shock, the enzyme loading was reduced by ∼2× while maintaining the same conversion. Detonations are extraordinarily fast; rapidly cycling three small vessels (0.575 m(3) each) every 7.5 s enables commercially relevant shock treatment (2,000 tone/day). © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  2. Fine structures of embryonic discs of in vivo post-hatching porcine blastocysts at the pre-primitive streak stage.

    PubMed

    Xia, P; Liu, Z; Qin, P

    2011-04-01

    To date, reports about the ultrastructure of porcine embryonic discs have not shown details of the primitive streak. The main objective of this study was to examine the ultrastructure of interior and exterior embryonic discs in porcine in vivo blastocysts with diameters of 1, 3 and 9 mm using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. For the first time, we revealed the ultrastructure of the unusual group of cells in the pre-primitive streak area of embryonic discs. The cells were 1-2 μm in diameter, had high electron density and contained abundant, free ribosomes and endoplasmic reticulum. These primitive streak cells could represent original embryonic stem cells or represent a stem cell niche. The results also showed three types of cells on the exterior surface of the embryonic discs. Moreover, our results provided morphological evidence of condensed nuclei in the smooth cells on the surface of the embryonic disc.

  3. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-04

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index 'bubble' in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the 'bubble'. Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the 'bubble' from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  4. Picosecond-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy at low signal contrast using a hard X-ray streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Jiao, Yishuo

    2015-06-24

    A picosecond-resolving hard-X-ray streak camera has been in operation for several years at Sector 7 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Several upgrades have been implemented over the past few years to optimize integration into the beamline, reduce the timing jitter, and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. These include the development of X-ray optics for focusing the X-rays into the sample and the entrance slit of the streak camera, and measures to minimize the amount of laser light needed to generate the deflection-voltage ramp. For the latter, the photoconductive switch generating the deflection ramp was replaced with microwave power electronics. With these, the streak camera operates routinely at 88 MHz repetition rate, thus making it compatible with all of the APS fill patterns including use of all the X-rays in the 324-bunch mode. Sample data are shown to demonstrate the performance.

  5. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  6. Sinogram-based coil selection for streak artifact reduction in undersampled radial real-time magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background Streak artifacts are a common problem in radial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We therefore developed a method for automatically excluding receiver coil elements which lead to these artifacts. Methods The proposed coil selection relates to real-time MRI data based on highly undersampled radial acquisitions. It exploits differences between high- and low-resolution sinograms reconstructed from datasets acquired during preparatory scans. Apart from phantom validations, the performance was assessed for real-time MRI studies of different human organ systems in vivo. Results The algorithm greatly reduces streak artifact strength without compromising image quality in other parts of the image. It is robust with respect to different experimental settings and fast to be included in the online reconstruction pipeline for real-time MRI. Conclusions The proposed method enables a fast reduction of streak artifacts in radial real-time MRI. PMID:27942475

  7. The Allantoic Core Domain: New Insights Into Development of the Murine Allantois and Its Relation to the Primitive Streak

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Karen M.; Inman, Kimberly E.; Jin, Dexter X.; Enders, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    The whereabouts and properties of the posterior end of the primitive streak have not been identified in any species. In the mouse, the streak’s posterior terminus is assumed to be confined to the embryonic compartment, and to give rise to the allantois, which links the embryo to its mother during pregnancy. In this study, we have refined our understanding of the biology of the murine posterior primitive streak and its relation to the allantois. Through a combination of immunostaining and morphology, we demonstrate that the primitive streak spans the posterior extraembryonic and embryonic regions at the onset of the neural plate stage (~7.0 days postcoitum, dpc). Several hours later, the allantoic bud emerges from the extraembryonic component of the primitive streak (XPS). Then, possibly in collaboration with overlying allantois-associated extraembryonic visceral endoderm, the XPS establishes a germinal center within the allantois, named here the Allantoic Core Domain (ACD). Microsurgical removal of the ACD beyond headfold (HF) stages resulted in the formation of allantoic regenerates that lacked the ACD and failed to elongate; nevertheless, vasculogenesis and vascular patterning proceeded. In situ and transplantation fate mapping demonstrated that, from HF stages onward, the ACD’s progenitor pool contributed to the allantois exclusive of the proximal flanks. By contrast, the posterior intraembryonic primitive streak (IPS) provided the flanks. Grafting the ACD into TC/TC hosts, whose allantoises are significantly foreshortened, restored allantoic elongation. These results revealed that the ACD is essential for allantoic elongation, but the cues required for vascularization lie outside of it. On the basis of these and previous findings, we conclude that the posterior primitive streak of the mouse conceptus is far more complex than was previously believed. Our results provide new directives for addressing the origin and development of the umbilical cord, and

  8. Small Near-Earth Asteroids in the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: A Real-Time Streak-detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waszczak, Adam; Prince, Thomas A.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Bue, Brian; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Barlow, Tom; Surace, Jason; Helou, George; Kulkarni, Shrinivas

    2017-03-01

    Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) in the 1–100 meter size range are estimated to be ∼1,000 times more numerous than the ∼15,000 currently cataloged NEAs, most of which are in the 0.5–10 kilometer size range. Impacts from 10–100 meter size NEAs are not statistically life-threatening, but may cause significant regional damage, while 1–10 meter size NEAs with low velocities relative to Earth are compelling targets for space missions. We describe the implementation and initial results of a real-time NEA-discovery system specialized for the detection of small, high angular rate (visually streaked) NEAs in Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) images. PTF is a 1.2-m aperture, 7.3 deg2 field of view (FOV) optical survey designed primarily for the discovery of extragalactic transients (e.g., supernovae) in 60-second exposures reaching ∼20.5 visual magnitude. Our real-time NEA discovery pipeline uses a machine-learned classifier to filter a large number of false-positive streak detections, permitting a human scanner to efficiently and remotely identify real asteroid streaks during the night. Upon recognition of a streaked NEA detection (typically within an hour of the discovery exposure), the scanner triggers follow-up with the same telescope and posts the observations to the Minor Planet Center for worldwide confirmation. We describe our 11 initial confirmed discoveries, all small NEAs that passed 0.3–15 lunar distances from Earth. Lastly, we derive useful scaling laws for comparing streaked-NEA-detection capabilities of different surveys as a function of their hardware and survey-pattern characteristics. This work most directly informs estimates of the streak-detection capabilities of the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF, planned to succeed PTF in 2017), which will apply PTF’s current resolution and sensitivity over a 47-deg2 FOV.

