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Sample records for corneal blinking reflex

  1. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  2. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-07

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  3. Effects of caffeine on the trigeminal blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Schicatano, Edward J

    2005-04-01

    The acoustic startle and trigeminal blink reflexes share the same motor output. Since caffeine has been shown to augment the startle reflex, it was proposed that caffeine would also increase the trigeminal blink reflex. In 6 humans, the effects of caffeine (100 mg) on the trigeminal blink reflex were investigated. Reflex blinks were elicited by stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve. Following ingestion of caffeinated coffee, reflex blinks increased in amplitude and duration and occurred at a shorter latency than reflex blinks following ingestion of decaffeinated coffee. Since the blink reflex is a brainstem reflex, these results suggest that the psychomotor effects of caffeine facilitate brainstem processing.

  4. Buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease and blink reflex study.

    PubMed

    Unal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2013-07-01

    To define a new primitive reflex named the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and to investigate this reflex clinically and neurophysiologically in patients with Parkinson disease. This prospectively designed study included 17 patients, 9 BPR positive patients, and 8 BPR negative patients in Ankara Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, and was carried out between January and December 2008. All patients had Parkinson disease without any medication. Using the blink reflex technique, 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve were stimulated. Additionally, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr Score (HYS), the blink frequency, and the duration of Parkinson disease was also matched between the 2 groups. In patients with positive BPR, 5 had tremor and the remaining 4 had bradykinesia as a dominant symptom, while all other patients with negative BPR had only tremor. When blink reflex findings were compared between the 2 groups, R2 and contralateral R2 latencies that were taken by supraorbital stimulus were significantly shorter in the BPR positive patients. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of MMSE, UPDRS, HYS, and frequency of blinking, and duration of illness between the 2 groups. This reflex may be an indicator of sensitivity or decrease of threshold level such as Myerson`s sign, in which there is no inhibition in glabella reflex. The blink reflex findings support this hypothesis.

  5. Pharmacology of reflex blinks in the rat: a novel model for headache research.

    PubMed

    Jones, M G; Andreou, A P; McMahon, S B; Spanswick, D

    2016-12-01

    Migraineurs are highly sensitive to the nitric oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate which triggers attacks in many sufferers. In animal studies, glyceryl trinitrate increases neuronal activity in the trigeminovascular pathway and elevates neurotransmitter levels in the brainstem. Many migraineurs also display alterations in blink reflexes, known to involve brainstem circuits. We investigated the effect of GTN on evoked blinks in the anaesthetised rat to determine whether such reflexes may prove useful as the basis for a novel animal model to evaluate potential anti-migraine therapeutic agents. In anaesthetised rats the electromyogram associated with the reflex blink evoked by corneal airpuff was recorded. Rats were infused with glyceryl trinitrate, sumatriptan plus glyceryl trinitrate or vehicle control. Changes in the magnitude of the reflex blink-associated electromyogram following these treatments were measured. Glyceryl trinitrate potentiated the evoked reflex blink-associated EMG response from 2 h after infusion. That effect was abolished by simultaneous infusion of sumatriptan with glyceryl trinitrate. These results show that simple skin surface measurements of evoked electromyographic activity in the rat can reliably detect the evoked blink reflex that can be potentiated by nitric oxide donors. This novel model may be an effective tool for evaluating putative anti-migraine therapeutic agents.

  6. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  7. Blink reflex in Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, L M; Chacon, J; Madrazo, J; Chaparro, P

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the electrically evoked blink reflex (R1 and R2 components) in 40 parkinsonian patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia (15 with facial dyskinesia, 13 with limb-truncal dyskinesia and 12 with mixed dyskinesia). R2 latencies (both ipsilateral and contralateral) were significantly prolonged in dyskinetic patients. These findings are indicative of decreased excitability of brainstem interneurones in the dyskinetic parkinsonians. We found no correlation between the neurophysiological pattern of blink reflex and the localization of dyskinesia.

  8. Startle and blink reflex in high functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Ozdem; Korkmaz, Baris; Alev, Gulce; Demirbilek, Veysi; Kiziltan, Meral

    2016-06-01

    An important clinical feature of autism is the presence of atypical responses to sensory stimuli. In this study, we investigated if high functioning autistic patients had abnormalities in the blink reflex and the startle reaction to auditory or somatosensory stimuli. Fourteen patients aged between 7 and 16 years were included in the study. We found a longer latency of the blink reflex, an increased duration and amplitude of the auditory startle reaction and a lower presence rate of the somatosensorial startle reaction in autistic patients. To better define the sensorial characteristics of the disease could improve the therapeutic management of children with autism spectrum disorder.

  9. Somatosensory eye blink reflex in peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Erkol, Gökhan; Kiziltan, Meral E; Uluduz, Derya; Uzun, Nurten

    2009-09-04

    To investigate the association between somatosensory blink reflex (SBR) and peripheral facial palsy (PFP) severity and trigeminal blink reflex (BR) changes in cases with PFP and subsequent postparalytic facial syndrome development (PFS). One hundred and twenty subjects with peripheral facial palsy and post-facial syndrome and 44 age and gender matched healthy volunteers were enrolled to this study. Blink reflexes and somatosensory blink reflex were studied in all. The association between R1 and R2 responses of the BR and SBR positivity was investigated. SBR was elicited in 36.3% of normal subjects, in 18.3% of PFP and in 65.3% of PFS patients. In the paralytic side, the frequency of SBR positivity was significantly lower in PFP group compared to controls and SBR was most frequently observed in patients with PFS. Compared to PFP and control groups, SBR positivity on the non-paralytic side significantly revealed a higher rate in PFS patients. SBR positivity of patients in whom R1 or R2 were absent, was significantly lower than those subjects with prolonged or normal R1 or R2 responses. PFP and successive PFS are good models for the sensory motor gate mechanisms and/or excitability enhancement of brainstem neurons responsible for SBR.

  10. Blink reflex in dyskinetic and nondyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, L M; Chacon, J; Madrazo, J; Chaparro, P; Vadillo, J

    1989-01-01

    An electrophysiological study of the blink Reflex was undertaken in 40 dyskinetic and 20 nondyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease, who were matched for age, stage of disease, duration of illness and amount and nature of antiparkinsonian medication. We found that latencies of R2 responses (both ipsilateral and contralateral) were prolonged in the dyskinetic group compared to the nondyskinetic group. Moreover, the late response was more easily inhibited by conditioning stimulation in dyskinetic patients. This behavior of late response in dyskinetic parkinsonians may be attributed to the reinstatement of dopaminergic suppressive control over the segmental multisynaptic systems belonging to the reflex.

  11. [Blink and masseter inhibitory reflexes in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Stamenović, Jelena; Djurić, Stojanka; Djurić, Vanja

    2010-03-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder with prevalence from 60 to 187 per 100 000 persons in general population. The aim of the study was to determine the abnormalities of the blink reflex (BR) and the masseter inhibitory reflex (MIR) in parkinsonian patients, as indices of the functional status of brainstem neuronal network, and abnormality level dependence on disease progression. The investigation was conducted at the Clinic of Neurology, Clinical Center Nis, comprising a group of 60 subjects of both sexes, suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease in I-IV stages, according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale. The control group included 30 healthy subjects of both sexes and corresponding age. Testing of the patients was performed during the "on" phase by registering MIR and BR. Latency of polysynaptic R2 and R2' blink reflex responses and latency of polysynaptic S2 response, as well as a silent period of MIR, are linearly shortened in the subjects with PD, and more expressed in the subsequent stages of the disease compared to the control group. There is a positive correlation between the applied neurophysiological tests results and clinical stage of PD.

  12. Blink reflex latency after exposure to trichloroethylene in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.G.; Chirico-Post, J.; Proctor, S.P.

    1988-03-01

    The electrophysiological measurement of the blink reflex (BR) can quantify the conduction latency in the reflex arc involving the Vth (trigeminal) and VIIth (facial) cranial nerves. We measured the electrophysiological BR in a population (N = 21), which had alleged chronic exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through the public drinking water at levels 30-80 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contamination Level (MCL). A highly significant difference was observed in the conduction latency means of the BR components (p less than .0001), when the study population was compared with laboratory controls (N = 27). This difference suggests a subclinical alteration of the Vth cranial nerve function due to chronic, environmental exposure to TCE.

  13. Analysis of the corneal reflex with air puff: normal controls and patient groups.

    PubMed

    Varolgüneŝ, N; Celebisoy, N; Akyürekli, O; Pehlivan, M; Akyürekli, O

    1999-09-01

    Though there are several reports published about the corneal reflex elicited by different methods, a standardized electrophysiologic study with air puff in man has not been published. The aim of this study is to standardize the corneal reflex elicited by air puff to cornea. The authors studied the corneal reflex with air puff and direct touch by using a standardized method in patients with thalamic hemorrhage (n = 15), hemispheric infarction (n = 9), brainstem infarction (n = 9), multiple sclerosis (n = 12), and Bell's palsy (n = 12) and in normal control subjects (n = 21). The conventional blink reflex (BR) was also studied. The reflex responses were recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by air puff and direct touch to cornea in addition to the electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. No statistical difference could be detected between the responses elicited by air puff or direct touch to cornea (P > 0.05). Corneal reflex responses were statistically different from the R2 response of the BR (P < 0.005). Because the responses elicited by direct touch and air puff to cornea are identical, air puff to cornea can be used confidently to study the corneal reflex.

  14. Schirmer tear test, phenol red thread tear test, eye blink frequency and corneal sensitivity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Trost, Katrin; Skalicky, M; Nell, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    To establish reference values for Schirmer tear tests (STT) I and II, phenol red thread (PRT) tear test and eye blink frequency, and to determine corneal sensitivity for normal guinea pigs. One hundred and eight eyes of 54 adult Duncan-Hartley guinea pigs. Schirmer tear test (STT) I and then STT II were performed in 36 guinea pigs. PRT and STT I were compared in 18 adult Duncan-Hartley guinea pigs. Corneal sensitivity was determined in 23 guinea pigs by evaluating the corneal touch threshold (CTT) of five different regions using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. Eye blink frequency was measured in 10 guinea pigs over a period of 20 min and in 17 guinea pigs over a period of 10 min. Mean STT I was 0.36 mm +/- 1.09 mm (wetting/min) and mean STT II was 0.43 mm +/- 1.29 mm (wetting/min). There was no significant difference between mean STT I and mean STT II (P = 0.79). The mean PRT-value was 16 +/- 4.7 mm (wetting/15 s), and the mean STT I-value in the same guinea pigs was 0.6 +/- 1.83 mm (wetting/min). Corneal sensitivity was significantly higher in the center than in the four limbal regions. The mean CTT for central, ventral, nasal, temporal and dorsal regions was 2, 1.7, 1.7, 1.7 and 1.6 cm or 3.7, 5.2, 5.6, 5.7 and 6.4 g/mm(2), respectively. Eye blink frequency was between two to five (mean 3.4 +/- 1.04) blinks per eye over 20 min in guinea pigs in their home environment, while in handheld and restrained guinea pigs eye blink frequency showed a variation between 0 and 17 blinks per eye (mean 3.24 +/- 3.64 blinks per eye) over 10 min. As there were no significant differences between STT I and STT II results, reflex tear secretion in the guinea pig may not exist. The most likely explanation is a lower corneal sensitivity in the guinea pig than in other species, such as cats, dogs and horses. Because of the small amount of tears, PRT is the preferred test for tear measurement in the guinea pig.

  15. Delayed blink reflex in dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Bonanni, Laura; Anzellotti, Francesca; Varanese, Sara; Thomas, Astrid; Manzoli, Lamberto; Onofrj, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Blink reflexes (BR) to electric stimuli of the supraorbital nerve were recorded in 26 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 26 patients with multiple system atrophy, 26 patients with Parkinson's disease, with or without REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), and in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 20 with progressive supranuclear palsy without RBD, and compared with recordings in 30 healthy controls. BR were significantly delayed (p<0.001) only in DLB patients in comparison with controls and with the other groups of patients; 14 (53.8%) patients had BR latency above 2 SD of the control mean, ranging from 36.1 to 46.3 ms. BR latency was not related to the presence of RBD, while a Spearman correlation rho of 0.68 was found for scores assessing the presence of cognitive fluctuations. R2 delay was prominently (71.5%) bilateral. PMID:17878193

  16. Fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex in patients with cerebellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Maschke, M.; Drepper, J.; Kindsvater, K.; Kolb, F.; Diener, H.; Timmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether the human cerebellum takes part in fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex.
METHODS—A group of 10 cerebellar patients (eight patients with lesions involving the medial cerebellum, two patients with circumscribed lesions of the cerebellar hemispheres) was compared with a group of 16 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The fear conditioned potentiation paradigm consisted of three phases. During the first, habituation phase subjects received 20 successive acoustic blink stimuli. In the subsequent fear conditioning phase, subjects passed through 20 paired presentations of the unconditioned fear stimulus (US; an electric shock) and the conditioned stimulus (CS; a light). Thereafter, subjects underwent the potentiation phase, which consisted of a pseudorandom order of 12 trials of the acoustic blink stimulus alone, 12 acoustic blink stimuli paired with the conditioned stimulus, and six conditioned stimuli paired with the unconditioned stimulus. The EMG of the acoustic blink reflex was recorded at the orbicularis oculi muscles. The potentiation effect was determined as the difference in normalised peak amplitude of the blink reflex evoked by pairs of CS and acoustic blink stimuli and evoked by the acoustic stimulus alone.
RESULTS—In the habituation phase, short term habituation of the acoustic blink reflex was preserved in all cerebellar patients. However, in the potentiation phase, the potentiation effect of the blink reflex was significantly reduced in patients with medial cerebellar lesions compared with the controls (mean (SD) potentiation effect (%), patients: −6.4 (15.3), controls: 21.6 (35.6)), but was within normal limits in the two patients with lateral lesions.
CONCLUSIONS—The present findings suggest that the human medial cerebellum is involved in associative learning of non-specific aversive reactions—that is, the fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex

  17. Blink reflex in 57 parkinsonian patients with correlation between the clinical and electrophysiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, L M; Chacón, J; Madrazo, J; Chaparro, P; Vadillo, J

    1988-01-01

    An electrophysiological study of the blink reflex was undertaken in 25 control subjects and in 57 patients with Parkinson's disease. An increase in the ipsilateral and contralateral late response was the most evident finding. The excitability cycle of recovery of the R2 component of the blink reflex after a prior conditioning shock was enhanced in the patients. A statistically significant correlation was established between the increase in the late response and the severity of akinesia and rigidity.

  18. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  19. Corneal Sensitivity in Tear Dysfunction and its Correlation with Clinical Parameters and Blink Rate

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Effie Z.; Lam, Peter K.; Chu, Chia-Kai; Moore, Quianta; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare corneal sensitivity in tear dysfunction due to a variety of causes using contact and non-contact esthesiometers and to evaluate correlations between corneal sensitivity, blink rate and clinical parameters. Design Comparative observational case series. Methods Ten normal and 33 subjects with tear dysfunction [meibomian gland disease (n = 11), aqueous tear deficiency (n = 10) - without (n = 7) and with (n = 3) Sjögren syndrome (SS) and conjunctivochalasis (n = 12)] were evaluated. Corneal sensitivity was measured with Cochet-Bonnet and air jet esthesiometers and blink rate by electromyelography. Eye irritation symptoms, tear meniscus height, tear break-up time (TBUT), and corneal and conjunctival dye staining were measured. Between group means were compared and correlations calculated. Results Compared with control (Cochet-Bonnet 5.45 mm, air esthesiometer 3.62 mg), mean sensory thresholds were significantly higher in aqueous tear deficiency using either Cochet-Bonnet (3.6 mm; P = 0.003) or air (11.7 mg; P = 0.046) esthesiometers, but were not significantly different in the other groups. Reduced corneal sensitivity significantly correlated with more rapid TBUT and blink rate, and greater irritation and ocular surface dye staining with one or both esthesiometers. Mean blink rates were significantly higher in both aqueous tear deficiency and conjunctivochalasis compared with control. Among all subjects, blink rate positively correlated with ocular surface staining and irritation and inversely correlated with TBUT. Conclusion Amongst conditions causing tear dysfunction, reduced corneal sensitivity is associated with greater irritation, tear instability, ocular surface disease and blink rate. Rapid blinking is associated with worse ocular surface disease and tear stability. PMID:26255576

  20. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.…

  1. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.…

  2. Modification of cornea-evoked reflex blinks in rats.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Victor M; Evinger, Craig

    2005-06-01

    Although maintaining the tear film on the cornea is the most important role of blinking, information about the organization and modification of cornea-evoked blinks is sparse. This study characterizes cornea-evoked blinks and their modification in urethane-anesthetized rats. Cornea-evoked blinks typically begin 16.2 ms after an electrical stimulus to the cornea and last an average of 50.2 ms. In anesthetized rats, the blink only occurs ipsilateral to the stimulus. In response to cornea stimulation, the orbicularis oculi EMG activity typically exhibits two bursts that correlate with the arrival of A delta and C-fiber inputs to the spinal trigeminal complex. In the paired-stimulus paradigm, suppression of the blink evoked by the second cornea stimulus occurs for interstimulus intervals less than 300 ms and is exclusively unilateral. Stimulation of the contralateral cornea does not affect subsequent blinks evoked from stimulation of the ipsilateral cornea. To determine whether activation of cornea-related neurons in the border region between the spinal trigeminal caudalis subdivision and the C1 spinal cord (Vc/C1) inhibits the second blink in the paired-stimulus paradigm, we examine the suppression of cornea-evoked blinks caused by microstimulation in this region. This suppression of orbicularis oculi EMG activity begins 8.3 ms after Vc/C1 stimulation. Activation of this region, however, is unlike suppression in the paired-stimulus paradigm because Vc/C1 activation bilaterally inhibits cornea-evoked blinks. Thus, activation of Vc/C1 is a previously unidentified mechanism for modulating cornea-evoked blinks.

  3. Circadian Change in Blink Reflex Recovery in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    UZUN, Nurten; GÜNDÜZ, Ayşegül; KARADENİZ, Derya; KIZILTAN, Meral E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is associated with dysfunction of the dopaminergic systems in the pathways that specifically link the sensory input and motor output. Keeping in mind that clinical symptomatology in RLS and cerebrospinal fluid dopamine concentrations in healthy individuals show changes throughout the day, we hypothesized that excitability of the related pathways increases during the night in RLS, and in the present study, we aimed to analyze our hypothesis by the assessment of blink reflex (BR) recovery. Methods Eleven patients with primary RLS and eight age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were included in the study. All participants underwent detailed interviews and neurological examinations. BR responses were recorded after single and paired supraorbital stimulation during the early afternoon and late at night. For double stimulation, interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 100, 300, and 500 ms were used. Daytime and nighttime investigations were separately compared between the patient and control groups (between-group analyses). In-group analyses were conducted between daytime and nighttime investigations of the patient and control groups. Results BR responses to single stimuli were normal in all participants at all sessions. R2 recovery was the highest in the patient group during nighttime investigations. In-group analysis showed a reduction of R2 recovery during the night in healthy subjects. R2 recoveries at ISIs of 300 and 500 ms at nighttime were higher in RLS patients but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion The BR circuit is less excitable during the night in healthy individuals, whereas the reduction of excitability is lost in RLS. Despite the limited number of included subjects, we suggest that the normal circadian modulation of the BR circuit is lost in RLS. PMID:28373805

  4. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  5. Comparative effects of electroacupuncture and transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Willer, J C; Roby, A; Boulu, P; Boureau, F

    1982-11-01

    The effects of low frequency (2 Hz) high intensity (10-12 mA) (electroacupuncture, EA) and of high frequency (100 Hz) low intensity (2 mA) (transcutaneous nerve stimulation, TNS) conditioning stimuli were studied on the nociceptive component (R2) of the blink reflex in normal volunteers. EA induced a progressive and moderate partially naloxone-reversible depression in the R2 response. In contrast, TNS induced a rapid and major depression in this reflex. In this latter case, naloxone failed to produce any reversal effect. These two patterns of data are discussed and further electrophysiological studies provide some evidence for two different mechanisms in the depressive effects of EA and TNS upon the nociceptive component of the blink reflex in man.

  6. Electrophysiological study of Bell palsy: electrically elicited blink reflex in assessment of prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, J; Giron, L T; Young, S M

    1976-03-01

    The electrically elicited blink reflex was tested serially in 81 patients with Bell palsy. In 56 patients, the reflex returned before excitability of the distal segment of the facial nerve was lost, indicating recovery of conduction across the involved segment before distal degeneration. These patients generally showed a good clinical recovery within a few months after onset. The reflex latency, however, was considerably prolonged during the first month, suggesting demyelination or other pathologic change. The reflex latency was reduced considerably during the second month and returned to normal levels during the third or fourth months. In the remaining 25 patients, direct response to facial nerve stimulation became unelicitable before reflex responses returned, indicating distal degeneration of the nerve. In this group of patients, clinical recovery was prolonged and generally incomplete.

  7. Blink reflex habituation in migraine and chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Avramidis, Theodoros; Bougea, Anastasia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Thomaides, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Alexandros

    2017-06-01

    ΑBSTRACT: R1 and R2 blink reflex latencies were investigated blind in 55 patients with chronic tension-type headache, 55 patients with migraine, and 55 headache-free controls. Standard electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve was applied and the response was recorded from the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi muscles. There were no R1 or R2 latency differences between the three groups. During migraine attacks we observed a statistically significant reduction of R2 amplitude and area. The main finding of our study was the elicitation of the late R2" response at different interstimulus intervals in migraine patients compared to the tension-type headache and control groups. This could be considered an indication of habituation mechanism hyperexcitability, although further investigation is needed to confirm these findings and establish the neurophysiologic basis. This study suggests that blink reflex studies can be used routinely as a non-evasive and inexpensive method for the evaluation of headache patients.

  8. Results from two research projects concerning aversion responses including the blink reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter; Dollinger, Klaus; Hofmann, Joachim

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine the safety philosophy for laser classes 2 and 2M according to the international laser standard IEC 60825-1, which is based on the existence of aversion responses including the blink reflex, two research projects have been funded by the Federal Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (FIOSH) in Germany. In total, 2,250 volunteers have been investigated in the blink-reflex study in various test situations, where a collimated beam, a divergent beam, a scanned laser line or LED irradiation have been used as a bright optical stimulus. The various test situations included, for example, a free laser beam (like that used in the case of laser adjustment), an eye-tracking system, in which visual tasks have been performed, or LEDs used as single elements or in a cluster. 796 volunteers took part in the aversion response study. Concerning the blink reflex, the mean value of the frequency has been estimated to be 18.36 % within a range extending from 13.8 % up to 36.1 % depending on various parameters and applied optical sources. Their respective influences will be explained. Aversion responses, like head and eye movements, have been found to be relatively seldom events, since only 4.65 % of volunteers showed a reaction which belonged to this category of inherent, physiological, protection reactions. The different parameters which are mainly responsible for the respective results concerning the blink reflex and aversion responses will be dealt with and explained, as they have been experimentally achieved up to now.

  9. [Abolition by naloxone of the inhibitory effect of peripheral electrical stimulation on the blink reflex].

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Willer, J C; Yamaguchi, Y

    1979-09-01

    The effects of a low frequency (2 c/sec) peripheral stimulation (electro-acupuncture, EA) on the nociceptive (R2) response of the blink reflex elicited by supra-orbital nerve stimulation (0.1 msec, 1 shock/8 sec) were studied in 10 healthy subjects. EA stimulation produced a very significant inhibition of the reflex in 8 subjects. Double-blind injection of naloxone (0.8 mg) reversed this inhibition while no signiificant change was observed with placebo. These results suggest that EA stimulation induces the release of endogenous opiates.

  10. The R3 component of the electrically elicited blink reflex is present in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Maria J; Axelrod, Felicia; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2009-01-01

    To clarify whether the R3 component of the electrically elicited blink reflex is a nociceptive response we studied two patients with congenital insensitivity to pain due to the impaired development of Adelta and C nerve fibers (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy types III and IV). We postulated that if the R3 component is a nociceptive reflex, it should be absent in these patients. The R3 responses were elicited in both sides in both the patients at all intensities, strongly suggesting that the R3 component of the blink reflex is not a nociceptive response.

  11. Effects of Visual Cortex Activation on the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  12. Exposure Stress Induces Reversible Corneal Graft Opacity in Recipients With Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Yun, Hongmin; Hendricks, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Most of the inflammation in murine herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced stromal keratitis (HSK) is due to exposure stress resulting from loss of corneal nerves and blink reflex. Corneal grafts often fail when placed on corneal beds with a history of HSK. We asked if corneal exposure contributes to the severe pathology of corneal grafts on HSV-1–infected corneal beds. Methods Herpes simplex virus type 1–infected corneas were tested for blink reflex. Opacity and vascularization were monitored in allogeneic and syngeneic corneal grafts that were transplanted to corneal beds with no blink reflex or to those that retained blink reflex in at least one quadrant following infection. Results Retention of any level of blink reflex significantly reduced inflammation in HSV-1–infected corneas. Corneal allografts placed on HSV-1–infected beds lacking corneal blink reflex developed opacity faster and more frequently than those placed on infected beds that partially or completely retained blink reflex. Corneal grafts placed on infected corneal beds with no blink reflex rapidly became opaque to a level that would be considered rejection. However, protecting these grafts from exposure by tarsorrhaphy prevented or reversed the opacity in both syngeneic and allogenic grafts. Conclusions Exposure due to HSV-1–engendered hypoesthesia causes rapid, severe, persistent, but reversible opacification of both allogeneic and syngeneic corneal grafts. This opacity should not be interpreted as immunologic rejection. Exposure stress may contribute to the high rate of corneal graft pathology in patients with recurrent HSK. PMID:28055100

  13. Tear-film lipid layer morphology and corneal sensation in the development of blinking in neonates and infants

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, John G; Birhah, Rosalind; Murphy, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of lipid layer thickness and corneal sensation in the development of blinking in neonates. The study group comprised sixty-four neonates and infants (mean age 27.5 ± 15 (sd) weeks, range 3.4–52) whose mothers were attending a general practice healthy baby clinic. Spontaneous eye-blink activity was determined from digital videographic recordings; tear film lipid layer morphology wasexamined using interference patterns produced by the Keeler Tearscope™ Plus over a five-point grading scale (higher grades are associated with thick and stable lipid films); corneal sensation threshold was assessed with the Non-Contact Corneal Aesthesiometer (NCCA), using the eye-blink response as an objective indication that the cooling stimulus had been felt; palpebral aperture dimensions were measured using calibrated digital still images of the eye in the primary position. The overall mean spontaneous blink-rate was found to be 3.6 (± 0.3) blinks min−1, and the mean interblink time was 21.6 (± 2.8) s. The lowest blink-rates were observed in the 0–17-week age group (average 2 blinks min−1). The blink-rate showed a highly significant correlation with age (r = 0.46, P < 0.01). The overall mean lipid layer grading was 3.6 (± 0.2 SE) arbitrary units. Higher grades were found in the newborn and the mean grading score reduced with age (P < 0.01). The mean sensation threshold to blink (TTB) was 0.69 (0.04 SE) mbar, which did not differ from a control group of older subjects (P > 0.05). There was a rapid increase in palpebral aperture length and width from birth to 1 year old, with surface area increasing by 50% over the same period. We concluded that the low rate of spontaneous eye blink activity in neonates is associated with a thick stable lipid layer that may be a function of a small palpebral aperture. Furthermore, neonates appear to have the capacity to detect ocular surface cooling, which is a major trigger for spontaneous

  14. Blink reflex in subjects with different hypnotizability: New findings for an old debate.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Briscese, Lucia; Capitani, Simone; Orsini, Paolo; Varanini, Maurizio; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Hypnotizability is associated with attentional characteristics whose neurophysiological bases are still under debate. Aim of the study was the assessment of possible hypnotizability-related differences in blink reflex (BR) which has a nociceptive component, is sensitive to attentional-emotional traits and states and is modulated by the brain dopamine content. In 10 high (highs) and 10 low hypnotizable participants (lows) BR was induced by electrical nociceptive stimulation of the right supraorbital nerve in the absence (noW) and in the presence of a visual cue preceding the electrical stimulation by 0.1ms (W01) and by 1ms (W1). The studied variables were: the amplitude of BR components (R1, R2, R3), the amplitude of the quick change (TO) of heart rate ("turbulence") induced by stimulation and its recovery slope (TS), the role of the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation System (BIS/BAS) in the variability BR and cardiac turbulence. Repeated measures ANOVA did not show any significant difference between highs and lows in blink reflex. TO indicated stimulation related HR increase in highs and decrease in lows, TS was larger in highs. BIS and BAS accounted for the warning effects on the BR amplitude and modulated the hypnotizability and warning effects on TO and TS. Findings do not support dopamine based hypnotizability-related attentional abilities. In contrast, they indicate that hypnotizability modulates the short-lasting cardiac response to electrical nociceptive stimulation.

  15. Effect of hypnosis on pain and blink reflexes in patients with painful temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Randi; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2011-05-01

    This study contrasted the effect of hypnosis on self-reported pain and changes in a nociceptive brainstem reflex, the blink reflex (BR), in 39 women with temporomandibular disorder. The patients were randomized to hypnosis or control (nonhypnotic relaxation). Pain intensity was assessed 3 times daily on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. BRs were elicited by electrical stimulation with a nociceptive-specific electrode and recorded before and after treatment at pain threshold (Ip) and supra threshold (2×Ip). Significant reduction of pain intensity was observed in the hypnosis group from 4.5±2.1 at baseline to 2.9±2.4 after treatment (P<0.001). The pain reduction was generally unrelated to changes in the BR, with the exception being a lowered ipsilateral R2 BR component at the right side supra threshold (P=0.034). Hypnosis thus seems to reduce complex temporomandibular disorder pain, most likely because of cortical changes with little, if any, involvement of brainstem reflex pathways.

  16. High-flow oxygen therapy in cluster headache patients has no significant effect on nociception specific blink reflex parameters: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haane, D Y P; Plaum, A; Koehler, P J; Houben, M P W A

    2016-01-01

    The exact pathophysiology of cluster headache is unclear. We examined the influence of interneurons on the trigemino-facial reflex arch and the effect of oxygen, by using the nociception specific blink reflex parameters. There is no significant effect of oxygen, immediately and over time, on the nociception specific blink reflex parameters in ten male patients during the active phase of cluster headache, outside attacks. Also, there is no significant difference between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side. None of the subjects experienced a cluster headache attack during study participation. We therefore present the collected data as reference values of nociception specific trigeminal stimulation and the effect of oxygen on nociception specific blink reflex parameters. The nociception specific blink reflex seems not a suitable instrument for exploring the pathophysiology of cluster headache.

  17. Nociception specific supraorbital nerve stimulation may prevent cluster headache attacks: serendipity in a blink reflex study.

    PubMed

    Haane, Danielle Y P; Koehler, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    In cluster headache, neuromodulation is offered when patients are refractory to pharmacological prophylaxis. Non-invasive peripheral neuromodulatory approaches are of interest. We will focus on these and particularly on nociception specific, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation. In a study using the nociception specific blink reflex, we made a serendipitous discovery, notably the potential prophylactic effect of bilateral, time contingent, nociception specific, transcutaneous stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. We report on a case series of seven cluster headache patients, in whom attacks seemed to disappear during repeated stimulation of the supraorbital nerves. Three patients stopped experiencing attacks since study participation. Bilateral, time contingent, nociception specific, transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation may have a prophylactic effect in episodic and chronic cluster headache. Given its limited side effects and its non-invasive nature, further studies to investigate this potential peripheral neuromodulatory approach for both episodic and chronic cluster headache are warranted. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Zolmitriptan reverses blink reflex changes induced during the migraine attack in humans.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-07-28

    The question about the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B-1D) receptors agonists, if the clinical efficacy in migraine attacks is linked with the action at the central level or at the peripheral one, is still unresolved. We evaluated the effects of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan on blink reflex in thirty migraine without aura patients during the attacks in order to assess the central action on the trigeminal system. Both drugs were effective in reducing headache severity compared to placebo. In the migraine attack an increased area of the R3 component on the pain side was observed; it was suppressed by zolmitriptan, which confirmed its action on the central trigeminal circuits, though the clinical relevance of this effect could be questioned.

  19. There is still a role for the blink reflex in the diagnosis and follow-up of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Jardim, Marcia Rodrigues; Papais-Alvarenga, Regina Maria; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) has essentially evolved to clinical manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging. Inexpensive, quick to apply, non-invasive, quantitative and reliable neurophysiological tests are rare in daily practice and absent in clinical trials. The blink reflex was assessed in 50 patients with remitting-relapsing MS (RRMS) and 100 matched controls. Patients with RRMS had abnormalities in the blink reflex waves in relation to controls. If only RRMS patients were considered, these abnormalities were more pronounced in patients with longer disease duration, higher disability and for those with clinical or image lesions in the brainstem. Neurophysiological tests, such as the blink reflex, can be used for helping the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with RRMS, since the reflex can identify dissemination in time and in space in a clear and quantitative manner. Potential good methods for diagnosis and follow-up of MS should be considered for clinical trials and daily practice. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Usefulness of blink reflex in hypothyroid patients with or without polyneuropathy: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sachin; Udan, Vikas; Jain, Jyoti; Shende, Vinod; Singh, Ramji

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is an important consequence of thyroid deficiency. Cranial nerves are frequently affected in hypothyroid process. On routine nerve conduction studies, symptomatic peripheral and cranial neuropathy can be detected, however, diagnosing subclinical cranial neuropathy pose the major problem. Blink reflex (BR), has been shown to be an effective method for revealing subclinical involvement of cranial nerves in generalized neuropathies. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of BR as a method for early diagnosis of subclinical cranial neuropathy in hypothyroid patients with or without overt peripheral polyneuropathy. A case control study was conducted on 150 subjects aged 18 years and above (100 controls, 50 cases). A routine nerve conduction study and BR evaluation was done in all the subjects. We found abnormal BR response in 50% of hypothyroid patients studied. In hypothyroid patient without polyneuropathy R1 latency was significantly prolonged (P < 0.05 Vs control). Ipsilateral and contralateral R2 latencies were significantly prolonged in hypothyroid cases with or without polyneuropathy on bilateral stimulation. Magnitude of prolongation was greater in with polyneuropathy group. In conclusion, study suggests that BR is a useful non-invasive method for the detection of clinically silent cranial nerve compromise in hypothyroid patients.

  1. The three responses of the blink reflex in adult and juvenile migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2000-06-01

    Recent theories about migraine pathogenesis have emphasized the role of the trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of migraine attacks (Moskowitz, 1997). The blink reflex (BR) could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine, as it is generally elicited by stimulation of the trigeminal ophthalmic division (Kimura et al., 1967), involved in migraine attacks. Sixty one adult and 15 juvenile migraine without aura subjects were selected, in order to evaluate the BR features, including the subjective perceptive and pain thresholds and the R1, R2 and R3 components intensity thresholds and amplitudes. The electrophysiological procedure was carried out during the pain free phase. The findings were compared with those of 28 healthy controls, 18 adults and 10 children. In both adult and juvenile migraine sufferers an early appearance of the R3 response at almost the R2 threshold was observed in comparison with age-matched controls. Unfortunately, the anatomic and physiologic organization of the R3 component is uncertain: its early onset could suggest a dysfunction of the inhibitory control system on the trigeminal networks, which may predispose to migraine attacks.

  2. Assessment of Blink Reflex in Genetic Generalized Epilepsy Patients With Eyelid Myoclonia.

    PubMed

    Altıokka-Uzun, Güneş; Ekizoğlu, Esme; Kocasoy-Orhan, Elif; Bebek, Nerses; Gürses, Candan; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Öge, Ali Emre; Baykan, Betül

    2017-03-01

    Eyelid myoclonia (EM) with or without absences are a rare type of generalized seizures associated with a variety of epilepsy syndromes with an unknown pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible contribution of the brainstem structures in this underrecognized special type of seizures. Sixteen consecutive patients with EM, diagnosed with genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) according to International League Against Epilepsy 2010 criteria were included. Brainstem excitabilities were examined by blink reflex (BR) studies. The results of BR studies in GGE patients with EM were statistically compared with 2 control groups; namely age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) patients without any absences and using similar antiepileptic drugs. There were no statistical differences between the thresholds of the BR studies and the BR recovery curves in terms of amplitudes and areas of healthy subjects, JME patients and GGE patients with EM. Our findings do not support a profound interictal hyperexcitability in the BR-related brainstem structures of the GGE patients with EM. It can be considered that EM may be associated with excitability changes of the occipital cortex and other cortical areas.

  3. A high-resolution binocular video-oculography system: assessment of pupillary light reflex and detection of an early incomplete blink and an upward eye movement.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Julián; Roig, Ana Belén; Pérez, Jorge; Mas, David

    2015-03-13

    The pupillary light reflex characterizes the direct and consensual response of the eye to the perceived brightness of a stimulus. It has been used as indicator of both neurological and optic nerve pathologies. As with other eye reflexes, this reflex constitutes an almost instantaneous movement and is linked to activation of the same midbrain area. The latency of the pupillary light reflex is around 200 ms, although the literature also indicates that the fastest eye reflexes last 20 ms. Therefore, a system with sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolutions is required for accurate assessment. In this study, we analyzed the pupillary light reflex to determine whether any small discrepancy exists between the direct and consensual responses, and to ascertain whether any other eye reflex occurs before the pupillary light reflex. We constructed a binocular video-oculography system two high-speed cameras that simultaneously focused on both eyes. This was then employed to assess the direct and consensual responses of each eye using our own algorithm based on Circular Hough Transform to detect and track the pupil. Time parameters describing the pupillary light reflex were obtained from the radius time-variation. Eight healthy subjects (4 women, 4 men, aged 24-45) participated in this experiment. Our system, which has a resolution of 15 microns and 4 ms, obtained time parameters describing the pupillary light reflex that were similar to those reported in previous studies, with no significant differences between direct and consensual reflexes. Moreover, it revealed an incomplete reflex blink and an upward eye movement at around 100 ms that may correspond to Bell's phenomenon. Direct and consensual pupillary responses do not any significant temporal differences. The system and method described here could prove useful for further assessment of pupillary and blink reflexes. The resolution obtained revealed the existence reported here of an early incomplete blink and an

  4. Discharge profiles of abducens, accessory abducens, and orbicularis oculi motoneurons during reflex and conditioned blinks in alert cats.

    PubMed

    Trigo, J A; Gruart, A; Delgado-García, J M

    1999-04-01

    The discharge profiles of identified abducens, accessory abducens, and orbicularis oculi motoneurons have been recorded extra- and intracellularly in alert behaving cats during spontaneous, reflexively evoked, and classically conditioned eyelid responses. The movement of the upper lid and the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle also were recorded. Animals were conditioned by short, weak air puffs or 350-ms tones as conditioned stimuli (CS) and long, strong air puffs as unconditioned stimulus (US) using both trace and delayed conditioning paradigms. Motoneurons were identified by antidromic activation from their respective cranial nerves. Orbicularis oculi and accessory abducens motoneurons fired an early, double burst of action potentials (at 4-6 and 10-16 ms) in response to air puffs or to the electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. Orbicularis oculi, but not accessory abducens, motoneurons fired in response to flash and tone presentations. Only 10-15% of recorded abducens motoneurons fired a late, weak burst after air puff, supraorbital nerve, and flash stimulations. Spontaneous fasciculations of the orbicularis oculi muscle and the activity of single orbicularis oculi motoneurons that generated them also were recorded. The activation of orbicularis oculi motoneurons during the acquisition of classically conditioned eyelid responses happened in a gradual, sequential manner. Initially, some putative excitatory synaptic potentials were observed in the time window corresponding to the CS-US interval; by the second to the fourth conditioning session, some isolated action potentials appeared that increased in number until some small movements were noticed in eyelid position traces. No accessory abducens motoneuron fired and no abducens motoneuron modified their discharge rate for conditioned eyelid responses. The firing of orbicularis oculi motoneurons was related linearly to lid velocity during reflex blinks but to lid position during

  5. Effects of brain-stem and thalamic lesions on the corneal reflex: an electrophysiological and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Moffie, D

    1979-09-01

    In 9 patients with Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome, one patient with a midbrain lesion involving the right side of the tegmentum, and 2 patients with a thalamic lesion, corneal reflexes were investigated by a new electromyographic technique. The electrophysical results were compared with the results obtained by clinical observation. In the lateral medullary lesions the electrophysiologically obtained reflex responses showed four types of abnormality. Type A consisted of a bilateral delay and type B a bilateral absence of the corneal reflex response to stimulation on the affected side in combination with a normal reflex response on both sides when the cornea on the normal side was stimulated. Type C, which was present in one case, and type D which was seen in 3 cases, consisted of a bilateral absence of the corneal reflex upon stimulation on the affected side; stimulation on the unaffected side produced a normal reflex response on the intact side in combination with, respectively, a delay or absence of the corneal reflex response on the affected side. Comparison of the clinical observations with the electrophysiological findings revealed minor discrepancies in type A and B abnormalities. However, the electrophysiological type C and D abnormalities were not detected by clinical observation. These findings demonstrate that electrophysiological recording of the corneal reflex may reveal clinically undetectable abnormalities. From the electrophysiological findings it is concluded that the corneal reflex is conducted along medullary pathways running both ipsilaterally and contralaterally from the stimulated side before connecting, respectively, with the ipsilateral and contralateral facial nucleus. From the anatomical findings it is suggested that the ascending pathways from the spinal fifth nerve complex to the facial nuclei are located in the lateral reticular formation of the lower brain-stem. The normal corneal reflex responses in the presence of thalamic and

  6. SOME PROPERTIES OF THE AFFERENT PATHWAY IN THE FROG CORNEAL REFLEX,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    evidence on the neurological basis of stimulus specificity. The frog corneal reflex is particularly well suited for this type of study, since the stimulus...conducted on normal adult frogs . The results provide a new basis for study of animals with transplanted sensory tissue. (Author)

  7. Heterosynaptic long-term depression of craniofacial nociception: divergent effects on pain perception and blink reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Yekta, Sareh Said; Lamp, Susanne; Ellrich, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Noxious low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of presynaptic nerve fibers induces long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In vitro studies suggest a sole homosynaptic effect. Consequently, the present study addressed the hypothesis that LTD of craniofacial nociception in man is mediated by a homosynaptic mechanism. Nociceptive supraorbital afferents were excited by electric pulses via a concentric electrode in ten healthy volunteers. The electrically evoked bilateral blink reflex (BR) was recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by surface electrodes. The BR was evoked in blocks of ten electric stimuli each (0.1 Hz) with an interblock interval of 8 min. Conditioning noxious LFS (1 Hz, 20 min) was applied via concentric electrode either to the same site as BR test stimuli (ipsilateral) or to the corresponding contralateral forehead area (contralateral). LFS and test stimulus intensities corresponded to about threefold the pain threshold. After three baseline stimulus blocks, either conditioning ipsilateral or contralateral LFS were applied or stimulation was interrupted for 20 min as a control task. Afterwards, test stimulation blocks were continued for 40 min. Each volunteer participated in all three sessions on different days. Noxious LFS induced LTD of the BR independently from the side of conditioning stimulation. Pain perception decreased after ipsilateral LFS but not after contralateral LFS. The bilateral effect of noxious LFS on the BR provides evidence for heterosynaptic LTD based on bilateral projections of supraorbital nerve afferents onto spinal trigeminal nuclei. The divergent effect on pain perception may be due to a preferential contralateral projection of nociceptive afferents onto reflex interneurons but not onto trigeminothalamic projection neurons.