  9. Depth resolution improvement of streak tube imaging lidar using optimal signal width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Guangchao; Fan, Rongwei; Lu, Wei; Dong, Zhiwei; Li, Xudong; He, Ping; Chen, Deying

    2016-10-01

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system that has a high depth resolution with the use of a pulsed laser transmitter and streak tube receiver to produce three-dimensional (3-D) range images. This work investigates the optimal signal width of the lidar system, which is helpful to improve the depth resolution based on the centroid algorithm. Theoretical analysis indicates that the signal width has a significant effect on the depth resolution and the optimal signal width can be determined for a given STIL system, which is verified by both the simulation and experimental results. An indoor experiment with a planar target was carried out to validate the relation that the range error decreases first and then increases with the signal width, resulting in an optimal signal width of 8.6 pixels. Finer 3-D range images of a cartoon model were acquired by using the optimal signal width and a minimum range error of 5.5 mm was achieved in a daylight environment.

  10. Streak Tectonics associated with the Irregular Slab Topography at Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the physical features of streak tectonics (or abrasion tectonics) associated with the irregular surface topography, such as local convex rise or seamount(s), on the downgoing slab at subduction zones. Marine surveys such as sophisticated multichannel seismic experiments have revealed the detailed vertical structure of the overriding lithosphere as well as the upper-most part of downgoing slab at the fore-arc zone from the trench axis through the inclined plate interface zone at a depth of 10 - 15km. As previously, some researchers (e.g., Eguchi, 1979, 1996; Hilde, 1983; Suzan, 2010) demonstrated the influence of the surface irregular topography of the slab on the occurrence regime of greater interplate seismic events with the low-angle underthrusting slip. However, the earlier studies didn't incorporate any effects due to the spherical buckling of oceanic lithosphere with the age-dependent elastic thickness at subduction zones. In the case of a subduction zone where the slab age has gradually been decreasing or increasing, the spherical buckling of elastic shell (e.g., Eguchi, 2012) suggests that the interplate mechanical coupling strength varies with time and space. Next, we argue some tectonic features of strain-rate dependent deformation at areas surrounding an isolated-seamount on the downgoing slab, such as the quasi-static fluid lubrication, boundary lubrication or plastic deformation. We then discuss how to represent mathematically the streak process during a larger interplate seismic event at the non-uniform plate interface zone.

  11. Direct evidence for encoding of motion streaks in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Apthorp, Deborah; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Kaul, Christian; Bahrami, Bahador; Alais, David; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Temporal integration in the visual system causes fast-moving objects to generate static, oriented traces (‘motion streaks’), which could be used to help judge direction of motion. While human psychophysics and single-unit studies in non-human primates are consistent with this hypothesis, direct neural evidence from the human cortex is still lacking. First, we provide psychophysical evidence that faster and slower motions are processed by distinct neural mechanisms: faster motion raised human perceptual thresholds for static orientations parallel to the direction of motion, whereas slower motion raised thresholds for orthogonal orientations. We then used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity while human observers viewed either fast (‘streaky’) or slow random dot stimuli moving in different directions, or corresponding static-oriented stimuli. We found that local spatial patterns of brain activity in early retinotopic visual cortex reliably distinguished between static orientations. Critically, a multivariate pattern classifier trained on brain activity evoked by these static stimuli could then successfully distinguish the direction of fast (‘streaky’) but not slow motion. Thus, signals encoding static-oriented streak information are present in human early visual cortex when viewing fast motion. These experiments show that motion streaks are present in the human visual system for faster motion. PMID:23222445

  12. Synchroscan streak camera imaging at a 15-MeV photoinjector with emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2012-09-01

    At the Fermilab A0 photoinjector facility, bunch-length measurements of the laser micropulse and the e-beam micropulse have been done in the past with a fast single-sweep module of the Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera with an intrinsic shot-to-shot trigger jitter of 10-20 ps. We have upgraded the camera system with the synchroscan module tuned to 81.25 MHz to provide synchronous summing capability with less than 1.5 ps FWHM trigger jitter and a phase-locked delay box to provide phase stability of ˜1 ps over 10 s of minutes. These steps allowed us to measure both the UV laser pulse train at 263 nm and the e-beam via optical transition radiation (OTR). Due to the low electron beam energies and OTR signals, we typically summed over 50 micropulses with 0.25-1 nC per micropulse. The phase-locked delay box allowed us to assess chromatic temporal effects and instigated another upgrade to an all-mirror input optics barrel. In addition, we added a slow sweep horizontal deflection plug-in unit to provide dual-sweep capability for the streak camera. We report on a series of measurements made during the commissioning of these upgrades including bunch-length and phase effects using the emittance exchange beamline and simultaneous imaging of a UV drive laser component, OTR, and the 800 nm diagnostics laser.

  13. Slit-mounted LED fiducial system for rotating mirror streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.; Rivera, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a fiducial system for rotating mirror streak cameras that utilizes light emitting diodes mounted at the slit position of the camera. The diodes are driven to the required high brightness by a unique pulse power circuit designed to provide high voltage, high current pulses 18 nanoseconds in length at a frequency of up to 2.5 megahertz. The availability of super bright light emitting diodes with a wavelength of 630 to 640 nanometers allows us to record fiducial pulses, at streaking speeds in excess of 20mm per microsecond, on all the black and white films commonly used in high speed photography. The time marks on the film record are referenced to the real time of the experiment from a clock-driver that controls the start and frequency of the fiducial pulse train and by three adjustable and discreet blanked fiducials. This paper discusses the development of this system and describes the full setup as used at LLNL. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; ...

    2016-11-29

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40 nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP’s ~250-nm operating range ismore » then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. As a result, error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.« less

  15. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; Kendrick, J.; McCoy, C. A.; Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Millot, M.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40-nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP's ˜250-nm operating range is then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. Error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.

  16. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; Kendrick, J.; McCoy, C. A.; Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Millot, M.

    2016-11-29

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40 nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP’s ~250-nm operating range is then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. As a result, error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.

  17. PS-1/S1 picosecond streak camera application for multichannel laser system diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Garanin, S G; Bel'kov, S A; Rogozhnikov, G S; Rukavishnikov, N N; Romanov, V V; Voronich, I N; Vorob'ev, N S; Gornostaev, P B; Lozovoi, V I; Shchelev, M Ya

    2014-08-31

    A PS-1/S1 picosecond image-tube streak camera (ITSC) with slit scan (streak camera), developed and manufactured at the General Physics Institute RAS, has been used to measure the spatiotemporal characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses generated by a petawatt-power laser installation 'FEMTO' at the Institute of Laser Physics Research in Sarov. It is found that such a camera is suitable for measuring the spatial and temporal parameters of single laser pulses with an accuracy of about one picosecond. It is shown that the intensity time profile of a train of picosecond pulses may be precisely defined for the pulses separated in time by a few picoseconds. The camera allows the contrast of radiation to be determined with a high (no less than 10{sup 3}) accuracy; spatial distribution of the laser pulses can be measured with an accuracy of tens of microns, and the temporal separation of single laser pulses can be identified with an accuracy of 1 – 1.5 ps. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. Nonlinear response of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera to UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Oro, D.M.; Studebaker, J.K.; Wood, W.M.; Schappert, G.T.; Watts, S.; Fulton, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    We have found that a potassium-iodide photocathode of an x-ray streak camera responds to UV light at {lambda}=308 nm. The photocathode surface work function, 6.5 eV, is larger than the 4 eV energy of the UV photon, hence the source of the response is interesting. We will present results on the response of a transmission type potassium-iodide photocathode to the UV light from a {lambda}308 nm, subpicosecond XeCl laser and from a {lambda}=326 nm HeCd laser. We will test for the nonlinearity of the yield to measure of the number of photons that are needed to be absorbed before a signal is recorded. We will present data on the effect of the UV irradiance on the yield, as well as on the temporal width of the recorded signal. We will give an explanation of the observation and its effect on the dynamic-range response of the streak-camera. We will show that the response is linear with the incident irradiance, up to an incident irradiance of 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2} and we will explain the observation.

  19. An Optical Streak Diagnostic for Observing Anode-Cathode Plasmas for Radiographic Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Lare, Gregory A.; Bennett, Nichelle L.; Johnston, Mark D.

    2013-06-13

    National Security Technologies, LLC, and Sandia National Laboratories are collaborating in the development of pulsed power–driven flash x-ray radiographic sources that utilize high-intensity electron beam diodes. The RITS 6 (Radiographic Integrated Test Stand) accelerator at Sandia is used to drive a self magnetic pinch diode to produce a Bremsstrahlung x-ray source. The high electric fields and current densities associated with these short A-K gap pinch beam diodes present many challenges in diode development. Plasmas generated at both the anode and cathode affect the diode performance, which is manifested in varying spot (source) sizes, total dose output, and impedance profiles. Understanding the nature of these plasmas including closure rates and densities is important in modeling their behavior and providing insight into their mitigation. In this paper we describe a streak camera–based optical diagnostic that is capable of observing and measuring plasma evolution within the A-K gap. By imaging a region of interest onto the input slit of a streak camera, we are able to produce a time-resolved one-dimensional image of the evolving plasma. Typical data are presented.

  20. Corn residue removal impact on topsoil organic carbon in a corn-soybean rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn [Zea mays L.] residue is being considered as a feedstock source for biofuels production. The impact of removing corn residue on soil productivity needs to be determined in order to preserve the soil resource. A corn-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] rotation was established in 2000 and the eff...

  1. The development of a "Green" aqueous enzymatic process to extract corn oil from corn germ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 2.4 million tons of commercial corn oil were produced worldwide in 2012, compared to 2012 world production of palm oil (53.3 MT) and soybean oil (43.1 MT) according to FAS, USDA. Most commercial corn oil (~90%) is produced from corn germ that is expeller pressed and/or hexane extracte...

  2. Research on mechanical properties of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaifei; He, Yujing; Zhang, Hongmei; Li, He

    2017-03-01

    Many domestic scholars have studied on straw utilization from lodging resistance, by breeding agricultural experts to optimization parameters, which selected by agricultural mechanical experts and efficient utilization after the harvest crush. Therefore, the study of the mechanical properties of corn stalks has great prospects. It can provide the basis for the design of agricultural machinery and comprehensive utilization of straw that study the relationship between the properties of the corn stalk and the mechanical properties. In this paper, the radial compression and bending mechanical properties of corn stalk was conducted by universal material testing machine, which contributes to the increase of corn crop and provides basis for the development of equipment.

  3. 3. Interior view of corn crib showing heavytimber framing, railed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Interior view of corn crib showing heavy-timber framing, railed trackway and corn car at upper level. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Corn Crib, 2 miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  4. Corn silage from corn treated with foliar fungicide and performance of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Haerr, K J; Lopes, N M; Pereira, M N; Fellows, G M; Cardoso, F C

    2015-12-01

    Foliar fungicide application to corn plants is used in corn aimed for corn silage in the dairy industry, but questions regarding frequency of application and its effect on corn silage quality and feed conversion when fed to dairy cows remain prevalent. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of various foliar fungicide applications to corn on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and milk composition when fed to dairy cows. Sixty-four Holstein cows with parity 2.5±1.5, 653±80kg of body weight, and 161±51d in milk were blocked and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 corn silage treatments (total mixed ration with 35% of the dry matter as corn silage). Treatments were as follows: control (CON), corn silage with no applications of foliar fungicide; treatment 1 (1X), corn silage from corn that received 1 application of pyraclostrobin (PYR) foliar fungicide (Headline; BASF Corp.) at corn vegetative stage 5; treatment 2 (2X), corn silage from corn that received the same application as 1X plus another application of a mixture of PYR and metconazole (Headline AMP; BASF Corp.) at corn reproductive stage 1 ("silking"); and treatment 3 (3X), corn silage from corn that received the same applications as 2X as well as a third application of PYR and metconazole at reproductive stage 3 ("milky kernel"). Corn was harvested at about 32% dry matter and 3/4 milk line stage of kernel development and ensiled for 200d. Treatments were fed to cows for 5wk, with the last week being used for statistical inferences. Week -1 was used as a covariate in the statistical analysis. Dry matter intake tended to be lower for cows fed corn silage treated with fungicide than CON (23.8, 23.0, 19.5, and 21.3kg for CON, 1X, 2X, and 3X, respectively). A linear treatment effect for DMI was observed, with DMI decreasing as foliar fungicide applications increased. Treatments CON, 1X, 2X, and 3X did not differ for milk yield (34.5, 34.5, 34.2, and 34.4kg/d, respectively); however, a trend for

  5. Heartland Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) NCEZID Share Compartir Heartland virus On this Page What is Heartland virus? How ... Do I Need to Know? What is Heartland virus? Heartland virus belongs to a family of viruses ...