  8. Blink rate, incomplete blinks and computer vision syndrome.

    PubMed

    Portello, Joan K; Rosenfield, Mark; Chu, Christina A

    2013-05-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS), a highly prevalent condition, is frequently associated with dry eye disorders. Furthermore, a reduced blink rate has been observed during computer use. The present study examined whether post task ocular and visual symptoms are associated with either a decreased blink rate or a higher prevalence of incomplete blinks. An additional trial tested whether increasing the blink rate would reduce CVS symptoms. Subjects (N = 21) were required to perform a continuous 15-minute reading task on a desktop computer at a viewing distance of 50 cm. Subjects were videotaped during the task to determine their blink rate and amplitude. Immediately after the task, subjects completed a questionnaire regarding ocular symptoms experienced during the trial. In a second session, the blink rate was increased by means of an audible tone that sounded every 4 seconds, with subjects being instructed to blink on hearing the tone. The mean blink rate during the task without the audible tone was 11.6 blinks per minute (SD, 7.84). The percentage of blinks deemed incomplete for each subject ranged from 0.9 to 56.5%, with a mean of 16.1% (SD, 15.7). A significant positive correlation was observed between the total symptom score and the percentage of incomplete blinks during the task (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was noted between the blink score and symptoms (p = 0.035). Increasing the mean blink rate to 23.5 blinks per minute by means of the audible tone did not produce a significant change in the symptom score. Whereas CVS symptoms are associated with a reduced blink rate, the completeness of the blink may be equally significant. Because instructing a patient to increase his or her blink rate may be ineffective or impractical, actions to achieve complete corneal coverage during blinking may be more helpful in alleviating symptoms during computer operation.

  9. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  10. Corneal neurotization: a novel technique for the anesthetic cornea.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Dryer, Marylou M; Bodner, Bruce I

    2010-07-01

    This report describes and evaluates the efficacy of a novel procedure, direct corneal neurotization using contralateral, supraorbital, and supratrochlear nerves in patients with unilateral facial palsy and corneal anesthesia. The charts of 6 patients were thoroughly reviewed. Evaluated outcome parameters included corneal sensibility, improvement in best-corrected visual acuity, blink reflex, donor deficit, synesthesia, long-term corneal health, several psychosocial measures, and overall patient satisfaction. The mean age at time of surgery in our study was 41.7 +/- 9.07 years. Average time from denervation to surgery was 7.00 +/- 8.56 years with an average follow-up time of 16.3 +/- 2.42 years. After surgery, all 6 eyes showed improvement of corneal sensibility, visual acuity, and corneal health and remained free of ulcers without adjunctive surgical treatment. Average time to sensibility was 2.80 +/- 2.17 years, and average corneal sensibility improved from 2.00 +/- 4.47 mm before surgery to 27.8 +/- 22.6 mm after corneal neurotization (P < 0.016). Direct neurotization of the cornea using the contralateral, supraorbital, and supratrochlear branches of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve seems to be an effective method for restoration of corneal sensibility in patients with unilateral facial palsy and anesthetic cornea. This procedure preserves ocular anatomy and cosmesis while restoring function by improving corneal health and visual acuity and by reestablishing the blink reflex.

  11. Asymmetry of Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Iris S.; Evinger, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Too investigate asymmetry in eyelid movements with blinking, the stability of the asymmetry, and its modifiability in normal humans. Methods Differences in the start time and amplitude between the two eyelids were assessed for voluntary blinks and reflex blinks evoked by supraorbital trigeminal nerve stimulation. These variables were also measured before and up to 18 months after 2 hours of unilateral upper lid restraint. Results With voluntary blinks, one eyelid consistently began to close earlier and made a larger eyelid movement than the other eyelid. Stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve evoked relatively larger amplitude blinks in one eyelid that correlated with the asymmetries of voluntary blinks. There was a continuum of eyelid asymmetry across all subjects that was stable and independent of other biological asymmetries, such as handedness. Briefly reducing eyelid mobility created a long-lasting change in eyelid asymmetry with blinking. Conclusions Eyelid asymmetry results from differences in the excitability of motoneurons in the left and right facial motor nuclei and does not appear to involve asymmetries in cortical inputs to the brain stem. Because adaptive processes modify the motoneuron excitability that creates eyelid asymmetry, these processes may underlie changes in blinking associated with facial palsy and may play a role in the development of disorders that affect one side of the face, such as hemifacial spasm. PMID:16384962

  12. Correlation between corneal sensitivity and quantity of reflex tearing in cows, horses, goats, sheep, dogs, cats, rabbits, and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Barbara; Tichy, Alexander; Nell, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Guinea pigs have a very low threshold of corneal sensitivity and at the same time nearly no reflex tearing compared to dogs, cats, and horses. The question arose whether there is a general correlation between corneal sensitivity and the quantity of reflex tearing. Totally 160 animals of 8 different species (20 animals per species) were investigated. The corneal touch threshold (CTT) was measured with a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. The palpebral fissure length (PFL) was measured with a calliper ruler. The Schirmer tear test (STT) was modified by adapting the width of the STT strip to the PFL of every species. For the STT II, 0.4% oxybuprocaine was applied. Corneal touch threshold: Cows (1.67 g/mm(2)), horses (1.23 g/mm(2)), sheep (1.13 g/mm(2)), goats (1.44 g/mm(2)), dogs (2.16 g/mm(2)), and cats (1.33 g/mm(2)) show similar CTT values. In contrast, rabbits (6.21 g/mm(2)) and guinea pigs (7.75 g/mm(2)) show a significantly lower CTT. Tear Production Difference STT I - STT II: Rabbits have the greatest decline in tear production with 38.4%, followed by sheep (33.3%), dogs (31.1%), cats (24.7%), cows (23.7%), horses (18.0%), and goats (14.0%). Guinea pigs have no decline, but a slight increase of -16.0%. Correlation CTT and STT II - STT I Difference: Pearson's correlation coefficient shows a small, but significant correlation. The coefficient of determination can only forecast a value with 7.1% certainty. The high variance and low reproducibility of results suggest that the measuring devices are inappropriate to assess the evaluated parameters. Therefore, no assured correlation between the corneal sensitivity and the quantity of reflex tearing could be found. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Corneal neurotization: a novel solution to neurotrophic keratopathy.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Dryer, Marylou M; Bodner, Bruce I

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of direct corneal neurotization using contralateral supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves in patients with unilateral facial palsy and corneal anesthesia. A novel surgical procedure in which these donor nerve branches are inserted at the contralateral anesthetic corneal limbus for sensory neurotization is described. The charts of six patients were reviewed thoroughly to evaluate changes in corneal sensibility following surgery for direct corneal neurotization. Visual acuity, blink reflex, donor deficit, synesthesia, long-term corneal health, and several psychosocial measures and overall patient satisfaction with the procedure are reported. Six patients with an average denervation time of 7.00 +/- 8.56 years before surgery were followed for an average period of 16.3 +/- 2.42 years. All six eyes showed improvement of corneal sensibility, visual acuity, and corneal health and remained free of ulcers or other signs of advancing neurotropic keratopathy. Average corneal sensibility improved from 2.00 +/- 4.47 mm before surgery to 278.00 +/- 226.00 mm following corneal neurotization (p < 0.016). Direct neurotization of the cornea using the contralateral supraorbital and supratrochlear branches of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve appears to be an effective method of restoring the corneal sensibility in patients with unilateral facial palsy and anesthetic cornea. This technique preserves ocular anatomy and cosmesis and restores function by improving corneal health and visual acuity.

  14. Conditioned Eyelid Movement Is not a Blink

    PubMed Central

    Schade Powers, Alice; Coburn-Litvak, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Based on kinematic properties and distinct substrates, there are different classes of eyelid movement described as eyeblinks. We investigate whether the eyelid movements made in response to a conditioned stimulus (CS) are a category of eyelid movements distinct from blinks. Human subjects received 60 trials of classical eyelid conditioning with a tone as the CS and electrical stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Before and after training, reflex blinks were elicited with the UCS. The kinematics of conditioned responses (CRs) differed significantly from those of reflex blinks. The slope of the amplitude-maximum velocity function was steeper for reflex blinks than for CRs, and reflex blink duration was significantly shorter than CR duration. Unlike reflex blinks, for which maximum velocity was independent of blink duration, the maximum velocity of CRs depended on CR duration. These quantitative and qualitative differences indicated that CRs were a unique class of eyelid movements distinct from blinks and eyelid movements with vertical saccadic gaze shifts. PMID:19939960

  15. Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also investigate whether 130-Hz subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) affects blink abnormalities, as it does in PD patients. Like PD patients, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit reflex blink hyperexcitability, impaired blink plasticity, and a reduced spontaneous blink rate. At 130 Hz, but not 16 Hz, STN DBS eliminates reflex blink hyperexcitability and restores both short- and long-term blink plasticity. Replicating its lack of effect in PD patients, 130-Hz STN DBS does not reinstate a normal temporal pattern or rate to spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These data show that the 6-OHDA lesioned rat is an ideal model system for investigating the neural bases of reflex abnormalities in PD and highlight the complexity of PD's effects on motor control, by showing that dopamine depletion does not affect all blink systems via the same neural mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  17. Corneal Nerves in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Brittany; Bakir, May; Jain, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Corneal nerves are responsible for the sensations of touch, pain, and temperature and play an important role in the blink reflex, wound healing, and tear production and secretion. Corneal nerve dysfunction is a frequent feature of diseases that cause opacities and result in corneal blindness. Corneal opacities rank as the second most frequent cause of blindness. Technological advances in in vivo corneal nerve imaging, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal scanning, have generated new knowledge regarding the phenomenological events that occur during reinnervation of the cornea following disease, injury, or surgery. The recent availability of transgenic neurofluorescent murine models has stimulated the search for molecular modulators of corneal nerve regeneration. New evidence suggests that neuro-regenerative and inflammatory pathways in the cornea are intertwined. Evidence-based treatment of neurotrophic corneal diseases includes using neuro-regenerative (blood component-based and neurotrophic factors), neuroprotective, and ensconcing (bandage contact lens and amniotic membrane) strategies and avoiding anti-inflammatory therapies, such as cyclosporine and corticosteroids. PMID:24461367

  18. Effect of topical administration of tramadol on corneal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Cuvas Apan, Ozgun; Ozer, Murat Atabey; Takir, Selcuk; Apan, Alparslan; Sengul, Demet

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of topical tramadol administration on corneal wound healing, and examine ophthalmic structures and intraocular pressure 7 days after tramadol administration. The experiments were conducted on eight male Wistar rats (250-300 g). After ophthalmic examination, epithelial cell layers in the central cornea were wounded. Rats received 30 μL of tramadol hydrochloride in one eye (Group Tramadol) and the same volume of vehicle in the other (Group Control) every 12 h for 7 days. Both eyes were stained with fluorescein dye, photographed, and wound area was calculated every 8 h until complete healing was observed. Eye blink frequency and corneal reflex tests were measured before and after drug administrations. After 7 days, slit lamp biomicroscopy, fundoscopy, Goldmann applanation tonometry, and histological evaluation were performed. There was no difference in the corneal wound healing rates between the tramadol and control groups. Reduction in wound area over time was also similar; group-time interaction was insignificant (F = 738.911; p = 0.225). Tramadol application resulted in blinking and blepharospasm for 30 s, but vehicle did not. Corneal reflex was intact and eye blink frequency test results were similar in all measurement times in both groups. Slit lamp biomicroscopy, fundoscopy, and intraocular pressures were within normal range. Corneal cells appeared unaffected by the repeated doses of tramadol for 7 days. Topical tramadol application on the cornea did not cause any side effect, except for initial temporary blinking and blepharospasm. Corneal wound healing was not affected, either.

  19. Characterizing The Spontaneous Blink Generator: An Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Powers, Alice S.; Horn, Kyle G.; Hui, Channing; Evinger, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Although spontaneous blinking is one of the most frequent human movements, little is known about its neural basis. We developed a rat model of spontaneous blinking in order to identify and better characterize the spontaneous blink generator. We monitored spontaneous blinking for 55 min periods in normal conditions and after the induction of mild dry eye or dopaminergic drug challenges. The normal spontaneous blink rate was 5.3 ± 0.3 blinks/min. Dry eye or 1 mg/kg apomorphine significantly increased and 0.1 mg/kg haloperidol significantly decreased the blink rate. Additional analyses revealed a consistent temporal organization to spontaneous blinking with a median 750 s period that was independent of the spontaneous blink rate. Dry eye and dopaminergic challenges significantly modified the regularity of the normal pattern of episodes of frequent blinking interspersed with intervals having few blinks. Dry eye and apomorphine enhanced the regularity of this pattern, whereas haloperidol reduced its regularity. The simplest explanation for our data is that the spinal trigeminal complex is a critical element in the generation of spontaneous blinks; incorporating reflex blinks from dry eye and indirect basal ganglia inputs into the blink generator. Although human subjects exhibited a higher average blink rate (17.6 ± 2.4) than rats, the temporal pattern of spontaneous blinking was qualitatively similar for both species. These data demonstrate that rats are an appropriate model for investigating the neural basis of human spontaneous blinking and suggest that the spinal trigeminal complex is a major element in the spontaneous blink generator. PMID:21813686

  20. Frequency-Dependent Habituation Deficit of the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Aura With Migraine Headache. Can Migraine Aura Modulate Trigeminal Excitability?

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Armando; Anastasio, Maria Grazia; De Icco, Roberto; Coppola, Gianluca; Ambrosini, Anna; Serrao, Mariano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of the migraine aura on the trigeminal nociception, we investigated the habituation of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) R2 responses in aura with migraine headache (AwMH) and comparatively in migraine without aura (MWoA) and healthy subjects (HS). A clear deficit of habituation in trigeminal nociceptive responses has been documented in MWoA; however, similar data in MWA are lacking. Seventeen AwMH, 29 MWoA, and 30 HS were enrolled and a nonrandomized clinical neurophysiological study examining nBR habituation by clinical diagnosis was devised. We delivered a series of 26 electrical stimuli, at different stimulation frequencies (SF) (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 Hz), subsequently subdivided in five blocks of five responses for each SF. The mean area values of the second to the fifth block expressed as the percentage of the mean area value of the first block were taken as an index of habituation for each SF. A significant lower mean percentage decrease of the R2 area across all blocks was found at 1, 0.5, 0.3, and 0.2 Hz SF in MWoA and at 0.3 and 0.2 Hz SF in AwMH, when compared to HS. In the most representative fifth block of responses, we found in MWoA vs HS at 1 Hz, 57.0 ± 27.8 vs 30.6 ± 12.0; at 0.5 Hz, 54.8 ± 26.1 vs 32.51 ± 17.7; at 0.3 Hz, 44.7 ± 21.6 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 61.3 ± 29.5 vs 32.6 ± 18.0, and in AwMH vs HS at 0.3 Hz, 52.7 ± 24.7 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 69.3 ± 38.6 vs 32.6 ± 18.0 as mean ± SD of the R2 area percentage of the first block, respectively. Interestingly, AwMH subjects did not show differences in mean percentage decrease of the R2 area at 1 and 0.5 Hz SF when compared to HS. No differences between groups were found at 0.1 and 0.05 Hz SF. We demonstrated in AwMH a deficit of habituation of the nBR R2 responses after repeated stimulations, although less pronounced than that observed in MWoA of comparable clinical severity. We hypothesize

  1. Capsaicin effects on blinking.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Leon-S, Marta E

    2005-09-01

    Blinking is a normal human phenomenon involving trigeminal and facial pathways. To gain understanding on the neurobiology of blinking, five normal subjects were investigated before and after application of transdermal capsaicin at the forehead for two weeks. No effects of topical capsaicin were detected in eye blink rates. However, when capsaicin was applied to a female subject with blepharospasm, she showed a dramatic restoration of her vision subsequent to blinking modification. Deactivation of abnormal A-to-C fibers cross talks at the trigeminal-facial pathways seems to be the most likely mechanism of such improvement.

  2. Somatosensory-evoked blink response: investigation of the physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Nohara, C; Hotta, M; Shimo, Y; Amemiya, K

    1998-02-01

    The somatosensory-evoked blink response (SBR) is a newly identified blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The present study was performed to investigate the physiological mechanism underlying the SBR elicited by median nerve stimulation in normal subjects. The peripheral afferents responsible for the SBR included low-threshold cutaneous fibres. In the SBR-positive subjects, the late (R2) component of the blink reflex elicited by supraorbital nerve stimulation and the SBR facilitated each other when both responses were induced at the same time, but they each caused long-lasting inhibition in the other when one stimulus was given as a conditioning stimulus. The extent of inhibition was correlated with the size of the preceding SBR. In the SBR-negative subjects, simultaneous inhibition of R2 was observed when median nerve stimulation was applied as a conditioning stimulus. Brainstem excitability, as evaluated by blink-reflex recovery studies, did not differ between SBR-positive and SBR-negative subjects. Therefore, based on anatomical and physiological findings, it appears that the reflex pathways of the SBR and R2 converge within the brainstem and compete with each other, presumably by presynaptic inhibition at the premotor level, before entering the common blink-reflex pathway. The influence of median nerve stimulation upon tonic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle was studied to detect the latent SBR. There was not only a facilitatory period corresponding to the SBR but also an active inhibitory period (exteroceptive suppression), suggesting that the mechanism generating the SBR is not only influenced by blink-reflex volleys but also by active exteroceptive suppression. Thus, the SBR may appear as a result of integration of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms within the brainstem.

  3. Blink Animation Software to Improve Blinking and Dry Eye Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nosch, Daniela S; Foppa, Curdin; Tóth, Mike; Joos, Roland E

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate if the animation "blink blink" increases blink rate and improves dry eye symptoms during prolonged computer use. Study part A: Blink rate was recorded at baseline and during computer work of normal subjects without symptoms of dry eye. Half of the subjects used "blink blink," instructed to blink on animation appearance; the other half used a placebo version for 1 week during computer use. Thereafter, blink rate was recorded again with the use of "blink blink." Study part B: Blink rate was recorded during computer work with dry eye symptoms (modified Ocular Surface Disease Index > 15.0). Subjects used the test and placebo version of "blink blink" each for 1 week (1 week washout; crossover) and were instructed to blink twice on presentation of the animation. Blink rate and dry eye symptoms were assessed after each phase and compared with baseline. Study part A: Ten subjects participated (mean [± SD] age, 38.3 [± 16.0] years; 5 women). A greater increase in blink rate was observed in the test group (5.62 blinks/min for the test group and 0.96 blinks/min for the control group). Study part B: Twenty-four subjects participated (mean [± SD] age, 39.3 [± 19.1] years; 11 women). Dry eye symptoms improved during both phases (with test and placebo) to a statistically significant degree (each, p < 0.001). This difference was more marked with the test (-5.42 [± 2.86] points) compared with the placebo version (-1.79 [± 1.38] points). Blink rate increased with the program by 6.75 (± 3.80) blinks/min (p < 0.001), compared with 0.50 (± 2.83) blinks/min with placebo (p = 0.396). This difference between test and placebo was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Twenty of the 24 subjects could tolerate "blink blink" well during computer use. Blink rate and dry eye symptoms improved with "blink blink." The double blink prompted by the animation allowed a decrease in number of presentations and improved acceptance of "blink blink."

  4. Eye Movements Blink the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamienkowski, Juan E.; Navajas, Joaquin; Sigman, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    When presented with a sequence of visual stimuli in rapid succession, participants often fail to detect a second salient target, a phenomenon referred as the attentional blink (AB; Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992; Shapiro, Raymond, & Arnell, 1997). On the basis of a vast corpus of experiments, several cognitive theories suggest that the blink…

  5. Eye Movements Blink the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamienkowski, Juan E.; Navajas, Joaquin; Sigman, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    When presented with a sequence of visual stimuli in rapid succession, participants often fail to detect a second salient target, a phenomenon referred as the attentional blink (AB; Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992; Shapiro, Raymond, & Arnell, 1997). On the basis of a vast corpus of experiments, several cognitive theories suggest that the blink…

  6. Unmasking the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; Potter, Mary C.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2009-01-01

    When asked to identify 2 visual targets (T1 and T2 for the 1st and 2nd targets, respectively) embedded in a sequence of distractors, observers will often fail to identify T2 when it appears within 200-500 ms of T1--an effect called the "attentional blink". Recent work shows that attention does not blink when the task is to encode a…

  7. Excessive Blinking in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms & Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy ... Screening Recommendations Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy ...

  8. Degeneration and Regeneration of Corneal Nerves in Response to HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J.; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is one cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreases in corneal sensation, blink reflex, and tear secretion as consequence of damage to the sensory fibers innervating the cornea. Our aim was to characterize changes in the corneal nerve network and its function in response to HSV-1 infection. Methods. C57BL/6J mice were infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. Corneas were harvested at predetermined times post infection (pi) and assessed for β III tubulin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and neurofilament H staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Corneal sensitivity was evaluated using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. Expression of genes associated with nerve repair was determined in corneas by real time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and IHC. Semaphorin 7A (SEMA 7A) neutralizing antibody or isotype control was subconjunctivally administered to infected mice. Results. The area of cornea occupied by β III tubulin immunoreactivity and sensitivity significantly decreased by day 8 pi. Modified reinnervation was observed by day 30 pi without recovery of corneal sensation. Sensory fibers were lost by day 8 pi and were still absent or abnormal at day 30 pi. Expression of SEMA 7A increased at day 8 pi, localizing to corneal epithelial cells. Neutralization of SEMA 7A resulted in defective reinnervation and lower corneal sensitivity. Conclusions. Corneal sensory nerves were lost, consistent with loss of corneal sensation at day 8 pi. At day 30 pi, the cornea reinnervated but without recovering the normal arrangement of its fibers or function. SEMA 7A expression was increased at day 8pi, likely as part of a nerve regeneration mechanism. PMID:25587055

  9. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. A comparative study of corneal sensitivity in birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Rodrigo P; Obón, Elena; Peña, Maria T; Costa, Daniel; Ríos, Jose; Leiva, Marta

    2014-05-01

    To determine and compare the corneal sensitivity in healthy wild diurnal and nocturnal birds of prey (BP) indigenous to Catalonia (Spain), and to establish if age is a determining factor in corneal sensitivity in those species. Ophthalmic examination was performed in 105 BP. Only birds with no ocular abnormalities were included in the study (n = 81): 21 diurnal BP (Falco tinnunculus: 16 fledglings, 5 adults) and 60 nocturnal BP (20 Athene noctua [9 fledglings, 11 adults], 20 Strix aluco [15 fledglings, 5 adults], and 20 Otus scops [6 fledglings and 14 adults]). Corneal touch threshold (CTT) was determined for each eye in five different corneal regions. Five attempts to cause a blink reflex were made in each region, and when three or more reflexes were positive, the pressure was deemed the CTT. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test for independent data or an anova model. The results between species and age groups were compared using the Generalized Estimated Equations model. There were no significant differences between any of the corneal regions (P = 0.25), or between the right (CTT = 4.9 ± 1.7 cm) and left (CTT = 4.8 ± 1.7 cm) eye in any of the species (P = 0.692). No difference was found between diurnal and nocturnal species (P = 0.913). Considering all the species, a significant difference was found between the mean CTT of fledglings (5.4 ± 1.2 cm) and adults (4.1 ± 2 cm), P < 0.001. A significant difference was found between fledglings and adults of A. noctua (P < 0.001) and S. aluco (P = 0.002). There is no significant difference in CTT between the different corneal regions in all the species studied. Corneal sensitivity is similar between diurnal and nocturnal birds of prey. Age is a determining factor in the CTT of A. noctua and S. aluco, with fledglings having a significantly higher CTT. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Effect of electrical water bath stunning on physical reflexes of broilers: evaluation of stunning efficacy under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Girasole, M; Marrone, R; Anastasio, A; Chianese, Antonio; Mercogliano, R; Cortesi, M L

    2016-05-01

    The effects of different amounts and frequencies of stunning sine wave alternating current were investigated under field conditions. Seven hundred and fifty broilers were stunned in an electrical water bath with an average root mean square (RMS) current of 150, 200, and 250 mA and frequencies of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,200 Hz. The occurrence of corneal reflex, spontaneous eye blinking, and a positive response to a painful stimulus were monitored and recorded immediately after the stunning and at 20 s post-stun. Statistical analysis showed that the electrical stunning frequency (P=0.0004), the stunning RMS current (P<0.0001) and the interaction between stunning frequency and stunning current (P<0.0001) had a significant effect on the occurrence of animals experiencing an abolition of corneal reflex at 20 s post-stun.At a current of 150 mA, the probability of a successful stun was over 90% at 200 Hz, approximately 40% at 400 Hz, and below 5% for frequencies greater than 600 Hz. So, stunning at frequencies greater than 600 Hz cannot be recommended when a RMS current of 150 mA is applied. The maximum probability of a successful stun was obtained for a current level of 200 mA at 400 Hz and for a current level of 250 mA at 400 and 600 Hz, whereas the stunning treatments at 1,200 Hz provided the lowest probability of a successful stun. Assessment of spontaneous eye blinking and responses to comb pinching confirmed the indications coming from the analysis of corneal reflex.

  12. COMMUNALITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN FEAR POTENTIATION BETWEEN CARDIAC DEFENSE AND EYE-BLINK STARTLE

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B.; Guerra, Pedro; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mata, José Luís; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Vila, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    This study examines similarities and differences in fear potentiation between two protective reflexes: cardiac defense and eye-blink startle. Women reporting intense fear of animals but low fear of blood or intense fear of blood but low fear of animals viewed pictures depicting blood or the feared animal for 6 s in 2 separate trials in counterbalanced order. An intense burst of white noise, able to elicit both a cardiac defense response and a reflexive startle blink, was presented 3.5 s after picture onset. Both cardiac and blink responses were potentiated when highly fearful individuals viewed fearful pictures. However, differences appeared concerning picture order. This pattern of results indicates communalities and differences among protective reflexes that are relevant for understanding the dynamics of emotional reflex modulation. PMID:19572906

  13. Did Lavoisier Blink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2004-01-01

    A question and answer session on whether Lavoisier made an agreement with the French mathematician, Comte Joseph-Louis Lagrange shortly before being beheaded that he would blink his eyes if he retained consciousness after being beheaded and that he was executed because of his revolutionary scientific views is described. The circumstances…

  14. Objective Tinnitus Concomitant with Eye Blinking: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Jang, Ho Joon; Park, Soon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is a common auditory phenomenon associated with many otological diseases, and is usually subjective. Objective tinnitus can be generated by para-auditory structures, usually derived from vascular or myogenic sources, or the eustachian tube. We present a rare case of intermittent unilateral tinnitus associated with eye blinking. Otoendoscopic examination showed that the external auditory canals and tympanic membranes were normal; however, rhythmic movements of both tympanic membranes, concomitant with the tinnitus, were evident whenever the patient blinked. The tympanometry and stapedial reflexes measured via impedance audiometry exhibited saw-tooth patterns; movement of the tympanic membrane was associated with eyelid blinking. The patient was managed conservatively, with reassurance and medication, and the condition became well-controlled. Here, we present this educational case and review the literature. PMID:26413577

  15. Blink User Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-07

    7 2.6 Inspecting data with Jeannie expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3...portable mixed-mode Java/native debugger for JNI (Java Native Interface) and Jeannie programs. Blink allows you to inspect Java and native program...using the Microsoft CDB and supporting the Windows native environment. 1.1.2 Download You need xtc-core.zip to run Jeannie , xtc-testsuite.zip to test

  16. Kalman filter detection of blinks in video-oculography: applications for VVOR measurement during locomotion.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Palmer, T; Goldvasser, D; Krebs, D E

    2001-04-30

    A Kalman filter algorithm was implemented for automatic detection of blink artifacts in video-oculography (VOG) data, and a cubic spline used to patch the eliminated data. The algorithm was tested by randomly introducing artificial blinks into eye movement data and computing the errors introduced by the patches. We also computed visual vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) gain and phase in healthy and vestibulopathic subjects during a locomotor task, before and after blink removal, to demonstrate the interpretive importance of eliminating blink artifacts. The error introduced by the patched data was small (0.50+/-0.32 degrees ) and within the resolution of head angle measurements. Comparison of gain and phase shift before and after removing blinks revealed that even when calculated values are within expected limits, coherence of the VVOR signal was significantly (p=0.003) lower prior to blink removal (0.51+/-0.37) compared to that after blink removal (0.92+/-0.08). Comparison of VVOR calculations between healthy and vestibulopathic subjects (after removal of blinks) revealed that vestibulopathic subjects had significantly decreased gains (p=0.018) and increased phase shifts (p=0.009): these results agree with data reported in literature. We conclude that the Kalman filter detection and cubic spline patching algorithms are useful tools for VOG and should enable reliable VVOR measurements during unconstrained, ecologically meaningful locomotor activities.

  17. A randomised controlled study of the efficacy of hypromellose and Lacri-Lube combination versus polyethylene/Cling wrap to prevent corneal epithelial breakdown in the semiconscious intensive care patient.

    PubMed

    Koroloff, Natasha; Boots, Robert; Lipman, Jeff; Thomas, Peter; Rickard, Claire; Coyer, Fiona

    2004-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of two forms of eye care (hypromellose and Lacri-Lube combination vs polyethylene/Cling wrap covers) for intensive care patients. Randomised-controlled trial. University affiliated, tertiary referral hospital. One hundred ten patients with a reduced or absent blink reflex were followed through until they regained consciousness, were discharged from the facility during study enrolment, died or developed a positive corneal ulcer or eye infection. All patients received standard eye cleansing every 2 h. In addition to this, group one ( n=60) received a treatment combining hypromellose drops and Lacri-Lube (HL) to each eye every 2 h. Group two ( n=50) had polyethylene covers only placed over the eye to create a moisture chamber. Corneal ulceration was determined using corneal fluorescein stains and mobile slit lamp evaluation, performed daily. No patients had corneal ulceration in the polyethylene cover group, but 4 patients had corneal ulceration in the HL group. Polyethylene covers are as effective as HL in reducing the incidence of corneal damage in intensive care patients.

  18. Topical Drug Formulations for Prolonged Corneal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Shankarappa, Sahadev A.; Tong, Rong; Ciolino, Joseph B.; Tsui, Jonathan H.; Chiang, Homer H.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ocular local anesthetics (OLA’s) currently used in routine clinical practice for corneal anesthesia are short acting and their ability to delay corneal healing makes them unsuitable for long-term use. In this study, we examined the effect on the duration of corneal anesthesia of the site-1 sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), applied with either proparacaine or the chemical permeation enhancer OTAB. The effect of test solutions on corneal healing was also studied. Methods Solutions of TTX, proparacaine, and OTAB, singly or in combination were applied topically to the rat cornea. The blink response, an indirect measure of corneal sensitivity, was recorded using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer, and the duration of corneal anesthesia calculated. The effect of test compounds on the rate of corneal epithelialization was studied in vivo following corneal debridement. Results Combination of TTX and proparacaine resulted in corneal anesthesia that was 8–10 times longer in duration than that from either drug administered alone, while OTAB did not prolong anesthesia. The rate of corneal healing was moderately delayed following co-administration of TTX and proparacaine. Conclusion Co-administration of TTX and proparacaine significantly prolonged corneal anesthesia but in view of delayed corneal re-epithelialization, caution is suggested in use of the combination. PMID:23615270

  19. To blink or not to blink: fine cognitive tuning of the defensive peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Sambo, C F; Forster, B; Williams, S C; Iannetti, G D

    2012-09-12

    The blink reflex elicited by the electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist [hand blink reflex (HBR)] is a subcortical, defensive response that is enhanced when the stimulated hand is inside the peripersonal space of the face. Such enhancement results from a tonic, top-down modulation of the excitability of the brainstem interneurons mediating the HBR. Here we aim to (1) characterize the somatotopical specificity of this top-down modulation and investigate its dependence on (2) cognitive expectations and (3) the presence of objects protecting the face, in healthy humans. Experiment 1 showed that the somatotopical specificity of the HBR enhancement is partially homosegmental, i.e., it is greater for the HBR elicited by the stimulation of the hand near the face compared with the other hand, always kept far from the face. Experiment 2 showed that the HBR is enhanced only when participants expect to receive stimuli on the hand close to the face and is thus strongly dependent on cognitive expectations. Experiment 3 showed that the HBR enhancement by hand-face proximity is suppressed when a thin wooden screen is placed between the participants' face and their hand. Thus, the screen reduces the extension of the defensive peripersonal space, so that the hand is never inside the peripersonal space of the face, even in the "near" condition. Together, these findings indicate a fine somatotopical and cognitive tuning of the excitability of brainstem circuits subserving the HBR, whose strength is adjusted depending on the context in a purposeful manner.

  20. Interactions between gaze-evoked blinks and gaze shifts in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Neeraj J

    2012-02-01

    Rapid eyelid closure, or a blink, often accompanies head-restrained and head-unrestrained gaze shifts. This study examines the interactions between such gaze-evoked blinks and gaze shifts in monkeys. Blink probability increases with gaze amplitude and at a faster rate for head-unrestrained movements. Across animals, blink likelihood is inversely correlated with the average gaze velocity of large-amplitude control movements. Gaze-evoked blinks induce robust perturbations in eye velocity. Peak and average velocities are reduced, duration is increased, but accuracy is preserved. The temporal features of the perturbation depend on factors such as the time of blink relative to gaze onset, inherent velocity kinematics of control movements, and perhaps initial eye-in-head position. Although variable across animals, the initial effect is a reduction in eye velocity, followed by a reacceleration that yields two or more peaks in its waveform. Interestingly, head velocity is not attenuated; instead, it peaks slightly later and with a larger magnitude. Gaze latency is slightly reduced on trials with gaze-evoked blinks, although the effect was more variable during head-unrestrained movements; no reduction in head latency is observed. Preliminary data also demonstrate a similar perturbation of gaze-evoked blinks during vertical saccades. The results are compared with previously reported effects of reflexive blinks (evoked by air-puff delivered to one eye or supraorbital nerve stimulation) and discussed in terms of effects of blinks on saccadic suppression, neural correlates of the altered eye velocity signals, and implications on the hypothesis that the attenuation in eye velocity is produced by a head movement command.

  1. Corneal Ectasia and Hydrops in Ocular Hypotony: The Corneal Crease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Asim V; Soin, Ketki; Williamson, Samantha; Joslin, Charlotte E; Cortina, Maria S; Tu, Elmer Y

    2015-09-01

    To report the association of chronic ocular hypotony with the development of progressive corneal ectasia and hydrops. Retrospective case series. Three patients with ocular hypotony were referred for corneal evaluation and found to have ectasia and acute corneal hydrops in their hypotonous eye(s). Clinically, the globes were easily deformable with either external digital palpation and/or simple blinking. All 3 patients had a history of chronic iridocyclitis, including one with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. In each case, the area of thinning was narrow and arcuate in configuration, distinctive from other ectatic disorders. Also uncharacteristically, the acute hydrops resolved rapidly within 2 to 3 weeks without surgical intervention. In 1 case, severe thinning with perforation occurred requiring urgent penetrating keratoplasty. This case series demonstrates a unique clinical entity in which corneal ectasia and hydrops developed in the setting of ocular hypotony and easily deformable corneas, in a pattern unlike previously described forms of ectasia. Acute hydrops, even with associated corneal perforation, demonstrated a short and self-limited course. Corneal ectasia and irregular astigmatism should be suspected as a cause of unexplained visual loss in the ever-increasing number of patients with chronic, stable ocular hypotony. Further study is warranted to determine the pathophysiology of corneal ectasia in this setting, which may include mechanical and inflammatory factors.

  2. Corneal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injuries Dystrophies - conditions in which parts of the cornea lose clarity due to a buildup of cloudy material Treatments of corneal disorders include medicines, corneal transplantation, and corneal laser surgery. NIH: National Eye Institute

  3. Cardiac Modulation of Startle: Effects on Eye Blink and Higher Cognitive Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Andre; Reichert, Carolin F.; Richter, Steffen; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac cycle time has been shown to affect pre-attentive brainstem startle processes, such as the magnitude of acoustically evoked reflexive startle eye blinks. These effects were attributed to baro-afferent feedback mechanisms. However, it remains unclear whether cardiac cycle time plays a role in higher startle-related cognitive processes, as…

  4. Cardiac Modulation of Startle: Effects on Eye Blink and Higher Cognitive Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Andre; Reichert, Carolin F.; Richter, Steffen; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac cycle time has been shown to affect pre-attentive brainstem startle processes, such as the magnitude of acoustically evoked reflexive startle eye blinks. These effects were attributed to baro-afferent feedback mechanisms. However, it remains unclear whether cardiac cycle time plays a role in higher startle-related cognitive processes, as…

  5. Corneal Topographic Changes After Eyelid Ptosis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Savino, Gustavo; Battendieri, Remo; Riso, Monica; Traina, Salvatore; Poscia, Andrea; DʼAmico, Giovanni; Caporossi, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the corneal topography and the topographic changes after ptosis surgery on patients affected by congenital and acquired blepharoptosis. Twenty eyes of 17 patients affected by acquired and congenital ptosis underwent surgical correction through anterior levator complex tightening. Computerized tomography (Syrius Sistem; CSO) was used to analyze any change in corneal astigmatism (CYL), simulated keratometry, anterior corneal symmetry index front, apical keratometry front, and central corneal thickness. Visual acuity, margin reflex distance, and levator function were also measured. After surgical ptosis repair, corneal topography demonstrated a reduction in average keratometry of 0.15 ± 0.47 diopters (D) and in corneal astigmatism of 0.26 ± 1.12 D. Significant differences were found in apical keratometry front (-1.84 ± 1.76 D) and in best-corrected visual acuity (-0.18 ± 0.06 logMAR) in the postoperative examinations. Central corneal thickness did not show significant differences between preoperative and postoperative examinations. Postoperative topographic maps showed a reduction of symmetry index front (0.10 ± 0.64 D). Eyelid ptosis modifies anterior corneal surface inducing refractive errors and modifying corneal astigmatism in patients, thus affecting the quality of vision. The surgical correction of blepharoptosis induces anterior corneal surface modification, restoring corneal symmetry and regular corneal astigmatism. Postoperative corneal topography showed normal corneal contours.

  6. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... in other age groups. These include: Moro reflex Sucking reflex (sucks when area around mouth is touched) ... side that was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly ...

  7. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm(2)) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm(2)) (p<0.0001). Corneal sensitivity did not differ significantly between the patients with Parkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R(2)=0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder.

  8. A kinetic study of blinking responses in cats

    PubMed Central

    Trigo, José Alberto; Roa, Laura; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José María

    2003-01-01

    Reflexively evoked and eye-related eyelid responses were recorded using the search coil in a magnetic field technique in alert cats. The downward phase of a blink was a large (up to 21 deg), fast (up to 2000 deg s−1) eyelid displacement in the closing direction, with an almost fixed rise time duration (15-20 ms); its maximum velocity was achieved in ≈10 ms. Upward eyelid motion was separated into two phases. The first phase consisted of a fast eyelid displacement, with a short duration (≈30 ms) and a maximum velocity up to 900 deg s−1. The second phase had an exponential-like form, lasting for 200–400 ms, and a maximum velocity ranging between 30 and 250 deg s−1. Maximum blink velocity in the downward direction was linearly related to maximum velocity of the first upward phase. The first phase in the upward direction was never observed if the eyelid stayed closed for a long period (> 50 ms) or moved slowly in the closing direction before it started to open. In these two cases, the upswing motion of the blink reflex contained only the exponential-like movement characteristic of the second upward phase, and maximum velocity in the downward direction was not related to that of the eyelid upward displacement. Mean duration of eyelid downward saccades was ≈130 ms, and their peak velocities ranged between 50 and 440 ms. A physiological model is presented explaining the active and passive forces involved in both reflex and saccadic eyelid responses. A second-order system seems to be appropriate to describe the postulated biomechanical model. PMID:12665614

  9. The Attentional Blink in Developing Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gregor M. T.; Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Castles, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink refers to a reduction in accuracy that occurs when identifying the second of two targets presented within approximately 500 msec of each other. This research explored individual differences in the attentional blink in a sample of 86 children (aged 8-10) with normally developing reading skills. The attentional blink was…

  10. Dry eye modifies the thermal and menthol responses in rat corneal primary afferent cool cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a painful condition caused by inadequate or altered tear film on the ocular surface. Primary afferent cool cells innervating the cornea regulate the ocular fluid status by increasing reflex tearing in response to evaporative cooling and hyperosmicity. It has been proposed that activation of corneal cool cells via a transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel agonist may represent a potential therapeutic intervention to treat dry eye. This study examined the effect of dry eye on the response properties of corneal cool cells and the ability of the TRPM8 agonist menthol to modify these properties. A unilateral dry eye condition was created in rats by removing the left lacrimal gland. Lacrimal gland removal reduced tears in the dry eye to 35% compared with the contralateral eye and increased the number of spontaneous blinks in the dry eye by over 300%. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed 8–10 wk following surgery in the trigeminal ganglion of dry eye animals and age-matched controls. Responses of corneal cool cells to cooling were examined after the application of menthol (10 μM–1.0 mM) to the ocular surface. The peak frequency of discharge to cooling was higher and the cooling threshold was warmer in dry eye animals compared with controls. The dry condition also altered the neuronal sensitivity to menthol, causing desensitization to cold-evoked responses at concentrations that produced facilitation in control animals. The menthol-induced desensitization of corneal cool cells would likely result in reduced tearing, a deleterious effect in individuals with dry eye. PMID:23636717

  11. Dry eye modifies the thermal and menthol responses in rat corneal primary afferent cool cells.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D

    2013-07-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a painful condition caused by inadequate or altered tear film on the ocular surface. Primary afferent cool cells innervating the cornea regulate the ocular fluid status by increasing reflex tearing in response to evaporative cooling and hyperosmicity. It has been proposed that activation of corneal cool cells via a transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel agonist may represent a potential therapeutic intervention to treat dry eye. This study examined the effect of dry eye on the response properties of corneal cool cells and the ability of the TRPM8 agonist menthol to modify these properties. A unilateral dry eye condition was created in rats by removing the left lacrimal gland. Lacrimal gland removal reduced tears in the dry eye to 35% compared with the contralateral eye and increased the number of spontaneous blinks in the dry eye by over 300%. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed 8-10 wk following surgery in the trigeminal ganglion of dry eye animals and age-matched controls. Responses of corneal cool cells to cooling were examined after the application of menthol (10 μM-1.0 mM) to the ocular surface. The peak frequency of discharge to cooling was higher and the cooling threshold was warmer in dry eye animals compared with controls. The dry condition also altered the neuronal sensitivity to menthol, causing desensitization to cold-evoked responses at concentrations that produced facilitation in control animals. The menthol-induced desensitization of corneal cool cells would likely result in reduced tearing, a deleterious effect in individuals with dry eye.

  12. Corneal oxygen uptake associated with piggyback contact lens systems.

    PubMed

    Florkey, Lindsay N; Fink, Barbara A; Mitchell, G Lynn; Hill, Richard M

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of static (without blinking) and dynamic (with blinking once every 5 seconds) wear of piggyback contact lens systems on corneal oxygen uptake. Corneal oxygen uptake rates were measured on the right eyes of 11 human subjects by using a polarographic electrode. Measurements were made for the normal open eye and after 5 minutes of wear of 4 rigid lens materials (Dk/t 0-82.5), 4 soft lens materials (Dk/t 13-122), and 16 combinations of rigid and soft lens materials. The piggyback systems were worn under both static and dynamic conditions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare oxygen uptake rates associated with the wear of the rigid lens components, soft lens components, piggyback systems, and static versus dynamic wearing conditions. Spearman correlation coefficients and regression analyses were used to examine relationships between corneal oxygen uptake rates. Measurable differences were found among oxygen uptake rates associated with the rigid lens components, soft lens components, and piggyback systems. Blinking resulted in no reduction in corneal oxygen uptake with the piggyback systems. Corneal oxygen uptake associated with the wear of the piggyback systems could not be predicted from those associated with the rigid and soft lens components of the systems. Piggyback combinations of rigid and soft lens components with the highest transmissibilities resulted in the least increase in corneal oxygen uptake beyond that of the normal open eye.

  13. Corneal topography and the hirschberg test.

    PubMed

    Brodie, S E

    1992-07-01

    A simple trigonometric analysis of the Hirschberg test with the assumption that the corneal surface is spherical predicts a sinusoidal dependence of the corneal reflex displacement on the angle of ocular rotation. A comparison with corneal reflex photographs demonstrates that at angles larger than 50 prism diopters (26 deg) the reflex displacements are larger than predicted by the spherical model. This discrepancy may be accounted for by incorporating a more general description of the corneal topography into the geometric analysis. The linear Hirschberg relation that is seen in typical data is accounted for by a relative flattening of the peripheral cornea by ~ 20% of the apical curvature. This geometric analysis of the functional dependence of the Hirschberg relation on the corneal topography can be expressed as an integral equation. Differentiation yields a second-order differential equation for the corneal topography in terms of the Hirschberg data. If the Hirschberg relation is assumed to be linear, a quadratic dependence is found for the corneal curvature. A similar differential approach can be formulated for the Placido disk. In this sense the corneal topography problem given in terms of Placido disk data is shown to be wellformulated. The relative simplicity of the Hirschberg geometry is seen to stem from the alignment of the light source with the eye of the observer.

  14. Capturing Attention When Attention "Blinks"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Serena; Chua, Fook K.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments addressed the question of whether attention may be captured when the visual system is in the midst of an attentional blink (AB). Participants identified 2 target letters embedded among distractor letters in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence. In some trials, a square frame was inserted between the targets; as the only…

  15. Corneal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2009-01-01

    The term corneal dystrophy embraces a heterogenous group of bilateral genetically determined non-inflammatory corneal diseases that are restricted to the cornea. The designation is imprecise but remains in vogue because of its clinical value. Clinically, the corneal dystrophies can be divided into three groups based on the sole or predominant anatomical location of the abnormalities. Some affect primarily the corneal epithelium and its basement membrane or Bowman layer and the superficial corneal stroma (anterior corneal dystrophies), the corneal stroma (stromal corneal dystrophies), or Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium (posterior corneal dystrophies). Most corneal dystrophies have no systemic manifestations and present with variable shaped corneal opacities in a clear or cloudy cornea and they affect visual acuity to different degrees. Corneal dystrophies may have a simple autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive Mendelian mode of inheritance. Different corneal dystrophies are caused by mutations in the CHST6, KRT3, KRT12, PIP5K3, SLC4A11, TACSTD2, TGFBI, and UBIAD1 genes. Knowledge about the responsible genetic mutations responsible for these disorders has led to a better understanding of their basic defect and to molecular tests for their precise diagnosis. Genes for other corneal dystrophies have been mapped to specific chromosomal loci, but have not yet been identified. As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. Main differential diagnoses include various causes of monoclonal gammopathy, lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase deficiency, Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage diseases (mucopolysaccharidoses

  16. Differential effects of blinks on horizontal saccade and smooth pursuit initiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger; El Baz, Ieman; Helmchen, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Blinks executed during eye movements affect kinetic eye movement parameters, e.g., peak velocity of saccades is decreased, their duration is increased, but their amplitude is not altered. This effect is mainly explained by the decreased activity of premotor neurons in the brainstem: omni-pause neurons (OPN) in the nucleus raphe interpositus. Previous studies examined the immediate effect of blinks directly on eye movements but not their effect when they are elicited several hundred milliseconds before the eye movements. In order to address this question we tested blinks elicited before the target onset of saccades and pursuit and compared the results to the gap effect: if a fixation light is extinguished for several hundred milliseconds, the reaction time (latency) for subsequent saccades or smooth pursuit eye movements is decreased. Monocular eye and lid movements were recorded in nine healthy subjects using the scleral search-coil system. Laser stimuli were front-projected onto a tangent screen in front of the subjects. Horizontal step-ramp smooth pursuit of 20 deg/s was elicited in one session, or 5 deg horizontal visually guided saccades in another experimental session. In one-third of the trials (smooth pursuit or saccades) the fixation light was extinguished for 200 ms before stimulus onset (gap condition), and in another third of the trials reflexive blinks were elicited by a short airpuff before the stimulus onset (blink condition). The last third of the trials served as controls (control condition). Stimulus direction and the three conditions were randomized for saccades and smooth pursuit separately. The latency of the step-ramp smooth pursuit in the blink condition was found to be decreased by 10 ms, which was less than in the gap condition (38 ms). However, the initial acceleration and steady-state velocity of smooth pursuit did not differ in the three conditions. In contrast, the latency of the saccades in the gap condition was decreased by 39 ms, but

  17. Contact lens and tear film dynamics during blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Timothy; Anderson, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    We develop a mathematical model that couples the dynamics of the tear film and contact lens during blinking. We derive an ordinary differential equation for the motion of the contact lens (parallel to the cornea) driven and retarded by viscous forces in the thin fluid films separating the contact lens from the eyelids and the corneal surface. Using the contact lens motion and tear film dynamics models we calculate a numerical solution of tear film thickness, showing that the lens and lid motion influence the tear film dynamics. The numerical solution uses a mapped Chebyshev spectral method for the spatial derivatives to reduce the model to a system of differential algebraic equations. National Science Foundation Grants (DMS-1407087) and (DMS-1107848).

  18. Corneal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Belknap, Ellen B

    2015-09-01

    Corneal emergencies can be due to a number of different causes and may be vision threatening if left untreated. In an attempt to stabilize the cornea, it is of benefit to place an Elizabethan collar on the patient to prevent further corneal damage. This article discusses the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of corneal emergencies in dogs and cats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A new model of central lid margin apposition and tear film mixing in spontaneous blinking.

    PubMed

    Pult, Heiko; Korb, Donald R; Murphy, Paul J; Riede-Pult, Britta H; Blackie, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    To investigate tear film spreading and central lid position in spontaneous blinks and to propose a model of the central lid position of the closed eye in such blinks. In vivo: lid margin position and geometry of 15 subjects (9 female; median age=45 years) were evaluated by high-speed video and slit-lamp microscope video in consecutive spontaneous blinks. Upper lid (UL) tear meniscus (TM) depth was observed in the open and almost closed eye. Eyelid geometry, position and UL TM depth were analysed by Image-J Software. Lid margin thicknesses were measured with a Scheimpflug camera. In vitro: tear film spreading and lipid layer formation were simulated on a lubricated glass plate and videoed by high-speed camera (JVC, GZ-GX1BE, Japan). In vivo: the median central lid margin thickness was not significantly (p=0.258) different between UL (1.8mm) and LL (1.7mm) in the opened eye. During blinking, UL remained perpendicular to the corneal surface, while LL tilted in and thinned. A scaled model diagram was created and revealed an over-blink of the UL over the LL (>0.7mm) and a height offset of the posterior lid margin of >0.7mm. In vitro: the LL TM fused with the UL TM even before full lid touch due to capillary bridge building. The central UL overlaps the central LL during spontaneous blinking. This provides the appearance of complete closure. The space that results from the lack of lid margin apposition influences the fusion of the upper and lower TM and ultimately tear film mixing. Copyright © 2015 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Blinks of the eye predict blinks of the mind.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Slagter, Heleen A; Spapé, Michiel M A; Hommel, Bernhard

    2008-11-01

    The Attentional Blink (AB)--a deficit in reporting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid sequence of distracters--has been related to individual processing limitations of working memory. Given the known role of dopamine (DA) in working memory processes, the present experiment tested the hypothesis that DA, and in particular the DA/D1 subsystem, plays a role in the AB. We present evidence that the spontaneous eyeblink rate (EBR), a functional marker of central dopaminergic function, reliably predicts the size of AB. Thus, in line with our hypothesis, these data point to a modulatory role for DA in the AB.

  1. TRPM8 is a neuronal osmosensor that regulates eye blinking in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quallo, Talisia; Vastani, Nisha; Horridge, Elisabeth; Gentry, Clive; Parra, Andres; Moss, Sian; Viana, Felix; Belmonte, Carlos; Andersson, David A.; Bevan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Specific peripheral sensory neurons respond to increases in extracellular osmolality but the mechanism responsible for excitation is unknown. Here we show that small increases in osmolality excite isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons expressing the cold-sensitive TRPM8 channel (transient receptor potential channel, subfamily M, member 8). Hyperosmotic responses were abolished by TRPM8 antagonists, and were absent in DRG and TG neurons isolated from Trpm8−/− mice. Heterologously expressed TRPM8 was activated by increased osmolality around physiological levels and inhibited by reduced osmolality. Electrophysiological studies in a mouse corneal preparation demonstrated that osmolality regulated the electrical activity of TRPM8-expressing corneal afferent neurons. Finally, the frequency of eye blinks was reduced in Trpm8−/− compared with wild-type mice and topical administration of a TRPM8 antagonist reduced blinking in wild-type mice. Our findings identify TRPM8 as a peripheral osmosensor responsible for the regulation of normal eye-blinking in mice. PMID:25998021

  2. Correlation of augmented startle reflex with brainstem electrophysiological responses in Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sadao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Sugai, Kenji; Iso, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of an augmented startle reflex in Tay-Sachs disease and compare the temporal relationship between this reflex and brainstem evoked potentials. Clinical and electrophysiological data from 3 patients with Tay-Sachs disease were retrospectively collected. The augmented startle reflex appeared between the age of 3 and 17 months and disappeared between the age of 4 and 6 years. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potentials revealed that poor segregation of peak I, but not peak III, coincided with the disappearance of the augmented startle reflex. A blink reflex with markedly high amplitude was observed in a patient with an augmented startle reflex. The correlation between the augmented startle reflex and the preservation of peak I but not peak III supports the theory that the superior olivary nucleus is dispensable for this reflex. The blink reflex with high amplitudes may represent augmented excitability of reticular formation at the pontine tegmentum in Tay-Sachs disease, where the pattern generators for the augmented startle and blink reflexes may functionally overlap. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Blinks slow memory-guided saccades.

    PubMed

    Powers, Alice S; Basso, Michele A; Evinger, Craig

    2013-02-01

    Memory-guided saccades are slower than visually guided saccades. The usual explanation for this slowing is that the absence of a visual drive reduces the discharge of neurons in the superior colliculus. We tested a related hypothesis: that the slowing of memory-guided saccades was due also to the more frequent occurrence of gaze-evoked blinks with memory-guided saccades compared with visually guided saccades. We recorded gaze-evoked blinks in three monkeys while they performed visually guided and memory-guided saccades and compared the kinematics of the different saccade types with and without blinks. Gaze-evoked blinks were more common during memory-guided saccades than during visually guided saccades, and the well-established relationship between peak and average velocity for saccades was disrupted by blinking. The occurrence of gaze-evoked blinks was associated with a greater slowing of memory-guided saccades compared with visually guided saccades. Likewise, when blinks were absent, the peak velocity of visually guided saccades was only slightly higher than that of memory-guided saccades. Our results reveal interactions between circuits generating saccades and blink-evoked eye movements. The interaction leads to increased curvature of saccade trajectories and a corresponding decrease in saccade velocity. Consistent with this interpretation, the amount of saccade curvature and slowing increased with gaze-evoked blink amplitude. Thus, although the absence of vision decreases the velocity of memory-guided saccades relative to visually guided saccades somewhat, the cooccurrence of gaze-evoked blinks produces the majority of slowing for memory-guided saccades.

  4. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article,…

  5. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article,…

  6. Short-term memory across eye blinks.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of eye blinks on short-term memory was examined in two experiments. On each trial, participants viewed an initial display of coloured, oriented lines, then after a retention interval they viewed a test display that was either identical or different by one feature. Participants kept their eyes open throughout the retention interval on some blocks of trials, whereas on others they made a single eye blink. Accuracy was measured as a function of the number of items in the display to determine the capacity of short-term memory on blink and no-blink trials. In separate blocks of trials participants were instructed to remember colour only, orientation only, or both colour and orientation. Eye blinks reduced short-term memory capacity by approximately 0.6-0.8 items for both feature and conjunction stimuli. A third, control, experiment showed that a button press during the retention interval had no effect on short-term memory capacity, indicating that the effect of an eye blink was not due to general motoric dual-task interference. Eye blinks might instead reduce short-term memory capacity by interfering with attention-based rehearsal processes.

  7. The attentional blink in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Popple, Ariella V; Levi, Dennis M

    2008-10-31

    Amblyopia is a disorder of visual acuity in one eye, thought to arise from suppression by the other eye during development of the visual cortex. In the attentional blink, the second of two targets (T2) in a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) stream is difficult to detect and identify when it appears shortly but not immediately after the first target (T1). We investigated the attentional blink seen through amblyopic eyes and found that it was less finely tuned in time than when the 12 amblyopic observers viewed the stimuli with their preferred eyes. T2 performance was slightly better through amblyopic eyes two frames after T1 but worse one frame after T1. Previously (A. V. Popple & D. M. Levi, 2007), we showed that when the targets were red letters in a stream of gray letters (or vice versa), normal observers frequently confused T2 with the letters before and after it (neighbor errors). Observers viewing through their amblyopic eyes made significantly fewer neighbor errors and more T2 responses consisting of letters that were never presented. In normal observers, T1 (on the rare occasions when it was reported incorrectly) was often confused with the letter immediately after it. Viewing through their amblyopic eyes, observers with amblyopia made more responses to the letter immediately before T1. These results suggest that childhood suppression of the input from amblyopic eyes disrupts attentive processing. We hypothesize reduced connectivity between monocularly tuned lower visual areas, subcortical structures that drive foveal attention, and more frontal regions of the brain responsible for letter recognition and working memory. Perhaps when viewing through their amblyopic eyes, the observers were still processing the letter identity of a prior distractor when the color flash associated with the target was detected. After T1, unfocused temporal attention may have bound together erroneously the features of succeeding letters, resulting in the appearance of

  8. Blinking

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to prevent harmful substances from getting in the eyes. During the normal course of a day, a ... of 15 times a minute to keep the eyes healthy. The lacrimal gland provides lubricating fluid for ...

  9. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  10. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes a Corneal Abrasion? Your eye has other defenses besides the orbital bone: The eyelids and eyelashes ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  11. Corneal transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... lenses to achieve the best vision. Laser vision correction may be an option if you have nearsightedness, ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Corneal Disorders Refractive Errors Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... fingernails short, too.Use care when putting in contact lenses. Make sure you clean them properly each day.Don’t sleep in your contact lenses.Trim low-hanging tree branches. Corneal abrasion treatment ...

  13. Corneal topography and soft contact lens fit.

    PubMed

    Young, Graeme; Schnider, Cristina; Hunt, Chris; Efron, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    To determine which ocular topography variables affect soft contact lens fit. Fifty subjects each wore three pairs of soft lenses in random succession (Vistakon Acuvue 2, Vistakon Acuvue Advance, Ciba Vision Night & Day), and various aspects of lens fit were evaluated. The steeper base curves of each type were worn in one eye and the flatter base curves in the other eye. Corneal topography data were collected using a Medmont E300 corneal topographer (Camberwell, Australia). Corneal curvature, shape factor (SF), and corneal height were measured over a 10 mm chord and also over the maximum measurable diameter. These were measured in the horizontal, vertical, steepest, and flattest meridians. With each lens type, the steeper base curve provided the best fit on the greatest proportion of eyes and the significant differences in various aspects of fit were noted between base curves. For each lens type, there was no significant difference in mean K-reading between those eyes best fit with the steeper base curve and those eyes best fit with the flatter base curve. Two of the lenses showed a positive correlation between centration and horizontal corneal height (maximum), whereas one lens showed a negative correlation between centration and horizontal SF (SF = e). Several lenses showed a positive correlation between post-blink movement and horizontal or vertical corneal SF. The measurement of corneal topography using current Placido disc instrumentation allows a better prediction of soft lens fit than by keratometry, but it is not reliable enough to enable accurate selection of the best fitting base curve. Some correlations are evident between corneal measurements; however, trial fitting remains the method of choice for selection of soft lens base curve.

  14. Reconstruction of eye movements during blinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M. S.; Bohn, C.; Kliegl, R.; Engbert, R.; Kurths, J.

    2008-03-01

    In eye movement research in reading, the amount of data plays a crucial role for the validation of results. A methodological problem for the analysis of the eye movement in reading are blinks, when readers close their eyes. Blinking rate increases with increasing reading time, resulting in high data losses, especially for older adults or reading impaired subjects. We present a method, based on the symbolic sequence dynamics of the eye movements, that reconstructs the horizontal position of the eyes while the reader blinks. The method makes use of an observed fact that the movements of the eyes before closing or after opening contain information about the eyes movements during blinks. Test results indicate that our reconstruction method is superior to methods that use simpler interpolation approaches. In addition, analyses of the reconstructed data show no significant deviation from the usual behavior observed in readers.

  15. Golden angle based scanning for robust corneal topography with OCT.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joerg; Goldblum, David; Cattin, Philippe C

    2017-02-01

    Corneal topography allows the assessment of the cornea's refractive power which is crucial for diagnostics and surgical planning. The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for corneal topography is still limited. One limitation is the susceptibility to disturbances like blinking of the eye. This can result in partially corrupted scans that cannot be evaluated using common methods. We present a new scanning method for reliable corneal topography from partial scans. Based on the golden angle, the method features a balanced scan point distribution which refines over measurement time and remains balanced when part of the scan is removed. The performance of the method is assessed numerically and by measurements of test surfaces. The results confirm that the method enables numerically well-conditioned and reliable corneal topography from partially corrupted scans and reduces the need for repeated measurements in case of abrupt disturbances.

  16. Golden angle based scanning for robust corneal topography with OCT

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Joerg; Goldblum, David; Cattin, Philippe C.

    2017-01-01

    Corneal topography allows the assessment of the cornea’s refractive power which is crucial for diagnostics and surgical planning. The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for corneal topography is still limited. One limitation is the susceptibility to disturbances like blinking of the eye. This can result in partially corrupted scans that cannot be evaluated using common methods. We present a new scanning method for reliable corneal topography from partial scans. Based on the golden angle, the method features a balanced scan point distribution which refines over measurement time and remains balanced when part of the scan is removed. The performance of the method is assessed numerically and by measurements of test surfaces. The results confirm that the method enables numerically well-conditioned and reliable corneal topography from partially corrupted scans and reduces the need for repeated measurements in case of abrupt disturbances. PMID:28270961

  17. Reciprocal modulation of eye-blink and pinna-flexion components of startle during reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Hackley, Steven A; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Hebert, Karen; Valle-Inclán, Fernando; Vila, Jaime

    2009-11-01

    Because expectancies play a central role in current theories of dopaminergic neuron function, it is important to develop measures of reward anticipation processes. In the present study, reflexogenic bursts of white noise were presented to 39 healthy young adults as they awaited rewards and punishments in a gambling-like task. The rewards were small pieces of chocolate; the punishments, segments of bitter-tasting banana peel. Consistent with prior research on affective valence, postauricular reflexes were larger prior to rewards than punishments, whereas the reverse was true for acoustic blink reflexes. We theorized that potentiation of the postauricular reflex prior to consuming appetizing food is related to the priming of ear-retraction musculature during nursing in our remote ancestors.

  18. Blink lagophthalmos and dry eye keratopathy in patients with non-facial palsy: clinical features and management with upper eyelid loading.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vikesh; Daya, Sheraz M; Lake, Damian; Malhotra, Raman

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of using upper eyelid gold weight implantation for patients with non-paralytic lagophthalmos on blink (LOB) only. We highlight the features of incomplete blink and reduced blink rate in patients with non-facial palsy as an exacerbating factor in dry eye keratopathy. Retrospective, noncomparative case series. Twelve patients (21 procedures) who underwent upper eyelid gold weight implantation for non-paralytic LOB only. Retrospective case note review of patients who underwent upper eyelid loading for non-paralytic LOB only over a 5-year period at a single institution. Improvement in LOB, gentle and forced closure, increased frequency of blinking (FOB), degree of corneal staining, incidence of epithelial defects or corneal ulcer, improvement in vision, and subjective improvement in ocular discomfort. Twenty-one procedures in 12 patients. Nine patients underwent bilateral surgery. Mean age was 56 (range, 8-80) years. Median postoperative follow-up was 15 months, and mean follow-up was 20.38 ± 16.61 (6-58) months. Eleven of 12 patients had an improvement in LOB and increased FOB, resulting in improvement of keratopathy and reduced ocular discomfort. One patient developed superior corneal thinning and descemetocele, requiring removal of the gold weight; 1 patient required ptosis surgery; and 1 patient developed a gold allergy and underwent platinum chain exchange. We highlight the need to consider incomplete blink and reduced FOB as exacerbating factors for corneal-related disorders, including dry eye. Upper eyelid loading with gold weight implantation is a useful and predictive method of improving exposure-related keratopathy due to LOB in the absence of facial palsy. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes This is a normal reflex present in newborn infants. Absence of the Moro reflex in an infant ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Infant and Newborn Care Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  1. A model for wetting and evaporation of a post-blink precorneal tear film.

    PubMed

    Winter, Katlyn N; Anderson, Daniel M; Braun, Richard J

    2010-09-01

    We examine a fluid dynamic model for the evolution of a precorneal tear film that includes evaporation of the aqueous layer and a wetting corneal surface. Our model extends previous work on the break-up time for a post-blink tear film to include a more realistic model for evaporation. The evaporation model includes the effects of conjoining pressure and predicts the existence of an equilibrium adsorbed fluid layer that serves as a model for a wetting corneal surface/mucin layer. The model allows the prediction of dewetting rates that are compared with experimental measurements. By choosing an expected thickness where evaporation and conjoining pressure balance, we obtain qualitative agreement for the opening rate with in vivo observations.

  2. Spontaneous eye blinks during creative task correlate with divergent processing.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Tominaga, Atsuko; Kajimura, Shogo; Nomura, Michio

    2016-07-01

    Creativity consists of divergent and convergent thinking, with both related to individual eye blinks at rest. To assess underlying mechanisms between eye blinks and traditional creativity tasks, we investigated the relationship between creativity performance and eye blinks at rest and during tasks. Participants performed an alternative uses and remote association task while eye blinks were recorded. Results showed that the relationship between eye blinks at rest and creativity performance was compatible with those of previous research. Interestingly, we found that the generation of ideas increased as a function of eye blink number during the alternative uses task. On the other hand, during the remote association task, accuracy was independent of eye blink number during the task, but response time increased with it. Moreover, eye blink changes in participants who responded quickly during the remote association task were different depending on their resting state eye blinks; that is, participants with many eye blinks during rest showed little increasing eye blinks and achieved solutions quickly. Positive correlations between eye blinks during creative tasks and yielding ideas on the alternative uses task and response time on the remote association task suggest that eye blinks during creativity tasks relate to divergent thinking processes such as conceptual reorganization.

  3. Dynamics and function of the tear film in relation to the blink cycle

    PubMed Central

    Braun, R.J.; King-Smith, P.E.; Begley, C.G.; Li, Longfei; Gewecke, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Great strides have recently been made in quantitative measurements of tear film thickness and thinning, mathematical modeling thereof and linking these to sensory perception. This paper summarizes recent progress in these areas and reports on new results. The complete blink cycle is used as a framework that attempts to unify the results that are currently available. Understanding of tear film dynamics is aided by combining information from different imaging methods, including fluorescence, retroillumination and a new high-speed stroboscopic imaging system developed for studying the tear film during the blink cycle. During the downstroke of the blink, lipid is compressed as a thick layer just under the upper lid which is often released as a narrow thick band of lipid at the beginning of the upstroke. “Rippling” of the tear film/air interface due to motion of the tear film over the corneal surface, somewhat like the flow of water in a shallow stream over a rocky streambed, was observed during lid motion and treated theoretically here. New mathematical predictions of tear film osmolarity over the exposed ocular surface and in tear breakup are presented; the latter is closely linked to new in vivo observations. Models include the effects of evaporation, osmotic flow through the cornea and conjunctiva, quenching of fluorescence, tangential flow of aqueous tears and diffusion of tear solutes and fluorescein. These and other combinations of experiment and theory increase our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the tear film and its potential impact on the ocular surface. PMID:25479602

  4. Dynamics and function of the tear film in relation to the blink cycle.

    PubMed

    Braun, R J; King-Smith, P E; Begley, C G; Li, Longfei; Gewecke, N R

    2015-03-01

    Great strides have recently been made in quantitative measurements of tear film thickness and thinning, mathematical modeling thereof and linking these to sensory perception. This paper summarizes recent progress in these areas and reports on new results. The complete blink cycle is used as a framework that attempts to unify the results that are currently available. Understanding of tear film dynamics is aided by combining information from different imaging methods, including fluorescence, retroillumination and a new high-speed stroboscopic imaging system developed for studying the tear film during the blink cycle. During the downstroke of the blink, lipid is compressed as a thick layer just under the upper lid which is often released as a narrow thick band of lipid at the beginning of the upstroke. "Rippling" of the tear film/air interface due to motion of the tear film over the corneal surface, somewhat like the flow of water in a shallow stream over a rocky streambed, was observed during lid motion and treated theoretically here. New mathematical predictions of tear film osmolarity over the exposed ocular surface and in tear breakup are presented; the latter is closely linked to new in vivo observations. Models include the effects of evaporation, osmotic flow through the cornea and conjunctiva, quenching of fluorescence, tangential flow of aqueous tears and diffusion of tear solutes and fluorescein. These and other combinations of experiment and theory increase our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the tear film and its potential impact on the ocular surface.

  5. Blinking supervision in a working environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcego, Bernardo; Argilés, Marc; Cabrerizo, Marc; Cardona, Genís; Pérez, Ramon; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Gispets, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The health of the ocular surface requires blinks of the eye to be frequent in order to provide moisture and to renew the tear film. However, blinking frequency has been shown to decrease in certain conditions such as when subjects are conducting tasks with high cognitive and visual demands. These conditions are becoming more common as people work or spend their leisure time in front of video display terminals. Supervision of blinking frequency in such environments is possible, thanks to the availability of computer-integrated cameras. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the detection of eye blinks and to test it, in a number of videos captured, while subjects are conducting a variety of tasks in front of the computer. The sensitivity of the algorithm for blink detection was found to be of 87.54% (range 30% to 100%), with a mean false-positive rate of 0.19% (range 0% to 1.7%), depending on the illumination conditions during which the image was captured and other computer-user spatial configurations. The current automatic process is based on a partly modified pre-existing eye detection and image processing algorithms and consists of four stages that are aimed at eye detection, eye tracking, iris detection and segmentation, and iris height/width ratio assessment.

  6. Blinking supervision in a working environment.

    PubMed

    Morcego, Bernardo; Argilés, Marc; Cabrerizo, Marc; Cardona, Genís; Pérez, Ramon; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Gispets, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The health of the ocular surface requires blinks of the eye to be frequent in order to provide moisture and to renew the tear film. However, blinking frequency has been shown to decrease in certain conditions such as when subjects are conducting tasks with high cognitive and visual demands. These conditions are becoming more common as people work or spend their leisure time in front of video display terminals. Supervision of blinking frequency in such environments is possible, thanks to the availability of computer-integrated cameras. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the detection of eye blinks and to test it, in a number of videos captured, while subjects are conducting a variety of tasks in front of the computer. The sensitivity of the algorithm for blink detection was found to be of 87.54% (range 30% to 100%), with a mean false-positive rate of 0.19% (range 0% to 1.7%), depending on the illumination conditions during which the image was captured and other computer–user spatial configurations. The current automatic process is based on a partly modified pre-existing eye detection and image processing algorithms and consists of four stages that are aimed at eye detection, eye tracking, iris detection and segmentation, and iris height/width ratio assessment.

  7. Corneal temperature in patients with dry eye evaluated by infrared radiation thermometry.

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, H; Toda, I; Yamada, M; Sato, N; Tsubota, K

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The corneal temperature change following each blink was investigated in patients with dry eye using an infrared radiation thermometer. METHODS: Twenty patients with dry eye and 20 normal controls were enrolled in this study. Subjects kept their eyes open for 10 seconds without blinking and corneal temperature was measured every second with a recently improved infrared radiation thermometer. RESULTS: In the 20 patients with dry eye, corneal temperature change after keeping the eye open for 10 seconds was 0.21 (SD 0.06) degree C while it was 0.61 (0.28) degree C in the 20 normal patients (p = 0.0001). In an exponential equation, the inclination of the slope of a patient with dry eye was smaller than the normal. The correlation coefficient was r = 0.79 (0.16) in patients with dry eye and r = 0.90 (0.07) in normal patients. The mean K value of patients with dry eye was 0.20 (0.13)/second and that of normal subjects was 0.31 (0.19)/second (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Findings demonstrate the usefulness of this thermometer for measuring corneal temperature in the evaluation of dry eye. Decrease in corneal temperature with each blink in patients with dry eye was smaller than in normal subjects. Images PMID:8664227

  8. The lack of deep reflexes in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Messina, C; Tonali, P; Scoppetta, C

    1976-12-01

    Clinical and electrophysiological observations have been carried out on 12 patients with myotonic dystrophy. Neurological examination showed that the tendon reflexes were absent or weak in almost all cases, whereas the cutaneous reflexes were normal. Examination of both deep and superficial sensibility gave normal results. Electromyography confirmed widespread "myopathic" activity and myotonic discharges were recorded on insertion of the needle electrode and at rest. Motor and sensory conduction velocity in the ulnar nerve and motor conduction in the peroneal nerve proved to be normal. Repetitive supramaximal nerve stimulation showed in 10 cases a decrease in potential amplitude, more evident at higher frequencies of stimulation. In the 2 other cases, by contrast, an increase in amplitude was observed, and this was suggestive of a partial presynaptic block. The jaw reflex was absent in 5 cases and reduced in amplitude in the 7 other cases. The results of blink reflex investigations were normal, with the exception of 2 cases where no early response was elicited. Spinal monosynaptic reflexes were absent in 7 cases after both electrical (H reflex) and mechanical stimulation (T reflex), whereas the response to direct stimulation of nerve motor fibres (the M response) was always present, even though reduced in amplitude. Such data lead one to reject the hypothesis that the absence of deep reflexes is due to pathological change in the muscle spindles. It seems more likely that the selective atrophy of Type 1 muscle fibres, known to be involved in deep reflex responses, is responsible for the early disappearance of the tendon reflexes.

  9. Electrothermal blinking vortices for chaotic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loire, Sophie; Kauffmann, Paul; Gimenez, Paul; Meinhart, Carl; Mezic, Igor

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of electrothermal chaotic mixing using blinking of asymmetric 2D electrothermal vortices. Electrothermal flows are modelled with 2D finite element method using COMSOL software based on an enhanced electrothermal model. Velocities in top-view and side-view devices are measured by micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV). The experimentally reconstructed velocity profile shows a dramatic asymmetry between the two vortices, in good agreement with the FEM model. The separation line between the two vortices is shifted and tilted making the blinking vortices overlap. We use the mix-variance coefficient (MVC) on experimental particle detection data and numerical trajectory simulations to evaluate mixing at different scales including the layering of fluid interfaces by the flow, a keypoint for efficient mixing. The blinking vortices method greatly improve mixing efficiency. Theoretical, experimental and simulation results of the mixing process will be presented.

  10. Corneal honeybee sting.

    PubMed

    Al-Towerki, Abdul-Elah

    2003-10-01

    To report a rare case of corneal honeybee sting. The corneal honeybee stinger was removed under slit-lamp guidance using a 27-gauge needle. Corneal edema resolved by 90% the next day after removal of the honeybee stinger without using topical steroids. The patient's condition improved significantly after removal of the corneal honeybee stinger, and corneal edema disappeared. The patient was evaluated in 1 week and then 3 months with permanent mild central corneal opacity.

  11. [Corneal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Bourges, J-L

    2017-09-01

    Degenerative or hereditary corneal diseases are sometimes difficult to discriminate. Corneal dystrophies affect approximately 0.09 % of the population. They are identified by the IC3D classification based on their phenotype, genotype and evidence gathered for their diagnosis. Practically, the ophthalmologist manages functional symptoms, such as recurrent erosions, visual loss and amblyopia, photophobia, foreign body sensation, and sometimes pain and aesthetic concerns. Medical treatments consist of drops to promote healing, ointments, hyperosmotic agents and bandage contact lenses. Less invasive surgical treatments are used as second line therapy (phototherapeutic keratectomy, lamellar keratectomy). More invasive procedures may eventually be utilized (lamellar or penetrating keratoplasty). Anterior lamellar or endothelial keratoplasty are now preferred to penetrating keratoplasty, although the latter still remains the only possible option in some cases. Some rare dystrophies require coordinated and comprehensive medical care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Corneal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bourges, J-L

    2017-06-01

    Degenerative or hereditary corneal diseases are sometimes difficult to discriminate. Corneal dystrophies affect approximately 0.09% of the population. They are identified by the IC3D classification based on their phenotype, genotype and evidence gathered for their diagnosis. In practice, the ophthalmologist manages functional symptoms such as recurrent erosions, visual loss and amblyopia, photophobia, foreign body sensation, and sometimes pain and aesthetic concerns. Medical treatments consist of drops to promote healing, ointments, hyperosmotic agents and bandage contact lenses. Less invasive surgical treatments are used as second line therapy (phototherapeutic keratectomy, lamellar keratectomy). More invasive procedures may eventually be utilized (lamellar or penetrating keratoplasty). Anterior lamellar or endothelial keratoplasty are now preferred to penetrating keratoplasty, although the latter still remains the only possible option in some cases. Some rare dystrophies require coordinated and comprehensive medical care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Eye-Blink Behaviors in 71 Species of Primates

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Hideoki; Omori, Yasuko; Hirokawa, Kumi; Ohira, Hideki; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the associations between eye-blink behaviors and various other factors in primates. We video-recorded 141 individuals across 71 primate species and analyzed the blink rate, blink duration, and “isolated” blink ratio (i.e., blinks without eye or head movement) in relation to activity rhythms, habitat types, group size, and body size factors. The results showed close relationships between three types of eye-blink measures and body size factors. All of these measures increased as a function of body weight. In addition, diurnal primates showed more blinks than nocturnal species even after controlling for body size factors. The most important findings were the relationships between eye-blink behaviors and social factors, e.g., group size. Among diurnal primates, only the blink rate was significantly correlated even after controlling for body size factors. The blink rate increased as the group size increased. Enlargement of the neocortex is strongly correlated with group size in primate species and considered strong evidence for the social brain hypothesis. Our results suggest that spontaneous eye-blinks have acquired a role in social communication, similar to grooming, to adapt to complex social living during primate evolution. PMID:23741522

  14. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Patients and methods: Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Results: Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15–20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Conclusion: Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both. PMID:15314112

  15. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship.

    PubMed

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H-M

    2004-09-01

    Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15-20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both.

  16. Biology Today: Of Wishbones, Beavers & Blinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided is a discussion of items covering a variety of fascinating biological topics which include: the elasticity of the furcula of starlings in flight, beavers increasing the greenhouse effect, effective invaders, traveling birds, the cuckoo deception, competitive sperm, hearing springs, heat and sight, blinking as punctuation, mutations, and…

  17. The Attention Cascade Model and Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shui-I

    2008-01-01

    An attention cascade model is proposed to account for attentional blinks in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli. Data were collected using single characters in a single RSVP stream at 10 Hz [Shih, S., & Reeves, A. (2007). "Attentional capture in rapid serial visual presentation." "Spatial Vision", 20(4), 301-315], and single words,…

  18. Biology Today: Of Wishbones, Beavers & Blinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided is a discussion of items covering a variety of fascinating biological topics which include: the elasticity of the furcula of starlings in flight, beavers increasing the greenhouse effect, effective invaders, traveling birds, the cuckoo deception, competitive sperm, hearing springs, heat and sight, blinking as punctuation, mutations, and…

  19. The Attention Cascade Model and Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shui-I

    2008-01-01

    An attention cascade model is proposed to account for attentional blinks in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli. Data were collected using single characters in a single RSVP stream at 10 Hz [Shih, S., & Reeves, A. (2007). "Attentional capture in rapid serial visual presentation." "Spatial Vision", 20(4), 301-315], and single words,…

  20. Postauricular reflexes elicited by soft acoustic clicks and loud noise probes: Reliability, prepulse facilitation, and sensitivity to picture contents.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Rachel V; Benning, Stephen D

    2016-12-01

    The startle blink reflex is facilitated during early picture viewing, then inhibited by attention during pleasant and aversive pictures compared to neutral pictures, and finally potentiated during aversive pictures specifically. However, it is unclear whether the postauricular reflex, which is elicited by the same loud acoustic probe as the startle blink reflex but enhanced by appetitive instead of defensive emotion, has the same pattern and time course of emotional modulation. We examined this issue in a sample of 90 undergraduates using serially presented soft acoustic clicks that elicited postauricular (but not startle blink) reflexes in addition to standard startle probes. Postauricular reflexes elicited by both clicks and probes correlated during food and nurturant contents, during which they were potentiated compared to neutral pictures, suggesting clicks effectively elicit emotionally modulated postauricular reflexes. The postauricular reflex was initially facilitated during the first 500 ms of picture processing but was larger during pleasant than neutral pictures throughout picture processing, with larger effect sizes during the latter half of picture processing. Across reflexes and eliciting stimuli, measures of emotional modulation had higher coefficient alphas than magnitudes during specific picture contents within each valence, indicating that only emotional modulation measures assess higher-order appetitive or defensive processing.

  1. Variable Foreperiod Deficits in Parkinson's Disease: Dissociation across Reflexive and Voluntary Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkowski, A.J.; Stepp, E.; Hackley, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of a visual warning signal (1.0-6.5s random foreperiod, FP) on the latency of voluntary (hand-grip) and reflexive (startle-eyeblink) reactions was investigated in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and in young and aged control subjects. Equivalent FP effects on blink were observed across groups. By contrast, FP effects diverged for…

  2. Variable Foreperiod Deficits in Parkinson's Disease: Dissociation across Reflexive and Voluntary Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkowski, A.J.; Stepp, E.; Hackley, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of a visual warning signal (1.0-6.5s random foreperiod, FP) on the latency of voluntary (hand-grip) and reflexive (startle-eyeblink) reactions was investigated in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and in young and aged control subjects. Equivalent FP effects on blink were observed across groups. By contrast, FP effects diverged for…

  3. Feline corneal disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, Phillip Anthony

    2005-05-01

    The cornea is naturally transparent. Anything that interferes with the cornea's stromal architecture, contributes to blood vessel migration, increases corneal pigmentation, or predisposes to corneal edema, disrupts the corneas transparency and indicates corneal disease. The color, location, and shape and pattern of a corneal lesion can help in determining the underlying cause for the disease. Corneal disease is typically divided into congenital or acquired disorders. Congenital disorders, such as corneal dermoids are rare in cats, whereas acquired corneal disease associated with nonulcerative or ulcerative keratitis is common. Primary ocular disease, such as tear film instability, adenexal disease (medial canthal entropion, lagophthalmus, eyelid agenesis), and herpes keratitis are associated with the majority of acquired corneal disease in cats. Proliferative/eosinophilic keratitis, acute bullous keratopathy, and Florida keratopathy are common feline nonulcerative disorders. Nonprogressive ulcerative disease in cats, such as chronic corneal epithelial defects and corneal sequestration are more common than progressive corneal ulcerations.

  4. The optics of static photographic skiascopy. Comments on a paper by K. Kaakinen: A simple method for screening of children with strabismus, anisometropia or ametropia by simultaneous photography of the corneal and the fundus reflexes.

    PubMed

    Howland, H C

    1980-04-01

    The appearance of reflexes in static, photographic skiascopy is a function of myopic or hyperopic focus of the subject relative to the camera, camera to subject distance, subject pupil size, distance of flash relative to optic axis and camera aperture stop. This paper specifies this function.