  6. GPU-accelerated Faint Streak Detection for Uncued Surveillance of LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    By astronomical standards, small objects (<10cm) in LEO illuminated by the Sun under terminator conditions are quite bright, depositing 100's to 1000's of photons per second into small telescope apertures (< 1m diameter). The challenge in discovering these objects with no a priori knowledge of their orbit (i.e. uncued surveillance) is that their relative motion with respect to a ground-based telescope makes them appear to have large angular rates of motion, up to and exceeding 1 degree per second. Thus in even a short exposure, the signal from the object is smeared out in a streak with low signal-to-noise per pixel. Go Green Termite (GGT), Inc. of Gilroy, CA, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), is building two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test, develop and prove a novel streak detection technique. The imaging systems are built from off-the-shelf optics and detectors resulting in a 350mm aperture and a 6 square degree field of view. For streak detection, field of view is of critical importance because the maximum exposure time on the object is limited by its crossing time. In this way, wider fields of view impact surveys for LEO objects both by increasing the survey volume and increasing sensitivity. Using our newly GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems are expected to be able to detect objects fainter than 12th magnitude moving at 1 degree per second and possibly as faint as 13th magnitude for slower moving objects. Meter-class optical systems using these techniques should be able to detect objects fainter than 14th magnitude, which is roughly equivalent to a golf ball at 1000km altitude. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a scalable system for near real time detection of fast moving objects that can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same

  7. Analysis of Dark Slope Streaks on Mars based on Multitemporal HRSC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Björn; van Gasselt, Stephan; Jan-Peter, Muller

    2016-04-01

    Recurring slope lineae (RSL) on Mars are dark and narrow downhill oriented surface features found in equatorial regions (1) associated with water or hydrated salt flows (2). On the other hand there are Dark Slope Streaks which seem to be dry avalanches on dust covered slopes (3). The origin of both ist still under discussion. We found linear features in eastern Noctis Labyrinthus region (6°S, 265°E) with lengths of up to several kilometres and lateral extensions of 20-30 metres. As described by (4), RSL fade and recur in the same location over multiple Mars years. Similarily, Dark Slope Streaks form on at least annual to decade-long timescales (5). During 10 years of HRSC observation time (2005-2015) several linear features in Noctis Labyrinthus changed in visibility. Slope parameters and seasonal illumination conditions are investigated based on a digital elevation model derived from HRSC data. For large datasets a feature identification is presented which involves spatial filtering in conjunction with elevation data analysis. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379. (1) McEwen, A.S., et al. (2014): Recurring slope lineae in equatorial regions of Mars. Nat. Geosci 7: 53-58. (2) Ojha, L. et al. (2015): Spectral evidence for hydrated salts in recurring slope linear on Mars. Nat. Geosci, DOI:10.1038/NGEO2546. (3) Sullivan, R. et al. (2001). Mass Movement Slope Streaks Imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera. J. Geophys. Res., 106(E10), 23,607-23,633. (4) McEwen, A.S., et al. (2011): Seasonal Flows on Warm Martian Slopes. Science, Vol. 333, Issue 6043, pp. 740-743. (5) Malin, M.C.; Edgett, K.S. (2001). Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera: Interplanetary cruise through primary mission. J. Geophys. Res., 106(E10), 23,429-23,570.

  8. Starlink corn: a risk analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bucchini, Luca; Goldman, Lynn R

    2002-01-01

    Modern biotechnology has dramatically increased our ability to alter the agronomic traits of plants. Among the novel traits that biotechnology has made available, an important group includes Bacillus thuringiensis-derived insect resistance. This technology has been applied to potatoes, cotton, and corn. Benefits of Bt crops, and biotechnology generally, can be realized only if risks are assessed and managed properly. The case of Starlink corn, a plant modified with a gene that encodes the Bt protein Cry9c, was a severe test of U.S. regulatory agencies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had restricted its use to animal feed due to concern about the potential for allergenicity. However, Starlink corn was later found throughout the human food supply, resulting in food recalls by the Food and Drug Administration and significant disruption of the food supply. Here we examine the regulatory history of Starlink, the assessment framework employed by the U.S. government, assumptions and information gaps, and the key elements of government efforts to manage the product. We explore the impacts on regulations, science, and society and conclude that only significant advances in our understanding of food allergies and improvements in monitoring and enforcement will avoid similar events in the future. Specifically, we need to develop a stronger fundamental basis for predicting allergic sensitization and reactions if novel proteins are to be introduced in this fashion. Mechanisms are needed to assure that worker and community aeroallergen risks are considered. Requirements are needed for the development of valid assays so that enforcement and post market surveillance activities can be conducted. PMID:11781159

  9. Climate forecasts for corn producer decision making

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn is the most widely grown crop in the Americas, with annual production in the United States of approximately 332 million metric tons. Improved climate forecasts, together with climate-related decision tools for corn producers based on these improved forecasts, could substantially reduce uncertai...

  10. Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The Integrated Corn-Based Bio-Refinery (ICBR) process will use new technology to convert corn grain and stover into fermentable sugars for the parallel production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and fuel ethanol.

  11. Corn stalk as a bioenergy resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Paul E., Jr.

    Waste corn stalk has the potential to help reduce the nation's dependence upon foreign sources of petroleum by becoming a major bioenergy resource. There are many sources of biomass that could also be utilized for this endeavor. It is estimated that over 100 million tons of agricultural waste are produced in the United States alone. This represents a significant source of energy. Through gasification, this waste could be used to generate power, fuels, and/or products. This dissertation shows that the gasification of corn stalk can produce char, heat, synthesis gases (CO and H2), and can also be used for work to dry moist biomass. Through the integration of drying, gasification, and carbon production, waste corn stalk can be used as a significant bioenergy resource. Novel concepts included in this dissertation include: (1) using corn stalk as a gasification fuel, (2) using corn stalk to generate activated carbon, (3) using activated carbon from corn stalk to adsorb organic pollutants, (4) using the gasification of corn stalk in a new process to dry moist biomass, (5) using the "partial" gasification of moist corn stalk in another new process to dry moist biomass in a single step. Each concept could be integrated with existing gasification technology to increase the efficient utilization of energy from biomass.

  12. The corn blight problem: 1970 and 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Southern corn leaf blight is caused by the fungus, Helminthosporium maydis. Race T of H maydis adapted itself to the Texas male sterile cytoplasm corn. The problems caused by this variety of the blight in 1970 and 1971 are discussed, as well as the symptoms and development of the disease.

  13. Alcohol from corn: poor energy balance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-10

    It is reported that most processing plants producing alcohol from corn currently operate with very unfavourable energy balances. The energy needed to grow and harvest corn plus petroleum or natural gas used in the processing phase often exceeds the energy that can be derived from the alcohol.

  14. Prediction of the perceived quality of streak distortions in offset-printing with a psychophysically motivated multi-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzicki, Konrad; Zetzsche, Christoph

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of printing machines poses the problem of how distortions like streaks caused by the machine can be detected and assessed automatically. Although luminance variations in prints can be measured quite precisely, the measured functions bear little relevance for the lightness of streaks and other distortions of prints as perceived by human observers. First, the measurements sometimes indicate changes of luminance in regions which are perceived as homogeneous by humans. Second, the measured strength of a distortion correlates often weakly with its perceived strength, which is influenced by a variety of factors, like the shape of a streak's luminance profile and the distribution of luminance variations in its spatial surround. We have used a model of human perception, based on fundamental neurophysiological and psychophysical properties of the visual system, in order to predict the perceptual strength of streaks (i.e. the distortion as perceived by a human observer) from the measured physical luminance signal. For the evaluation of the model, tests with naive and expert observers have been conducted. The results show that the model yields a good correlation (?) to the assessments of human observers and is thus well suited for use in an automatic evaluation system.