  5. The precorneal tear film as a fluid shell: the effect of blinking and saccades on tear film distribution and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Norihiko; Bron, Anthony J; Georgiev, Georgi As

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a series of experiments to elucidate the behavior of the human precorneal tear film (PCTF) during blinking and horizontal and vertical saccades. Methodology included video-interferometry with subsequent image cross-correlation (tear film lipid layer [TFLL]) and video-microscopy (mucoaqueous subphase [MAS]). We observed that the TFLL interference pattern deteriorates rapidly with successive blinks and degrades slowly with repeated horizontal saccades during blink suppression when dark arcs of thinning appear in the fluorescein-stained PCTF. Furthermore, after full downgaze and a return to the primary position, a transient horizontal bright band appears, deep to the spreading TFLL. It may be followed by local disturbances in the interference pattern. Two horizontal dark bands form in the stained PCTF after the return saccade. PCTF disruption may occur below the lower band during blink suppression. We concluded that shearing during horizontal saccades is insufficient to disturb the tear film structure greatly. The MAS and TFLL move together as a fluid shell. The dark arcs/bands are caused by meniscus-induced thinning, imprinted onto the PCTF at the lid margin. Their stability during blink suppression suggests that the MAS has gel-like properties. The horizontal bright bands are probably due to transient corneal indentation in downgaze. In downgaze, the disturbance of the TFLL and MAS below the dark bands is possibly due to shearing across the MAS in the return phase. This could cause desiccating stress in everyday activities, such as working at a computer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Blink Prosthesis For Facial Paralysis Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO...eye blink in patients with unilateral facial nerve paralysis. The system will electrically stimulate the paretic eyelid when EMG electrodes detect...thermal discharge. 15. SUBJECT TERMS facial paralysis, neuroprosthetics, functional electrical stimulation, medical device, Bell’s Palsy 16

  7. Workload assessment of surgeons: correlation between NASA TLX and blinks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Jiang, Xianta; Tien, Geoffrey; Meneghetti, Adam; Panton, O Neely M; Atkins, M Stella

    2012-10-01

    Blinks are known as an indicator of visual attention and mental stress. In this study, surgeons' mental workload was evaluated utilizing a paper assessment instrument (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index, NASA TLX) and by examining their eye blinks. Correlation between these two assessments was reported. Surgeons' eye motions were video-recorded using a head-mounted eye-tracker while the surgeons performed a laparoscopic procedure on a virtual reality trainer. Blink frequency and duration were computed using computer vision technology. The level of workload experienced during the procedure was reported by surgeons using the NASA TLX. A total of 42 valid videos were recorded from 23 surgeons. After blinks were computed, videos were divided into two groups based on the blink frequency: infrequent group (≤ 6 blinks/min) and frequent group (more than 6 blinks/min). Surgical performance (measured by task time and trajectories of tool tips) was not significantly different between these two groups, but NASA TLX scores were significantly different. Surgeons who blinked infrequently reported a higher level of frustration (46 vs. 34, P = 0.047) and higher overall level of workload (57 vs. 47, P = 0.045) than those who blinked more frequently. The correlation coefficients (Pearson test) between NASA TLX and the blink frequency and duration were -0.17 and 0.446. Reduction of blink frequency and shorter blink duration matched the increasing level of mental workload reported by surgeons. The value of using eye-tracking technology for assessment of surgeon mental workload was shown.

  8. Blink and you’ll miss it: the role of blinking in the perception of magic tricks

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tamami

    2016-01-01

    Magicians use several techniques to deceive their audiences, including, for example, the misdirection of attention and verbal suggestion. We explored another potential stratagem, namely the relaxation of attention. Participants watched a video of a highly skilled magician whilst having their eye-blinks recorded. The timing of spontaneous eye-blinks was highly synchronized across participants. In addition, the synchronized blinks frequency occurred immediately after a seemingly impossible feat, and often coincided with actions that the magician wanted to conceal from the audience. Given that blinking is associated with the relaxation of attention, these findings suggest that blinking plays an important role in the perception of magic, and that magicians may utilize blinking and the relaxation of attention to hide certain secret actions. PMID:27069808

  9. Corneal alterations in Crisponi/CISS1 syndrome: A slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo confocal microscopy corneal report.

    PubMed

    Agresta, Antonio; Fasciani, Romina; Padua, Luca; Petroni, Sergio; La Torraca, Ilaria; Dickmann, Anna; Zampino, Giuseppe; Caporossi, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the cytokine receptor-like factor 1 (CRLF1) gene are responsible for Crisponi/Cold-induced Sweat Syndrome, an extremely rare autosomal-recessive multisystem disorder. The protein encoded is a soluble cytokine receptor, involved in the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) pathway. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes corneal wound healing and patients with Crisponi/CISS1 syndrome suffer from recurrent keratitis. The aim of the study was to report and discuss the corneal alterations in Crisponi/CISS1 rare disease. We evaluated the cornea of both eyes in four Crisponi/CISS1 patients to provide a detailed description of slit-lamp biomicroscopy findings. Corneal sensitivity, tears functionality and blinking video recording at rest were also assessed in all patients. Two patients were also evaluated with in vivo confocal microscopy, completed with a needle electromyography of their orbicularis muscles. None of the patients presented a tears dysfunction and video recording documented a prolonged lid excursion in all patients. Slit lamp examination revealed a chronic epithelial impairment in all cases. Needle electromyography of the orbicularis oculi showed a dystonic pattern. The confocal microscopy confirmed the biomicroscopic observed lesions and documented unusual findings of the corneal nerve plexus. This is the first report of microscopic cornea alterations explored with confocal imaging in Crisponi/CISS1 patients. The observed corneal findings suggest a possible direct correlation to the CNTFR pathway defect and the blinking imbalance could exacerbate the compromised epithelial wound healing. Topical administrations of lubricating eye drops are strongly recommended in these patients.

  10. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Enhances the Excitability of Trigemino-Facial Reflex Circuits.

    PubMed

    Cabib, Christopher; Cipullo, Federica; Morales, Merche; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a tiny burning sensation through activation of local cutaneous trigeminal afferents. Trigeminal sensory inputs from tDCS may generate excitability changes in the trigemino-facial reflex circuits. Sixteen healthy volunteers were submitted to 20 minutes tDCS sessions with two types of electrode-montage conditions: 1. Real vs Sham 'bi-hemispheric' tDCS (cathode/anode: C4/C3), for blinded assessment of effects, and 2. 'uni-hemispheric' tDCS (cathode/anode: Fp3/C3), for assessment of laterality of the effects. Supraorbital nerve stimuli were used to obtain blink reflexes before, during (10 minutes from onset) and after (30 minutes from onset) the tDCS session. Outcome measures were R2 habituation (R2H) to repeated stimuli, the blink reflex excitability recovery (BRER) to paired stimuli and the blink reflex inhibition by a prepulse (BRIP). Real but not sham bi-hemispheric tDCS caused a significant decrease of R2H and leftward shift of BRER curve (p < 0.05 for all measures). The effects of uni-hemispheric tDCS on BRER and BRIP were larger on ipsilateral than on contralateral blink reflexes (p < 0.05). Excitability changes were still present 10 minutes after the end of stimulation in a lesser extent. This study shows that 20 minute tDCS enhances the excitability of trigemino-facial reflex circuits. The finding of larger ipsilateral than contralateral effects suggests that sensitization through cutaneous trigeminal afferents adds on other possible mechanisms such as activation of cortico-nuclear or cortico-reticular connections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Corneal ulcers in horses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynn B; Pinard, Chantale L

    2013-01-01

    Corneal ulceration is commonly diagnosed by equine veterinarians. A complete ophthalmic examination as well as fluorescein staining, corneal cytology, and corneal bacterial (aerobic) and fungal culture and sensitivity testing are necessary for all infected corneal ulcers. Appropriate topical antibiotics, topical atropine, and systemic NSAIDs are indicated for all corneal ulcers. If keratomalacia (melting) is observed, anticollagenase/antiprotease therapy, such as autologous serum, is indicated. If fungal infection is suspected, antifungal therapy is a necessity. Subpalpebral lavage systems allow convenient, frequent, and potentially long-term therapy. Referral corneal surgeries provide additional therapeutic options when the globe's integrity is threatened or when improvement has not been detected after appropriate therapy.

  12. The effect of tear film on higher order corrections applied to the corneal surface during wavefront-guided refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether the property of the surface of a fluid film to smooth irregularities in the underlying surface will cause the tear film to partially erase the effect of higher order corrections ablated onto a corneal surface during wavefront-guided refractive surgical correction. Coating flow theory shows that the film surface initially replicates the underlying surface. An iteration method is given to allow calculations to be made of the tear fluid flow and resulting surface change during the time between blinks. A new experimental technique is introduced using a corneal topographer and live video imaging to observe changes in tear surface curvature as the tear film flows. Tear flow changes in an eye with a high amount of aberration due to an unsuccessful LASIK procedure are simulated to show that while tear fluid occurs and causes changes in the tear/air surface, the change when expressed in terms of unwanted aberrations is below that which would cause any image degradation. Results of the live video technique on a cornea with an irregular surface 4 days after photorefractive keratectomy show that irregularities in the tear film surface immediately after a blink are not smoothed to any extent in the time before the next blink. Tear film flow following initial film formation by a blink can be demonstrated by computer simulation and observed with live corneal topography video. Tear film dynamics will not erase the effects of ablative corrections for higher order aberrations.

  13. Kinetic and frequency-domain properties of reflex and conditioned eyelid responses in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Gruart, A; Schreurs, B G; del Toro, E D; Delgado-García, J M

    2000-02-01

    Eyelid position and the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle were recorded unilaterally in rabbits during reflex and conditioned blinks. Air-puff-evoked blinks consisted of a fast downward phase followed sometimes by successive downward sags. The reopening phase had a much longer duration and slower peak velocity. Onset latency, maximum amplitude, peak velocity, and rise time of reflex blinks depended on the intensity and duration of the air puff-evoking stimulus. A flashlight focused on the eye also evoked reflex blinks, but not flashes of light, or tones. Both delayed and trace classical conditioning paradigms were used. For delayed conditioning, animals were presented with a 350-ms, 90-dB, 600-Hz tone, as conditioned stimulus (CS). For trace conditioning, animals were presented with a 10-ms, 1-k/cm(2) air puff, as CS. The unconditioned stimulus (US) consisted of a 100-ms, 3-k/cm(2) air puff. The stimulus interval between CS and US onsets was 250 ms. Conditioned responses (CRs) to tones were composed of downward sags that increased in number through the successive conditioning sessions. The onset latency of the CR decreased across conditioning at the same time as its maximum amplitude and its peak velocity increased, but the time-to-peak of the CR remained unaltered. The topography of CRs evoked by short, weak air puffs as the CS showed three different components: the alpha response to the CS, the CR, and the reflex response to the US. Through conditioning, CRs showed a decrease in onset latency, and an increase in maximum amplitude and peak velocity. The time-to-peak of the CR remained unchanged. A power spectrum analysis of reflex and conditioned blink acceleration profiles showed a significant approximately 8-Hz oscillation within a broadband of frequencies between 4 and 15 Hz. Nose and mandible movements presented power spectrum profiles different from those characterizing reflex and conditioned blinks. It is concluded that eyelid reflex

  14. Eye complaints in the office environment: precorneal tear film integrity influenced by eye blinking efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wolkoff, P; Nojgaard, J; Troiano, P; Piccoli, B

    2005-01-01

    To achieve a common base for understanding work related eye complaints in the office environment, it is necessary to merge approaches from indoor air science, occupational health, and ophthalmology. Based on database searches, it is concluded that precorneal tear film (PTF) alteration leads to eye complaints that may be caused by: (1) thermal factors (low relative humidity; high room temperature); (2) demanding task content (attention decreases blinking and widens the exposed ocular surface area); and (3) individual characteristics (for example, tear film alterations, blinking anomalies, gland dysfunctions, and use of contact lenses). These factors and conditions are able to progressively increase water evaporation and faster thinning of the PTF, which causes dryness and dry spot formation on the cornea, possibly followed by corneal and conjunctiva epithelial alterations and eye complaints. Another possible cause of eye complaints is certain irritating chemical compounds, in addition to oxidation mixtures that are formed in reactions between ozone and unsaturated organic compounds (alkenes). The effect may be exacerbated by low relative humidity. PMID:15613602

  15. Blink patterns: reading from a computer screen versus hard copy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Christina A; Rosenfield, Mark; Portello, Joan K

    2014-03-01

    Many subjects experience ocular and visual symptoms during computer use. Previous studies have reported a reduced blink rate during computer operation and suggested that this may account for some of the symptoms, particularly dry eye. However, these earlier investigations failed to include an appropriate control condition. To determine whether it is computer screen viewing that produces the change in blink rate, the present study compared blink patterns when reading from either a desktop computer monitor or a hard copy printed text under equivalent viewing conditions. Subjects (N = 25) were required to perform a continuous 20-minute reading task from either a desktop computer screen or a printed hard copy page at a viewing distance of 50 cm. Identical text was used in the two sessions, which was matched for size and contrast. Target viewing angle and luminance were similar for the two conditions. Subjects were videotaped during the task to determine their blink rate and amplitude. Immediately after the task, subjects completed a questionnaire regarding ocular symptoms experienced during the trial. Mean blink rates for the computer and hard copy conditions were 14.9 and 13.6 blinks per minute, respectively (p = 0.58). However, a significantly higher percentage of incomplete blinks was observed for the computer condition (7.02 vs. 4.33%; p = 0.02). No significant correlation was found between the symptom score and the percentage of incomplete blinks. When compared with an equivalent hard copy control condition, blink rates were not reduced during computer operation. It is proposed that the previously observed differences in blink rate are more likely to be produced by changes in cognitive demand rather than the method of presentation. However, a higher percentage of incomplete blinks was noted during computer operation, which may have been associated with visual fatigue.

  16. Human tears reveal insights into corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Nadia; Van Grasdorff, Sigi; Wouters, Kristien; Rozema, Jos; Koppen, Carina; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Berneman, Zwi; Tassignon, Marie-José

    2012-01-01

    Corneal neovascularization results from the encroachment of blood vessels from the surrounding conjunctiva onto the normally avascular cornea. The aim of this study is to identify factors in human tears that are involved in development and/or maintenance of corneal neovascularization in humans. This could allow development of diagnostic tools for monitoring corneal neovascularization and combination monoclonal antibody therapies for its treatment. In an observational case-control study we enrolled a total of 12 patients with corneal neovascularization and 10 healthy volunteers. Basal tears along with reflex tears from the inferior fornix, superior fornix and using a corneal bath were collected along with blood serum samples. From all patients, ocular surface photographs were taken. Concentrations of the pro-angiogenic cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) and Fas Ligand (FasL) were determined in blood and tear samples using a flow cytometric multiplex assay. Our results show that the concentration of pro-angiogenic cytokines in human tears are significantly higher compared to their concentrations in serum, with highest levels found in basal tears. Interestingly, we could detect a significantly higher concentration of IL- 6, IL-8 and VEGF in localized corneal tears of patients with neovascularized corneas when compared to the control group. This is the first study of its kind demonstrating a significant difference of defined factors in tears from patients with neovascularized corneas as compared to healthy controls. These results provide the basis for future research using animal models to further substantiate the role of these cytokines in the establishment and maintenance of corneal neovascularization.

  17. Human Tears Reveal Insights into Corneal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Kristien; Rozema, Jos; Koppen, Carina; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Berneman, Zwi; Tassignon, Marie-José

    2012-01-01

    Corneal neovascularization results from the encroachment of blood vessels from the surrounding conjunctiva onto the normally avascular cornea. The aim of this study is to identify factors in human tears that are involved in development and/or maintenance of corneal neovascularization in humans. This could allow development of diagnostic tools for monitoring corneal neovascularization and combination monoclonal antibody therapies for its treatment. In an observational case-control study we enrolled a total of 12 patients with corneal neovascularization and 10 healthy volunteers. Basal tears along with reflex tears from the inferior fornix, superior fornix and using a corneal bath were collected along with blood serum samples. From all patients, ocular surface photographs were taken. Concentrations of the pro-angiogenic cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) and Fas Ligand (FasL) were determined in blood and tear samples using a flow cytometric multiplex assay. Our results show that the concentration of pro-angiogenic cytokines in human tears are significantly higher compared to their concentrations in serum, with highest levels found in basal tears. Interestingly, we could detect a significantly higher concentration of IL- 6, IL-8 and VEGF in localized corneal tears of patients with neovascularized corneas when compared to the control group. This is the first study of its kind demonstrating a significant difference of defined factors in tears from patients with neovascularized corneas as compared to healthy controls. These results provide the basis for future research using animal models to further substantiate the role of these cytokines in the establishment and maintenance of corneal neovascularization. PMID:22590547

  18. Infrared-based blink-detecting glasses for facial pacing: toward a bionic blink.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alice; Hadlock, Tessa A; Murray, Elizabeth H; Heaton, James T

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Facial paralysis remains one of the most challenging conditions to effectively manage, often causing life-altering deficits in both function and appearance. Facial rehabilitation via pacing and robotic technology has great yet unmet potential. A critical first step toward reanimating symmetrical facial movement in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movement to use as a trigger for stimulated movement. OBJECTIVE To test a blink detection system that can be attached to standard eyeglasses and used as part of a closed-loop facial pacing system. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Standard safety glasses were equipped with an infrared (IR) emitter-detector unit, oriented horizontally across the palpebral fissure, creating a monitored IR beam that became interrupted when the eyelids closed, and were tested in 24 healthy volunteers from a tertiary care facial nerve center community. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Video-quantified blinking was compared with both IR sensor signal magnitude and rate of change in healthy participants with their gaze in repose, while they shifted their gaze from central to far-peripheral positions, and during the production of particular facial expressions. RESULTS Blink detection based on signal magnitude achieved 100% sensitivity in forward gaze but generated false detections on downward gaze. Calculations of peak rate of signal change (first derivative) typically distinguished blinks from gaze-related eyelid movements. During forward gaze, 87% of detected blink events were true positives, 11% were false positives, and 2% were false negatives. Of the 11% false positives, 6% were associated with partial eyelid closures. During gaze changes, false blink detection occurred 6% of the time during lateral eye movements, 10% of the time during upward movements, 47% of the time during downward movements, and 6% of the time for movements from an upward or downward gaze back to the primary gaze. Facial expressions

  19. INFRARED- BASED BLINK DETECTING GLASSES FOR FACIAL PACING: TOWARDS A BIONIC BLINK

    PubMed Central

    Frigerio, Alice; Hadlock, Tessa A; Murray, Elizabeth H; Heaton, James T

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Facial paralysis remains one of the most challenging conditions to effectively manage, often causing life-altering deficits in both function and appearance. Facial rehabilitation via pacing and robotic technology has great yet unmet potential. A critical first step towards reanimating symmetrical facial movement in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movement to use as a trigger for stimulated movement. OBJECTIVE To test a blink detection system that can be attached to standard eyeglasses and used as part of a closed-loop facial pacing system. DESIGN Standard safety glasses were equipped with an infrared (IR) emitter/detector pair oriented horizontally across the palpebral fissure, creating a monitored IR beam that became interrupted when the eyelids closed. SETTING Tertiary care Facial Nerve Center. PARTICIPANTS 24 healthy volunteers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Video-quantified blinking was compared with both IR sensor signal magnitude and rate of change in healthy participants with their gaze in repose, while they shifted gaze from central to far peripheral positions, and during the production of particular facial expressions. RESULTS Blink detection based on signal magnitude achieved 100% sensitivity in forward gaze, but generated false-detections on downward gaze. Calculations of peak rate of signal change (first derivative) typically distinguished blinks from gaze-related lid movements. During forward gaze, 87% of detected blink events were true positives, 11% were false positives, and 2% false negatives. Of the 11% false positives, 6% were associated with partial eyelid closures. During gaze changes, false blink detection occurred 6.3% of the time during lateral eye movements, 10.4% during upward movements, 46.5% during downward movements, and 5.6% for movements from an upward or downward gaze back to the primary gaze. Facial expressions disrupted sensor output if they caused substantial squinting or shifted the glasses. CONCLUSION

  20. The Attentional Blink Provides Episodic Distinctiveness: Sparing at a Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (J. E. Raymond, K. L. Shapiro, & K. M. Arnell, 1992) refers to an apparent gap in perception observed when a second target follows a first within several hundred milliseconds. Theoretical and computational work have provided explanations for early sets of blink data, but more recent data have challenged these accounts by…

  1. The Attentional Blink Provides Episodic Distinctiveness: Sparing at a Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (J. E. Raymond, K. L. Shapiro, & K. M. Arnell, 1992) refers to an apparent gap in perception observed when a second target follows a first within several hundred milliseconds. Theoretical and computational work have provided explanations for early sets of blink data, but more recent data have challenged these accounts by…

  2. Corneal transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000243.htm Corneal transplant - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a corneal transplant. Most of the tissue of your cornea (the ...

  3. Infantile reflexes (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Infantile reflexes are tested and observed by medical professionals to evaluate neurological function and development. Absent or ... reflex is normally lost, or redevelopment of an infantile reflex in an older child or adult may ...

  4. Electrical Stimulation of Eye Blink in Individuals with Acute Facial Palsy: Progress toward a Bionic Blink.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alice; Heaton, James T; Cavallari, Paolo; Knox, Chris; Hohman, Marc H; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2015-10-01

    Elicitation of eye closure and other movements via electrical stimulation may provide effective treatment for facial paralysis. The authors performed a human feasibility study to determine whether transcutaneous neural stimulation can elicit a blink in individuals with acute facial palsy and to obtain feedback from participants regarding the tolerability of surface electrical stimulation for daily blink restoration. Forty individuals with acute unilateral facial paralysis, HB grades 4 through 6, were prospectively studied between 6 and 60 days of onset. Unilateral stimulation of zygomatic facial nerve branches to elicit eye blink was achieved with brief bipolar, charge-balanced pulse trains, delivered transcutaneously by adhesive electrode placement; results were recorded on a high-speed video camera. The relationship between stimulation parameters and cutaneous sensation was analyzed using the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale. Complete eye closure was achieved in 55 percent of participants using stimulation parameters reported as tolerable. In those individuals, initial eye twitch was observed at an average current of 4.6 mA (±1.7; average pulse width of 0.7 ms, 100 to 150 Hz), with complete closure requiring a mean of 7.2 mA (±2.6). Transcutaneous facial nerve stimulation may artificially elicit eye blink in a majority of patients with acute facial paralysis. Although individuals varied widely in their reported degrees of discomfort from blink-eliciting stimulation, most of them indicated that such stimulation would be tolerable if it could restore eye closure. These patients would therefore benefit from a biomimetic device to facilitate eye closure until the recovery process is complete. Therapeutic, IV.

  5. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  6. The effects of threat and nonthreat word lead stimuli on blink modification.

    PubMed

    Aitken, C J; Siddle, D A; Lipp, O V

    1999-11-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of visually presented threat and nonthreat word lead stimuli on blink modification among unselected young adults (Experiment 1, N = 35) and participants selected for low and high trait anxiety (Experiment 2, N = 60). The blink reflex was elicited by a white noise probe of 105 dB. Lead stimulus intervals of 60, 120, 240, and 2000 ms were used in both experiments. Prepulse inhibition was observed at the 240-ms interval and prepulse facilitation was observed at the 60-ms interval in both experiments. Also, greater facilitation was found in both experiments during threat words at the 60-ms interval and greater inhibition during threat words at the 240-ms interval. Experiment 2 provided some evidence that the greater facilitation during threat words than during nonthreat words at the 60-ms probe interval may be found in high trait anxious participants, but not in low trait anxious participants. The results are discussed in relation to contemporary information processing theories of anxiety.

  7. Spontaneous Blinking from a Tribological Viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Pult, Heiko; Tosatti, Samuele G P; Spencer, Nicholas D; Asfour, Jean-Michel; Ebenhoch, Michael; Murphy, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical forces between the lid wiper and the ocular surface, and between a contact lens and the lid wiper, are reported to be related to dry eye symptoms. Furthermore, the mechanical forces between these sliding partners are assumed to be related to the ocular signs of lid-wiper epitheliopathy (LWE) and lid-parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF). Recent literature provides some evidence that a contact lens with a low coefficient of friction (CoF) improves wearing comfort by reducing the mechanical forces between the contact lens surface and the lid wiper. This review discusses the mechanical forces during spontaneous blinks from a tribological perspective, at both low and high sliding velocities, in a healthy subject. It concludes that the coefficient of friction of the ocular surfaces appears to be strongly comparable to that of hydrophilic polymer brushes at low sliding velocity, and that, with increased sliding velocity, there is no wear at the sliding partners' surfaces thanks to the presence of a fluid film between the two sliding partners. In contrast, in the case of dry eye, the failure to maintain a full fluid film lubrication regime at high blinking speeds may lead to increased shear rates, resulting in deformation and wear of the sliding pairs. These shear rates are most likely related to tear film viscosity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wireless quantified reflex device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoyne, Robert Charles

    The deep tendon reflex is a fundamental aspect of a neurological examination. The two major parameters of the tendon reflex are response and latency, which are presently evaluated qualitatively during a neurological examination. The reflex loop is capable of providing insight for the status and therapy response of both upper and lower motor neuron syndromes. Attempts have been made to ascertain reflex response and latency, however these systems are relatively complex, resource intensive, with issues of consistent and reliable accuracy. The solution presented is a wireless quantified reflex device using tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometers to obtain response based on acceleration waveform amplitude and latency derived from temporal acceleration waveform disparity. Three specific aims have been established for the proposed wireless quantified reflex device: 1. Demonstrate the wireless quantified reflex device is reliably capable of ascertaining quantified reflex response and latency using a quantified input. 2. Evaluate the precision of the device using an artificial reflex system. 3.Conduct a longitudinal study respective of subjects with healthy patellar tendon reflexes, using the wireless quantified reflex evaluation device to obtain quantified reflex response and latency. Aim 1 has led to the steady evolution of the wireless quantified reflex device from a singular two dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of measuring reflex response to a tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of reliably measuring reflex response and latency. The hypothesis for aim 1 is that a reflex quantification device can be established for reliably measuring reflex response and latency for the patellar tendon reflex, comprised of an integrated system of wireless three dimensional MEMS accelerometers. Aim 2 further emphasized the reliability of the wireless quantified reflex device by evaluating an artificial reflex system. The hypothesis for aim 2 is that

  9. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  10. Excitability of the human trigeminal motoneuronal pool and interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Priori, A

    2001-01-01

    We studied the properties of motoneurones and Ia-motoneuronal connections in the human trigeminal system, and their functional interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways mediated by non-muscular (Aβ) afferents. With surface EMG recordings we tested the recovery cycles of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle and the homonymous silent period in the masseter muscle both elicited by stimulation of the masseteric nerve at the infratemporal fossa in nine healthy subjects. In four subjects single motor-unit responses were recorded from the temporalis muscle. In six subjects we also tested the effect of the stimulus to the mental nerve on the temporalis H-reflex and, conversely, the effect of Ia input (stimulus to the masseteric nerve) on the R1 component of the blink reflex in the orbicularis oculi muscle. The recovery cycle of the H-reflex showed a suppression peaking at the 5-20 ms interval; conversely the time course of the masseteric silent period was facilitated at comparable intervals. The inhibition of the test H-reflex was inversely related to the level of background voluntary contraction. Single motor units were unable to fire consistently in response to the test stimulus at intervals shorter than 50 ms. Mental nerve stimulation strongly depressed the H-reflex. The time course of this inhibition coincided with the EMG inhibition elicited by mental nerve stimulation during voluntary contraction. The trigeminal Ia input facilitated the R1 component of the blink reflex when the supraorbital test stimulation preceded the masseteric conditioning stimulation by 2 ms. We conclude that the time course of the recovery cycle of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle reflects the after-hyperpolarization potential (AHP) of trigeminal motoneurones, and that the Ia trigeminal input is integrated with other brainstem reflexes. PMID:11230527

  11. Reflexes in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Richard D; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-04-01

    Psychiatric patients often do not cooperate fully with the neurologic examination. Reflexes virtually bypass patient effort and are difficult to consciously determine. This article reviews muscle stretch (deep tendon) reflexes, and pathological reflexes including the extensor plantar (Babinski) and primitive release reflexes. Topics include findings in common psychiatric and neurologic conditions and methods for eliciting these signs.

  12. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  13. The nasocardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Baxandall, M L; Thorn, J L

    1988-06-01

    The oculocardiac reflex is well described and recognised in anaesthesia. The nasocardiac reflex is less well-known. We describe a clinical manifestation of this reflex and describe the relevant anatomy. This reflex may be obtunded during general anaesthesia. during general anaesthesia.

  14. Reflexives in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Maki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconsider reflexives in Japanese through the following three steps: (a) separation of genuine reflexive elements from elements that are confounded as reflexives, (b) classification of reflexive anaphors into subtypes based on their semantic difference, and (c) classification of predicates that occur with…

  15. Blinking suppression of single quantum dots in agarose gel

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, H. C.; Yuan, C. T.; Tang, Jau; Lin, S. H.

    2010-01-04

    Fluorescence blinking is commonly observed in single molecule/particle spectroscopy, but it is an undesirable feature in many applications. We demonstrated that single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in agarose gel exhibited suppressed blinking behavior. In addition, the long-time exponential bending tail of the power-law blinking statistics was found to be influenced by agarose gel concentration. We suggest that electron transfer from the light state to the dark state might be blocked due to electrostatic surrounding of gel with inherent negatively charged fibers.

  16. Age effects on attentional blink performance in meditation.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sara; Müller, Notger G; Melloni, Lucia

    2009-09-01

    Here we explore whether mental training in the form of meditation can help to overcome age-related attentional decline. We compared performance on the attentional blink task between three populations: A group of long-term meditation practitioners within an older population, a control group of age-matched participants and a control group of young participants. Members of both control groups had never practiced meditation. Our results show that long-term meditation practice leads to a reduction of the attentional blink. Meditation practitioners taken from an older population showed a reduction in blink as compared to a control group taken from a younger population, whereas, the control group age-matched to the meditators' group revealed a blink that was comparatively larger and broader. Our results support the hypothesis that meditation practice can: (i) alter the efficiency with which attentional resources are distributed and (ii) help to overcome age-related attentional deficits in the temporal domain.

  17. Photoinduced blinking in a solid-state quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhane, Amanuel M.; Bradac, Carlo; Aharonovich, Igor

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state single-photon emitters (SPEs) are one of the prime components of many quantum nanophotonics devices. In this work, we report on an unusual, photoinduced blinking phenomenon of SPEs in gallium nitride. This is shown to be due to the modification in the transition kinetics of the emitter, via the introduction of additional laser-activated states. We investigate and characterize the blinking effect on the brightness of the source and the statistics of the emitted photons. Combining second-order correlation and fluorescence trajectory measurements, we determine the photodynamics of the trap states and characterize power-dependent decay rates and characteristic "off"-time blinking. Our work sheds light into understanding solid-state quantum system dynamics and, specifically, power-induced blinking phenomena in SPEs.

  18. Eye blinking in an avian species is associated with gaze shifts

    PubMed Central

    Yorzinski, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Even when animals are actively monitoring their environment, they lose access to visual information whenever they blink. They can strategically time their blinks to minimize information loss and improve visual functioning but we have little understanding of how this process operates in birds. This study therefore examined blinking in freely-moving peacocks (Pavo cristatus) to determine the relationship between their blinks, gaze shifts, and context. Peacocks wearing a telemetric eye-tracker were exposed to a taxidermy predator (Vulpes vulpes) and their blinks and gaze shifts were recorded. Peacocks blinked during the majority of their gaze shifts, especially when gaze shifts were large, thereby timing their blinks to coincide with periods when visual information is already suppressed. They inhibited their blinks the most when they exhibited high rates of gaze shifts and were thus highly alert. Alternative hypotheses explaining the link between blinks and gaze shifts are discussed. PMID:27572457

  19. Characterization of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Match W L; Dongming Wei; Leung, Christopher K S

    2015-01-01

    Corneal indentation is adapted for the design and development of a characterization method for corneal hysteresis behavior - Corneal Indentation Hysteresis (CIH). Fourteen porcine eyes were tested using the corneal indentation method. The CIH measured in enucleated porcine eyes showed indentation rate and intraocular pressure (IOP) dependences. The CIH increased with indentation rate at lower IOP (<; 25 mmHg) and decreased with indentation rate at higher IOP (> 25 mmHg). The CIH was linear proportional to the IOP within an individual eye. The CIH was positively correlated with the IOP, corneal in-plane tensile stress and corneal tangent modulus (E). A new method based on corneal indentation for the measurement of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis in vivo is developed. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introduce the corneal indentation hysteresis and correlate the corneal indentation hysteresis and corneal tangent modulus.

  20. Corneal pain activates a trigemino-parabrachial pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Hermes, Sam M.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal pain is mediated by primary afferent fibers projecting to the dorsal horn of the medulla, specifically the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. In contrast to reflex responses, the conscious perception of pain requires transmission of neural activity to higher brain centers. Ascending pain transmission is mediated primarily by pathways to either the thalamus or parabrachial nuclei. We previously showed that some corneal afferent fibers preferentially contact parabrachial-projecting neurons in the rostral pole of the trigeminal nucleus caudalis, but the role of these projection neurons in transmitting noxious information from the cornea has not been established. In the present study, we show that noxious stimulation of the corneal surface activates neurons in the rostral pole of the nucleus caudalis, including parabrachially projecting neurons that receive direct input from corneal afferent fibers. We used immunocytochemical detection of c-Fos protein as an index of neuronal activation after noxious ocular stimulation. Animals had previously received injections of a retrograde tracer into either thalamic or parabrachial nuclei to identify projection neurons in the trigeminal dorsal horn. Noxious stimulation of the cornea induced c-Fos in neurons sending projections to parabrachial nuclei, but not thalamic nuclei. We also confirmed that corneal afferent fibers identified with cholera toxin B preferentially target trigeminal dorsal horn neurons projecting to the parabrachial nucleus. The parabrachial region sends ascending projections to brain regions involved in emotional and homeostatic responses. Activation of the ascending parabrachial system may explain the extraordinary salience of stimulation of corneal nociceptors. PMID:24418463

  1. Significance of corneal arcus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, K. Mohan; Reddy, P. Arun Subhash; Kumar, Vikram Chella

    2015-01-01

    The corneal arcus consists of cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides. As serum triglyceride is one of the accurate of lipid metabolic state, greater importance was given, and it was found to be elevated in 72% of patients and a positive correlation with increasing age. This suggests a strong correlation between impairment of lipid metabolism and incidence of corneal arcus. PMID:26015693

  2. Significance of corneal arcus.

    PubMed

    Raj, K Mohan; Reddy, P Arun Subhash; Kumar, Vikram Chella

    2015-04-01

    The corneal arcus consists of cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides. As serum triglyceride is one of the accurate of lipid metabolic state, greater importance was given, and it was found to be elevated in 72% of patients and a positive correlation with increasing age. This suggests a strong correlation between impairment of lipid metabolism and incidence of corneal arcus.

  3. Corneal-shaping electrode

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; Hutson, Richard L.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a circulating saline electrode for changing corneal shape in eyes. The electrode comprises a tubular nonconductive electrode housing having an annular expanded base which has a surface substantially matched to a subject corneal surface. A tubular conductive electrode connected to a radiofrequency generating source is disposed within the electrode housing and longitudinally aligned therewith. The electrode has a generally hemispherical head having at least one orifice. Saline solution is circulated through the apparatus and over the cornea to cool the corneal surface while radiofrequency electric current emitted from the electrode flows therefrom through the cornea to a second electrode, on the rear of the head. This current heats the deep corneal stroma and thereby effects corneal reshaping as a biological response to the heat.

  4. Corneal biomechanics - a review.

    PubMed

    Kling, Sabine; Hafezi, Farhad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the interest in corneal biomechanics has strongly increased. The material properties of the cornea determine its shape and therefore play an important role in corneal ectasia and related pathologies. This review addresses the molecular origin of biomechanical properties, models for their description, methods for their characterisation, techniques for their modification, and computational simulation approaches. Recent research has focused on developing non-contact techniques to measure the biomechanical properties in vivo, on determining structural and molecular abnormalities in pathological corneas, on developing and optimising techniques to reinforce the corneal tissue and on the computational simulation of surgical interventions. A better understanding of corneal biomechanics will help to improve current refractive surgeries, allow an earlier diagnosis of ectatic disorders and a better quantification of treatments aiming at reinforcing the corneal tissue. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  5. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  6. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  7. Grading of corneal transparency.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Clare; Wolffsohn, James S

    2004-12-01

    To examine the academic literature on the grading of corneal transparency and to assess the potential use of objective image analysis. Reference databases of academic literature were searched and relevant manuscripts reviewed. Annunziato, Efron (Millennium Edition) and Vistakon-Synoptik corneal oedema grading scale images were analysed objectively for relative intensity, edges detected, variation in intensity and maximum intensity. In addition, corneal oedema was induced in one subject using a low oxygen transmissibility (Dk/t) hydrogel contact lens worn for 3h under a light eye patch. Recovery from oedema was monitored over time using ultrasound pachymetry, high and low contrast visual acuity measures, bulbar hyperaemia grading and transparency image analysis of the test and control eyes. Several methods for assessing corneal transparency are described in the academic literature, but none have gained widespread use in clinical practice. The change in objective image analysis with printed scale grade was best described by quadratic parametric or sigmoid 3-parameter functions. 'Pupil image scales' (Annunziato and Vistakon-Synoptik) were best correlated to average intensity; however, the corneal section scale (Efron) was strongly correlated to variations in intensity. As expected, patching an eye wearing a low Dk/t hydrogel contact lens caused a significant (F = 119.2, p < 0.001) 14.3% increase in corneal thickness, which gradually recovered under open eye conditions. Corneal section image analysis was the most affected parameter and intensity variation across the slit width, in isolation, was the strongest correlate, accounting for 85.8% of the variance with time following patching, and 88.7% of the variance with corneal thickness. Corneal oedema is best determined objectively by the intensity variation across the width of a corneal section. This can be easily measured using a slit-lamp camera connected to a computer. Oedema due to soft contact lens wear is not

  8. Attention "blinks" differently for plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Balas, Benjamin; Momsen, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Plants, to many, are simply not as interesting as animals. Students typically prefer to study animals rather than plants and recall plants more poorly, and plants are underrepresented in the classroom. The observed paucity of interest for plants has been described as plant blindness, a term that is meant to encapsulate both the tendency to neglect plants in the environment and the lack of appreciation for plants' functional roles. While the term plant blindness suggests a perceptual or attentional component to plant neglect, few studies have examined whether there are real differences in how plants and animals are perceived. Here, we use an established paradigm in visual cognition, the "attentional blink," to compare the extent to which images of plants and animals capture attentional resources. We find that participants are better able to detect animals than plants in rapid image sequences and that visual attention has a different refractory period when a plant has been detected. These results suggest there are fundamental differences in how the visual system processes plants that may contribute to plant blindness. We discuss how perceptual and physiological constraints on visual processing may suggest useful strategies for characterizing and overcoming zoocentrism.

  9. Current status of corneal xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Kum; Hara, Hidetaka

    2015-11-01

    Corneal allo-transplantation is a well-established technique to treat corneal blindness. However, the limited availability of human donors demands the exploration of alternative treatments such as corneal xenotransplantation (e.g., pigs as donors) and bioengineered corneas. Since the first attempt of corneal xenotransplantation using a donor pig cornea in 1844, great advances have been made in the development of genetically-engineered pigs, effective immunosuppressive protocols and the establishment of guidelines for the conduction of clinical trials. We highlight immunological and physio-anatomical barriers of corneal xenotransplantation, recent progress of corneal xenotransplantation in non-human-primates studies, and regulatory guidelines to conduct clinical trials for corneal xenotransplantation.

  10. Nasonasal reflexes, the nasal cycle, and sneeze.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James N; Kim, Dennis

    2007-05-01

    The nasal mucosa is a complex tissue that interacts with its environment and effects local and systemic changes. Receptors in the nose receive signals from stimuli, and respond locally through afferent, nociceptive, type C neurons to elicit nasonasal reflex responses mediated via cholinergic neurons. This efferent limb leads to responses in the nose (eg, rhinorrhea, glandular hyperplasia, hypersecretion with mucosal swelling). Anticholinergic agents appear useful against this limb for symptomatic relief of a "runny nose." Chronic exposure to allergens can lead to hyperresponsiveness of the nasal mucosa. As a result, receptors upregulate specific ion channels to increase the sensitivity and potency of their reflex response. Nasal stimuli also affect distant parts of the body. Nerves in the sinus mucosa cause vasodilation; the lacrimal glands can be stimulated by nasal afferent triggers. Even the cardiopulmonary system can be affected via the trigeminal chemosensory system, where sensed irritants can lead to changes in tidal volume, respiratory rate, and blink frequency. The sneeze is an airway defense mechanism that removes irritants from the nasal epithelial surface. It is generally benign, but can lead to problems in certain circumstances. The afferent pathway involves histamine-mediated depolarization of H1 receptor-bearing type C trigeminal neurons and a complex coordination of reactions to effect a response.

  11. Detection of eye blink artifacts from single prefrontal channel electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Kim, Kiwoong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Eye blinks are one of the most influential artifact sources in electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from frontal channels, and thereby detecting and rejecting eye blink artifacts is regarded as an essential procedure for improving the quality of EEG data. In this paper, a novel method to detect eye blink artifacts from a single-channel frontal EEG signal was proposed by combining digital filters with a rule-based decision system, and its performance was validated using an EEG dataset recorded from 24 healthy participants. The proposed method has two main advantages over the conventional methods. First, it uses single-channel EEG data without the need for electrooculogram references. Therefore, this method could be particularly useful in brain-computer interface applications using headband-type wearable EEG devices with a few frontal EEG channels. Second, this method could estimate the ranges of eye blink artifacts accurately. Our experimental results demonstrated that the artifact range estimated using our method was more accurate than that from the conventional methods, and thus, the overall accuracy of detecting epochs contaminated by eye blink artifacts was markedly increased as compared to conventional methods. The MATLAB package of our library source codes and sample data, named Eyeblink Master, is open for free download.

  12. Probing and controlling fluorescence blinking of single semiconductor nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau

    2011-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the experimental and theoretical development on fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and the roles of electron transfer in semiconductor crystalline nanoparticles. Blinking is a very interesting phenomenon commonly observed in single molecule/particle experiments. Under continuous laser illumination, the fluorescence time trace of these single nanoparticles exhibit random light and dark periods. Since its first observation in the mid-1990s, this intriguing phenomenon has attracted wide attention among researchers from many disciplines. We will first present the historical background of the discovery and the observation of unusual inverse power-law dependence for the waiting time distributions of light and dark periods. Then, we will describe our theoretical modeling efforts to elucidate the causes for the power-law behavior, to probe the roles of electron transfer in blinking, and eventually to control blinking and to achieve complete suppression of the blinking, which is an annoying feature in many applications of quantum dots as light sources and fluorescence labels for biomedical imaging. PMID:22110871

  13. Envelope filter sequence to delete blinks and overshoots.

    PubMed

    Merino, Manuel; Gómez, Isabel María; Molina, Alberto J

    2015-05-30

    Eye movements have been used in control interfaces and as indicators of somnolence, workload and concentration. Different techniques can be used to detect them: we focus on the electrooculogram (EOG) in which two kinds of interference occur: blinks and overshoots. While they both draw bell-shaped waveforms, blinks are caused by the eyelid, whereas overshoots occur due to target localization error and are placed on saccade. They need to be extracted from the EOG to increase processing effectiveness. This paper describes off- and online processing implementations based on lower envelope for removing bell-shaped noise; they are compared with a 300-ms-median filter. Techniques were analyzed using two kinds of EOG data: those modeled from our own design, and real signals. Using a model signal allowed to compare filtered outputs with ideal data, so that it was possible to quantify processing precision to remove noise caused by blinks, overshoots, and general interferences. We analyzed the ability to delete blinks and overshoots, and waveform preservation. Our technique had a high capacity for reducing interference amplitudes (>97%), even exceeding median filter (MF) results. However, the MF obtained better waveform preservation, with a smaller dependence on fixation width. The proposed technique is better at deleting blinks and overshoots than the MF in model and real EOG signals.

  14. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects. PMID:23959240

  15. Analysis of blink dynamics in patients with blepharoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Anthony; Kwon, Kyung-Ah; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Rose, Geoffrey E.; Murta, Fabiola; Ezra, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the rapid movements of the human upper eyelid, a high-speed camera was used to record and characterize voluntary blinking and the blink dynamics of blepharoptosis patients were compared to a control group. Twenty-six blepharoptosis patients prior to surgery and 45 control subjects were studied and the vertical height of the palpebral aperture (PA) was measured manually at 2 ms intervals during each blink cycle. The PA and blinking speed were plotted with respect to time and a predictive model was generated. The blink dynamic was analysed in closing and opening phases, and revealed a reduced speed of the initial opening phase in ptotic patients, suggesting intrinsic muscle function change in ptosis pathogenesis. The PA versus time curve for each subject was reconstructed using custom-built parameters; however, there were significant differences between the two groups. Those parameters used included the rate of closure, the delay between opening and closing, rate of initial opening, rate of slow opening (nonlinear function) and the ‘switch point’ between those two rates of opening. The model was tested against a new group of subjects and was able to discriminate ptosis patients from controls with 80% accuracy. PMID:26962027

  16. Withdrawal of voluntary inhibition unravels the off state of the spontaneous blink generator.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, Timoleon; Ghosh, Arko

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary movements such as spontaneous eye blinks can be successfully inhibited at will. Little do we know how the voluntary motor circuits countermand spontaneous blinks. Do the voluntary inhibitory commands act to pause or to turn off the endogenous blink generator, or does inhibition intersect and counter the generator׳s excitatory outputs? In theory, the time taken for the system to generate an after-inhibition blink will reflect onto the form of inhibition. For instance, if voluntary commands were to turn the blink generator off then the after-blink latency would be fixed to the inhibition offset and reflect the time it takes for the generator to rebound and turn on. In this study we measured the after-blink latency from the offset of voluntary inhibition. Volunteers inhibited their blinks in response to sound tones of randomly varying durations. At the offset volunteers withdrew the inhibition and relaxed. Interestingly, the spontaneous after-blinks were fixed to the offset of the inhibition as if the generator rebounded from an off state. The after-blink latency was not related to the duration of the inhibition, and inhibiting even for a small fraction of the mean inter-blink interval generated an after-blink time-locked to the inhibition offset. Interestingly, the insertion of voluntary blinks after inhibition further altered the blink generator by delaying the spontaneous after-blinks. We propose that the inhibition of spontaneous blinks at the level of the generator allows for highly effective voluntary countermanding. Nevertheless, the withdrawal of such inhibition was strongly associated with motor excitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Corneal blindness and xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Vladimir; Hara, Hidetaka; Mammen, Alex; Dhaliwal, Deepinder; Cooper, David K C

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 39 million people are blind worldwide, with an estimated 285 million visually impaired. The developing world shoulders 90% of the world's blindness, with 80% of causative diseases being preventable or treatable. Blindness has a major detrimental impact on the patient, community, and healthcare spending. Corneal diseases are significant causes of blindness, affecting at least 4 million people worldwide. The prevalence of corneal disease varies between parts of the world. Trachoma, for instance, is the second leading cause of blindness in Africa, after cataracts, but is rarely found today in developed nations. When preventive strategies have failed, corneal transplantation is the most effective treatment for advanced corneal disease. The major surgical techniques for corneal transplantation include penetrating keratoplasty (PK), anterior lamellar keratoplasty, and endothelial keratoplasty (EK). Indications for corneal transplantation vary between countries, with Fuchs' dystrophy being the leading indication in the USA and keratoconus in Australia. With the exception of the USA, where EK will soon overtake PK as the most common surgical procedure, PK is the overwhelming procedure of choice. Success using corneal grafts in developing nations, such as Nepal, demonstrates the feasibility of corneal transplantation on a global scale. The number of suitable corneas from deceased human donors that becomes available will never be sufficient, and so research into various alternatives, for example stem cells, amniotic membrane transplantation, synthetic and biosynthetic corneas, and xenotransplantation, is progressing. While each of these has potential, we suggest that xenotransplantation holds the greatest potential for a corneal replacement. With the increasing availability of genetically engineered pigs, pig corneas may alleviate the global shortage of corneas in the near future.

  18. CORNEAL BLINDNESS AND XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Vladimir; Hara, Hidetaka; Mammen, Alex; Dhaliwal, Deepinder; Cooper, David K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 39 million people are blind worldwide, with an estimated 285 million visually impaired. The developing world shoulders 90% of the world’s blindness, with 80% of causative diseases being preventable or treatable. Blindness has a major detrimental impact on the patient, community, and healthcare spending. Corneal diseases are significant causes of blindness, affecting at least 4 million people worldwide. The prevalence of corneal disease varies among parts of the world. Trachoma, for instance, is the second leading cause of blindness in Africa, after cataracts, but is rarely found today in developed nations. When preventive strategies have failed, corneal transplantation is the most effective treatment for advanced corneal disease. The major surgical techniques for corneal transplantation include penetrating keratoplasty (PK), anterior lamellar keratoplasty (ALK), and endothelial keratoplasty (EK). Indications for corneal transplantation vary among countries, with Fuchs’ dystrophy being the leading indication in the U.S. and keratoconus in Australia. With the exception of the US, where EK will soon overtake PK as the most common surgical procedure, PK is the overwhelming procedure of choice. Success using corneal grafts in developing nations, such as Nepal, demonstrates the feasibility of corneal transplantation on a global scale. The number of suitable corneas from deceased human donors that becomes available will never be sufficient, and so research into various alternatives, e.g., stem cells, amniotic membrane transplantation, synthetic and biosynthetic corneas, and xenotransplantation, is progressing. While each of these has potential, we suggest that xenotransplantation holds the greatest potential for a corneal replacement. With the increasing availability of genetically-engineered pigs, pig corneas may alleviate the global shortage of corneas in the near future. PMID:25268248

  19. Pellucid marginal corneal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Krachmer, J H

    1978-07-01

    Pellucid marginal degeneration of the cornea is a bilateral, clear, inferior, peripheral corneal-thinning disorder. Protrusion of the cornea occurs above a band of thinning, which is located 1 to 2 mm from the limbus and measures 1 to 2 mm in width. American ophthalmologists are generally not familiar with the condition because most of the literature concerning pellucid degeneration is European. Four cases are described. This condition is differentiated from other noninflammatory cornel-thinning disorders such as keratoconus, keratoglobus, keratotorus, and posterior keratoconus. It is also differentiated from peripheral corneal disorders associated with inflammation such as Terrien's peripheral corneal degeneration, Mooren's ulcers, and ulcers from connective tissue disease.

  20. The Sparing Is Far from Spurious: Reevaluating Within-Trial Contingency Effects in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Hulleman, Johan; Spalek, Thomas; Kawahara, Jun-ichiro; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink is the marked deficit in awareness of a 2nd target (T2) when it is presented shortly after the 1st target (T1) in a stream of distractors. When the distractors between T1 and T2 are replaced by even more targets, the attentional blink is reduced or absent, indicating that the attentional blink results from online selection…

  1. Optimizing Blink Parameters for Highlighting an Air Traffic Control Situation Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    degrade its attention -getting value. Those factors include target size, color, brightness contrast, frequency of blink, and the time the blink is at...maximum brightness relative to the time it is off or dim during the blink cycle. No guidelines were found for determining the optimal attention -getting

  2. The Sparing Is Far from Spurious: Reevaluating Within-Trial Contingency Effects in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Hulleman, Johan; Spalek, Thomas; Kawahara, Jun-ichiro; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink is the marked deficit in awareness of a 2nd target (T2) when it is presented shortly after the 1st target (T1) in a stream of distractors. When the distractors between T1 and T2 are replaced by even more targets, the attentional blink is reduced or absent, indicating that the attentional blink results from online selection…

  3. Triple helix conformation-specific blinking of Cy3 in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2015-03-21

    We report that Cy3 undergoes triple helix conformation-specific blinking in DNA. Blinking patterns were affected by the stabilization of the Hoogsteen base-pair, suggesting that not only the presence but also the fluctuating behaviour of the triple helix can be monitored by the changes in the Cy3 blinking patterns.

  4. Regulating the blink: Cognitive reappraisal modulates attention.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ruth; Schönfelder, Sandra; Forneck, Johanna; Wessa, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Our brain is unable to fully process all the sensory signals we encounter. Attention is the process that helps selecting input from all available information for detailed processing and it is largely influenced by the affective value of the stimuli. This study examined if attentional bias toward emotional stimuli can be modulated by cognitively changing their emotional value. Participants were presented with negative and neutral images from four different scene-categories depicting humans ("Reading", "Working", "Crying" and "Violence"). Using cognitive reappraisal subjects decreased and increased the negativity of one negative (e.g., "Crying") and one neutral (e.g., "Reading") category respectively, whereas they only had to watch the other two categories (e.g., "Working" and "Violence") without changing their feelings. Subsequently, subjects performed the attentional blink paradigm. Two targets were embedded in a stream of distractors, with the previously seen human pictures serving as the first target (T1) and rotated landmark/landscape images as the second (T2). Subjects then reported T1 visibility and the orientation of T2. We investigated if the detection accuracy of T2 is influenced by the change of the emotional value of T1 due to the reappraisal manipulation. Indeed, T2 detection rate was higher when T2 was preceded by a negative image that was only viewed compared to negative images that were reappraised to be neutral. Thus, more resources were captured by images that have been reappraised before, i.e., their negativity has been reduced. This modulatory effect of reappraisal on attention was not found for neutral images. Possibly upon re-exposure to negative stimuli subjects had to recall the previously performed affective change. In this case resources may be allocated to maintain the reappraised value and therefore hinder the detection of a temporally close target. Complimentary self-reported ratings support the reappraisal manipulation of negative images.

  5. Effects of Meditation Practice on Spontaneous Eye Blink Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kruis, Ayla; Slagter, Heleen A.; Bachhuber, David R.W.; Davidson, Richard J.; Lutz, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of research suggests that meditation can change brain and cognitive functioning. Yet little is known about the neurochemical mechanisms underlying meditation-related changes in cognition. Here we investigated the effects of meditation on spontaneous Eye Blink Rates (sEBR), a non-invasive peripheral correlate of striatal dopamine activity. Previous studies have shown a relationship between sEBR and cognitive functions such as mind-wandering, cognitive flexibility, and attention–functions that are also affected by meditation. We therefore expected that long-term meditation practice would alter eye-blink activity. To test this, we recorded baseline sEBR and Inter Eye-Blink Intervals (IEBI) in long-term meditators (LTM) and meditation naive participants (MNP). We found that LTM not only blinked less frequently, but also showed a different eye-blink pattern than MNP. This pattern had good to high degree of consistency over three time points. Moreover, we examined the effects of an 8 week-course of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on sEBR and IEBI, compared to an active control group and a waitlist-control group. No effect of short-term meditation practice was found. Finally, we investigated whether different types of meditation differentially alter eye blink activity by measuring sEBR and IEBI after a full day of two kinds of meditation practices in the LTM. No effect of meditation type was found. Taken together, these findings may suggest either that individual difference in dopaminergic neurotransmission is a self-selection factor for meditation practice, or that long-term, but not short-term meditation practice induces stable changes in baseline striatal dopaminergic functioning. PMID:26871460

  6. Using Eye Blinking for EOG-Based Robot Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguleana, Mihai; Mogan, Gheorghe

    This paper proposes a new approach to real-time robot controlling by integrating an Electrooculography (EOG) measuring device within human-robot interaction (HRI). Our study focuses on controlling robots using EOG for fulfilling elementary robot activities such as basic motor movements and environment interaction. A new EOG-based HRI paradigm has been developed on the specific defined problem of eye blinking. The resulted model is tested using biometric capturing equipment. We propose a simple algorithm for real-time identification and processing of signals produced by eyes during blinking phases. We present the experimental setup and the results of the experiment. We conclude by listing further research issues.

  7. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  8. Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Elhalis, Hussain; Azizi, Behrooz; Jurkunas, Ula V.

    2011-01-01

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is characterized by progressive loss of corneal endothelial cells, thickening of Descement’s membrane and deposition of extracellular matrix in the form of guttae. When the number of endothelial cells becomes critically low, the cornea swells and causes loss of vision. The clinical course of FECD usually spans 10–20 years. Corneal transplantation is currently the only modality used to restore vision. Over the last several decades genetic studies have detected several genes, as well as areas of chromosomal loci associated with the disease. Proteomic studies have given rise to several hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of FECD. This review expands upon the recent findings from proteomic and genetic studies and builds upon recent advances in understanding the causes of this common corneal disorder. PMID:20964980

  9. Corneal transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100082.htm Corneal transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  10. Equine corneal surgery and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Denis, Heidi M

    2004-08-01

    Corneal disease is common in equine ophthalmology and requires vigilant monitoring and appropriate therapy to optimize the outcome. Many equine corneal diseases, particularly those that progress rapidly, may benefit from surgical intervention. These include descemetoceles, deep corneal lacerations and ulcers, corneal perforation/iris prolapse, ulcerative keratitis, corneal stromal abscesses, and corneoscleral neoplasia. Indications for corneal transplantation include optical, tectonic, therapeutic, and cosmetic purposes. Corneal transplantation is most often implemented in equine patients for tectonic and therapeutic reasons when a cornea is compromised by corneal stromal abscess, iris prolapse, or neoplasia. This article provides an outline of when to consider surgical intervention for corneal disease, the procedures available and expected outcomes, and how appropriate early surgical intervention can dramatically improve the end result.

  11. Abnormal Control of Orbicularis Oculi Reflex Excitability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Christopher; Llufriu, Sara; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Saiz, Albert; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis may lead to abnormal excitability of brainstem reflex circuits because of impairment of descending control pathways. We hypothesized that such abnormality should show in the analysis of blink reflex responses in the form of asymmetries in response size. The study was done in 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 12 matched healthy subjects. We identified first patients with latency abnormalities (AbLat). Then, we analyzed response size by calculating the R2c/R2 ratio to stimulation of either side and the mean area of the R2 responses obtained in the same side. Patients with significantly larger response size with respect to healthy subjects in at least one side were considered to have abnormal response excitability (AbEx). We also examined the blink reflex excitability recovery (BRER) and prepulse inhibition (BRIP) of either side in search for additional indices of asymmetry in response excitability. Neurophysiological data were correlated with MRI-determined brain lesion-load and volume. Eight patients were identified as AbLat (median Expanded Disability Status Scale–EDSS = 2.75) and 7 of them had ponto-medullary lesions. Nine patients were identified as AbEx (EDSS = 1.5) and only 2 of them, who also were AbLat, had ponto-medullary lesions. In AbEx patients, the abnormalities in response size were confined to one side, with a similar tendency in most variables (significantly asymmetric R1 amplitude, BRER index and BRIP percentage). AbEx patients had asymmetric distribution of hemispheral lesions, in contrast with the symmetric pattern observed in AbLat. The brainstem lesion load was significantly lower in AbEx than in AbLat patients (p = 0.04). Asymmetric abnormalities in blink reflex response excitability in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with lesser disability and lower tissue loss than abnormalities in response latency. Testing response excitability could

  12. Central corneal abscess.

    PubMed

    van Bijsterveld, O P

    1976-05-01

    Central corneal abscess developed in the experimental animal after inoculation of biologically active staphylococcal strains in a paracentral epithelial lesion of the cornea. These abscesses did not ulcerate, developed only with high inocula, occurred more frequently in immunized rabbits. A serpiginous type of ulceration did not develop at the site of the initial epithelial lesion nor at any other place in the cornea. Histologically, the lesions consisted of densely packed polymorphonuclear leukocytes between the corneal lamellae.

  13. Problems with corneal arcus.

    PubMed

    Fielder, A R; Winder, A F; Sheraidah, G A; Cooke, E D

    1981-01-01

    Corneal arcus presents many puzzling features. The correlation between its incidence and serum lipid levels is poor and, using immunoelectrophoresis, we have only been able to identify low-density lipoprotein inconsistently in corneae containing this deposition. Infrared thermography has shown us that arcus commences in the warmest regions of the cornea. We have considered the possible relevance of our biochemical and thermographic findings to other problems with corneal arcus such as its irreversibility, anatomical distribution, and clear zone.

  14. Effects of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell counts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Tao; Pan, Yingzhe

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic keratopathy is an ocular complication that occurs with diabetes. In the present study, the effect of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell count was investigated. One hundred and eighty diabetic patients (360 eyes) were enrolled in the study during the period from March, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients were divided into three age groups: <5, 5-10 and >10 years, with 60 patients per group (120 eyes). During the same period, 60 healthy cases (120 eyes) were selected and labeled as the normal control group. The Pentacam was used to measure the corneal optical density, and central corneal thickness. Specular microscopy was used to examine the corneal endothelial cell density. The coefficient of partial correlation was used to control age and correlate the analysis between the corneal optical density, corneal endothelial cell density, and central corneal thickness. The stage of the disease, the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness was analyzed in the diabetes group. The corneal optical density in the diabetes group increased compared with that of the normal control group. The medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were positively correlated with the course of the disease. However, the corneal endothelial cell density was not associated with the course of diabetes. There was a positive association between the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness of the diabetic patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were sensitive indicators for early diabetic keratopathy.

  15. Effects of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Tao; Pan, Yingzhe

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic keratopathy is an ocular complication that occurs with diabetes. In the present study, the effect of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell count was investigated. One hundred and eighty diabetic patients (360 eyes) were enrolled in the study during the period from March, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients were divided into three age groups: <5, 5–10 and >10 years, with 60 patients per group (120 eyes). During the same period, 60 healthy cases (120 eyes) were selected and labeled as the normal control group. The Pentacam was used to measure the corneal optical density, and central corneal thickness. Specular microscopy was used to examine the corneal endothelial cell density. The coefficient of partial correlation was used to control age and correlate the analysis between the corneal optical density, corneal endothelial cell density, and central corneal thickness. The stage of the disease, the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness was analyzed in the diabetes group. The corneal optical density in the diabetes group increased compared with that of the normal control group. The medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were positively correlated with the course of the disease. However, the corneal endothelial cell density was not associated with the course of diabetes. There was a positive association between the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness of the diabetic patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were sensitive indicators for early diabetic keratopathy. PMID:27588090

  16. Corneal honeybee sting.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Stephen C B; Lee, Jong-Jian; Fam, Han-Bor

    2005-08-01

    We report the complications and management of a retained bee sting injury to the cornea. The case highlights the acute and chronic management of an uncommon injury and its pathogenesis. A 67-year-old man was attacked by a swarm of bees and was referred for severe chemosis on the right eye. A retained corneal bee stinger (ovipositor) was seen but removal was only partially successful. He subsequently developed a large corneal epithelial defect, anterior uveitis, intractable glaucoma, traumatic cataract, toxic optic neuropathy, and corneal scarring. We reviewed the literature on corneal bee sting injuries and their complications. Inflammation was controlled with topical steroids and the patient underwent a combined phacoemulsification and trabeculectomy with mitomycin-C for uncontrolled glaucoma. However, optic neuropathy did not resolve. Corneal bee sting injuries are uncommon but can result in severe sight-threatening complications such as toxic optic neuropathy. Early recognition of the possible complications and appropriate treatment may help to prevent permanent loss of vision. Removal of a retained corneal bee stinger remains controversial.

  17. Randomised, controlled blink reflex in patients with migraine and tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Gökhan; Sayin, Refah; Cögen, Etem Emre; Odabas, Faruk Omer; Tombul, Temel

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the latencies, amplitudes of R1, R2i and R2k responses and R2 habituation; to compare the groups with each other and with the placebo group and to demonstrate new evidences on migraine and tension-type headache TTH mechanisms. This analytical study was carried out among 40 migraine patients who were admitted to Yuzuncu Yil University, Medical Faculty, Neurology Clinics between May 2009 and December 2009, with or without aura according to the diagnostic criteria of International Headache Society 2004 classification. Forty TTH patients, who were diagnosed with TTH were included, and 40 control group subjects were formed according to the same demographic data. SPSSv13 was used for Chi-square test, one-way ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficients was used for the determination of the relation between the groups and categorical. Mean age was 33.04 +/- 9.07 years. An average of RR2k latency was significantly high in migraine group comparing with TTH and the control groups, and in TTH group comparing with the control group. Similarly, the average of LR2k latency was found to be significantly higher in migraine group than TTH and the control groups, and significantly higher in TTH group than the control group. Our findings demonstrated that brainstem and trigeminovascular connections play an important role in migraine pathogenesis and that central mechanisms play a role in TTH and concerning these two diseases.

  18. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  19. A corneal mold to restore normal corneal dimensions.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Kornmehl, E W; York, S; Forman, J S

    1986-01-01

    A corneal mold is described that provides an MK corneal button of normal thickness and curvature from an edematous, post-mortem button. The uniform, processed tissue can then be used for experimental refractive surgery.

  20. Neuromagnetic brain responses to other person's eye blinks seen on video.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Anne; Helokunnas, Siiri; Pihko, Elina; Hari, Riitta

    2014-08-01

    Eye blinks, typically occurring 15-20 times per minute, rarely capture attention during face-to-face interaction. To determine the extent to which eye blinks affect the viewer's brain activity, we recorded magnetoencephalographic brain responses to natural blinks, and to the same blinks slowed down to 38% of the original speed. The stimuli were presented on video once every 2.3-6.2 s. As a control, we presented two horizontal black bars moving with the same time courses and the same extent as the eyelids in the blink video. Both types of blinks and bars elicited clear responses peaking at about 200 ms in the occipital areas, with no systematic differences between hemispheres. For the bars, these main responses were (as expected) weaker (by 24%) and later (by 33 ms) to slow-motion than normal-speed stimuli. For blinks, however, the responses to both normal-speed and slow-motion stimuli were of the same amplitude and latency. Our results demonstrate that the brain not only responds to other persons' eye blinks, but that the responses are as fast and of equal size even when the blinks are considerably slowed down. We interpret this finding to reflect the increased social salience of the slowed-down blinks that counteracted the general tendency of the brain to react more weakly and more slowly to slowly- vs. quickly-changing stimuli. This finding may relate to the social importance of facial gestures, including eye blinks.

  1. Mars Rover Opportunity View of Comet Blink of Two Exposures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-20

    This two-image blink shows a comparison of two exposure times in images from the panoramic camera Pancam on NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity showing comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as it flew near Mars on Oct. 19, 2014.

  2. Viewpoint Costs Occur during Consolidation: Evidence from the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dux, Paul E.; Harris, Irina M.

    2007-01-01

    Do the viewpoint costs incurred when naming rotated familiar objects arise during initial identification or during consolidation? To answer this question we employed an attentional blink (AB) task where two target objects appeared amongst a rapid stream of distractor objects. Our assumption was that while both targets and distractors undergo…

  3. Masking T1 Difficulty: Processing Time and the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Troy A. W.

    2007-01-01

    When observers are presented with 2 targets in rapid succession, identification of the 1st is highly accurate, whereas identification of the 2nd is impaired at brief intertarget intervals (i.e., 200-500 ms). This 2nd-target deficit is known as the attentional blink (AB). According to bottleneck models, the AB arises because attending to the 1st…

  4. When Do Additional Distractors Reduce the Attentional Blink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawahara, Jun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    When 2 targets are embedded in a rapid serial visual presentation stream of distractors, perception of the second target is impaired when the intertarget lag is relatively short (less than 500 ms). Stimuli concurrently presented with the stream can affect this phenomenon, which is called attentional blink (AB). Previous studies have yielded…

  5. Excessive blinking as an initial manifestation of juvenile Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Chen, Ling; Chen, Xi; Pei, Zhong; Zeng, Jinsheng; Li, Jinru

    2008-09-01

    Juvenile Huntington's disease (JHD) is mostly characterized by rigidity, myoclonus, bradykinesia, dystonia and seizure. We report a 9-year-old male JHD patient presenting excessive blinking as the initial symptom two years prior to typical JHD symptoms. Genetic analysis revealed expansion of 108 CAG repeats and magnetic resonance imaging showed caudate atrophy with lateral ventricular enlargement.

  6. When Do Additional Distractors Reduce the Attentional Blink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawahara, Jun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    When 2 targets are embedded in a rapid serial visual presentation stream of distractors, perception of the second target is impaired when the intertarget lag is relatively short (less than 500 ms). Stimuli concurrently presented with the stream can affect this phenomenon, which is called attentional blink (AB). Previous studies have yielded…

  7. Masking T1 Difficulty: Processing Time and the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Troy A. W.

    2007-01-01

    When observers are presented with 2 targets in rapid succession, identification of the 1st is highly accurate, whereas identification of the 2nd is impaired at brief intertarget intervals (i.e., 200-500 ms). This 2nd-target deficit is known as the attentional blink (AB). According to bottleneck models, the AB arises because attending to the 1st…

  8. Viewpoint Costs Occur during Consolidation: Evidence from the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dux, Paul E.; Harris, Irina M.

    2007-01-01

    Do the viewpoint costs incurred when naming rotated familiar objects arise during initial identification or during consolidation? To answer this question we employed an attentional blink (AB) task where two target objects appeared amongst a rapid stream of distractor objects. Our assumption was that while both targets and distractors undergo…

  9. Modulation of eyeblink and postauricular reflexes during the anticipation and viewing of food images.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Karen R; Valle-Inclán, Fernando; Hackley, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    One of the goals of neuroscience research on the reward system is to fractionate its functions into meaningful subcomponents. To this end, the present study examined emotional modulation of the eyeblink and postauricular components of startle in 60 young adults during anticipation and viewing of food images. Appetitive and disgusting photos served as rewards and punishments in a guessing game. Reflexes evoked during anticipation were not influenced by valence, consistent with the prevailing view that startle modulation indexes hedonic impact (liking) rather than incentive salience (wanting). During the slide-viewing period, postauricular reflexes were larger for correct than incorrect feedback, whereas the reverse was true for blink reflexes. Probes were delivered in brief trains, but only the first response exhibited this pattern. The specificity of affective startle modification makes it a valuable tool for studying the reward system.

  10. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  11. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  12. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  13. Corneal fibrosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Strong, Travis D; Tangeman, Sarah; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Haynes, Joseph; Allbaugh, Rachel A

    2016-07-01

    To present the clinicopathologic features of a Domestic Short-haired cat with spontaneous, intermediate-grade corneal fibrosarcoma, possibly secondary to chronic corneal irritation associated with a corneal sequestrum. A 12-year-old, spayed female Domestic Short-haired cat was evaluated for a slowly growing, pink, exophytic mass affecting the left cornea. The cat had presented 6 years previously for bilateral brown corneal sequestra, as well as 3 years previously for a small pale growth on the left cornea hypothesized to be an epithelial inclusion cyst and a corneal ulcer affecting the right eye. Incisional biopsy of the corneal mass indicated intermediate-grade corneal fibrosarcoma within the corneal stroma. Owing to the potential for malignant behavior, the left globe was enucleated. Routine systemic staging was performed prior to surgery with no evidence of metastasis. Definitive diagnosis of corneal fibrosarcoma was made through histopathologic examination of the incisional biopsy. There was an elevated mitotic index, indicating an intermediate-grade phenotype. Histopathology of the enucleated globe substantiated the initial findings, and complete tumor resection was confirmed. Subjacent to the corneal fibrosarcoma, there was a region of necrotic tissue suggestive of a corneal sequestrum. Six months after diagnosis and enucleation, the patient remained healthy with no signs of local spread or distant metastasis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first documented case of a corneal fibrosarcoma in a cat. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Corneal tattooing: an alternative treatment for disfiguring corneal scars

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, S; Jahn, R; Frisch, L; Duis, A; Pfeiffer, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: The performance and results of corneal tattooing are described in a case series of 11 patients suffering from a disfiguring corneal scar using a technique similar to conventional dermatography. Methods: Drawing ink in different shades was applied into the anterior corneal stroma by punctures performed with a conventional spatula needle. Results: Up to 4 years after surgery all patients still had satisfactory staining of the formerly cosmetically disfiguring corneal scar. Conclusion: Tattooing of unsightly corneal scars proved to be an efficient and easy to perform technique, yielding acceptable results during follow up. PMID:11914207

  15. Evoking Blinks with Natural Stimulation and Detecting Them with a Noninvasive Optical Device: A Simple, Inexpensive Method for Use with Freely Moving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Many laboratories studying eyeblinks in unanesthetized rodents use a periorbital shock to evoke the blink. The stimulus is typically delivered via a tether and usually obliterates detection of a full unconditioned response with electromyographic (EMG) recording. Here we describe the adapter we have used successfully for several years to deliver puffs of air to the cornea of freely moving rats during our studies of eyeblink conditioning. The stimulus evokes an unconditioned response that can be recorded without affecting the EMG signal. This allows a complete analysis of the unconditioned response which is important for studies examining reflex modification or the effect of drugs, genetic manipulations, or aging on the unconditioned blink reflex. We also describe an infrared reflective sensor that can be added to the tether to minimize the number of wires that need to be implanted around the eye, and which is relatively immune to electrical artifacts associated with a periorbital shock stimulus or other devices powered by alternating current. The responses recorded simultaneously by EMG wires and the optical sensor appear highly correlated and demonstrate that the optical sensor can measure responses that might otherwise be lost due to electrical interference from a shock stimulus. PMID:18598716

  16. Corneal grafting and banking.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper; Nielsen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Corneal transplantation was conceptualized at the end of the 18th century, but it took more than 100 years before human corneal grafting was introduced. The greatest step forward was the demonstration by Filatov that corneal tissue can be collected and used post mortem. The history of eye banking includes the development of preservation techniques. Storage in cold to minimize microbial growth and tissue disintegration was first choice but during the last 30 years this has been taken over by warm storage (organ culture) where the donor cornea proves its sterility and vitality before being transferred to the recipient. The long-term organ culture storage makes exchange between centres possible and allows for histocompatibility matching. The internationalization led to the establishing of the European Eye Bank Association but also to an increasing number of governmental regulations. Developments in years to come may lead to control of graft biomechanics and optics. This technical development tends to favour a centralization.

  17. The effects of topical diclofenac, topical flurbiprofen, and humidity on corneal sensitivity in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Dorbandt, Daniel M; Labelle, Amber L; Mitchell, Mark A; Hamor, Ralph E

    2017-03-01

    To determine the immediate and chronic effects of topical 0.1% diclofenac and 0.03% flurbiprofen on corneal sensitivity in normal canine eyes. Eighteen normal, nonbrachycephalic dogs. A prospective, randomized, masked, crossover study was performed. To determine the immediate effects associated with treatment, the study drug was instilled into the eye every 5 min for five doses, and corneal sensitivity of treated and untreated eyes was obtained prior to treatment and every 15 min post-treatment for 60 min. To determine the chronic effects, the study drug was instilled every 12 h for 30 days, and corneal sensitivity of treated and untreated eyes was obtained prior to treatment on days 0 and 30. A washout period of at least 30 days occurred between drug crossover. Ambient temperature and humidity were measured throughout the study. After multiple instillations, there was no difference in corneal sensitivity between eyes over time for diclofenac (P = 0.67) or flurbiprofen (P = 0.54), with a median sensitivity of 25 mm (1.8 g/mm(2) ). After chronic dosing, there was no difference in corneal sensitivity between eyes over time for diclofenac (P = 0.82) or flurbiprofen (P = 0.56), with a median sensitivity of 35 mm (1.0 g/mm(2) ). Decreasing ambient humidity was associated with an increase in sensitivity measurements (P = 0.0001). Neither diclofenac nor flurbiprofen had an effect on corneal sensitivity after multiple-drops or twice-daily dosing for 30 days. Ambient humidity may have an effect on corneal sensitivity measurements, with a longer filament length eliciting a blink response at lower humidity. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. Eye-blinks in choice response tasks uncover hidden aspects of information processing

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, Edmund; Heppner, Holger; Möckel, Tina; Kobald, Sven Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous eye-blinks occur much more often than it would be necessary to maintain the tear film on the eyes. Various factors like cognitive demand, task engagement, or fatigue are influencing spontaneous blink rate. During cognitive information processing there is evidence that blinks occur preferably at moments that can be assigned to input stream segmentation. We investigated blinking behavior in three different visual choice response experiments (Experiment 1: spatial Stimulus-Response correspondence, Experiment 2: Change Detection, Experiment 3: Continuous performance Test - AX version). Blinks during the experimental tasks were suppressed when new information was expected, as well as during cognitive processing until the response was executed. Blinks in go trials occurred within a short and relatively constant interval after manual responses. However, blinks were not a side effect of manual behavior, as they occurred in a similar manner in no-go trials in which no manual response was executed. In these trials, blinks were delayed when a prepared response had to be inhibited, compared to trials in which no response was intended. Additionally, time on task effects for no-go blinks mirrored those obtained in go trials. Thus, blinks seem to provide a reliable measure for cognitive processing beyond (or rather additional to) manual responses. PMID:27152110

  19. The effects of gender and birth control pill use on spontaneous blink rates.

    PubMed

    Yolton, D P; Yolton, R L; López, R; Bogner, B; Stevens, R; Rao, D

    1994-11-01

    Two major reference works suggest that men and women blink spontaneously at different rates, but they disagree with regard to which gender blinks faster. Spontaneous blink rates of 59 males and 86 females, 44 of whom were taking birth control (BC) pills, were measured for 5 consecutive minutes. Schirmer test results and tear break-up times (TBUTs) were also obtained. Females taking BC pills blinked at a mean rate of 19.6 times per minute, females not taking birth control pills blinked 14.9 times per minute, and males blinked 14.5 times per minute. There were very large differences between blink rates for individuals in each of the groups. No strong associations were found between spontaneous blink rates and a history of contact lens use, tear break-up time, Schirmer test results, temperature or humidity in the examination room, subject age, or menstrual cycle phase. The 32 percent increase in mean blink rate for females taking BC pills suggests that the pills affect at least one of the mechanisms that control spontaneous blinking, but it is unclear how they accomplish this.

  20. [Corneal transplantation today].

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Cârstocea, B; Beşleagă, C

    1994-01-01

    Corneal transplant become a surgical procedure which is performed with success in more many ophthalmological medico-surgical centers. This way it raised a fully experience concerning selection of cases and the preservation of the graft, surgical technique and the graft rejection. The authors present a general view of the problems concerning keratoplasty making a briefly summary of the indications, contraindications and prognosis of this technique, screening of donor tissue and a little larger one the surgical technique with his problems: trephining, preserving the donor tissue and placing the graft, and also the postoperative problems--suture removal, visual correction and corneal transplant rejection.

  1. Treating corneal abrasions.

    PubMed

    Wingate, S

    1999-06-01

    Although corneal abrasions are commonly seen in primary care settings, the primary care literature contains scant references on detecting and managing this problem. This article provides an overview of corneal abrasion assessment and treatment. Four common etiologies of abrasion are discussed: traumatic abrasion, contact lens abrasion, foreign body abrasion, and recurrent erosion. Parameters for the history and physical examination are outlined, including sections on contact lens removal, lid eversion, and fluorescein staining. Treatment regimens for each of the etiologies are discussed, with a focus on current research on using pressure eye patches as an intervention. Indications for referral to an ophthalmologist are noted.

  2. [Application value of corneal hysteresis in diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma].

    PubMed

    He, L Y; Liang, L; Zhu, M N

    2017-02-11

    Glaucoma is the first leading cause of irreversible blindness world widely, but the pathogenesis was still unclear. The collagen fibers from cornea and sclera connect to each other and both of them have similar extracellular matrix components. The biomechanical characteristics of optic nerve lamina cribrosa may associated with the biomechanical properties of the cornea. Therefore, the study of corneal physiological can indirectly reflex the compression and damage in optic nerve lamina cribrosa. The technical developments in corneal hysteresis examination had been updated these years constantly. Many researches implicated that low corneal hysteresis involved in pathogenesis and progression of glaucoma which refresh our recognition of the relationship between cornea and glaucoma. This review summarized the characteristics of corneal hysteresis, the examination and the connection with glaucoma to provide the reference for clinical work. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 140-143).

  3. Estimating the Osmolarities of Tears During Evaporation Through the “Eyes” of the Corneal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Dallacasagrande, Valentina; Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A population of corneal neurons in rats preferentially sense and monitor the hyperosmolar conditions of tears when the tears begin to evaporate during corneal dryness. The present study exploited this ability in an effort to estimate tear osmolarities by comparing the responses to corneal dryness to their responses to hyperosmolar stimuli. Methods Extracellular recordings were performed from single neurons in the trigeminal ganglia innervating the corneas of rats. To determine the extent to which the corneal neurons' responses to drying of the cornea were induced via the activation by hyperosmolar stimuli, we assessed the responses to ocular instillation of 500 and 600 mOsm/L, and a graded series of hyperosmolar stimuli ranging from 350 to 1000 mOsm/L. Results The magnitudes of the responses to drying of the cornea were matched almost exactly to those induced by the ocular instillation of the 600 mOsm/L stimuli but not the 500 mOsm/L solutions. The response magnitudes to a graded series of hyperosmolar solutions were nearly linear from the 350 to the 600 mOsm/L stimuli, but reached a plateau or declined slightly thereafter. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the tear osmolarity in rats could reach 600 to 1000 mOsm/L during ocular dryness. Furthermore, a spontaneous eye blink could be generated at a tear osmolarity of approximately 400 mOsm/L if the blink is solely determined by hyperosmolar tears, but ocular surface cooling also can become a major factor if hyperosmolar tears occurring during ocular dryness lower the threshold of activation of the neurons. PMID:28114576

  4. Estimating the Osmolarities of Tears During Evaporation Through the "Eyes" of the Corneal Nerves.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Dallacasagrande, Valentina; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2017-01-01

    A population of corneal neurons in rats preferentially sense and monitor the hyperosmolar conditions of tears when the tears begin to evaporate during corneal dryness. The present study exploited this ability in an effort to estimate tear osmolarities by comparing the responses to corneal dryness to their responses to hyperosmolar stimuli. Extracellular recordings were performed from single neurons in the trigeminal ganglia innervating the corneas of rats. To determine the extent to which the corneal neurons' responses to drying of the cornea were induced via the activation by hyperosmolar stimuli, we assessed the responses to ocular instillation of 500 and 600 mOsm/L, and a graded series of hyperosmolar stimuli ranging from 350 to 1000 mOsm/L. The magnitudes of the responses to drying of the cornea were matched almost exactly to those induced by the ocular instillation of the 600 mOsm/L stimuli but not the 500 mOsm/L solutions. The response magnitudes to a graded series of hyperosmolar solutions were nearly linear from the 350 to the 600 mOsm/L stimuli, but reached a plateau or declined slightly thereafter. Our results demonstrate that the tear osmolarity in rats could reach 600 to 1000 mOsm/L during ocular dryness. Furthermore, a spontaneous eye blink could be generated at a tear osmolarity of approximately 400 mOsm/L if the blink is solely determined by hyperosmolar tears, but ocular surface cooling also can become a major factor if hyperosmolar tears occurring during ocular dryness lower the threshold of activation of the neurons.

  5. Advances in corneal preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, R L

    1990-01-01

    The functional status of the endothelium and sustained corneal deturgescence after corneal preservation are of great clinical importance and have been primary goals in the development of corneal storage media. In our investigational studies we have specifically addressed the improvement of the quality of donor tissue after 4 degrees C storage, the extension of corneal preservation time, the enhancement of corneal wound healing, and the reduction of the normal progressive loss of endothelial cells postkeratoplasty. Specifically we have developed in vitro HCE cell and epithelial cell culture models that can accurately reflect the response of human corneal tissue in vivo. These models have been utilized to study the effects of growth factors and medium components in relation to their biocompatibility and efficacy in the development of improved corneal preservation solutions. Our laboratory investigated in vitro conditions that allowed human corneal endothelium to shift from a nonproliferative state, in which they remain viable and metabolically active, to a proliferative, mitotically active state. Isolation techniques developed in our laboratory have enabled the establishment of primary and subsequent subcultures of human corneal endothelium that retain the attributes of native endothelium. These in vitro conditions maintain HCE cells in a proliferative state, actively undergoing mitosis. A quantitative bioassay has been developed to determine the effects of various test medium in the stimulation or inhibition of DNA synthesis. In attempting to learn more about the events that occur during in vitro endothelial cell isolation, cell reattachment, extracellular matrix interaction and migrating during subculture, SEM was done on isolated HCE cells incubated in CSM. These studies suggest that the components of the extracellular matrix modulate the growth response of HCE cells, and play a role in regulating proliferation and migration. These observations are important in

  6. Paraspinal muscle reflex dynamics.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Slota, G P; Bennett, B C

    2004-02-01

    Neuromuscular control of spinal stability may be represented as a control system wherein the paraspinal muscle reflex acts as feedback response to kinetic and kinematic disturbances of the trunk. The influence of preparatory muscle recruitment for the control of spinal stability has been previously examined, but there are few reported studies that characterize paraspinal reflex gain as feedback response. In the current study, the input-output dynamics of paraspinal reflexes were quantified by means of the impulse response function (IRF), with trunk perturbation force representing the input signal and EMG the output signal. Surface EMGs were collected from the trunk muscles in response to a brief anteriorly directed impact force applied to the trunk of healthy participants. Reflex behavior was measured in response to three levels of force impulse, 6.1, 9.2 and 12.0 Ns, and two different levels of external trunk flexion preload, 0 and 110 N anterior force. Reflex EMG was quantifiable in response to 91% of the perturbations. Mean reflex onset latency was 30.7+/-21.3 ms and reflex amplitude increased with perturbation amplitude. Impulse response function gain, G(IRF), was defined as the peak amplitude of the measured IRF and provided a consistent measure of response behavior. EMG reflex amplitude and G(IRF) increased with force impulse. Mean G(IRF) was 2.27+/-1.31% MVC/Ns and demonstrated declining trend with flexion preload. Results agree with a simple systems model of the neuromechanical feedback behavior. The relative contribution of the reflex dynamics to spinal stability must be investigated in future research.