  15. Environmental factors influencing the development of black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) on bananas in Puerto Rico.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of environmental factors on the development of black leaf streak (BLS) were studied in Puerto Rico under field conditions. Environmental factors evaluated included temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and solar radiation. Their effect on BLS was determined by recording the youngest...

  16. A four-quadrant sequential streak technique to evaluate Campylobacter selective broths for suppressing background flora in broiler carcass rinses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ecometric technique is a semi-quantitative scoring method used in the quality control of culture media in microbiology laboratories. This technique involves inoculation with defined populations of a specific culture onto solid media via a standardized chronological streaking technique, leading ...

  17. A 'chemotactic dipole' mechanism for large-scale vortex motion during primitive streak formation in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Sandersius, S A; Chuai, M; Weijer, C J; Newman, T J

    2011-08-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves significant coordinated cell movement lateral to the streak, in addition to the posterior-anterior movement of cells in the streak proper. Cells lateral to the streak are observed to undergo 'polonaise movements', i.e. two large counter-rotating vortices, reminiscent of eddies in a fluid. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for these movement patterns which relies on chemotactic signals emitted by a dipolar configuration of cells in the posterior region of the epiblast. The 'chemotactic dipole' consists of adjacent regions of cells emitting chemo-attractants and chemo-repellents. We motivate this idea using a mathematical analogy between chemotaxis and electrostatics, and test this idea using large-scale computer simulations. We implement active cell response to both neighboring mechanical interactions and chemotactic gradients using the Subcellular Element Model. Simulations show the emergence of large-scale vortices of cell movement. The length and time scales of vortex formation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We also provide quantitative estimates for the robustness of the chemotaxis dipole mechanism, which indicate that the mechanism has an error tolerance of about 10% to variation in chemotactic parameters, assuming that only 1% of the cell population is involved in emitting signals. This tolerance increases for larger populations of cells emitting signals.

  18. Evaluation of triticale accessions for resistance to wheat bacterial leaf streak caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterium Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa (Xtu) causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS) on wheat and other small grains. Several triticale accessions were reported to possess high levels of resistance to wheat Xtu strains. In this study, we evaluated a worldwide collection of 502 triticale acces...

  19. Association mapping of quantitative trait loci responsible for resistance to Bacterial Leaf Streak and Spot Blotch in spring wheat landraces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf streak (BLS), caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa, and spot blotch (SB), caused by Cochliobolus sativus are two major diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Planting resistant cultivars is the best approach to manage these diseases and identifying new sources of resistan...

  20. Compositions of Low Albedo Intracrater Materials and Wind Streaks on Mars: Examination of MGS TES Data in Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Wyatt, M. B.; Christensen, P.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Basalt and andesite surface compositions are identified within individual low albedo intracrater features and adjacent dark wind streaks. High resolution mapping of compositional heterogeneities may help constrain origin hypotheses for these features. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. First report of bacterial streak of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) in California caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. apii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new bacterial streak disease appeared on fennel leaves, stems and bulbs grown in Salinas California production fields. Initial symptoms consisted of small black lesions on stems that spread down the stem to the bulbs and up the stem to leaves as the disease progressed. The disease rendered the pl...

  2. Modified ecometric technique (four-quadrant sequential streak) to evaluate Campylobacter enrichment broth proficiency in suppressing background microflora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecometric technique is a semi-quantitative scoring method used for quality control of culture media in microbiological laboratories. The technique involves inoculation with defined populations of specific culture onto solid media via a standardized chronological streaking technique, leading to ever-...

  3. Corn plant locating by image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jiancheng; Krutz, Gary W.; Gibson, Harry W.

    1991-02-01

    The feasibility investigation of using machine vision technology to locate corn plants is an important issue for field production automation in the agricultural industry. This paper presents an approach which was developed to locate the center of a corn plant using image processing techniques. Corn plants were first identified using a main vein detection algorithm by detecting a local feature of corn leaves leaf main veins based on the spectral difference between mains and leaves then the center of the plant could be located using a center locating algorithm by tracing and extending each detected vein line and evaluating the center of the plant from intersection points of those lines. The experimental results show the usefulness of the algorithm for machine vision applications related to corn plant identification. Such a technique can be used for pre. cisc spraying of pesticides or biotech chemicals. 1.

  4. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  5. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5-9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 110 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL.

  6. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5 9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 1/10 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL.

  7. Integration of banana streak badnavirus into the Musa genome: molecular and cytogenetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Osuji, J O; Heslop-Harrison, J S; Hull, R

    1999-03-15

    Breeding and tissue culture of certain cultivars of bananas (Musa) have led to high levels of banana streak badnavirus (BSV) infection in progeny from symptomless parents. BSV DNA hybridized to genomic DNA of one such parent, Obino l'Ewai, suggesting integration of viral sequences. Sequencing of clones of Obino l'Ewai genomic DNA revealed an interface between BSV and Musa sequences and a complex BSV integrant. In situ hybridization revealed two different BSV sequence locations in Obino l'Ewai chromosomes and a complex arrangement of BSV and Musa sequences was shown by probing stretched DNA fibers. This is the first report of integrated sequences that possibly lead to a plant pararetrovirus episomal infection by a mechanism differing markedly from animal retroviral systems.

  8. A quill vibrating mechanism for a sounding apparatus in the streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus).

    PubMed

    Endo, Hideki; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Rakotondraparany, Felix; Matsui, Atsushi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Shinohara, Akio; Hasegawa, Masami

    2010-05-01

    The streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus) is equipped with a quill vibrating mechanism on the dorsal side of the caudal trunk that has evolved as an extraordinary sounding apparatus for communication. An arrangement of 15 or 16 light-brown quills was observed. Thickened cutaneous muscles were confirmed beneath quills. We named this structure the "quill vibrator disc" (QVD). The QVD was 16.8 mm long and 8.55 mm wide in a typical adult. Longitudinal musculature symmetrical about the sagittal plane was developed in the QVD. Myocytes were found immunohistochemically to contain mainly fast myosin but not slow myosin. These findings indicate that the QVD is a specialized apparatus in the cutaneous muscle that contributes to the vibration of quills and to the production of sound for communication.