  7. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  8. Corneal pain activates a trigemino-parabrachial pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Aicher, Sue A; Hegarty, Deborah M; Hermes, Sam M

    2014-03-06

    Corneal pain is mediated by primary afferent fibers projecting to the dorsal horn of the medulla, specifically the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. In contrast to reflex responses, the conscious perception of pain requires transmission of neural activity to higher brain centers. Ascending pain transmission is mediated primarily by pathways to either the thalamus or parabrachial nuclei. We previously showed that some corneal afferent fibers preferentially contact parabrachial-projecting neurons in the rostral pole of the trigeminal nucleus caudalis, but the role of these projection neurons in transmitting noxious information from the cornea has not been established. In the present study, we show that noxious stimulation of the corneal surface activates neurons in the rostral pole of the nucleus caudalis, including parabrachially projecting neurons that receive direct input from corneal afferent fibers. We used immunocytochemical detection of c-Fos protein as an index of neuronal activation after noxious ocular stimulation. Animals had previously received injections of a retrograde tracer into either thalamic or parabrachial nuclei to identify projection neurons in the trigeminal dorsal horn. Noxious stimulation of the cornea induced c-Fos in neurons sending projections to parabrachial nuclei, but not thalamic nuclei. We also confirmed that corneal afferent fibers identified with cholera toxin B preferentially target trigeminal dorsal horn neurons projecting to the parabrachial nucleus. The parabrachial region sends ascending projections to brain regions involved in emotional and homeostatic responses. Activation of the ascending parabrachial system may explain the extraordinary salience of stimulation of corneal nociceptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Brainstem and spinal reflex studies in patients with primary progressive freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Kızıltan, Meral E; Gunduz, Aysegul; Kızıltan, Gunes; Tekeoğlu, Anıl; Sohtaoğlu, Melis

    2014-08-15

    Our aim was to investigate the extent and pattern of involved pathways using brainstem and spinal reflexes by comparing primary progressive freezing of gait (PPFOG) progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) with FOG. Seven patients with PPFOG and age and sex matched seven PSP patients and 16 healthy subjects were included in the study. All subjects underwent blink reflex (BR), trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR), auditory startle reflex (ASR) and long latency flexor reflex (LLFR) investigations under the same conditions. All three groups had normal BR latencies. ASR probability was lowest in the PSP group and was highest in PPFOG (p=0.005). The presence rate of TCR was lowest in PSP and it was highest in PPFOG (p=0.007 for SC and p=0.023 for SCM). The presence rate and amplitude of LLFR (R II) were decreased in the PSP group (p=0.010 and p=0.031, respectively) whereas it was in a continuous pattern in some of PPFOG patients. ASR, TCR and LLFR were all inhibited in PSP and we suggest that suppression of all three reflexes is probably related to degeneration of brainstem reticular formation and basal ganglia connections. However, interestingly, in PPFOG, excitabilities of ASR and TCR circuits are increased suggesting loss of pathways mediating suprasegmental control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  11. Spontaneous Corneal Hydrops in a Patient with a Corneal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Batawi, Hatim; Kothari, Nikisha; Camp, Andrew; Bernhard, Luis; Karp, Carol L.; Galor, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report the case of a 77-year-old man with no history of keratoconus or other ectatic disorders who presented with corneal hydrops in the setting of a corneal ulcer. The risk factors, pathogenesis and treatment options of corneal hydrops are discussed. Method This is an observational case report study. Results A 77-year-old man presented with a 1-day history of severe pain, redness, mucous discharge and photophobia in the right eye. A slit-lamp examination of the right eye showed an area of focal corneal edema and protrusion. Within the area of edema and protrusion, there was an infiltrate with an overlying epithelial defect consistent with an infectious corneal ulcer. The Seidel test showed no leakage, so a clinical diagnosis of corneal hydrops associated with nonperforated corneal ulcer was made. With appropriate antibiotic treatment, the corneal ulcer and hydrops both resolved over a 1-month period. Conclusion Corneal hydrops can occur in the setting of corneal infections. PMID:26889160

  12. Clarifying the role of defensive reactivity deficits in psychopathy and antisocial personality using startle reflex methodology.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hall, Jason R; Patrick, Christopher J; Bernat, Edward M

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has demonstrated deficits in defensive reactivity (indexed by potentiation of the startle blink reflex) in psychopathic individuals. However, the basis of this association remains unclear, as diagnostic criteria for psychopathy encompass two distinct phenotypic components that may reflect differing neurobiological mechanisms-an affective-interpersonal component and an antisocial deviance component. Likewise, the role of defensive response deficits in antisocial personality disorder (APD), a related but distinct syndrome, remains to be clarified. In the current study, the authors examined affective priming deficits in relation to factors of psychopathy and symptoms of APD using startle reflex methods in 108 adult male prisoners. Deficits in blink reflex potentiation during aversive picture viewing were found in relation to the affective-interpersonal (Factor 1) component of psychopathy, and to a lesser extent in relation to the antisocial deviance (Factor 2) component of psychopathy and symptoms of APD-but only as a function of their overlap with affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy. These findings provide clear evidence that deficits in defensive reactivity are linked specifically to the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy and not to the antisocial deviance features represented most strongly in APD.

  13. Clarifying the Role of Defensive Reactivity Deficits in Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Using Startle Reflex Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hall, Jason R.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Bernat, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated deficits in defensive reactivity (indexed by potentiation of the startle blink reflex) in psychopathic individuals. However, the basis of this association remains unclear, as diagnostic criteria for psychopathy encompass two distinct phenotypic components that may reflect differing neurobiological mechanisms – an affective-interpersonal component, and an antisocial deviance component. Likewise, the role of defensive response deficits in antisocial personality disorder (APD), a related but distinct syndrome, remains to be clarified. The current study examined affective priming deficits in relation to factors of psychopathy and symptoms of APD using startle reflex methods in 108 adult male prisoners. Deficits in blink reflex potentiation during aversive picture viewing were found in relation to the affective-interpersonal (Factor 1) component of psychopathy, and to a lesser extent in relation to the antisocial deviance (Factor 2) component of psychopathy and symptoms of APD—but only as a function of their overlap with affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy. These findings provide clear evidence that deficits in defensive reactivity are linked specifically to the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy, and not the antisocial deviance features represented most strongly in APD. PMID:20973594

  14. Comparison of blinking behavior during listening to and speaking in Japanese and English.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Yagi, Akihiro; Miyata, Yo

    2004-04-01

    Blinking behavior during conversation may be different between conditions in listening and responding to questions because sifting attention from external to internal is possibly associated. The purpose of this study was to compare blinking behavior, duration, heart rates, and mental states during the tasks of listening to and responding to questions in Japanese and English. Participants were 67 (35 men and 32 women) undergraduate students. Blink rate while responding to questions in English did not differ from that while responding to questions in Japanese, but blink rate while listening to questions in English was significantly reduced compared to that while listening to Japanese. While anxiety and uneasiness were increased by the English conversation, blink rate and heart rate were decreased. Blinking behavior may be related to thinking and attention.

  15. Corneal biomechanical properties from air-puff corneal deformation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Susana; Kling, Sabine; Bekesi, Nandor; Dorronsoro, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The combination of air-puff systems with real-time corneal imaging (i.e. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), or Scheimpflug) is a promising approach to assess the dynamic biomechanical properties of the corneal tissue in vivo. In this study we present an experimental system which, together with finite element modeling, allows measurements of corneal biomechanical properties from corneal deformation imaging, both ex vivo and in vivo. A spectral OCT instrument combined with an air puff from a non-contact tonometer in a non-collinear configuration was used to image the corneal deformation over full corneal cross-sections, as well as to obtain high speed measurements of the temporal deformation of the corneal apex. Quantitative analysis allows direct extraction of several deformation parameters, such as apex indentation across time, maximal indentation depth, temporal symmetry and peak distance at maximal deformation. The potential of the technique is demonstrated and compared to air-puff imaging with Scheimpflug. Measurements ex vivo were performed on 14 freshly enucleated porcine eyes and five human donor eyes. Measurements in vivo were performed on nine human eyes. Corneal deformation was studied as a function of Intraocular Pressure (IOP, 15-45 mmHg), dehydration, changes in corneal rigidity (produced by UV corneal cross-linking, CXL), and different boundary conditions (sclera, ocular muscles). Geometrical deformation parameters were used as input for inverse finite element simulation to retrieve the corneal dynamic elastic and viscoelastic parameters. Temporal and spatial deformation profiles were very sensitive to the IOP. CXL produced a significant reduction of the cornea indentation (1.41x), and a change in the temporal symmetry of the corneal deformation profile (1.65x), indicating a change in the viscoelastic properties with treatment. Combining air-puff with dynamic imaging and finite element modeling allows characterizing the corneal biomechanics in-vivo.

  16. Real-Time Nanoscopy by Using Blinking Enhanced Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fukui, Shingo; Jin, Takashi; Fujii, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Superresolution optical microscopy (nanoscopy) is of current interest in many biological fields. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging, which utilizes higher-order cumulant of fluorescence temporal fluctuations, is an excellent method for nanoscopy, as it requires neither complicated optics nor illuminations. However, it does need an impractical number of images for real-time observation. Here, we achieved real-time nanoscopy by modifying superresolution optical fluctuation imaging and enhancing the fluctuation of quantum dots. Our developed quantum dots have higher blinking than commercially available ones. The fluctuation of the blinking improved the resolution when using a variance calculation for each pixel instead of a cumulant calculation. This enabled us to obtain microscopic images with 90-nm and 80-ms spatial-temporal resolution by using a conventional fluorescence microscope without any optics or devices. PMID:20923631

  17. Eye blink rate predicts individual differences in pseudoneglect

    PubMed Central

    Slagter, Heleen A.; Davidson, Richard J.; Tomer, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Most healthy individuals display a subtle spatial attentional bias, exhibiting relative inattention for stimuli on one side of the visual field, a phenomenon known as pseudoneglect. Prior work in animals and patients has implicated dopamine in spatial attention asymmetries. The current study therefore examined - in healthy individuals - the relationship between the attentional bias and spontaneous eye-blink rate (EBR), a putative measure of central dopaminergic function. We found that those individuals, who blinked more often under resting conditions, displayed greater preference for the right side of the visual display in a subsequent attention task. This finding may support the idea that the observed attentional bias in healthy individuals reflects asymmetries in dopaminergic circuits, and corroborates previous findings implicating dopamine in spatial attention. PMID:20036680

  18. 3D super-resolution imaging with blinking quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Cai, En; Ng, Tony; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots are promising candidates for single molecule imaging due to their exceptional photophysical properties, including their intense brightness and resistance to photobleaching. They are also notorious for their blinking. Here we report a novel way to take advantage of quantum dot blinking to develop an imaging technique in three-dimensions with nanometric resolution. We first applied this method to simulated images of quantum dots, and then to quantum dots immobilized on microspheres. We achieved imaging resolutions (FWHM) of 8–17 nm in the x-y plane and 58 nm (on coverslip) or 81 nm (deep in solution) in the z-direction, approximately 3–7 times better than what has been achieved previously with quantum dots. This approach was applied to resolve the 3D distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) molecules at, and inside of, the plasma membrane of resting basal breast cancer cells. PMID:24093439

  19. Two-laser optical tweezers with a blinking beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamperska, Weronika; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Gusin, Paweł

    2017-07-01

    We report on a two-laser holographic optical tweezers setup and present its two major advantages over single-laser one. First, the trap stiffness of a weak trapping beam can be measured with a considerable accuracy. Second, a novel method of examining local viscosity of fluid is proposed. Both measurements are performed based on forcing the oscillations of a microscopic polystyrene bead placed between two optical traps. The two beams are generated by separate laser sources and therefore their trapping power can vary. Moreover, a stronger trap 'blinks', modulated by an electronic shutter. The blinking frequency can be precisely adjusted to the experimental conditions, which results in high accuracy of the measurements.

  20. Real-time nanoscopy by using blinking enhanced quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Fukui, Shingo; Jin, Takashi; Fujii, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    2010-10-06

    Superresolution optical microscopy (nanoscopy) is of current interest in many biological fields. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging, which utilizes higher-order cumulant of fluorescence temporal fluctuations, is an excellent method for nanoscopy, as it requires neither complicated optics nor illuminations. However, it does need an impractical number of images for real-time observation. Here, we achieved real-time nanoscopy by modifying superresolution optical fluctuation imaging and enhancing the fluctuation of quantum dots. Our developed quantum dots have higher blinking than commercially available ones. The fluctuation of the blinking improved the resolution when using a variance calculation for each pixel instead of a cumulant calculation. This enabled us to obtain microscopic images with 90-nm and 80-ms spatial-temporal resolution by using a conventional fluorescence microscope without any optics or devices.

  1. Hyperosmolar Tears Induce Functional and Structural Alterations of Corneal Nerves: Electrophysiological and Anatomical Evidence Toward Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Marfurt, Carl F; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to elucidate possible neural mechanisms underlying diminished tearing in dry eye disease, this study sought to determine if hyperosmolar tears, a ubiquitous sign of dry eye disease, produce functional changes in corneal nerve responses to drying of the cornea and if these changes correlate with alterations in corneal nerve morphology. In vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervated the cornea before, and up to 3 hours after, the ocular application of continuous hyperosmolar tears or artificial tears. In corollary experiments, immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare corneal nerve morphology in control and in eyes treated with hyperosmolar solutions. Our previous studies identified a population of corneal afferents, dry-sensitive neurons that are strongly excited by corneal dessication ("dry response"), a response thought to trigger the lacrimation reflex. In the present study, we found that the dry responses of corneal dry-sensitive neurons were depressed or even completely abolished by hyperosmolar tears in a time- (30 minutes to 3 hours) and dose (450- to 1000-mOsm solutions)-dependent manner. Furthermore, eyes treated with hyperosmolar tears for 3 hours contained large numbers of morphologically abnormal (granular, fragmented, or prominently beaded) subbasal nerves that appeared to be undergoing degeneration. These results demonstrate that tear hyperosmolarity, considered to be a "core" mechanism of dry eye disease, significantly decreases physiological sensitivity and morphologic integrity of the corneal nerves important in tear production. These alterations might contribute to the diminished tearing seen clinically in dry eye patients.

  2. Children Induce an Enhanced Attentional Blink in Child Molesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, Anthony R.; Kalmus, Ellis; Tipper, Steven P.; Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Flak, Vanja; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a robust phenomenon that has been consistently reported in the cognitive literature. The AB is found when two target images (T1, T2) are presented within 500 ms of each other and errors are induced on the perceptual report of T2. The AB may increase when T1 has some salience to the viewer. This study examined the…

  3. Correlated blinking of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, D.; Lhuillier, E.; Ithurria, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Rech, I.; Carminati, R.; De Wilde, Y.; Krachmalnicoff, V.

    2017-03-01

    We observe time-correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single-photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead. We demonstrate that the molecules inside the bead show the same blinking behavior as the quantum dot.

  4. Children Induce an Enhanced Attentional Blink in Child Molesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, Anthony R.; Kalmus, Ellis; Tipper, Steven P.; Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Flak, Vanja; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a robust phenomenon that has been consistently reported in the cognitive literature. The AB is found when two target images (T1, T2) are presented within 500 ms of each other and errors are induced on the perceptual report of T2. The AB may increase when T1 has some salience to the viewer. This study examined the…

  5. Understanding unconscious intelligence and intuition: "blink" and beyond.

    PubMed

    Isenman, Lois

    2013-01-01

    The importance of unconscious intelligence and intuition is increasingly acknowledged by the scientific community. This essay examines and assesses the varied views on the topic presented in three books that bridge the scientific world and reading public: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell (2005), Gut Feelings by Gerd Gigerenzer (2008), and How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman (2007). The analysis differentiates among kinds of unconscious intelligence and points towards a more complete understanding of the higher cognitive potential of the unconscious mind.

  6. Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Cascade Induced by Mechanical Stimulation of Fluid Shear Stress in Cultured Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Tsugiaki; Ishibazawa, Akihiro; Nagaoka, Taiji; Hanada, Kazuomi; Yokota, Harumasa; Ishii, Nobuhito; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Because blinking is regarded as mechanical stimulation of fluid shear stress on the corneal epithelial cells, we investigated the effects of fluid shear stress on cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). The HCECs were exposed to shear stress (0, 1.2, 12 dyne/cm2) with the parallel-plate type of flow chamber. Wound healing, cellular proliferation, growth factor expression, TGF-β1 concentration in the culture supernatant, and phosphorylation of SMAD2 were investigated. Monolayers of HCECs exposed to shear stress had delayed wound healing and decreased proliferation compared with those of the static control (0 dyne/cm2). With increasing shear stress, TGF-β1 expression and phosphorylation of SMAD2 increased significantly, but the levels of total TGF-β1 in the culture supernatant decreased significantly. Delayed wound healing, decreased proliferation, and phosphorylation of the SMAD2 by shear stress were canceled out with a TGF-β receptor inhibitor. Fluid shear stress on the HCECs affected TGF-β signaling, which was associated with delayed wound healing. Mechanical stress by blinking might involve TGF-β signaling, and activation of TGF-β might be a key factor in wound healing of the corneal epithelium. Further studies should investigate the molecular mechanism of shear stress-induced activation of TGF-β.

  7. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online].

  8. Facts and artifacts in the blinking statistics of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Catherine H; Sauter, Orion; Wu, Xiaohua; Purcell, Robert; Querner, Claudia; Drndic, Marija; Pelton, Matthew

    2010-05-12

    Since its initial discovery just over a decade ago, blinking of semiconductor nanocrystals has typically been described in terms of probability distributions for durations of bright, or "on," states and dark, or "off," states. These distributions are obtained by binning photon counts in order to construct a time series for emission intensity and then applying a threshold to distinguish on states from off states. By examining experimental data from CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals and by simulating this data according to a simple, two-state blinking model, we find that the apparent truncated power-law distributions of on times can depend significantly on the choices of binning time and threshold. For example, increasing the binning time by a factor of 10 can double the apparent truncation time and change the apparent power-law exponent by 30%, even though the binning time is only 3% of the truncation time. Our findings indicate that stringent experimental conditions are needed to accurately determine blinking-time probability distributions. Similar considerations should apply to any phenomenon characterized by time series data that displays telegraph noise.

  9. Origin and control of blinking in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Efros, Alexander L; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-08-03

    Semiconductor nanocrystals offer an enormous diversity of potential device applications, based on their size-tunable photoluminescence, high optical stability and 'bottom-up' chemical approaches to self-assembly. However, the promise of such applications can be seriously limited by photoluminescence intermittency in nanocrystal emission, that is, 'blinking', arising from the escape of either one or both of the photoexcited carriers to the nanocrystal surface. In the first scenario, the remaining nanocrystal charge quenches photoluminescence via non-radiative Auger recombination, whereas for the other, the exciton is thought to be intercepted before thermalization and does not contribute to the photoluminescence. This Review summarizes the current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for nanocrystal blinking kinetics as well as core-shell engineering efforts to control such phenomena. In particular, 'softening' of the core-shell confinement potential strongly suppresses non-radiative Auger processes in charged nanocrystals, with successful non-blinking implementations demonstrated in CdSe-CdS core-thick-shell nanocrystals and their modifications.

  10. Statistics of photocounts of blinking fluorescence of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Uchaikin, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    The blinking of quantum dots under the action of laser radiation is described based on a model of a binary (two-state) renewal process with on (fluorescent) and off (non fluorescent) states. The T on and T off sojourn times in the on and off states are random and power-law distributed with exponents 0 < α < 1 and 0 < β < 1; the averages of the on and off times are infinite. As a consequence of this, the Gaussian statistics is inapplicable and the process is described using a more general statistics. An equation for the density of distribution p( t on| t) of the total on time during the observation time t is derived that contains derivatives of fractional orders α and β. A solution to this equation is found in terms of fractional stable distributions. The Poisson transform of the density p( t on| t) leads to the photon counting distribution and determines the fluorescence statistics. It is demonstrated that, if a blinking process with exponents α < β is implemented, then, at fairly long times, the on time will considerably prevail over the off time, i.e., blinking will be suppressed. This behavior is evidenced by the types of distributions of the total fluorescence time, the decay of relative fluctuations, and the Monte Carlo simulated trajectories of the process.

  11. Efficient topological chaos embedded in the blinking vortex system.

    PubMed

    Kin, Eiko; Sakajo, Takashi

    2005-06-01

    We consider the particle mixing in the plane by two vortex points appearing one after the other, called the blinking vortex system. Mathematical and numerical studies of the system reveal that the chaotic particle mixing, i.e., the chaotic advection, is observed due to the homoclinic chaos, but the mixing region is restricted locally in the neighborhood of the vortex points. The present article shows that it is possible to realize a global and efficient chaotic advection in the blinking vortex system with the help of the Thurston-Nielsen theory, which classifies periodic orbits for homeomorphisms in the plane into three types: periodic, reducible, and pseudo-Anosov (pA). It is mathematically shown that periodic orbits of pA type generate a complicated dynamics, which is called topological chaos. We show that the combination of the local chaotic mixing due to the topological chaos and the dipole-like return orbits realize an efficient and global particle mixing in the blinking vortex system.

  12. Correlated fluorescence blinking in two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weigao; Liu, Weiwei; Schmidt, Jan F.; Zhao, Weijie; Lu, Xin; Raab, Timo; Diederichs, Carole; Gao, Weibo; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-12-01

    ‘Blinking’, or ‘fluorescence intermittency’, refers to a random switching between ‘ON’ (bright) and ‘OFF’ (dark) states of an emitter; it has been studied widely in zero-dimensional quantum dots and molecules, and scarcely in one-dimensional systems. A generally accepted mechanism for blinking in quantum dots involves random switching between neutral and charged states (or is accompanied by fluctuations in charge-carrier traps), which substantially alters the dynamics of radiative and non-radiative decay. Here, we uncover a new type of blinking effect in vertically stacked, two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures, which consist of two distinct monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) that are weakly coupled by van der Waals forces. Unlike zero-dimensional or one-dimensional systems, two-dimensional TMD heterostructures show a correlated blinking effect, comprising randomly switching bright, neutral and dark states. Fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy analyses show that a bright state occurring in one monolayer will simultaneously lead to a dark state in the other monolayer, owing to an intermittent interlayer carrier-transfer process. Our findings suggest that bilayer van der Waals heterostructures provide unique platforms for the study of charge-transfer dynamics and non-equilibrium-state physics, and could see application as correlated light emitters in quantum technology.

  13. Ipsilateral blinking seizures during left fronto-temporal ictal pattern on scalp EEG.

    PubMed

    Pestana, Elia M; Gupta, Ajay

    2007-12-01

    We report an infant with left eye blinking seizures accompanying a left (ipsilateral) fronto-temporal scalp EEG ictal pattern. The epileptogenic lesion was a left frontal encephalomalacia along the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt tract. The shunt was inserted for treatment of communicating hydrocephalus. This case illustrates the lateralizing value of the ictal blinking. Review of the literature suggests that seizures with unilateral blinking are likely to be produced by activation of ipsilateral trigeminal fibers innervating subdural intracranial structures and pial vessels in temporal and frontal lobes. Ipsilateral blinking could also be produced by activation of the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere.

  14. The Grasp Reflex and Moro Reflex in Infants: Hierarchy of Primitive Reflex Responses

    PubMed Central

    Futagi, Yasuyuki; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The plantar grasp reflex is of great clinical significance, especially in terms of the detection of spasticity. The palmar grasp reflex also has diagnostic significance. This grasp reflex of the hands and feet is mediated by a spinal reflex mechanism, which appears to be under the regulatory control of nonprimary motor areas through the spinal interneurons. This reflex in human infants can be regarded as a rudiment of phylogenetic function. The absence of the Moro reflex during the neonatal period and early infancy is highly diagnostic, indicating a variety of compromised conditions. The center of the reflex is probably in the lower region of the pons to the medulla. The phylogenetic meaning of the reflex remains unclear. However, the hierarchical interrelation among these primitive reflexes seems to be essential for the arboreal life of monkey newborns, and the possible role of the Moro reflex in these newborns was discussed in relation to the interrelationship. PMID:22778756

  15. The role of corneal afferent neurons in regulating tears under normal and dry eye conditions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ian D; Kurose, Masayuki

    2013-12-01

    The cornea is one of several orofacial structures requiring glandular secretion for proper lubrication. Glandular secretion is regulated through a neural reflex initiated by trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the corneal epithelium. Corneal sensory afferents must respond to irritating and potentially damaging stimuli, as well as drying that occurs with evaporation of the tear film, and the physiological properties of corneal afferents are consistent with these requirements. Polymodal neurons are sensitive to noxious mechanical, thermal and chemical stimuli, mechanoreceptive neurons are selectively activated by mechanical stimuli, and cool cells respond to innocuous cooling. The central terminations of corneal primary afferents are located within two regions of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. The more rostral region, located at the transition between the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and interpolaris, represents a critical relay for the regulation of the lacrimation reflex. From this region, major control of lacrimation is carried through projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurons located in or around the superior salivatory nucleus. Dry eye syndrome may be caused by a dysfunction in the tear secreting glands themselves or in the neuronal circuit regulating these glands. Furthermore, the dry eye condition itself may modify the properties of corneal afferents and affect their ability to regulate secretion, a possibility just now being explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of corneal afferent neurons in regulating tears under normal and dry eye conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ian D.; Kurose, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The cornea is one of several orofacial structures requiring glandular secretion for proper lubrication. Glandular secretion is regulated through a neural reflex initiated by trigeminal primary afferent neurons innervating the corneal epithelium. Corneal sensory afferents must respond to irritating and potentially damaging stimuli, as well as drying that occurs with evaporation of the tear film, and the physiological properties of corneal afferents are consistent with these requirements. Polymodal neurons are sensitive to noxious mechanical, thermal and chemical stimuli, mechanoreceptive neurons are selectively activated by mechanical stimuli, and cool cells respond to innocuous cooling. The central terminations of corneal primary afferents are located within two regions of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. The more rostral region, located at the transition between the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and interpolaris, represents a critical relay for the regulation of the lacrimation reflex. From this region, major control of lacrimation is carried through projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurons located in or around the superior salivatory nucleus. Dry eye syndrome may be caused by a dysfunction in the tear secreting glands themselves or in the neuronal circuit regulating these glands. Furthermore, the dry eye condition itself may modify the properties of corneal afferents and affect their ability to regulate secretion, a possibility just now being explored. PMID:23994439

  17. Corneal Hydration Control in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Katrin; McLaren, Jay W.; Kane, Katrina M.; Baratz, Keith H.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess corneal hydration control across a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) by measuring the percent recovery per hour (PRPH) of central corneal thickness after swelling the cornea and to determine its association with corneal morphologic parameters. Methods Twenty-three corneas of 23 phakic FECD patients and 8 corneas of 8 healthy control participants devoid of guttae were graded (modified Krachmer scale). Effective endothelial cell density (ECDe) was determined from the area of guttae and local cell density in confocal microscopy images. Steady-state corneal thickness (CTss) and standardized central corneal backscatter were derived from Scheimpflug images. Corneal swelling was induced by wearing a low-oxygen transmissible contact lens for 2 hours in the morning. De-swelling was measured over 5 hours after lens removal or until corneal thickness returned to CTss. Percent recovery per hour was 100 × (1 – e−k), where k was determined from CT(t) = (de−kt) + CTss, and where d was the initial change from CTss. Results After contact lens wear, corneas swelled by 9% (95% CI 9–10). Percent recovery per hour was 49%/h (95% CI 41–57) in controls and 37%/h in advanced FECD (95% CI 29–43, P = 0.028). Low PRPH was associated with disease severity, low ECDe, and increased anterior and posterior corneal backscatter. Anterior backscatter was associated with PRPH in a multivariable model (R2 = 0.44). Conclusions Corneal hydration control is impaired in advanced FECD and is inversely related to anterior corneal backscatter. Anterior corneal backscatter might serve as an indicator of impaired endothelium in FECD. PMID:27661858

  18. Distinctive abnormalities of facial reflexes in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Valls-Solé, J; Valldeoriola, F; Tolosa, E; Marti, M J

    1997-10-01

    Spontaneous and voluntary eyelid motility is often abnormal in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. In contrast, their eyelid reflex responses are relatively preserved, and only those generated by an acoustic startle have been found absent or severely reduced. We hypothesized that, because of their relevant brainstem pathology, patients with progressive supranuclear palsy might have other brainstem reflex abnormalities which, on detection, could help with their neurophysiological characterization. In this study, we examined facial reflex responses in 14 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, 12 patients with multisystem atrophy, 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, six patients with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, 11 patients with various non-parkinsonian neurological illnesses and 10 normal subjects. EMG activity was simultaneously recorded from the orbicularis oculi and mentalis muscles following electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. Mentalis responses were obtained in two normal subjects and in all patients except one with Parkinson's disease, one with progressive supranuclear palsy and one with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration; there were no differences between groups of subjects regarding latency or peak amplitude. Orbicularis oculi responses were always present in control subjects and patients who exhibited mentalis responses, with the significant exception of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, in whom only the response of mentalis was obtained. Blink-reflex responses to supraorbital nerve electrical stimuli were present at a normal latency and amplitude in all patients. An abnormally enhanced blink-reflex excitability recovery curve to paired stimuli was found in a similar percentage of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, multisystem atrophy and Parkinson's disease, but in only two patients with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have a

  19. Changes in the activity of units of the cat motor cortex with rapid conditioning and extinction of a compound eye blink movement.

    PubMed

    Aou, S; Woody, C D; Birt, D

    1992-02-01

    Patterns of spike activity were measured in the pericruciate cortex of conscious cats before and after development of a Pavlovian conditioned eye blink response. Unit activity was tested with presentations of a click conditioned stimulus (CS) and a hiss discriminative stimulus (DS) of similar intensity to the click. Unit discharge in response to the CS increased after conditioning, but not after backward conditioning when conditioned reflexes (CRs) were not performed. Rates of spontaneous, baseline discharge were not increased after conditioning with respect to rates of discharge measured in the naive state. It appeared that an increase in the ratio of CS-elicited discharge to background activity, together with an increase in the number of units responding to the CS after conditioning, supported discrimination of the CS from the DS and performance of the conditioned blink response. This is the first detailed characterization of patterns of a rapidly conditioned Pavlovian response. Activation of units by the CS preceded the onset of the CR, supporting the hypothesis that the activity played a role in initiating the conditioned eye blink movement. Extinction with retention of performance of the CR was associated with perseverance of the increased unit discharge in response to the CS. Extinction with substantially reduced performance of the CR was associated with diminution of the unit response to the CS below levels found with conditioning. Averages of patterns of spike activity elicited by the CS after conditioning showed components of discharge with onsets of 8-40 msec (alpha 1), 40-72 msec (alpha 2), 72-112 msec (beta), and greater than 112 msec (gamma), corresponding to each of four separate excitatory EMG components of the compound blink CR. Each component increased in magnitude after conditioning, relative to levels found in the naive state. The finding that long- as well as short-latency components of unit activation increased after conditioning supported the

  20. Computational Model for Corneal Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Delia

    2003-10-01

    We evaluated the refractive consequences of corneal transplants using a biomechanical model with homogeneous and inhomogeneous Young's modulus distributions within the cornea, taking into account ablation of some stromal tissue. A FEM model was used to simulate corneal transplants in diseased cornea. The diseased cornea was modeled as an axisymmetric structure taking into account a nonlinearly elastic, isotropic formulation. The model simulating the penetrating keratoplasty procedure gives more change in the postoperative corneal curvature when compared to the models simulating the anterior and posterior lamellar graft procedures. When a lenticle shaped tissue was ablated in the graft during the anterior and posterior keratoplasty, the models provided an additional correction of about -3.85 and -4.45 diopters, respectively. Despite the controversy around the corneal thinning disorders treatment with volume removal procedures, results indicate that significant changes in corneal refractive power could be introduced by a corneal transplantation combined with myopic laser ablation.

  1. Nanomedicine Approaches for Corneal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Lim, Rayne R.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal diseases are the third leading cause of blindness globally. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, antibiotics and tissue transplantation are currently used to treat corneal pathological conditions. However, barrier properties of the ocular surface necessitate high concentration of the drugs applied in the eye repeatedly. This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects. Nanoparticle-based molecular medicine seeks to overcome these limitations by enhancing the permeability and pharmacological properties of the drugs. The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated. Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified. This review provides an overview of corneal diseases, nanovector properties and their applications in drug-delivery and corneal disease management. PMID:25941990

  2. Cryopreservation for corneal storage.

    PubMed

    Armitage, W John

    2009-01-01

    Currently, cryopreservation is the only method that offers the prospect of truly long-term storage of living cells and tissues. Despite some successful cryopreserved corneal grafts, freezing has been shown to damage the endothelium. When isolated cells are frozen, there are two principal mechanisms of damage: intracellular freezing, which occurs at high cooling rates, and solution effect injury at low cooling rates. When tissues are frozen, there are additional factors that appear to render cells more susceptible to intracellular freezing. Lower cooling rates appear to overcome this when freezing cornea. Vitrification is a way of achieving ice-free cryopreservation, but it also poses considerable challenges owing to the very high solute concentrations required to achieve vitrification at practicable cooling rates. Encouraging results have also been reported for cornea frozen using non-permeating cryoprotectants, which could lead to simpler methods of corneal cryopreservation.

  3. Keratomycosis in corneal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S L; Bajaj, R; Sharma, R

    1987-01-01

    510 cases of corneal ulceration were studied for the presence of fungus as a causative organism. Fungus was found in 87 (17.5%) most common fungus found was aspergillus. Mucor was found in 16 cases (18.1%) which is higher than earlier reports. History of trauma specially with vegetative matter and the application of steriods for one purpose or the other is a factor of importance as noted in this study.

  4. Exploring the characteristics of the attentional blink paradigm when used to discover concealed knowledge.

    PubMed

    Niziurski, Julie; Andre, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Ganis and Patnaik (Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 34:189-196, 2009) reported that the attentional blink paradigm using faces could be used to detect the presence of concealed knowledge. The attentional blink is defined as the inability to successfully detect the second of two target items presented within a short inter-stimulus interval. The present study tested the use of the attentional blink paradigm in a concealed knowledge test by investigating the effect that familiar faces may have on the attentional blink. Participants completed 200 trials where they were told to look for the same familiar target (Target 2; actor Brad Pitt) that was intermixed with neutral face stimuli and one other familiar face (Target 1; actor George Clooney). Target 1 was to act as the concealed knowledge as participants familiar with Target 1 would be distracted by his unannounced presence and report not seeing Target 2 thereby showing an attentional blink. Despite all participants being familiar with Target 2, an attentional blink still occurred, but with higher than normal Target 2 accuracy rates. Overall, we found support for using the AB paradigm with the concealed knowledge test; however, a possible countermeasure to the attentional blink is familiarity with Target 2 as eight of 21 participants who recognized Target 1 (the concealed knowledge) were also able to detect Target 2 on 100 % of the trials where Target 1's presence should have created an attentional blink.

  5. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  6. Macaque Pontine Omnipause Neurons Play No Direct Role in the Generation of Eye Blinks

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, K. P.; Williams, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    We recorded the activity of pontine omnipause neurons (OPNs) in two macaques during saccadic eye movements and blinks. As previously reported, we found that OPNs fire tonically during fixation and pause about 15 ms before a saccadic eye movement. In contrast, for blinks elicited by air puffs, the OPNs paused <2 ms before the onset of the blink. Thus the burst in the agonist orbicularis oculi motoneurons (OOMNs) and the pause in the antagonist levator palpabrae superioris motoneurons (LPSMNs) necessarily precede the OPN pause. For spontaneous blinks there was no correlation between blink and pause onsets. In addition, the OPN pause continued for 40–60 ms after the time of the maximum downward closing of the eyelids, which occurs around the end of the OOMN burst of firing. LPSMN activity is not responsible for terminating the OPN pause because OPN resumption was very rapid, whereas the resumption of LPSMN firing during the reopening phase is gradual. OPN pause onset does not directly control blink onset, nor does pause offset control or encode the transition between the end of the OOMN firing and the resumption of the LPSMNs. The onset of the blink-related eye transients preceded both blink and OPN pause onsets. Therefore they initiated while the saccadic short-lead burst neurons were still fully inhibited by the OPNs and cannot be saccadic in origin. The abrupt dynamic change of the vertical eye transients from an oscillatory behavior to a single time constant exponential drift predicted the resumption of the OPNs. PMID:20164389

  7. Spontaneous Eye-Blinking and Stereotyped Behavior in Older Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebel, Amanda M.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicates that abnormal stereotyped movements are associated with central dopamine dysfunction and that eye-blink rate is a noninvasive, in vivo measure of dopamine function. We measured the spontaneous eye-blinking and stereotyped behavior of older adults with severe/profound mental retardation living in a state mental…

  8. Photoluminescence Blinking of Single-Crystal Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Nanorods Induced by Surface Traps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) of organometal halide perovskite materials reflects the charge dynamics inside of the material and thus contains important information for understanding the electro-optical properties of the material. Interpretation of PL blinking of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) nanostructures observed on polycrystalline samples remains puzzling owing to their intrinsic disordered nature. Here, we report a novel method for the synthesis of high-quality single-crystal MAPbI3 nanorods and demonstrate a single-crystal study on MAPbI3 PL blinking. At low excitation power densities, two-state blinking was found on individual nanorods with dimensions of several hundred nanometers. A super-resolution localization study on the blinking of individual nanorods showed that single crystals of several hundred nanometers emit and blink as a whole, without showing changes in the localization center over the crystal. Moreover, both the blinking ON and OFF times showed power-law distributions, indicating trapping–detrapping processes. This is further supported by the PL decay times of the individual nanorods, which were found to correlate with the ON/OFF states. Furthermore, a strong environmental dependence of the nanorod PL blinking was revealed by comparing the measurements in vacuum, nitrogen, and air, implying that traps locate close to crystal surfaces. We explain our observations by proposing surface charge traps that are likely related to under-coordinated lead ions and methylammonium vacancies to result in the PL blinking observed here. PMID:27617323

  9. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  10. The dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 effectively increases eye blinking count in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Kiyoshi, Akihiko; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Ikejiri, Masaru; Ogi, Yuji; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2016-03-01

    Eye blinking is a spontaneous behavior observed in all mammals, and has been used as a well-established clinical indicator for dopamine production in neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Tourette syndrome [1,2]. Pharmacological studies in humans and non-human primates have shown that dopamine agonists/antagonists increase/decrease eye blinking rate. Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) have recently attracted a great deal of attention as suitable experimental animals in the psychoneurological field due to their more developed prefrontal cortex than rodents, easy handling compare to other non-human primates, and requirement for small amounts of test drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dopamine D1-4 receptors agonists on eye blinking in common marmosets. Our results show that the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 and the non-selective dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine significantly increased common marmosets eye blinking count, whereas the dopamine D2 agonist (+)-PHNO and the dopamine D3 receptor agonist (+)-PD-128907 produced somnolence in common marmosets resulting in a decrease in eye blinking count. The dopamine D4 receptor agonists PD-168077 and A-41297 had no effect on common marmosets' eye blinking count. Finally, the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 39166 completely blocked apomorphine-induced increase in eye blinking count. These results indicate that eye blinking in common marmosets may be a useful tool for in vivo screening of novel dopamine D1 receptor agonists as antipsychotics.

  11. Spontaneous Eye-Blinking and Stereotyped Behavior in Older Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebel, Amanda M.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicates that abnormal stereotyped movements are associated with central dopamine dysfunction and that eye-blink rate is a noninvasive, in vivo measure of dopamine function. We measured the spontaneous eye-blinking and stereotyped behavior of older adults with severe/profound mental retardation living in a state mental…

  12. A closed-loop stimulation system supplemented with motoneurone dynamic sensitivity replicates natural eye blinks.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alice; Cavallari, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    The authors are designing an implantable device that will electrically stimulate a paretic eyelid when electrodes implanted into the contralateral healthy orbicularis oculi muscle detect a spontaneous blink activity. As a novelty, the stimulation pattern includes the dynamic sensitivity of motor units, thus obtaining complete eyelid closure, tailored on the kinematics of the natural eye blink. A preliminary study was performed on 10 healthy subjects, to observe, first, the kinematics of their natural eye blink and, second, the eye blink stimulated by a dynamic vs nondynamic pattern. A microaccelerometer taped onto the left upper eyelid detected its kinematics. A dedicated LabView software built up and triggered the stimulation pattern. A webcam recorded the behavioral effect. The kinematics of spontaneous eye blinks was detected. Then, an epicutaneous stimulation of the facial nerve branch for the left orbicularis oculi muscle was performed on the same subjects. Muscle recruitment curves were studied, and acceleration of the bionic blink was measured and compared with the natural one. Kinematics of the natural eyelid is highly variable within subjects. The stimulation pattern frequency was set case by case in order to obtain the desired eyelid acceleration of the contralateral eye. A custom-fit dynamic stimulation leads to a symmetrical natural-like eye blink. By adding the dynamic pulse, the authors were able to tailor a bionic eye blink, which was hardly distinguishable from the subject's natural one.

  13. The Role of the Magnocellular and Parvocellular Pathways in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Jepma, Marieke; La Fors, Sabrina; Olivers, Christian N. L.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink refers to the transient impairment in perceiving the 2nd of two targets presented in close temporal proximity in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect on human attentional-blink performance of disrupting the function of the magnocellular pathway--a major…

  14. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  15. The inhibitory control reflex.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Best, Maisy; Bowditch, William A; Stevens, Tobias; McLaren, Ian P L

    2014-12-01

    Response inhibition is typically considered a hallmark of deliberate executive control. In this article, we review work showing that response inhibition can also become a 'prepared reflex', readily triggered by information in the environment, or after sufficient training, or a 'learned reflex' triggered by the retrieval of previously acquired associations between stimuli and stopping. We present new results indicating that people can learn various associations, which influence performance in different ways. To account for previous findings and our new results, we present a novel architecture that integrates theories of associative learning, Pavlovian conditioning, and executive response inhibition. Finally, we discuss why this work is also relevant for the study of 'intentional inhibition'.

  16. Mechanisms of fluorescence blinking in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jau; Marcus, R A

    2005-08-01

    The light-induced spectral diffusion and fluorescence intermittency (blinking) of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots are investigated theoretically using a diffusion-controlled electron-transfer (DCET) model, where a light-induced one-dimensional diffusion process in energy space is considered. Unlike the conventional electron-transfer reactions with simple exponential kinetics, the model naturally leads to a power-law statistics for the intermittency. We formulate a possible explanation for the spectral broadening and its proportionality to the light energy density, the -32 power law for the blinking statistics of the fluorescence intermittency, the breakdown of the power-law behavior with a bending tail for the "light" periods, a lack of bending tail for the "dark" periods (but would eventually appear at later times), and the dependence of the bending tail on light intensity and temperature. This DCET model predicts a critical time t(c) (a function of the electronic coupling strength and other quantities), such that for times shorter than t(c) the exponent for the power law is -12 instead of -32. Quantitative analyses are made of the experimental data on spectral diffusion and on the asymmetric blinking statistics for the "on" and "off" events. Causes for deviation of the exponent from the ideal value of -32 are also discussed. Several fundamental properties are determined from the present experimental data, the diffusion correlation time, the Stokes shift, and a combination of other molecular-based quantities. Specific experiments are suggested to test the model further, extract other molecular properties, and elucidate more details of the light-induced charge-transfer dynamics in quantum dots.