  9. Antimicrobial Screening of Actinobacteria using a Modified Cross-Streak Method

    PubMed Central

    Velho-Pereira, Sonashia; Kamat, N M

    2011-01-01

    Out of the 30 actinobacterial cultures screened for antimicrobial activity, 28 cultures were found to produce active products against various pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast, using a modified cross streak method. The modified method helped in easy quantification of results and also in ruling out probable mutual antibiosis. The actinobacterial strains that showed the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds belonged to Streptomyces (53%), Micromonospora (13%) and Actinomadura (10%) genera. Streptomyces sp. strain MMA-5 showed the highest multispecific antibiosis efficiency score value. Broad antibiotic spectrum activity was exhibited by Streptomyces sp. strain MMA-2 and Micromonospora sp. strain MMA-8. The multidrug resistant human pathogenic yeast strain Candida albicans was inhibited by 18 actinobacterial strains. PMID:22303068

  10. Carrier-Envelope-Phase Characterization for an Isolated Attosecond Pulse by Angular Streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Pei-Lun; Ruiz, Camilo; He, Feng

    2016-05-01

    The carrier envelope phase (CEP) is a crucial parameter for a few-cycle laser pulse since it substantially determines the laser waveform. Stepping forward from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses, we propose a strategy to directly characterize the CEP of an isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) by numerically simulating the tunneling ionization of a hydrogen atom in a combined IAP and phase-stabilized circularly polarized IR laser pulse. The fine modulations of the combined laser fields, due to the variation of the CEP of the IAP, are exponentially enlarged onto the distinct time-dependent tunneling ionization rate. Electrons released at different time with distinct tunneling ionization rates are angularly streaked to different directions. By measuring the resulting photoelectron momentum distribution, the CEP of the IAP can be retrieved. The characterization of the CEP of an IAP will open the possibility of capturing sub-EUV-cycle dynamics.

  11. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  12. High-Resolving-Power, Streaked X-Ray Spectroscopy on the OMEGA EP Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilson, P. M.; Ehrne, F.; Mileham, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Jungquist, R. K.; Taylor, C.; Boni, R.; Hassett, J.; Stillman, C. R.; Ivancic, S. T.; Lonobile, D. J.; Kidder, R. W.; Shoup, M. J., III; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Froula, D. H.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, L.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolving-power, streaked x-ray spectrometer is being developed and tested on the OMEGA EP Laser System to study temperature-equilibration dynamics in rapidly heated solid matter. Temporal spectral shifts of the Cu Kα line in isochorically heated solid targets provide a fairly simple system where the spectrometer performance will be validated. The goal is to achieve a resolving power of several thousand and 2-ps temporal resolution. A time-integrating survey spectrometer has been developed and deployed on OMEGA EP to evaluate the throughput, focusing fidelity, and spectral resolution of two different crystal geometries. The results from these measurements will be presented and used to justify the down-selected time-resolved spectrometer design. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Carrier-Envelope-Phase Characterization for an Isolated Attosecond Pulse by Angular Streaking.

    PubMed

    He, Pei-Lun; Ruiz, Camilo; He, Feng

    2016-05-20

    The carrier envelope phase (CEP) is a crucial parameter for a few-cycle laser pulse since it substantially determines the laser waveform. Stepping forward from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses, we propose a strategy to directly characterize the CEP of an isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) by numerically simulating the tunneling ionization of a hydrogen atom in a combined IAP and phase-stabilized circularly polarized IR laser pulse. The fine modulations of the combined laser fields, due to the variation of the CEP of the IAP, are exponentially enlarged onto the distinct time-dependent tunneling ionization rate. Electrons released at different time with distinct tunneling ionization rates are angularly streaked to different directions. By measuring the resulting photoelectron momentum distribution, the CEP of the IAP can be retrieved. The characterization of the CEP of an IAP will open the possibility of capturing sub-EUV-cycle dynamics.

  14. Heterologous Acidothermus cellulolyticus 1,4-β-Endoglucanase E1 Produced Within the Corn Biomass Converts Corn Stover Into Glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Callista; Balan, Venkatesh; Biswas, Gadab; Dale, Bruce; Crockett, Elaine; Sticklen, Mariam

    Commercial conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars requires inexpensive bulk production of biologically active cellulase enzymes, which might be achieved through direct production of these enzymes within the biomass crops. Transgenic corn plants containing the catalytic domain of Acidothermus cellulolyticus E1 endo-1,4-β glucanase and the bar bialaphos resistance coding sequences were generated after Biolistic® (BioRad Hercules, CA) bombardment of immature embryo-derived cells. E1 sequences were regulated under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and tobacco mosaic virus translational enhancer, and E1 protein was targeted to the apoplast using the signal peptide of tobacco pathogenesis-related protein to achieve accumulation of this enzyme. The integration, expression, and segregation of E1 and bar transgenes were demonstrated, respectively, through Southern and Western blotting, and progeny analyses. Accumulation of up to 1.13% of transgenic plant total soluble proteins was detected as biologically active E1 by enzymatic activity assay. The corn-produced, heterologous E1 could successfully convert ammonia fiber explosion-pretreated corn stover polysaccharides into glucose as a fermentable sugar for ethanol production, confirming that the E1 enzyme is produced in its active from.

  15. Tracing dynamics of laser-induced fields on ultrathin foils using complementary imaging with streak deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Koschitzki, Ch.; Andreev, A. A.; Nickles, P. V.; Sander, W.; Schnürer, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the electric and magnetic fields, which are created on plasma vacuum interfaces as a result of highly intense laser-matter interactions. For the field generation ultrathin polymer foils (30-50 nm) were irradiated with high intensity femtosecond (1019 - 1020 W /cm2 ) and picosecond (˜1017 W /cm2 ) laser pulses with ultrahigh contrast (1010 - 1011 ). To determine the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of these fields the proton streak deflectometry method has been developed further and applied in two different imaging configurations. It enabled us to gather complementary information about the investigated field structure, in particular about the influence of different field components (parallel and normal to the target surface) and the impact of a moving ion front. The applied ultrahigh laser contrast significantly increased the reproducibility of the experiment and improved the accuracy of the imaging method. In order to explain the experimental observations, which were obtained by applying ultrashort laser pulses, two different analytical models have been studied in detail. Their ability to reproduce the streak deflectometry measurements was tested on the basis of three-dimensional particle simulations. A modification and combination of the two models allowed for an extensive and accurate reproduction of the experimental results in both imaging configurations. The controlled change of the laser pulse duration from 50 femtoseconds to 2.7 picoseconds led to a transition of the dominating force acting on the probing proton beam at the rear side of the polymer foil. In the picosecond case the (v ⇀ x B ⇀ ) -term of the Lorentz force dominated over the counteracting E ⇀-field and was responsible for the direction of the net force. The applied proton deflectometry method allowed for an unambiguous determination of the magnetic field polarity at the rear side of the ultrathin foil.

  16. High density lipoprotein plasma fractions inhibit aortic fatty streaks in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Badimon, J J; Badimon, L; Galvez, A; Dische, R; Fuster, V

    1989-03-01

    The effects of in vivo administration of high density lipoprotein-very high density lipoprotein (HDL-VHDL) on the development of aortic fatty streaks were studied in cholesterol-fed rabbits. The rabbits received a 0.5% cholesterol-rich diet for 8 weeks. During this period, the HDL-VHDL group was intravenously administered with 50 mg/week of homologous HDL-VHDL protein; the control group received normal saline (0.9% NaCl). HDL-VHDL fraction was obtained at density range 1.063 to 1.25 gm/ml by ultracentrifugation of normal rabbit plasma. Along the study, plasma lipid levels followed a similar profile in both groups. At the completion of the study, atherosclerotic-like lipid-rich lesions covered 37.9 +/- 6% (X +/- SEM) of the intimal aortic surface in the control group, and 14.9 +/- 2.1% in the treated group (p less than 0.001). The values of total and free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, and phospholipids deposited within vessel wall were significantly lower in the aortas of the HDL-VHDL treated group than those in the control group. Cholesterol accumulation in the livers was also significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in the treated group than in the control. We concluded that administration of homologous HDL-VHDL lipoprotein fraction to cholesterol-fed rabbits, dramatically inhibited the extent of aortic fatty streaks and lowered lipid deposition in the arterial wall and liver without modification of the plasma lipid levels.

  17. The ECM Moves during Primitive Streak Formation—Computation of ECM Versus Cellular Motion

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Evan A; Rongish, Brenda J; Little, Charles D

    2008-01-01

    Galileo described the concept of motion relativity—motion with respect to a reference frame—in 1632. He noted that a person below deck would be unable to discern whether the boat was moving. Embryologists, while recognizing that embryonic tissues undergo large-scale deformations, have failed to account for relative motion when analyzing cell motility data. A century of scientific articles has advanced the concept that embryonic cells move (“migrate”) in an autonomous fashion such that, as time progresses, the cells and their progeny assemble an embryo. In sharp contrast, the motion of the surrounding extracellular matrix scaffold has been largely ignored/overlooked. We developed computational/optical methods that measure the extent embryonic cells move relative to the extracellular matrix. Our time-lapse data show that epiblastic cells largely move in concert with a sub-epiblastic extracellular matrix during stages 2 and 3 in primitive streak quail embryos. In other words, there is little cellular motion relative to the extracellular matrix scaffold—both components move together as a tissue. The extracellular matrix displacements exhibit bilateral vortical motion, convergence to the midline, and extension along the presumptive vertebral axis—all patterns previously attributed solely to cellular “migration.” Our time-resolved data pose new challenges for understanding how extracellular chemical (morphogen) gradients, widely hypothesized to guide cellular trajectories at early gastrulation stages, are maintained in this dynamic extracellular environment. We conclude that models describing primitive streak cellular guidance mechanisms must be able to account for sub-epiblastic extracellular matrix displacements.

  18. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-15

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  19. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, M; Regan, S P; Bahr, R E; Romanofsky, M; Sorce, C

    2012-10-01

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO∕QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  20. Transitional features in human atherosclerosis. Intimal thickening, cholesterol clefts, and cell loss in human aortic fatty streaks.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1993-01-01

    The possible transition from a subset of fatty streaks to fibrous plaques in human atherosclerosis has long been postulated, but transitional features in lesions have rarely been demonstrated. We examined human aortic fatty streaks to determine whether significant tendencies toward intimal thickening and toward deep extracellular lipid deposition might be found. To provide accurate ultrastructural assessment of lipid, tissues were processed by new electron microscopic cytochemical techniques. Unilateral fatty streaks exhibited a 60% increase in intimal thickness when compared to contralateral control tissue. Fat droplets in intimal cells accounted for approximately half of the increase; nonfat portions of cells and extracellular matrix accounted for the remainder. Six of 32 fatty streaks (19%) contained cholesterol clefts, which were found in the musculo-elastic (deep) layer of the intima or in the tunica media. Volume fractions occupied by cells in deep intima were reduced when cholesterol clefts were evident, suggesting loss of cells in early core regions. Light and electron microscopy showed structures consistent with lipid-rich core regions in lesions with cholesterol clefts and in a few lesions without cholesterol clefts. The findings of intimal thickening, core region formation, and disappearance of intimal cells constitute new evidence that some fatty streaks are progressive lesions and sites of eventual fibrous plaque development. The findings also suggest that the lipid-rich core region does not originate primarily from the debris of dead foam cells in the superficial intima, but instead arises from lipids accumulating gradually in the extracellular matrix of the deep intima. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8238260

  1. 34. Credit JTL. Second floor, view of Monarch Co. Corn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Credit JTL. Second floor, view of Monarch Co. Corn cracking machine, by Sprout, Waldron and Co., (Muncy, PA), which cut and diced corn to a uniform size, then separated it into three grades of cracked corn and corn meal and removed chaff. - Bunker Hill Mill, County Route 26, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, WV

  2. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  3. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that...

  4. 21 CFR 137.250 - White corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false White corn meal. 137.250 Section 137.250 Food and... Related Products § 137.250 White corn meal. (a) White corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section not...

  5. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  6. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that...

  7. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  8. Multipass rotary shear comminution process to produce corn stover particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2015-04-14

    A process of comminution of corn stover having a grain direction to produce a mixture of corn stover, by feeding the corn stover in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction one or more times through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of corn stover travel.

  9. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that...

  10. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that...

  11. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  12. 21 CFR 137.280 - Bolted yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bolted yellow corn meal. 137.280 Section 137.280... Flours and Related Products § 137.280 Bolted yellow corn meal. Bolted yellow corn meal conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.255 for bolted white corn meal except that...

  13. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  14. 21 CFR 137.250 - White corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false White corn meal. 137.250 Section 137.250 Food and... Related Products § 137.250 White corn meal. (a) White corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section not...

  15. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  16. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  17. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  18. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  19. 21 CFR 137.250 - White corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false White corn meal. 137.250 Section 137.250 Food and... Related Products § 137.250 White corn meal. (a) White corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section not...

  20. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  1. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1866 - High fructose corn syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false High fructose corn syrup. 184.1866 Section 184... as GRAS § 184.1866 High fructose corn syrup. (a) High fructose corn syrup, a sweet, nutritive... solution from high dextrose-equivalent corn starch hydrolysate by partial enzymatic conversion of...

  3. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  4. 21 CFR 137.250 - White corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false White corn meal. 137.250 Section 137.250 Food and... Related Products § 137.250 White corn meal. (a) White corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section not...

  5. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  6. 21 CFR 137.285 - Degerminated yellow corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated yellow corn meal. 137.285 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.285 Degerminated yellow corn meal. Degerminated yellow corn meal, degermed yellow corn meal, conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.265...