  17. Non-blinking semiconductor colloidal quantum dots for biology, optoelectronics and quantum optics.

    PubMed

    Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoit; Buil, Stéphanie; Quélin, Xavier; Dubertret, Benoit; Hermier, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-14

    Twinkle, twinkle: The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. There are various approaches for obtaining non-blinking nanocrystals, one of which is to grow a thick coat of CdS on the CdSe core (see picture). Applications of this method in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing are discussed.The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. For some years, research on this phenomenon has demonstrated the possibility to progress beyond this problem by suppressing this fluorescence intermittency in various ways. After a brief overview on the microscopic mechanism of blinking, we review the various approaches used to obtain non-blinking nanocrystals and discuss the commitment of this crucial improvement to applications in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing.

  18. Camera vibration measurement using blinking light-emitting diode array.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kazuki; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2017-01-23

    We present a new method for measuring camera vibrations such as camera shake and shutter shock. This method successfully detects the vibration trajectory and transient waveforms from the camera image itself. We employ a time-varying pattern as the camera test chart over the conventional static pattern. This pattern is implemented using a specially developed blinking light-emitting-diode array. We describe the theoretical framework and pattern analysis of the camera image for measuring camera vibrations. Our verification experiments show that our method has a detection accuracy and sensitivity of 0.1 pixels, and is robust against image distortion. Measurement results of camera vibrations in commercial cameras are also demonstrated.

  19. Effect of shell thickness and composition on blinking suppression and the blinking mechanism in ‘giant’ CdSe/CdS nanocrystal quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Javier; Htoon, Han; Chen, Yongfen; Park, Young-Shin; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Goodwin, Peter M.; Werner, James H.; Wells, Nathan P.; Casson, Joanna L.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    We recently developed an inorganic shell approach for suppressing blinking in nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) that has the potential to dramatically improve the utility of these fluorophores for single-NQD tracking of individual molecules in cell biology. Here, we consider in detail the effect of shell thickness and composition on blinking suppression, focusing on the CdSe/CdS core/shell system. We also discuss the blinking mechanism as understood through profoundly altered blinking statistics. We clarify the dependence of blinking behavior and photostability on shell thickness, as well as on interrogation times. We show that, while the thickest-shell systems afford the greatest advantages in terms of enhanced optical properties, thinner-shell NQDs may be adequate for certain applications requiring relatively shorter interrogation times. Shell thickness also determines the sensitivity of the NQD optical properties to aqueous-phase transfer, a critical step in rendering NQDs compatible with bioimaging applications. Lastly, we provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of these unique NQDs for fluorescent particle tracking. High-resolution image of an ultra-thick-shell ‘giant’ nanocrystal quantum dot (left). Suppressed blinking behaviour afforded by this class of semiconductor nanocrystal yields new statistical relationships in the probability densities of fluorescence on- and off-time distributions (right). PMID:20626004

  20. Design and Reflexivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Toorn, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Argues that design, despite frequently well-intentioned ethical starting-points, has become generalized and rudimentary in its substantive and instrumental choices, and naive in its thinking about its own public role. Argues for a "mental ecology," for a multidimensional realistic reflexivity, which makes possible the recuperation of a…

  1. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  2. Corneal seal device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A corneal seal device is provided which, when placed in an incision in the eye, permits the insertion of a surgical tool or instrument through the device into the eye. The device includes a seal chamber which opens into a tube which is adapted to be sutured to the eye and serves as an entry passage for a tool. A sealable aperture in the chamber permits passage of the tool through the chamber into the tube and hence into the eye. The chamber includes inlet ports adapted to be connected to a regulated source of irrigation fluid which provides a safe intraocular pressure.

  3. A unique use for a corneal tattoo.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Emma; Maino, Anna; Lee, John

    2009-09-01

    Corneal tattoos have been previously used in managing corneal pathologies. We describe a case of a 28-year-old male who presented with intractable binocular diplopia, which was relieved with a corneal tattoo. This is a novel application of corneal tattooing for the alleviation of intractable binocular diplopia.

  4. Heat transfer and tear film dynamics over multiple blink cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Quan; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2014-07-01

    We consider model problems for the tear film over multiple blink cycles with heat transfer from the posterior side of the tear film. A nonlinear partial differential equation governs the film thickness on a moving domain in one space dimension and time. One end of the tear film moves in order to mimic blinking in the eye. The film thickness is coupled with the diffusion of heat from the posterior of the film, where the underlying cornea and aqueous humor are modeled as a rectangular domain. The domain of the tear film is located on one edge of the rectangle. The resulting problem is solved using the method of lines with a Chebyshev spectral method in space. Evaporation is included in the model, with end fluxes specified to compensate for the evaporation from the film. The numerical results reveal a similarity to quantitative in vivo observations of the film dynamics and measured ocular surface temperature. Periodicity in the film and temperature dynamics is explored with different flux conditions and end motions, and a transition between periodic and non-periodic solutions is analyzed.

  5. Corneal Densitometry for Quantification of Corneal Deposits in Monoclonal Gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Enders, Philip; Holtick, Udo; Schaub, Friederike; Tuchscherer, Armin; Hermann, Manuel M; Scheid, Christoph; Cursiefen, Claus; Bachmann, Björn O

    2017-04-01

    To assess the capability of Scheimpflug-based densitometry of the cornea to quantify light chain deposits in patients with active monoclonal gammopathies. This is a case-control study in which data from a leading tertiary university center in myeloma care were analyzed. Ten eyes of 5 patients with monoclonal gammopathy and 26 eyes of 13 healthy controls undergoing clinical evaluation and Scheimpflug-based measurements were included in the study. The main outcome measures were densitometry data of the 4 corneal layers-anterior layer (AL), central layer (CL), posterior layer, and total layer (TL)-in 4 different annuli (central annular zone 0-2 mm, intermediate annular zone 2-6 mm, peripheral annular zone 6-10 mm, and total annular zone 0-12 mm). In 8 eyes of 4 patients with IgG-based gammopathy, corneal light backscatter was highest in the AL and decreased with increasing corneal depth. The peripheral annular zone showed a higher densitometry value compared with the corneal center. Compared with healthy controls, the AL (P < 0.001), the CL (P < 0.001), and the TL (P < 0.001) had significantly higher corneal light backscatter in patients with gammopathy in the total and the peripheral annular zones. In one patient with predominantly IgA-based disease, corneal light backscatter was not elevated. Scheimpflug-based densitometry of the cornea is able to quantify opacification by immunoglobulin G light chain deposits in monoclonal gammopathies. This noninvasive technique can complement presently used in vivo confocal microscopy and corneal photography to objectivize corneal changes. Densitometry might allow monitoring of corneal immunoglobulin deposits in follow-up examinations.

  6. Abnormal activity of corneal cold thermoreceptors underlies the unpleasant sensations in dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Illés; Luna, Carolina; Quirce, Susana; Mizerska, Kamila; Callejo, Gerard; Riestra, Ana; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Meseguer, Victor M; Cuenca, Nicolás; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Acosta, M Carmen; Gasull, Xavier; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2016-02-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) affects >10% of the population worldwide, and it provokes an unpleasant sensation of ocular dryness, whose underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Removal of the main lachrymal gland in guinea pigs caused long-term reduction of basal tearing accompanied by changes in the architecture and density of subbasal corneal nerves and epithelial terminals. After 4 weeks, ongoing impulse activity and responses to cooling of corneal cold thermoreceptor endings were enhanced. Menthol (200 μM) first excited and then inactivated this augmented spontaneous and cold-evoked activity. Comparatively, corneal polymodal nociceptors of tear-deficient eyes remained silent and exhibited only a mild sensitization to acidic stimulation, whereas mechanonociceptors were not affected. Dryness-induced changes in peripheral cold thermoreceptor responsiveness developed in parallel with a progressive excitability enhancement of corneal cold trigeminal ganglion neurons, primarily due to an increase of sodium currents and a decrease of potassium currents. In corneal polymodal nociceptor neurons, sodium currents were enhanced whereas potassium currents remain unaltered. In healthy humans, exposure of the eye surface to menthol vapors or to cold air currents evoked unpleasant sensations accompanied by increased blinking frequency that we attributed to cold thermoreceptor stimulation. Notably, stimulation with menthol reduced the ongoing background discomfort of patients with DED, conceivably due to use-dependent inactivation of cold thermoreceptors. Together, these data indicate that cold thermoreceptors contribute importantly to the detection and signaling of ocular surface wetness, and develop under chronic eye dryness conditions an injury-evoked neuropathic firing that seems to underlie the unpleasant sensations experienced by patients with DED.

  7. Abnormal activity of corneal cold thermoreceptors underlies the unpleasant sensations in dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Illés; Luna, Carolina; Quirce, Susana; Mizerska, Kamila; Callejo, Gerard; Riestra, Ana; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Meseguer, Victor M.; Cuenca, Nicolás; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Acosta, M. Carmen; Gasull, Xavier; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dry eye disease (DED) affects >10% of the population worldwide, and it provokes an unpleasant sensation of ocular dryness, whose underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Removal of the main lachrymal gland in guinea pigs caused long-term reduction of basal tearing accompanied by changes in the architecture and density of subbasal corneal nerves and epithelial terminals. After 4 weeks, ongoing impulse activity and responses to cooling of corneal cold thermoreceptor endings were enhanced. Menthol (200 μM) first excited and then inactivated this augmented spontaneous and cold-evoked activity. Comparatively, corneal polymodal nociceptors of tear-deficient eyes remained silent and exhibited only a mild sensitization to acidic stimulation, whereas mechanonociceptors were not affected. Dryness-induced changes in peripheral cold thermoreceptor responsiveness developed in parallel with a progressive excitability enhancement of corneal cold trigeminal ganglion neurons, primarily due to an increase of sodium currents and a decrease of potassium currents. In corneal polymodal nociceptor neurons, sodium currents were enhanced whereas potassium currents remain unaltered. In healthy humans, exposure of the eye surface to menthol vapors or to cold air currents evoked unpleasant sensations accompanied by increased blinking frequency that we attributed to cold thermoreceptor stimulation. Notably, stimulation with menthol reduced the ongoing background discomfort of patients with DED, conceivably due to use-dependent inactivation of cold thermoreceptors. Together, these data indicate that cold thermoreceptors contribute importantly to the detection and signaling of ocular surface wetness, and develop under chronic eye dryness conditions an injury-evoked neuropathic firing that seems to underlie the unpleasant sensations experienced by patients with DED. PMID:26675826

  8. [Research and development for treating devastating corneal diseases].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    morphology. The use of a ROCK inhibitor, both for cultivated endothelial cell injection into the anterior chamber and for use as a topical application, may prove to be a potential tool for the treatment of corneal endothelial dysfunction. 7. The development of a new type of tear function test : The results of our investigations show that the time-dependent changes of tear film lipid layer (TFLL) spread are compatible with the Voigt model of viscoelasticity, and that the initial velocity of the TFLL spread after a blink decreases in proportion to the decrease in tear volume. Thus, a lipid-layer analysis will become an important tear analysis tool. The above are projects representing the way we believe new treatments for severe corneal diseases are heading.

  9. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  10. Intrasubject corneal thickness asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Khachikian, Stephen S; Belin, Michael W; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2008-06-01

    To establish the normal distribution for intrasubject (right eye/left eye) central corneal pachymetry in a refractive surgery population. A retrospective analysis was performed on 1448 eyes of 724 consecutive patients evaluated for refractive surgery. Pachymetric data were obtained from the Pentacam Eye Scanner. Right and left eye pachymetry values were compared for the corneal apex, pupil center, and thinnest point. Statistical analysis was performed to determine normal levels of variance. The average apex reading was 539.3+/-36.8 microm, median 542 microm, and mode 539 microm (range: 411 to 664 microm). Values for the pupil center (average 538.7 microm) and thinnest point (average 536.1 microm) followed a similar distribution. The average pachymetry difference between fellow eyes was 8.8+/-7.2 microm at the apex, 8.9+/-8.3 microm at the pupil center, and 9.0+/-8.3 microm at the thinnest region. Individuals with a greater than 23.2 microm apical pachymetry difference represent less than 5% of the population. Individuals with an apical difference greater than 30.4 microm represent less than 0.5%. Pachymetric asymmetry outside the normal range should alert the clinician to examine for other parameters that are more established refractive surgery risk factors.

  11. Corneal structure and transparency

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Keith M.; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  12. Corneal structure and transparency.

    PubMed

    Meek, Keith M; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  14. Tissue Engineering of Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Tatsuya; Yokoo, Seiichi; Yamagami, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) do not replicate after wounding. Therefore, corneal endothelial deficiency can result in irreversible corneal edema. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) allows selective replacement of the diseased corneal endothelium. However, DSAEK requires a donor cornea and the worldwide shortage of corneas limits its application. This review presents current knowledge on the tissue engineering of corneal endothelium using cultured HCECs. We also provide our recent work on tissue engineering for DSAEK grafts using cultured HCECs. We reconstructed DSAEK grafts by seeding cultured DiI-labelled HCECs on collagen sheets. Then HCEC sheets were transplanted onto the posterior stroma after descemetorhexis in the DSAEK group. Severe stromal edema was detected in the control group, but not in the DSAEK group throughout the observation period. Fluorescein microscopy one month after surgery showed numerous DiI-labelled cells on the posterior corneal surface in the DSAEK group. Frozen sections showed a monolayer of DiI-labelled cells on Descemet’s membrane. These findings indicate that cultured adult HCECs, transplanted with DSAEK surgery, maintain corneal transparency after transplantation and suggest the feasibility of performing DSAEK with HCECs to treat endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24955745

  15. Human intracranial recordings link suppressed transients rather than 'filling-in' to perceptual continuity across blinks

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Meshulam, Meir; Groppe, David M; Mégevand, Pierre; Yeagle, Erin M; Goldfinger, Matthew S; Harel, Michal; Melloni, Lucia; Schroeder, Charles E; Deouell, Leon Y; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We hardly notice our eye blinks, yet an externally generated retinal interruption of a similar duration is perceptually salient. We examined the neural correlates of this perceptual distinction using intracranially measured ECoG signals from the human visual cortex in 14 patients. In early visual areas (V1 and V2), the disappearance of the stimulus due to either invisible blinks or salient blank video frames ('gaps') led to a similar drop in activity level, followed by a positive overshoot beyond baseline, triggered by stimulus reappearance. Ascending the visual hierarchy, the reappearance-related overshoot gradually subsided for blinks but not for gaps. By contrast, the disappearance-related drop did not follow the perceptual distinction – it was actually slightly more pronounced for blinks than for gaps. These findings suggest that blinks' limited visibility compared with gaps is correlated with suppression of blink-related visual activity transients, rather than with "filling-in" of the occluded content during blinks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17243.001 PMID:27685352

  16. Removing eye blink artefacts from EEG-A single-channel physiology-based method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenghuan; McIntosh, Julia; Shadli, Shabah M; Neo, Phoebe S-H; Huang, Zhiyi; McNaughton, Neil

    2017-11-01

    EEG signals are often contaminated with artefacts, particularly with large signals generated by eye blinks. Deletion of artefact can lose valuable data. Current methods of removing the eye blink component to leave residual EEG, such as blind source component removal, require multichannel recording, are computationally intensive, and can alter the original EEG signal. Here we describe a novel single-channel method using a model based on the ballistic physiological components of the eye blink. This removes the blink component, leaving uncontaminated EEG largely unchanged. Processing time allows its use in real-time applications such as neurofeedback training. Blink removal had a success rate of over 90% recovered variance of original EEG when removing synthesised eye blink components. Fronto-lateral sites were poorer (∼80%) than most other sites (92-96%), with poor fronto-polar results (67%). When compared with three popular independent component analysis (ICA) methods, our method was only slightly (1%) better at frontal midline sites but significantly (>20%) better at lateral sites with an overall advantage of ∼10%. With few recording channels and real-time processing, our method shows clear advantages over ICA for removing eye blinks. It should be particularly suited for use in portable brain-computer-interfaces and in neurofeedback training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific brainstem and cortico-spinal reflex abnormalities in coexisting essential tremor and Parkinson's disease (ET-PD).

    PubMed

    Yavuz, D; Gündüz, A; Ertan, S; Apaydın, H; Şifoğlu, A; Kiziltan, G; Kiziltan, M E

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to analyze functional changes at brainstem and spinal levels in essential tremor (ET), Parkinson's disease (PD) and coexisting essential tremor and Parkinson's disease (ET-PD). Age- and gender-matched patients with tremor (15 ET, 7 ET with resting tremor, 25 ET-PD and 10 PD) and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Diagnosis was established according to standardized clinical criteria. Electrophysiological studies included blink reflex (BR), auditory startle reaction (ASR) and long latency reflex (LLR). Blink reflex was normal and similar in all groups. Probability of ASR was significantly lower in ET-PD group whereas it was similar to healthy subjects in ET and PD (P<0.001). LLR was recorded during voluntary activity in all three groups. LLR II was more common in ET, PD and ET-PD groups. LLR III was far more common in the PD group (n=3, 13.6% in ET; n=4, 16.0% in ET-PD and n=7, 46.7% in PD; p=0.037). Despite the integrity of BR pathways, ASR and LLR show distinctive abnormalities in ET-PD. In our opinion, our electrophysiological findings support the hypothesis that ET-PD is a distinct entity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Corneal blindness: a global perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Whitcher, J. P.; Srinivasan, M.; Upadhyay, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Diseases affecting the cornea are a major cause of blindness worldwide, second only to cataract in overall importance. The epidemiology of corneal blindness is complicated and encompasses a wide variety of infectious and inflammatory eye diseses that cause corneal scarring, which ultimately leads to functional blindness. In addition, the prevalence of corneal disease varies from country to country and even from one population to another. While cataract is responsible for nearly 20 million of the 45 million blind people in the world, the next major cause is trachoma which blinds 4.9 million individuals, mainly as a result of corneal scarring and vascularization. Ocular trauma and corneal ulceration are significant causes of corneal blindness that are often underreported but may be responsible for 1.5-2.0 million new cases of monocular blindness every year. Causes of childhood blindness (about 1.5 million worldwide with 5 million visually disabled) include xerophthalmia (350,000 cases annually), ophthalmia neonatorum, and less frequently seen ocular diseases such as herpes simplex virus infections and vernal keratoconjunctivitis. Even though the control of onchocerciasis and leprosy are public health success stories, these diseases are still significant causes of blindness--affecting a quarter of a million individuals each. Traditional eye medicines have also been implicated as a major risk factor in the current epidemic of corneal ulceration in developing countries. Because of the difficulty of treating corneal blindness once it has occurred, public health prevention programmes are the most cost-effective means of decreasing the global burden of corneal blindness. PMID:11285665

  19. Management of advanced corneal ectasias.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Prafulla K; Dubey, Aditi; Jhanji, Vishal; Sharma, Namrata; Das, Sujata; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2016-01-01

    Corneal ectasias include a group of disorders characterised by progressive thinning, bulging and distortion of the cornea. Keratoconus is the most common disease in this group. Other manifestations include pellucid marginal degeneration, Terrien's marginal degeneration, keratoglobus and ectasias following surgery. Advanced ectasias usually present with loss of vision due to high irregular astigmatism. Management of these disorders is difficult due to the peripheral location of ectasia and associated severe corneal thinning. Newer contact lenses such as scleral lenses are helpful in a selected group of patients. A majority of these cases requires surgical intervention. This review provides an update on the current treatment modalities available for management of advanced corneal ectasias.

  20. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  1. Patching for corneal abrasion.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chris H L; Turner, Angus; Lim, Blanche X

    2016-07-26

    Published audits have demonstrated that corneal abrasions are a common presenting eye complaint. Eye patches are often recommended for treating corneal abrasions despite the lack of evidence for their use. This systematic review was conducted to determine the effects of the eye patch when used to treat corneal abrasions. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of patching for corneal abrasion on healing and pain relief. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to May 2016), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to May 2016), System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (OpenGrey) (January 1995 to May 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 9 May 2016. We also searched the reference lists of included studies, unpublished 'grey' literature and conference proceedings and contacted pharmaceutical companies for details of unpublished trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared patching the eye with no patching to treat simple corneal abrasions. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. Investigators were contacted for further information regarding the quality of trials. The primary outcome was healing at 24, 48 and 72 hours while secondary outcomes included measures of pain, quality of life and adverse effects. We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. We included 12 trials which

  2. A tribute to Lawrence Rogers Blinks (1900-1989): light and algae.

    PubMed

    Thorhaug, Anitra; Berlyn, Graeme

    2009-06-01

    We honor Lawrence Rogers Blinks (1900-1989) in this tribute. We introduce his scientific life that started at the Harvard University, and ended at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University. We discuss his pioneering contributions in the areas of ion transport in membranes and of photosynthesis, particularly of the phenomenon that became known as the Blinks Effect, later linked to the two-light and two-pigment system scheme of photosynthesis. We have drawn information from the 2006 symposium held in his honor in California, and from the extensive 2006 and 2008 recollections of Francis Haxo, one of the major coworkers of Blinks.

  3. Hot spot assisted blinking suppression of CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liu; Tong, Xuan; Zhang, Xu; Ren, Naifei; Jiang, Bo; Lu, Haifei

    2016-05-01

    This work compares the blinking of CdSe QDs on glass, single silver nanowire, and double aligned nanowires. The corresponding on-time fractions of these three cases are 50%, 70% and 85% respectively, which indicates that aligned double nanowires shows more efficient suppression than that of single nanowire. This phenomenon is attributed to the higher concentration of hot electron from hot spot between nanowires. Occupation of the non-radiative recombination centers by hot electrons from silver nanowires can be explained for the suppressed blinking behavior. The result has provided a novel pathway of suppressing the blinking behavior of QDs through plasmonic hot spot.

  4. Blinking in quantum dots: The origin of the grey state and power law statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C.

    2011-09-01

    Quantum dot (QD) blinking is characterized by switching between an “on” state and an “off” state, and a power-law distribution of on and off times with exponents from 1.0 to 2.0. The origin of blinking behavior in QDs, however, has remained a mystery. Here we describe an energy-band model for QDs that captures the full range of blinking behavior reported in the literature and provides new insight into features such as the gray state, the power-law distribution of on and off times, and the power-law exponents.

  5. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates.

  6. Effect of treatment with a topical ophthalmic preparation of 1% nalbuphine solution on corneal sensitivity in clinically normal horses.

    PubMed

    Wotman, Kathryn L; Utter, Mary E

    2010-02-01

    To assess the effect of treatment with a topical ophthalmic preparation of 1.2% nalbuphine solution on corneal sensitivity in clinically normal horses. 8 horses. Baseline corneal touch threshold (CTT) was measured (defined as the mean filament length [mm] at which a consistent blink response was elicited) for both eyes of each horse by use of a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer. Subsequently, 0.2 mL of 1.2% nalbuphine solution was instilled in 1 randomly selected eye of each horse, and 0.2 mL of artificial tears solution was instilled in the contralateral eye (control treatment). For all 8 horses, CTT of each eye was measured within 1 minute following nalbuphine or artificial tears administration and every 15 minutes thereafter for 60 minutes. For 5 of the 8 horses, CTT was also measured in both eyes at 120 minutes. Changes in CTT values from baseline over time were assessed, as were differences between treated and control eyes. At any time point, corneal sensitivity following nalbuphine treatment did not differ significantly from control treatment findings. Mean CTTs for nalbuphine-treated and control eyes were 38.8 and 37.9 mm, respectively. In both groups, CTT was significantly lower than baseline value at 15, 45, 60, and 120 minutes. No tearing or redness developed in any eye treated with nalbuphine. Topical administration of ophthalmic 1% nalbuphine solution had no effect on corneal sensitivity in clinically normal horses. The topical ocular treatment was not associated with local irritation.

  7. Hyperosmolar tears enhance cooling sensitivity of the corneal nerves in rats: possible neural basis for cold-induced dry eye pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2014-08-19

    Tear hyperosmolarity is a ubiquitous feature of dry-eye disease. Although dry-eye patients' sensitivity to cooling is well known, the effects of tear hyperosmolarity on a small amount of cooling in the corneal nerves have not been quantitatively examined. Recently reported corneal afferents, high-threshold cold sensitive plus dry-sensitive (HT-CS + DS) neurons, in rats is normally excited by strong (>4°C) cooling of the cornea, which, when applied to healthy humans, evokes the sensation of discomfort. However, corneal cooling measured between blinks does not exceed 2°C normally. Thus, we sought to determine if these nociceptors could be sensitized by hyperosmolar tears such that they are now activated by small cooling of the ocular surface. Trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea were extracellularly recorded in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. The responses of single corneal neurons to cooling stimuli presented in the presence of hyperosmolar (350-800 mOsm NaCl) tears were examined. The HT-CS + DS neurons with thresholds averaging 4°C cooling responded to cooling stimuli presented after 15 minutes of hyperosmolar tears with thresholds of less than 1°C. The response magnitudes also were enhanced so that the responses to small (2°C) cooling emerged, where none was observed before. These results demonstrate that after exposure to hyperosmolar tears, these nociceptive corneal neurons now begin to respond to the slight cooling normally encountered between blinks, enabling the painful information to be carried to the brain, which could explain the cooling-evoked discomfort in dry eye patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  8. Cyanoacrylates and corneal abrasion.

    PubMed

    Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1989-01-01

    Cyanoacrylate-containing adhesives such as Super Glue, Krazy Glue, and a vast array of artificial nail adhesives are monomers which rapidly polymerize and bond in the presence of water or weak bases. Inadvertent contact with skin or tissue can also cause rapid bonding with resultant irritation. To assess the magnitude of problems associated with ocular contamination involving cyanoacrylates, a 12-month prospective study was conducted. 34 cases (21 adult and 13 pediatric) were collected. In all cases, contaminated eyes were thoroughly irrigated with tepid water for 15 minutes. 15 patients (44%) suffered a corneal abrasion, as determined by ophthalmic exam, necessitating treatment with antibiotics, cycloplegics, and patching. Individuals reporting complete resolution were irrigated with 20 minutes of exposure, while patients suffering mechanical injury delayed decontamination for a minimum of 15 minutes. In addition to immediate irrigation of eyes exposed to cyanoacrylates, we recommend an ophthalmologic evaluation to rule out the possibility of mechanical injury.

  9. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  10. Corneal Transplantation and Immune Privilege

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplants have been successfully performed in human subjects for over 100 years and enjoy an immune privilege that is unrivaled in the field of transplantation. Immune privilege is defined as the reduced incidence and tempo in the immune rejection of corneal allografts compared to other categories of organ allografts performed under the same conditions. Skin allografts transplanted across various MHC or minor histocompatibility barriers undergo rejection in approximately 100% of the hosts. By contrast, orthotopic corneal allografts experience long-term survival in 50% to >90% of the hosts, depending on the histocompatibility barriers that confront the host. The capacity of corneal allografts to evade immune rejection is attributable to multiple anatomical, physiological, and immunoregulatory conditions that conspire to prevent the induction and expression of alloimmunity. PMID:23360158

  11. Corneal Neuralgia after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Theophanous, Christos; Jacobs, Deborah S; Hamrah, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    To illustrate that corneal neuralgia may be the basis for refractory dry eye syndrome after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The methodology used is that of a retrospective medical record review of a small case series. Three male patients, aged 30 to 48 years, referred in 2012 for dry eye syndrome refractory to treatment within 1 year of LASIK or LASIK enhancement are reported. Each patient gave history of eye pain, light sensitivity, and difficulty with visual activities beginning within 2 months of LASIK or LASIK enhancement. Best-corrected visual acuity was 20/15 or 20/20 in each of the six eyes. Tear-centered models and metrics did not explain persistent symptoms, which was consistent with inadequate response to standard dry eye treatments used before referral and reported here. In vivo confocal microscopy was abnormal at presentation in each case and was followed over time. Treatments undertaken subsequent to referral included autologous serum tears (three cases), PROSE (Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem) treatment (two cases), and systemic agents for pain, anxiety, or depression (three cases). By the end of 2013, at a mean of 23 months after LASIK or LASIK enhancement, symptoms improved in all three patients. Patients with persistent dry eye symptoms out of proportion to clinical signs after LASIK have a syndrome that may best be classified as corneal neuralgia. In vivo confocal microscopy can be informative as to the neuropathic basis of this condition. In keeping with current understanding of complex regional pain syndrome, early multimodal treatment directed toward reducing peripheral nociceptive signaling is warranted to avoid subsequent centralization and persistence of pain. Distinguishing this syndrome from typical post-LASIK dry eye remains a challenge.

  12. Adductor T reflex abnormalities in patients with decreased patellar reflexes.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Deneri, Ersin; Ozkul, Ayca; Sair, Ahmet; Yaycioglu, Soner

    2009-08-01

    The adductor reflex (AR) is a tendon reflex that has various features that differ from other tendon reflexes. This reflex was tested in different disorders presenting with diminished patellar reflexes such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN), L2-L4 radiculopathy, and distal symmetric diabetic neuropathy (diabetic PNP). The AR and crossed-AR (elicited by tapping the contralateral patellar tendon) were recorded using concentric needle electrodes. Additionally, the patellar T reflex (vm-TR) and vastus medialis H reflex (vm-HR) were recorded using surface electrodes. AR was recorded in only one out of eight patients with DLRPN, but it was recorded in 21 out of 22 patients with L2-L4 radiculopathy (95.5%). Of these reflexes, only AR showed prolonged latency in the L2-L4 radiculopathy group. The latencies of AR, vm-TR, and vm-HR were prolonged in patients with diabetic PNP. We conclude that AR can be useful in the differential diagnosis of some lower motor neuron disorders that present with patellar reflex disturbance. Muscle Nerve 40: 264-270, 2009.

  13. [Methods for sealing of corneal perforations].

    PubMed

    Samoilă, O; Totu, Lăcrămioara; Călugăru, M

    2012-01-01

    A variety of corneal pathology can lead to corneal ulcers and perforations. A deep corneal ulcer may need surgical treatment to allow good volume restoration and reepithelisation. Corneal perforation must be sealed and when the perforation is large, the task of repairing the defect can be underwhelming. The elegant solution is the corneal transplant, but this is not always readily available, especially in undeveloped countries. We present here two cases with different solutions to seal the perforated cornea: the first one has a large peripheral defect and it is successfully sealed with scleral patch and the second one is central with small perforation and is successfully sealed with multilayered amniotic membrane. Both cases are followed for over 12 months and demonstrate good corneal restoration (both on clinical examination and corneal topography). Sclera and amniotic membrane can be used to seal corneal defects when corneal transplant is not readily available.

  14. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  15. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; ...

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  16. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  17. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator.

    PubMed

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  18. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  19. Perceptual similarity induces overinvestment in an attentional blink task.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Ellen; Shore, David I; Milliken, Bruce

    2017-07-28

    The overinvestment account of the attentional blink (AB) posits that the AB results from the allocation of more resources than necessary to encode a first target (T1), which in turn lowers the resources available to encode a second target (T2) shortly thereafter. Across two experiments, we examined whether resource allocation to T1, and thus overinvestment that results in an AB effect, might be limited by perceptual mechanisms that evaluate the need for encoding resources. The key result observed in both experiments was that a relatively easy to encode T1 can nonetheless result in an AB when it is perceptually similar to a more difficult to encode T1. The importance of experimental context as an influence on the allocation, or overinvestment, of attentional resources to T1 is highlighted by these findings.

  20. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  1. Identification of angry faces in the attentional blink

    PubMed Central

    Maratos, Frances A.; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P.

    2008-01-01

    According to cognitive and neural theories of emotion, attentional processing of innate threat stimuli, such as angry facial expressions, is prioritised over neutral stimuli. To test this hypothesis, the present study used a modified version of the rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm to investigate the effect of emotional face stimuli on the attentional blink (AB). The target stimuli were schematic faces which depicted threatening (angry), positive or neutral facial expressions. Results showed that performance accuracy was enhanced (i.e., the AB was reduced) on trials in which the second target was an angry face, rather than a neutral face. Results extend previous research by demonstrating that angry faces reduce the AB, and that this effect is found for schematic facial expressions. These findings further support the proposal that, when there is competition for attentional resources, threat stimuli are given higher priority in processing compared with non-threatening stimuli. PMID:19360116

  2. Filter Feeding, Chaotic Filtration, and a Blinking Stokeslet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J. R.; Otto, S. R.; Blake, D. A.

    The filtering mechanisms in bivalve molluscs, such as the mussel Mytilus edulis, and in sessile organisms, such as Vorticella or Stentor, involve complex fluid mechanical phenomena. In the former example, three different sets of cilia serving different functions are involved in the process whereas in the sessile organisms the flexibility and contractile nature of the stalk may play an important role in increasing the filtering efficiency of the organisms. In both cases, beating microscopic cilia are the ``engines'' driving the fluid motion, so the fluid mechanics will be dominated entirely by viscous forces. A fluid mechanical model is developed for the filtering mechanism in mussels that enables estimates to be made of the pressure drop through the gill filaments due to (i) latero-frontal filtering cilia, (ii) the lateral (pumping) cilia, and (iii) through the non-ciliated zone of the ventral end of the filament. The velocity profile across the filaments indicates that a backflow can occur in the centre of the channel leading to the formation of two ``standing'' eddies which may drive particles towards the mucus-laden short cilia, the third set of cilia. Filter feeding in the sessile organisms is modelled by a point force above a rigid boundary. The point force periodically changes its point of application according to a given protocol (a blinking stokeslet). The resulting fluid field is illustrated via Poincaré sections and particle dispersion-showing the potential for a much improved filtering efficiency. Returning to filter feeding in bivalve molluscs, this concept is extended to a pair of blinking stokeslets above a rigid boundary to give insight into possible mechanisms for movement of food particles onto the short mucus-bearing cilia. The appendix contains a Latin and English version of an ``Ode of Achievement'' in celebration of Sir James Lighthill's contributions to mathematics and fluid mechanics.

  3. Stapedial reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Murofushi, T; Yamane, M; Osanai, R

    1992-01-01

    In 27 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), stapedial reflexes were measured using impedance audiometry and compared with those of 11 age-matched control subjects. The reflex threshold of PD patients was lower than that of control subjects. A prolongation of contraction time (C50) and relaxation time (D50) was revealed. Between patients with and without L-dopa, there was no significant difference for any reflex parameter. But, the D50 of patients without anticholinergic drugs was longer than that of patients with anticholinergic drugs. The authors could not find any relationship between the severity of PD and the reflex parameters. The authors assume that the prolongation of reflex parameters might be attributed to the hyperactivity of the indirect pathways of the stapedial reflex.

  4. [Clinical aspects of corneal burns].

    PubMed

    Borderie, V

    2004-12-01

    Clinical aspects and prognosis of corneal burns mainly depend on the agent responsible for the trauma. The most severe burns are caustic burns, which should be classified as burns caused by basic agents, associated with deep and prolonged injuries, and burns caused by acidic agents, associated with more superficial injuries. At the acute stage, caustic burns induce epithelial defects, corneal edema, and ischemic necrosis of the limbus, conjunctiva, iris and ciliary body. At the early stage, reepithelialization occurs and is often associated with corneal vascularization and stromal infiltrates, followed by corneal scar formation. At the chronic stage, the following complications are possible: corneal scars, limbal stem cell insufficiency, lachrymal insufficiency, irregular astigmatism, ocular surface fibrosis, cataract, glaucoma, decreased intraocular pressure, and ocular atrophy. The Ropper-Hall classification is based on the extent of limbal ischemia. Thermal burns induce epithelial defects at the acute stage, with the more severe forms giving the same complications as caustic burns. Radiation-related burns can be caused by ultraviolet radiations (acute epithelial keratitis, pterygium, droplet-like keratitis), microwaves, infrared radiations, ionizing radiations or, laser radiations. Electrical burns are often a result of torture and give corneal stroma opacification.

  5. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  6. Intrastromal Corneal Ring Implants for Corneal Thinning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this project was to determine the role of corneal implants in the management of corneal thinning disease conditions. An evidence-based review was conducted to determine the safety, effectiveness and durability of corneal implants for the management of corneal thinning disorders. The evolving directions of research in this area were also reviewed. Subject of the Evidence-Based Analysis The primary treatment objectives for corneal implants are to normalize corneal surface topography, improve contact lens tolerability, and restore visual acuity in order to delay or defer the need for corneal transplant. Implant placement is a minimally invasive procedure that is purported to be safe and effective. The procedure is also claimed to be adjustable, reversible, and both eyes can be treated at the same time. Further, implants do not limit the performance of subsequent surgical approaches or interfere with corneal transplant. The evidence for these claims is the focus of this review. The specific research questions for the evidence review were as follows: Safety Corneal Surface Topographic Effects: Effects on corneal surface remodelling Impact of these changes on subsequent interventions, particularly corneal transplantation (penetrating keratoplasty [PKP]) Visual Acuity Refractive Outcomes Visual Quality (Symptoms): such as contrast vision or decreased visual symptoms (halos, fluctuating vision) Contact lens tolerance Functional visual rehabilitation and quality of life Patient satisfaction: Disease Process: Impact on corneal thinning process Effect on delaying or deferring the need for corneal transplantation Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Corneal ectasia (thinning) comprises a range of disorders involving either primary disease conditions such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal corneal degeneration or secondary iatrogenic conditions such as corneal thinning occurring after LASIK refractive surgery. The condition

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Gokkaya, Nilufer Kutay Ordu; Aras, Meltem; Yesiltepe, Elcin; Koseoglu, Fusun

    2006-12-01

    There is a high incidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the upper limbs in patients with hemiplegia, and its painful and functional consequences present a problem to specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This study was designed to assess the role of several factors in the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients with hemiplegia. Ninety-five consecutive stroke patients (63 male and 32 female, mean age 59+/-12 years) admitted to our hospital were evaluated. Of the study group, 29 patients (30.5%) were found to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy. There were no significant differences between the hemiplegic patient groups with or without reflex sympathetic dystrophy regarding age, gender, etiology, side of involvement, disease duration and the presence of comorbidities. The recovery stages of hemiplegia, as shown by Brunnstrom functional classification, were significantly different between the two groups; patients in lower recovery stages tended to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy more frequently (P<0.01). Additionally, the presence of flaccidity was also a significant factor in the development of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Glenohumeral subluxation was present in 37 patients (38.9%) in our study group and the presence of this complication was related to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The presence of glenohumeral subluxation was significantly higher in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (21/29, 72.4%) when compared to the patients without reflex sympathetic dystrophy (16/66, 24.2%) (P<0.001). Also, hemiplegic patients with more severe shoulder subluxation were significantly more likely to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy. These results suggest that lower recovery stages, reduced tonus and glenohumeral subluxation significantly contribute to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hemiplegic patient. We believe that preventive and treatment measures should consider these factors as they

  8. Evidence for a diffusion-controlled mechanism for fluorescence blinking of colloidal quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, Matthew; Smith, Glenna; Scherer, Norbert F.; Marcus, Rudolph A.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence blinking in nanocrystal quantum dots is known to exhibit power-law dynamics, and several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this behavior. We have extended the measurement of quantum-dot blinking by characterizing fluctuations in the fluorescence of single dots over time scales from microseconds to seconds. The power spectral density of these fluctuations indicates a change in the power-law statistics that occurs at a time scale of several milliseconds, providing an important constraint on possible mechanisms for the blinking. In particular, the observations are consistent with the predictions of models wherein blinking is controlled by diffusion of the energies of electron or hole trap states. PMID:17720807

  9. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  10. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism.

  11. Temporal selection is suppressed, delayed, and diffused during the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Vul, Edward; Nieuwenstein, Mark; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    How does temporal selection work, and along what dimensions does it vary from one instance to the next? We explored these questions using a phenomenon in which temporal selection goes awry. In the attentional blink, subjects fail to report the second of a pair of targets (T1 and T2) when they are presented at stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of roughly 200 to 500 ms. We directly tested the properties of temporal selection during the blink by analyzing distractor intrusions at a fast rate of item presentation. Our analysis shows that attentional selection is (a) suppressed, (b) delayed, and (c) diffused in time during the attentional blink. These effects are dissociated by their time course: The measure of each effect returns to the baseline value at a different SOA. Our results constrain theories of the attentional blink and indicate that temporal selection varies along at least three dissociable dimensions: efficacy, latency, and precision.

  12. A MODEL FOR THE TEAR FILM AND OCULAR SURFACE TEMPERATURE FOR PARTIAL BLINKS

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Quan; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, T. A.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of tear film and the associated temperature variation for partial blinks. We investigate the mechanism of fluid supply during partial blink cycles, and compare the film thickness with observation in vivo. We find that varying the thickness of the fluid layer beneath the moving upper lid improves the agreement for the in vivo measurement of tear film thickness after a half blink. By examining the flux of the fluid, we provide an explanation of this assumption. We also investigate the temperature dynamics both at the ocular surface and inside the simulated anterior chamber. Our simulation results suggest that the ocular surface temperature readjusts rapidly to normal temperature distribution after partial blinks. PMID:25635242

  13. The (b)link between creativity and dopamine: spontaneous eye blink rates predict and dissociate divergent and convergent thinking.

    PubMed

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-06-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of dopaminergic functioning. EBR predicted flexibility in divergent thinking and convergent thinking, but in different ways. The relationship with flexibility was independent of intelligence and followed an inverted U-shape function with medium EBR being associated with greatest flexibility. Convergent thinking was positively correlated with intelligence but negatively correlated with EBR, suggesting that higher dopamine levels impair convergent thinking. These findings support the claim that creativity and dopamine are related, but they also call for more conceptual differentiation with respect to the processes involved in creative performance.