  7. 21 CFR 137.250 - White corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false White corn meal. 137.250 Section 137.250 Food and... Related Products § 137.250 White corn meal. (a) White corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section not...

  8. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  9. Pilot process for decolorizing/deodorizing commercial corn zein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn zein is the major protein component of ground corn, and co-products of the corn ethanol industry which includes distiller’s dried grains and corn gluten meal. Zein products generated from those materials all possess some degree of yellow color and off-odor that deters their usage in food syste...

  10. Utilization of corn fiber for production of schizophyllan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber is an abundant lignocellulosic biomass resource produced during the wet milling of corn. Although corn fiber is recalcitrant to enzymatic digestion, the fungus Schizophyllum commune was able to directly utilize corn fiber for production of the valuable bioproduct, schizophyllan. Schizophy...

  11. On-Farm Validation of Alfalfa N Credits to Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rotating alfalfa with corn is useful for reducing soil erosion, enhancing soil tilth and carbon storage, reducing weed seedbanks, disrupting the life cycles of disease and insect pests of corn, and supplying nitrogen (N) to the subsequent corn crop. To adjust N fertilizer rates for corn following al...

  12. Rubidium marking technique for the European corn borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in corn

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, D.E.; Chiang, H.C.

    1984-04-01

    Laboratory and greenhouse experiments conducted in 1980 showed that rubidium (Rb) could be used to mark corn plants and emergent European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis (Huebner), moths. Rb had no adverse effects on pre-adult mortality, moth deformity, or fecundity. The best application method for marking ECB moths was an over-the-top + directed foliar spray to the corn plants. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  13. Viruses in maize and Johnsongrass in southern Ohio.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Teplier, R; Todd, J C; Jones, M W; Cassone, B J; Wijeratne, S; Wijeratne, A; Redinbaugh, M G

    2014-12-01

    The two major U.S. maize viruses, Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV), emerged in southern Ohio and surrounding regions in the 1960s and caused significant losses. Planting resistant varieties and changing cultural practices has dramatically reduced virus impact in subsequent decades. Current information on the distribution, diversity, and impact of known and potential U.S. maize disease-causing viruses is lacking. To assess the current reservoir of viruses present at the sites of past disease emergence, we used a combination of serological testing and next-generation RNA sequencing approaches. Here, we report enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RNA-Seq data from samples collected over 2 years to assess the presence of viruses in cultivated maize and an important weedy reservoir, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Results revealed a persistent reservoir of MDMV and two strains of MCDV in Ohio Johnsongrass. We identified sequences of several other grass-infecting viruses and confirmed the presence of Wheat mosaic virus in Ohio maize. Together, these results provide important data for managing virus disease in field corn and sweet corn maize crops, and identifying potential future virus threats.

  14. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  15. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned sweet corn is the product prepared from clean, sound kernels of... stand at least 24 hours at a temperature of 68 °F to 85 °F. Determine the gross weight, open,...

  16. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned sweet corn is the product prepared from clean, sound kernels of... stand at least 24 hours at a temperature of 68 °F to 85 °F. Determine the gross weight, open,...

  17. Specific energy requirement for compacting corn stover.

    PubMed

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope G; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2006-08-01

    Corn stover is a major crop residue for biomass conversion to produce chemicals and fuels. One of the problems associated with the supply of corn stover to conversion plants is the delivery of feedstock at a low cost. Corn stover has low bulk density and it is difficult to handle. In this study, chopped corn stover samples were compacted in a piston cylinder under three pressure levels (5, 10, 15 MPa) and at three moisture content levels (5%, 10%, 15% (wb)) to produce briquettes. The total energy requirement to compress and extrude briquette ranged from 12 to 30 MJ/t. The briquette density ranged from 650 to 950 kg/m3 increasing with pressure. Moisture content had also a significant effect on briquette density, durability and stability. Low moisture stover (5-10%) resulted in denser, more stable and more durable briquettes than high moisture stover (15%).

  18. Dust Devils Seen Streaking Across Mars: PART II--They're the Work of the Devil!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In December 1999, the MOC team finally had an answer! A dust devil, shown in the above left figure, was caught in the act of creating a swirly, dark streak! An eerie sensation washed over the first team members who saw this picture--here was an event on Mars 'caught in the act' just hours before the picture was played back to Earth. A 'smoking gun.'

    The first dust devil seen making a streak--located in Promethei Terra (above, left)--was traveling from right (east) to left (west). A columnar shadow was cast by sunlight coming from the upper left. This shadow indicates the true shape of the dust devil. The bright dust devil itself does not look like a column because the picture was taken from a camera looking straight down on it. The dust devil is less than 100 meters (less than 100 yards) wide and the picture covers an area approximately 1.5 by 1.7 kilometers (about 1 by 1 mile).

    Dust devils are spinning, columnar vortices of wind that move across the landscape, pick up dust, and look somewhat like miniature tornadoes. Dust devils are a common occurrence in dry and desert landscapes on Earth as well as Mars. They form when the ground heats up during the day, warming the air immediately above the surface. As the warmed air nearest the surface begins to rise, it spins. The spinning column begins to move across the surface and picks up loose dust (if any is present). The dust makes the vortex visible and gives it the 'dust devil' or tornado-like appearance. On Earth, dust devils typically last for only a few minutes.

    The fourth picture (above, right) shows a surface in southwestern Terra Sirenum near 63oS, 168oW, that has seen the activity of so many dust devils that it looks like a plate of dark gray spaghetti. This image, taken in early summer during February 2000, covers an area 3 km wide and 30 km long (1.9 by 19 miles). In fact, a dust devil

  19. Springback and diagravitropism in Merit corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Dark-treated Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots are diagravitropic and lose curvature upon withdrawal of the gravity stimulus (springback). Springback was not detected in a variety of corn that is orthogravitropic in the dark, nor in Merit roots in which tropistic response was enhanced either with red light or with abscisic acid. A possible interpretation is that springback may be associated with a weak growth response of diagravitropic roots.

  20. Transmission grating streaked spectrometer for the diagnosis of soft x-ray emission from ultrahigh intensity laser heated targets

    SciTech Connect

    Eagleton, R.T.; James, S.F.

    2004-10-01

    A free-standing gold transmission grating with a period of 5000 A has been coupled to a soft x-ray sensitive streak camera with a limiting temporal resolution of 10 ps. The streak camera is equipped with a caesium iodide transmission photocathode and observations have been made in the 10-100 A regime. For a small source (200 {mu}m diameter) the spectral resolution is predicted to be around 2.5 A. This has been confirmed by examination of the Lyman-{alpha} line in hydrogen-like laser heated boron. A recorded linewidth of 2.44 A is demonstrated. The instrument has been used to diagnose the soft x-ray emission from a plastic (CH) foil target heated by an ultra-intense (2x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}) laser pulse.