  14. Blinks, Saccades, and Fixation Pauses During Vigilance Task Performance: 1. Time on Task.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    aircraft (Stoliarov sion checks. Though these authors minimize the im- personal communication, 1991). portance of the obtained TOT effects, to those...E. ing. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 18, 708- (1988). Spontaneous blink rate, schizophrenia, 724. and schizotypal ...terminals. eyelid movements. Journal ofNervous and Mental Human Factors, 23, 529-540. Disorders , 132, 31-48. Orchard, L. & Stern, J.A. (1991). Blinks

  15. Eyelid transplantation: lessons from a total face transplant and the importance of blink.

    PubMed

    Sosin, Michael; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Dorafshar, Amir H; Fisher, Mark; Bojovic, Branko; Christy, Michael R; Iliff, Nicholas T; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2015-01-01

    Despite inclusion of periorbital structures in facial transplants, critical assessment of posttransplantation short- and long-term periorbital function has not been reported. The purpose of this article is to report recovery of ocular and periorbital function, with critical appraisal of posttransplant blink in the setting of revision surgery. Prospective ocular and periorbital functional assessments were completed at multiple time points in a patient undergoing facial transplantation and subsequent revision operations. Function was evaluated using clinical ocular examinations, visual acuity assessments, photography, and video at various intervals from preoperative baseline to 13.5 months after transplantation. During this period, revision operations involving periorbital structures were performed at 6 and 9 months after transplantation. Before transplantation, volitional blink was 100 percent in both eyes. Involuntary blink was 40 percent in the right eye and 90 percent in the left eye, with occasional full closure. Following face transplantation, voluntary blink was preserved, partial skin sensation was present, and involuntary blink improved to 70 percent in the right eye and 100 percent in the left eye. Following revision surgery, visual acuity and voluntary and involuntary blink were impaired. By 7.5 months after revision, improvement comparable to the pretransplantation assessment was observed. Adherence to principles of blink preservation is critical in periorbital transplantation. Involuntary blink is essential for preserving vision, and can be improved after transplantation. Revision surgery may temporarily impair advances made with initial allotransplantation. A comprehensive understanding of ocular biomechanics and function is invaluable to the reconstructive surgeon performing facial transplantation involving periorbital structures and posttransplant revision operations. Therapeutic, V.

  16. Eye Blink Startle Responses in Behaviorally Inhibited and Uninhibited Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Brakel, Anna M. L.; Muris, Peter; Derks, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the startle reflex as a physiological marker of behavioral inhibition. Participants were 7 to 12-year-old children who had been previously identified as inhibited or uninhibited as part of an ongoing longitudinal study on the role of behavioral inhibition in the development of anxiety disorders. Analysis of their scores…

  17. Eye Blink Startle Responses in Behaviorally Inhibited and Uninhibited Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Brakel, Anna M. L.; Muris, Peter; Derks, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the startle reflex as a physiological marker of behavioral inhibition. Participants were 7 to 12-year-old children who had been previously identified as inhibited or uninhibited as part of an ongoing longitudinal study on the role of behavioral inhibition in the development of anxiety disorders. Analysis of their scores…

  18. Hyperosmolar Tears Induce Functional and Structural Alterations of Corneal Nerves: Electrophysiological and Anatomical Evidence Toward Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila; Marfurt, Carl F.; Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In an effort to elucidate possible neural mechanisms underlying diminished tearing in dry eye disease, this study sought to determine if hyperosmolar tears, a ubiquitous sign of dry eye disease, produce functional changes in corneal nerve responses to drying of the cornea and if these changes correlate with alterations in corneal nerve morphology. Methods In vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervated the cornea before, and up to 3 hours after, the ocular application of continuous hyperosmolar tears or artificial tears. In corollary experiments, immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare corneal nerve morphology in control and in eyes treated with hyperosmolar solutions. Results Our previous studies identified a population of corneal afferents, dry-sensitive neurons that are strongly excited by corneal dessication (“dry response”), a response thought to trigger the lacrimation reflex. In the present study, we found that the dry responses of corneal dry-sensitive neurons were depressed or even completely abolished by hyperosmolar tears in a time- (30 minutes to 3 hours) and dose (450- to 1000-mOsm solutions)-dependent manner. Furthermore, eyes treated with hyperosmolar tears for 3 hours contained large numbers of morphologically abnormal (granular, fragmented, or prominently beaded) subbasal nerves that appeared to be undergoing degeneration. Conclusions These results demonstrate that tear hyperosmolarity, considered to be a “core” mechanism of dry eye disease, significantly decreases physiological sensitivity and morphologic integrity of the corneal nerves important in tear production. These alterations might contribute to the diminished tearing seen clinically in dry eye patients. PMID:26720465

  19. Two types of photoluminescence blinking revealed by single quantum dot spectroelectrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Galland, Christophe; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Steinbrück, Andrea; Sykora, Milan; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han

    2012-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking), or random switching between states of high- (ON) and low (OFF) emissivities, is a universal property of molecular emitters exhibited by dyes1, polymers2, biological molecules3 and artificial nanostructures such as nanocrystal quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, and nanowires4,5,6. For the past fifteen years, colloidal nanocrystals have been used as a model system for studies of this phenomenon.5,6 The occurrence of OFF periods in nanocrystal emission has been commonly attributed to the presence of an additional charge7, which leads to PL quenching by nonradiative Auger recombination.8 However, the “charging” model was recently challenged in several reports.9,10 Here, to clarify the role of charging in PL intermittency, we perform time-resolved PL studies of individual nanocrystals while controlling electrochemically the degree of their charging. We find that two distinct mechanisms can lead to PL intermittency. We identify conventional blinking (A-type) due to charging/discharging of the nanocrystal core when lower PL intensities correlate with shorter PL lifetimes. Importantly, we observe a different blinking (B-type), when large changes in the PL intensity are not accompanied by significant changes in PL dynamics. We attribute this blinking behavior to charge fluctuations in the electron-accepting surface sites. When unoccupied, these sites intercept hot electrons before they relax into emitting core states. Both blinking mechanisms can be controlled electrochemically and under appropriate potential blinking can be completely suppressed. PMID:22071764

  20. Compact and Blinking-Suppressed Quantum Dots for Single-Particle Tracking in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) offer distinct advantages over organic dyes and fluorescent proteins for biological imaging applications because of their brightness, photostability, and tunability. However, a major limitation is that single QDs emit fluorescent light in an intermittent on-and-off fashion called “blinking”. Here we report the development of blinking-suppressed, relatively compact QDs that are able to maintain their favorable optical properties in aqueous solution. Specifically, we show that a linearly graded alloy shell can be grown on a small CdSe core via a precisely controlled layer-by-layer process, and that this graded shell leads to a dramatic suppression of QD blinking in both organic solvents and water. A substantial portion (>25%) of the resulting QDs does not blink (more than 99% of the time in the bright or “on” state). Theoretical modeling studies indicate that this type of linearly graded shell not only can minimize charge carrier access to surface traps but also can reduce lattice defects, both of which are believed to be responsible for carrier trapping and QD blinking. Further, we have evaluated the biological utility of blinking-suppressed QDs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based ligands and multidentate ligands. The results demonstrate that their optical properties are largely independent of surface coatings and solvating media, and that the blinking-suppressed QDs can provide continuous trajectories in live-cell receptor tracking studies. PMID:25157589

  1. Evaluation of Factors Limiting Corneal Donation.

    PubMed

    Röck, Daniel; Wude, Johanna; Yoeruek, Efdal; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Tobias

    2016-11-15

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to investigate factors limiting corneal donation at the University Hospital Tübingen. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively studied all hospital deaths from January 2012 to December 2015, considering each deceased patient as a potential corneal donor. During this period an ophthalmic resident managed corneal donor procurement on a full-time basis. Various factors limiting corneal donation were examined. RESULTS Among the 3412 deaths, 2937 (86.1%) displayed nonfulfillment of corneal donation. Consent for corneal donation was obtained in 475 cases (13.9%). The mean annual corneal donation rate was 13.9 donors per 100 deaths (range: 11.2-17.8). The leading causes of nonfulfillment of corneal donations were refusal to donate (49.8%, 1698 cases) and medical contraindications (23.6%, 805 cases). After next-of-kin interview of 2173 potential donors (109 potential donors were excluded because of logistical problems), willingness to participate in corneal donation was present in 475 cases (21.9%), whereas in 1698 cases (78.1%) corneal donation was refused. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed refusal to donate is the most important factor limiting corneal donation. It seems that increasing the knowledge of people about corneal donation through public education and media are necessary to address the corneal shortage.

  2. Corneal electrolysis for recurrence of corneal stromal dystrophy after keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mashima, Y; Kawai, M; Yamada, M

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate corneal electrolysis as a treatment for recurrent diffuse corneal opacities at the host-graft interface of the stroma or at the subepithelial region in two types of granular corneal dystrophy (GCD). Methods: Recurrence developed at the host-graft interface of the stroma after lamellar keratoplasty in a patient with Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD). At surgery, the deep aspect of the graft in this patient was partially separated from host tissue to expose the deposits, with one third of the host-graft junction left intact. The graft was everted, and electrolysis was applied directly to remove the deposits attached to both surfaces of the host and the graft. Then the graft was returned to its place and sutured. In two patients with homozygous ACD and one patient with the superficial variant of GCD, diffuse subepithelial opacities developed following penetrating keratoplasty. Electrolysis was applied directly to the corneal surface. Results: Deposits at the host-graft interface of the stroma and in the subepithelial region disappeared following treatment, and vision recovered in all patients. Conclusions: This method is a simple, easy, and inexpensive way to remove deposits that recur after lamellar or penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:11864880

  3. Corneal Biomechanical Findings in Contact Lens Induced Corneal Warpage

    PubMed Central

    Letafatnejad, Mojgan; Beheshtnejad, Amir Hooshang; Ghaffary, Seyed Reza; Hassanpoor, Narges; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the difference in biomechanical properties between contact lens induced corneal warpage and normal and keratoconic eyes. Method. Prospective observational case control study, where 94 eyes of 47 warpage suspicious and 46 eyes of 23 keratoconic patients were included. Warpage suspected cases were followed until a definite diagnosis was made (warpage, normal, or keratoconus). Results. 44 eyes of 22 patients had contact lens related corneal warpage. 46 eyes of 23 people were diagnosed as nonwarpage normal eyes. 46 eyes of 23 known keratoconus patients were included for comparison. The mean age of the participants was 23.8 ± 3.8 years, and 66.2% of the subjects were female. The demographic and refractive data were not different between warpage and normal groups but were different in the keratoconus group. The biomechanical properties (corneal hysteresis or CH and corneal resistance factor or CRF) were different with the highest value in the warpage group followed by normal and keratoconus groups. CRF was 10.08 ± 1.75, 9.23 ± 1.22, and 7.38 ± 2.14 and CH was 10.21 ± 1.57, 9.59 ± 1.21, and 8.69 ± 2.34 in the warpage, normal, and keratoconus groups, respectively. Conclusion. Corneal biomechanics may be different in people who develop contact lens induced warpage. PMID:27688908

  4. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function.

  5. Substrates for Expansion of Corneal Endothelial Cells towards Bioengineering of Human Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Jesintha; Utheim, Tor P.; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Shahdadfar, Aboulghassem

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium is a single layer of specialized cells that lines the posterior surface of cornea and maintains corneal hydration and corneal transparency essential for vision. Currently, transplantation is the only therapeutic option for diseases affecting the corneal endothelium. Transplantation of corneal endothelium, called endothelial keratoplasty, is widely used for corneal endothelial diseases. However, corneal transplantation is limited by global donor shortage. Therefore, there is a need to overcome the deficiency of sufficient donor corneal tissue. New approaches are being explored to engineer corneal tissues such that sufficient amount of corneal endothelium becomes available to offset the present shortage of functional cornea. Although human corneal endothelial cells have limited proliferative capacity in vivo, several laboratories have been successful in in vitro expansion of human corneal endothelial cells. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of different substrates employed for in vitro cultivation of human corneal endothelial cells. Advances and emerging challenges with ex vivo cultured corneal endothelial layer for the ultimate goal of therapeutic replacement of dysfunctional corneal endothelium in humans with functional corneal endothelium are also presented. PMID:26378588

  6. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  7. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  8. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Corneal bee sting-induced endothelial changes.

    PubMed

    Gürlü, Vuslat Pelitli; Erda, Nazan

    2006-09-01

    To report the acute management and clinical findings of a case of corneal bee sting and to report the outcome of corneal endothelial cell analysis 1 year after trauma. Clinical findings, anterior segment photographs, corneal endothelial images, and medical treatment of a case of right corneal bee sting are presented. Right and left central corneal endothelial cell analysis was performed by noncontact specular microscopy. The stinger was removed from the cornea. Systemic, subconjunctival, and topical steroids and systemic and topical antibiotics were given. One year later, a corneal scar and anterior capsular opacity of the lens in the right eye were shown by slit-lamp examination. Endothelial cell analysis determined that the endothelial cell density of the right eye was substantially decreased compared with the left eye. Corneal infiltration gradually decreased, presumably because of the systemic, topical, and subconjunctival steroids. Late complications observed in this case included a substantial decrease in cornea endothelial cell density, a corneal scar, and anterior capsular opacity.

  10. Corneal plaque containing levofloxacin in a dog.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Woo; Kang, Byung-Jae; Lim, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Lim, Hyun Sook

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier developed a corneal ulcer 2 weeks after intracapsular lens extraction (ICLE) in the right eye. The corneal ulcer was treated with levofloxacin eye drops. A plaque with a white luster developed in the central cornea 2 weeks after treatment with levofloxacin eye drops. The corneal plaque was surgically removed under inhalant anesthesia. The corneal plaque displayed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. Furthermore, levofloxacin content in the plaque was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The corneal ulcer completely resolved 2 weeks after the surgical removal of the corneal lesion and replacement of levofloxacin eye drops with tobramycin eye drops. Although the topical use of levofloxacin is unlikely to lead to corneal chemical deposits due to the high water solubility of the drug compared to other topical fluoroquinolones, this patient developed corneal plaque of the antibiotic drop.

  11. Teaching Reflexivity in Qualitative Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Ping-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Reflexivity has gained paramount status in qualitative inquiry. It is central to debates on subjectivity, objectivity, and, ultimately, the scientific foundation of social science knowledge and research. Although much work on doing reflexivity by researchers and practitioners has been published, scholars have only recently begun to explore how one…

  12. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  13. Robotic microsurgery: corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bourges, J-L; Hubschman, J-P; Burt, B; Culjat, M; Schwartz, S D

    2009-12-01

    Robotic ocular microsurgery including corneal suturing has been proven to be feasible in porcine eyes. To determine whether or not bimanual teleoperated robotic penetrating keratoplasty (PK) can be performed in porcine and human eyes. Three arms of the da Vinci surgical robot were loaded with a dual-channel video and two, 360 degrees -rotating, 8 mm, wrested-end effector instruments and placed over porcine eyes or over a human cadaver head. The surgeon remotely performed mechanical trephination, cardinal sutures, continuous 10.0 nylon sutures and suture adjustments on both eyes. The procedures were documented with still and video photography. Using the da Vinci robot, penetrating keratoplasty procedures were successfully performed on both porcine eyes and human eyes in natural anatomical conditions. The precise placement of continuous sutures was facilitated by the wrested-end forceps. Orbital rims and nose did not limit surgical motions. Teleoperated robotic penetrating keratoplasty is technically feasible in humans. Further studies are pending to implement the procedure with femtosecond laser and other automated steps.

  14. Corneal cryopreservation with dextran.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, M; Athmann, S; Hagenah, M

    2001-08-01

    Different methods of corneal cryopreservation have been introduced, those employing intracellular cryoprotectants such as Me2SO or glycerol being the most widely favored. We investigated the influence of several freeze-thaw trauma variables on the survival of porcine endothelial monolayers when employing the extracellular cryoprotective agent dextran. We first examined the effects of various dextran concentrations and then, having ascertained the optimal concentration, further investigated the influence of fetal calf serum (FCS) concentration in the cryopreservation medium, the cooling rate, the thawing temperature, and the length of the preincubation in the freezing medium prior to cryopreservation. The numerical densities of endothelial cells were determined at dissection in hypoosmotic balanced salt solution and after organ culture by staining with alizarin red S and trypan blue. Morphological evaluation was not performed directly after thawing but after a subsequent organ culture at 37 degrees C to detect latent cell damage after freeze-thaw trauma. Our data revealed that corneas cryopreserved in minimal essential medium containing 10% dextran but lacking FCS, preincubated for 3 h, frozen at a cooling rate of 1 degrees C/min, and thawed at 37 degrees C incurred the lowest cell losses (22.4%, SD +/- 3.8). We conclude that dextran is an effective cryoprotectant for freezing of porcine corneas. However, variations between species in the results of cryopreservation require further investigation of an in vivo animal model and studies with human corneas before its clinical use can be recommended.

  15. Corneal biomechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Piñero, David P; Alcón, Natividad

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanics is often defined as 'mechanics applied to biology'. Due to the variety and complexity of the behaviour of biological structures and materials, biomechanics is better defined as the development, extension and application of mechanics for a better understanding of physiology and physiopathology and consequently for a better diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury. Different methods for the characterisation of corneal biomechanics are reviewed in detail, including those that are currently commercially available (Ocular Response Analyzer and CorVis ST). The clinical applicability of the parameters provided by these devices are discussed, especially in the fields of glaucoma, detection of ectatic disorders and orthokeratology. Likewise, other methods are also reviewed, such as Brillouin microscopy or dynamic optical coherence tomography and others with potential application to clinical practice but not validated for in vivo measurements, such as ultrasonic elastography. Advantages and disadvantages of all these techniques are described. Finally, the concept of biomechanical modelling is revised as well as the requirements for developing biomechanical models, with special emphasis on finite element modelling. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometry Australia.

  16. Corneal temperature in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Munitz, Hanan; Portuguese, Shirley; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Sigler, Mayanit; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Stryjer, Rafael; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-12-01

    Most data imply that dopaminergic transmission is essential for proper hypothalamic-mediated core temperature regulation. Altered central dopaminergic transmission is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, hypothetically, schizophrenia patients might be at increased risk of developing thermoregulatory dysregulation manifested by alterations in core temperature, as well as in peripheral tissue, the temperature of which has been shown to correlate with core temperature (e.g. cornea). Previous small pilot studies of ours showed that schizophrenia patients may exhibit corneal temperature abnormalities. Hence, we assessed corneal temperature in a controlled sample of drug-free ( n =11) and medicated ( n =28) schizophrenia patients compared to healthy comparison subjects ( n =9), using a FLIR thermal imaging camera. Drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibited significantly higher corneal temperature compared to healthy subjects, typical antipsychotic drug (APD)-treated patients ( n =16) and atypical APD-treated patients ( n =12) (37.08+/-1.46 degrees C vs. 33.37+/-2.51 degrees C, 31.08+/-1.43 degrees C and 31.67+/-0.44 degrees C respectively, p <0.0001; p <0.001 vs. each group separately). The healthy comparison subjects and the atypical APD-treated patients exhibited comparable corneal temperatures and these two groups exhibited higher corneal temperatures compared to the typical APD-treated patients ( p <0.01 and p =0.051 respectively). In conclusion, this study indicates that drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibit substantially higher corneal temperature compared to healthy comparison subjects or medicated patients, and that APDs may decrease corneal temperature either to normal (atypical APD) or to subnormal (typical APD) values. The relevance of these phenomena to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, the biological mechanism underlying drug-induced corneal temperature alterations, the possible role of temperature-lowering drugs

  17. Management of corneal bee sting.

    PubMed

    Razmjoo, Hassan; Abtahi, Mohammad-Ali; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Mohammadi, Zahra; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Corneal bee sting is an uncommon environmental eye injury that can result in various ocular complications with an etiology of penetrating, immunologic, and toxic effects of the stinger and its injected venom. In this study we present our experience in the management of a middle-aged male with a right-sided deep corneal bee sting. On arrival, the patient was complaining of severe pain, blurry vision with acuity of 160/200, and tearing, which he had experienced soon after the injury. Firstly, we administered conventional drugs for eye injuries, including topical antibiotic, corticosteroid, and cycloplegic agents. After 2 days, corneal stromal infiltration and edema developed around the site of the sting, and visual acuity decreased to 100/200. These conditions led us to remove the stinger surgically. Within 25 days of follow-up, the corneal infiltration decreased gradually, and visual acuity improved to 180/200. We suggest a two-stage management approach for cases of corneal sting. For the first stage, if the stinger is readily accessible or primary dramatic reactions, including infiltration, especially on the visual axis, exist, manual or surgical removal would be indicated. Otherwise, we recommend conventional treatments for eye injuries. Given this situation, patients should be closely monitored for detection of any worsening. If the condition does not resolve or even deteriorates, for the second stage, surgical removal of the stinger under local or generalized anesthesia is indicated.

  18. Femtosecond laser corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Ron M.; Spooner, Greg J. R.; Sletten, Karin R.; Yen, Kimberly G.; Sayegh, Samir I.; Loesel, Frieder H.; Horvath, Christopher; Liu, HsiaoHua; Elner, Victor; Cabrera, Delia; Muenier, Marie-Helene; Sacks, Zachary S.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1999-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, safety, and stability of femtosecond laser intrastromal refractive procedures in ex vivo and in vivo models. When compared with longer pulsewidth nanosecond or picosecond laser pulses, femtosecond laser-tissue interactions are characterized by significantly smaller and more deterministic photodisruptive energy thresholds, as well as reduced shock waves and smaller cavitation bubbles. We utilized a highly reliable, all-solid-state femtosecond laser system for all studies to demonstrate clinical practicality. Contiguous tissue effects were achieved by scanning a 5 μm focused laser spot below the corneal surface at pulse energies of approximately 2 - 4 microjoules. A variety of scanning patterns was used to perform three prototype procedures in animal eyes; corneal flap cutting, keratomileusis, and intrastromal vision correction. Superior dissection and surface quality results were obtained for lamellar procedures (corneal flap cutting and keratomileusis). Preliminary in vivo evaluation of intrastromal vision correction in a rabbit model revealed consistent and stable pachymetry changes, without significant inflammation or loss of corneal transparency. We conclude that femtosecond laser technology may be able to perform a variety of corneal refractive procedures with high precision, offering advantages over current mechanical and laser devices and techniques.

  19. Corneal integrins and their functions.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Mary Ann

    2006-07-01

    Integrins were first described just over 20 years ago and have been studied in the cornea by many groups interested in how the cornea functions in health and disease. There are a minimum of 12 different integrin heterodimers reported to be expressed by the major resident cells of the cornea: the corneal and limbal epithelial cells, keratocytes/fibroblasts, and corneal endothelial cells. These different integrin heterodimers play important and varied roles in maintaining the cornea and organizing how its cells interact with their surrounding extracellular matrix to maintain corneal clarity. In this review, an overview of the discovery and functions of integrins is provided along with a description of the current state of our knowledge of this large family of important proteins. While we have learned a lot about corneal integrins over the past 20 years, there is still much to learn. Areas where gaps in our knowledge of integrin functions in the cornea are slowing our progress in understanding corneal diseases and dystrophies at a molecular level are highlighted.

  20. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  1. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  2. Adrenoceptors and colocolonic inhibitory reflex.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S F; Scott, S M; Pilot, M A; Williams, N S

    1999-12-01

    The colocolonic inhibitory reflex is characterized by inhibition of proximal colonic motility induced by distal colonic distension. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of this reflex, in vivo, using an isolated loop of canine colon. In five beagle dogs, motility was recorded from an exteriorized colonic loop via a serosal strain gauge connected to a digital data logger and chart recorder. Inflation of a balloon in the distal colon resulted in inhibition of motility in the isolated loop. Inhibition of motor activity persisted following injection of propranolol (100 microg/kg intravenously), a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, but was abolished following administration of the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (200 microg/kg intravenously). This study confirms that the colocolonic inhibitory reflex is mediated via the extrinsic nerves to the colon. As the reflex was abolished by alpha2-, but not beta-adrenoceptor blockade, this indicates that the reflex pathway involves alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  3. Impaired acquisition of classically conditioned fear-potentiated startle reflexes in humans with focal bilateral basolateral amygdala damage

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Barak; Terburg, David; Stein, Dan J.; van Honk, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Based on studies in rodents, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is considered a key site for experience-dependent neural plasticity underlying the acquisition of conditioned fear responses. In humans, very few studies exist of subjects with selective amygdala lesions and those studies have only implicated the amygdala more broadly leaving the role of amygdala sub-regions underexplored. We tested a rare sample of subjects (N = 4) with unprecedented focal bilateral BLA lesions due to a genetic condition called Urbach–Wiethe disease. In a classical delay fear conditioning experiment, these subjects showed impaired acquisition of conditioned fear relative to a group of matched control subjects (N = 10) as measured by fear-potentiation of the defensive eye-blink startle reflex. After the experiment, the BLA-damaged cases showed normal declarative memory of the conditioned association. Our findings provide new evidence that the human BLA is essential to drive fast classically conditioned defensive reflexes. PMID:25552573

  4. 21 CFR 886.1220 - Corneal electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corneal electrode. 886.1220 Section 886.1220 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1220 Corneal electrode. (a) Identification. A corneal electrode is an AC-powered device, usually part of a special contact lens, intended to be applied directly...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1220 - Corneal electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corneal electrode. 886.1220 Section 886.1220 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1220 Corneal electrode. (a) Identification. A corneal electrode is an AC-powered device, usually part of a special contact lens, intended to be applied directly...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1220 - Corneal electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corneal electrode. 886.1220 Section 886.1220 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1220 Corneal electrode. (a) Identification. A corneal electrode is an AC-powered device, usually part of a special contact lens, intended to be applied directly...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1220 - Corneal electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corneal electrode. 886.1220 Section 886.1220 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1220 Corneal electrode. (a) Identification. A corneal electrode is an AC-powered device, usually part of a special contact lens, intended to be applied directly...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1220 - Corneal electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal electrode. 886.1220 Section 886.1220 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1220 Corneal electrode. (a) Identification. A corneal electrode is an AC-powered device, usually part of a special contact lens, intended to be applied directly...

  9. Ocular dimensions, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature in quarter horses with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia.

    PubMed

    Badial, Peres R; Cisneros-Àlvarez, Luis Emiliano; Brandão, Cláudia Valéria S; Ranzani, José Joaquim T; Tomaz, Mayana A R V; Machado, Vania M; Borges, Alexandre S

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ocular dimensions, corneal curvature, and corneal thickness between horses affected with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) and unaffected horses. Five HERDA-affected quarter horses and five healthy control quarter horses were used. Schirmer's tear test, tonometry, and corneal diameter measurements were performed in both eyes of all horses prior to ophthalmologic examinations. Ultrasonic pachymetry was performed to measure the central, temporal, nasal, dorsal, and ventral corneal thicknesses in all horses. B-mode ultrasound scanning was performed on both eyes of each horse to determine the dimensions of the ocular structures and to calculate the corneal curvature. Each corneal region examined in this study was thinner in the affected group compared with the healthy control group. However, significant differences in corneal thickness were only observed for the central and dorsal regions. HERDA-affected horses exhibited significant increases in corneal curvature and corneal diameter compared with unaffected animals. The ophthalmologic examinations revealed mild corneal opacity in one eye of one affected horse and in both eyes of three affected horses. No significant between-group differences were observed for Schirmer's tear test, intraocular pressure, or ocular dimensions. Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia-affected horses exhibit decreased corneal thickness in several regions of the cornea, increased corneal curvature, increased corneal diameter, and mild corneal opacity. Additional research is required to determine whether the increased corneal curvature significantly impacts the visual accuracy of horses with HERDA. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. Acute corneal hydrops in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Prafulla K; Sharma, Namrata; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2013-01-01

    Acute corneal hydrops is a condition characterized by stromal edema due to leakage of aqueous through a tear in descemet membrane. The patient presents with sudden onset decrease in vision, photophobia, and pain. Corneal thinning and ectasias combined with trivial trauma to the eye mostly by eye rubbing is considered as the underlying cause. With conservative approach self-resolution takes around 2 to 3 months. Surgical intervention is required in cases of non-resolution of corneal edema to avoid complications and for early visual rehabilitation. Intracameral injection of air or gas such as perflouropropane is the most common surgical procedure done. Recent investigative modality such as anterior segment optical coherence tomography is an extremely useful tool for diagnosis, surgical planning, and postoperative follow up. Resolution of hydrops may improve the contact lens tolerance and visual acuity but most cases require keratoplasty for visual rehabilitation. PMID:23925338

  11. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  12. Centennial review of corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, S Louise; Cartwright, Victoria A; Stumpf, Thomas H

    2005-12-01

    Abstract One hundred years ago, on 7 December 1905, Dr Eduard Zirm performed the world's first successful human corneal transplant. This significant milestone was achieved only after many decades of unsuccessful trial and error; however, it did not lead to relatively 'routine' keratoplasty success for several more decades. The idea of replacing an opaque cornea had been suggested for centuries, and had stimulated theoretical approaches to the problem by many esteemed physicians throughout history. However, little practical progress was made in the ultimate realization of the dream until the 19th century when pioneering surgeons pursued extensive studies in relation to both animal and human 'keratoplasty'. Clinical progress and scientific insight developed slowly, and it was ultimately due to parallel advances in medicine such as anaesthesia and antisepsis that Zirm's success was finally achieved. Key concepts were enshrined such as the use of fresh tissue from the same species, careful placement and handling of tissue, and the development of specialized instrumentation such as the circular trephine. In the latter half of the 20th century, many 'masters' of corneal surgery evolved significant refinements in technique and instrumentation with the development of corticosteroids, antibiotics, surgical microscopes, improved trephines, viscoelastics and suture materials, that enable this delicate procedure to be routinely performed with the prospect of success. There are still limitations to corneal transplantation, and corneal allograft rejection still poses the greatest challenge to the modern corneal surgeon. In the foreseeable future it may be in the laboratory, rather than the theatre, that further milestones will be achieved. This review aims to highlight the significant milestones in the rich history of corneal transplantation, and to pay tribute to the many inspired and dedicated individuals involved in the development of keratoplasty to a point where the

  13. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  14. Acoustic reflex measurement.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Kim S; Feeney, M Patrick; Sanford, Chris A

    2013-07-01

    Middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR) measurements have been a part of the standard clinical immittance test battery for decades as a cross-check with the behavioral audiogram and as a way to separate cochlear from retrocochlear pathologies. MEMR responses are measured in the ear canal by using a probe stimulus (e.g., single frequency or broadband noise) to monitor admittance changes elicited by a reflex-activating stimulus. In the clinical MEMR procedures, one test yields changes in a single measurement (i.e., admittance) at a single pure tone (e.g., 226 or 1000 Hz). In contrast, for the wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) procedure,one test yields information about multiple measurements (e.g., admittance, power reflectance, absorbance) across a wide frequency range (e.g., 250 to 8000 Hz analysis bandwidth of the probe). One benefit of the WAI method is that the MEMR can be identified in a single test regardless of the frequency at which the maximum shift in the immittance measurement occurs; this is beneficial because maximal shifts in immittance vary as a function of age and other factors. Another benefit is that the wideband response analysis yields lower MEMR thresholds than with the clinical procedures. Lower MEMR thresholds would allow for MEMR decay tests in ears in which the activator levels could not be safely presented. Finally, the WAI procedures can be automated with objective identification of the MEMR, which would allow for use in newborn and other screening programs in which the tests are completed by nonaudiological personnel.

  15. Progress in corneal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  16. Precision Measurement Of Corneal Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Paul R.; Macri, Timothy F.; Telfair, William B.; Bennett, Peter S.; Martin, Clifford A.; Warner, John W.

    1989-05-01

    We describe a new electro-optical device being developed to provide precise measurements of the three-dimensional topography of the human cornea. This device, called a digital keratoscope, is intended primarily for use in preparing for and determining the effect of corneal surgery procedures such as laser refractive keratectomy, radial keratotomy or corneal transplant on the refractive power of the cornea. It also may serve as an aid in prescribing contact lenses. The basic design features of the hardware and of the associated computer software are discussed, the means for alignment and calibration are described and typical results are given.

  17. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  18. Facial Expression Influences Face Identity Recognition During the Attentional Blink

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Emotional stimuli (e.g., negative facial expressions) enjoy prioritized memory access when task relevant, consistent with their ability to capture attention. Whether emotional expression also impacts on memory access when task-irrelevant is important for arbitrating between feature-based and object-based attentional capture. Here, the authors address this question in 3 experiments using an attentional blink task with face photographs as first and second target (T1, T2). They demonstrate reduced neutral T2 identity recognition after angry or happy T1 expression, compared to neutral T1, and this supports attentional capture by a task-irrelevant feature. Crucially, after neutral T1, T2 identity recognition was enhanced and not suppressed when T2 was angry—suggesting that attentional capture by this task-irrelevant feature may be object-based and not feature-based. As an unexpected finding, both angry and happy facial expressions suppress memory access for competing objects, but only angry facial expression enjoyed privileged memory access. This could imply that these 2 processes are relatively independent from one another. PMID:25286076

  19. The emotional attentional blink: what we know so far

    PubMed Central

    McHugo, Maureen; Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Zald, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The emotional attentional blink (EAB), also known as emotion-induced blindness, refers to a phenomenon in which the brief appearance of a task-irrelevant, emotionally arousing image captures attention to such an extent that individuals cannot detect target stimuli for several hundred ms after the emotional stimulus. The EAB allows for mental chronometry of stimulus-driven attention and the time needed to disengage and refocus goal-directed attention. In this review, we discuss current evidence for the mechanisms through which the EAB occurs. Although the EAB shares some similarities to both surprise-induced blindness (SiB) and other paradigms for assessing emotion-attention interactions, it possesses features that are distinct from these paradigms, and thus appears to provide a unique measure of the influence of emotion on stimulus-driven attention. The neural substrates of the EAB are not completely understood, but neuroimaging and neuropsychological data suggest some possible neural mechanisms underlying the phenomenon. The importance of understanding the EAB is highlighted by recent evidence indicating that EAB tasks can detect altered sensitivity to disorder relevant stimuli in psychiatric conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:23630482

  20. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  1. Facial expression influences face identity recognition during the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Bach, Dominik R; Schmidt-Daffy, Martin; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-12-01

    Emotional stimuli (e.g., negative facial expressions) enjoy prioritized memory access when task relevant, consistent with their ability to capture attention. Whether emotional expression also impacts on memory access when task-irrelevant is important for arbitrating between feature-based and object-based attentional capture. Here, the authors address this question in 3 experiments using an attentional blink task with face photographs as first and second target (T1, T2). They demonstrate reduced neutral T2 identity recognition after angry or happy T1 expression, compared to neutral T1, and this supports attentional capture by a task-irrelevant feature. Crucially, after neutral T1, T2 identity recognition was enhanced and not suppressed when T2 was angry-suggesting that attentional capture by this task-irrelevant feature may be object-based and not feature-based. As an unexpected finding, both angry and happy facial expressions suppress memory access for competing objects, but only angry facial expression enjoyed privileged memory access. This could imply that these 2 processes are relatively independent from one another.

  2. Corneal Densitometry, Central Corneal Thickness, and Corneal Central-to-Peripheral Thickness Ratio in Patients With Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alnawaiseh, Maged; Zumhagen, Lars; Wirths, Gabriele; Eveslage, Maria; Eter, Nicole; Rosentreter, André

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify Scheimpflug corneal densitometry in patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts and anterior segment data of 49 patients with FED before posterior lamellar keratoplasty and 51 healthy controls. The patients were examined using the Scheimpflug-based Oculus Pentacam. Central corneal thickness (CCT), ring-averaged (on a circle of 2, 2.4-10 mm diameter) noncentral corneal thickness, and densitometry data in different corneal layers and in different annuli were extracted and analyzed. The total corneal light backscatter at total corneal thickness (CT) and at total diameter was significantly higher in the FED group when compared with the control group (FED group: 28.8 ± 6.7; control group: 24.3 ± 4.1; P < 0.001). When the corneal surface was divided into concentric annular zones at total CT, the differences were significant only in the 2 central annuli (P < 0.001). The total corneal light backscatter at total CT in the central 0-2 mm annulus correlated moderately with the central corneal thickness (Pearson's correlation = 0.55, P < 0.001). Corneal light backscatter in the central cornea was greater in patients with FED than in normal subjects. Corneal densitometry enables us to evaluate the optical quality of the cornea in different corneal layers and in different annuli. It is a useful, objective method that, in combination with central corneal thickness and corneal central-to-peripheral thickness ratio, can help to quantify FED severity.

  3. Interpreting the corneal response to oxygen: Is there a basis for re-evaluating data from gas-goggle studies?

    PubMed

    Papas, Eric B; Sweeney, Deborah F

    2016-10-01

    When anoxia (0% oxygen) is created within a gas-tight goggle, ocular physiological responses, including corneal swelling, limbal hyperaemia and pH change, are known to vary, depending on the presence or absence of a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens. A new theory is proposed to account for this discrepancy based on the concept of lid derived oxygen, whereby oxygen originating from the vascular plexus of the palpebral conjunctiva supplements that available to the ocular surface in an open, normally blinking eye, even when the surrounding gaseous atmosphere is anoxic. The effect of a lid derived contribution to corneal oxygenation was assessed by using existing experimental data to model open-eye, corneal swelling behavior as a function of atmospheric oxygen content, both with and without the presence of a contact lens. These models predict that under atmospheric anoxia, contact lens wear results in 13.2% corneal swelling compared with only 5.4% when the lens was absent. Lid derived oxygen acts to provide the ocular surface in the non-contact lens wearing, normally blinking, open-eye with up to 4.7% equivalent oxygen concentration, even within the anoxic environment of a nitrogen filled goggle. Correcting for lid derived oxygen eliminates previously observed discrepancies in corneal swelling behavior and harmonizes the models for the contact lens wearing and gas-goggle cases. On this basis it is proposed that true anoxia at the ocular surface cannot be achieved by atmospheric manipulation (i.e. a gas-goggle) alone but requires an additional presence, e.g. a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens, to prevent access to oxygen from the eyelids. Data from previously conducted experiments in which the gas-goggle paradigm was used, may have been founded on underestimates of the real oxygen concentration acting on the ocular surface at the time and if so, will require re-interpretation. Future work in this area should consider if a correction for lid derived

  4. Evaluation of corneal hysteresis and corneal resistance factor after corneal cross-linking for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Gkika, Maria; Labiris, Georgios; Giarmoukakis, Athanassios; Koutsogianni, Anna; Kozobolis, Vassilios

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) in keratoconic (KC) eyes before and after corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL). Furthermore, to determine potential correlations with a series of corneal and demographic factors. The study consisted of 50 KC eyes that underwent CXL. CH and CRF were measured by the ocular response analyzer (ORA). Correlations were attempted with uncorrected visual acuity (UVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), central corneal thickness (CCT), mean keratometry (Km), astigmatism (Astig.), residual astigmatism, age, and gender. Fifty non-KC eyes served as controls. CH and CRF (mean ± SD) for non-KC eyes were 10.1 ± 1.9 mmHg and 9.7 ± 2.4 mmHg respectively, while for KC eyes preoperatively they were 8.2 ± 1.4 mmHg (p = 0.007) and 7.4 ± 2.3 mmHg (p = 0.01) respectively. Non-significant differences were detected between preoperative and postoperative CH and CRF measurements in KC eyes (p = 0.518 and p = 0.479 respectively). Significant correlations were found between ORA parameters and BSCVA, CCT, Km, Astig. and residual astigmatism. ORA parameters demonstrate significant differences between KC and non-KC eyes. Both CH and CRF present significant correlations with visual acuity and corneal parameters. CXL exerts a non-significant impact on ORA measurements.

  5. Corneal Regeneration After Photorefractive Keratectomy: A Review☆

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Juan, Javier; Murueta-Goyena Larrañaga, Ane; Hanneken, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) remodels corneal stroma to compensate refractive errors. The removal of epithelium and the ablation of stroma provoke the disruption of corneal nerves and a release of several peptides from tears, epithelium, stroma and nerves. A myriad of cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteases participate in the process of corneal wound healing. Their balance will determine if reepithelization and stromal remodeling are appropriate. The final aim is to achieve corneal transparency for restoring corneal function, and a proper visual quality. Therefore, wound-healing response is critical for a successful refractive surgery. Our goal is to provide an overview into how corneal wounding develops following PRK. We will also review the influence of intraoperative application of mitomycin C, bandage contact lenses, anti-inflammatory and other drugs in preventing corneal haze and post-PRK pain. PMID:25444646

  6. History of corneal transplantation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Coster, Douglas J

    2015-04-01

    Corneal transplantation is a triumph of modern ophthalmology. The possibility of corneal transplantation was first raised in 1797 but a century passed before Zirm achieved the first successful penetrating graft in 1905. Gibson reported the first corneal graft in Australia from Brisbane in 1940 and English established the first eye bank there a few years later. Corneal transplantation evolved steadily over the twentieth century. In the second half of the century, developments in microsurgery, including surgical materials such as monofilament nylon and strong topical steroid drops, accounted for improvements in outcomes. In 2013, approximately 1500 corneal transplants were done in Australia. Eye banking has evolved to cope with the rising demands for donor corneas. Australian corneal surgeons collaborated to establish and support the Australian Corneal Graft Registry in 1985. It follows the outcomes of their surgery and has become an important international resource for surgeons seeking further improvement with the procedure.

  7. Corneal Regeneration After Photorefractive Keratectomy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Juan, Javier; Murueta-Goyena Larrañaga, Ane; Hanneken, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) remodels corneal stroma to compensate refractive errors. The removal of epithelium and the ablation of stroma provoke the disruption of corneal nerves and a release of several peptides from tears, epithelium, stroma and nerves. A myriad of cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteases participate in the process of corneal wound healing. Their balance will determine if reepithelization and stromal remodeling are appropriate. The final aim is to achieve corneal transparency for restoring corneal function, and a proper visual quality. Therefore, wound-healing response is critical for a successful refractive surgery. Our goal is to provide an overview into how corneal wounding develops following PRK. We will also review the influence of intraoperative application of mitomycin C, bandage contact lenses, anti-inflammatory and other drugs in preventing corneal haze and post-PRK pain.

  8. Blink-related delta oscillations in the resting-state EEG: a wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Luca; Sello, Stefano; Andre, Paolo; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Arrighi, Pieranna; Rossi, Bruno

    2009-01-02

    Over the past decades, many studies have linked the variations in frequency of spontaneous blinking with certain aspects of information processing and in particular with attention and working memory functions. On the other hand, according to the theory postulated by Crick and Koch, the actual function of primary consciousness is based on the reciprocal interaction between attention and working memory in the automatic and serial mode. The purpose of this study was to investigate for electrophysiological correlates compatible with the cognitive nature of spontaneous blinking, by using the EEG recordings obtained in a group of seven healthy volunteers while they rested quietly though awake, with their eyes open, but not actively engaged in attention-demanding goal-directed behaviours. The global wavelet analysis - at total of 189 three-second EEG epochs time-locked to the blink - revealed an increase in the delta band signal corresponding to the blink. In particular, a reconstruction of the EEG signal by means of inverse-wavelet transform (IWT) showed a blink-related P300-like wave at mid-parietal site. We assumed this phenomenon to represent an electrophysiological sign of the automatic processing of contextual environmental information. This might play a role in maintaining perceptive awareness of the environment at a low level of processing, while the subject is not engaged in attention-demanding tasks but rather introspectively oriented mental activities or free association(s).

  9. Blinking effect and the use of quantum dots in single molecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Oswald, Peter; Bienert, Roland; Petersen, Jan; Domingo, M.P.; Pardo, Julian; Graeber, P.; Galvez, E.M.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is possible to eliminate the blinking effect of a water-soluble QD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a direct method to study protein function and dynamics at the single level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD, potent tool for single molecule studies of biochemical and biological processes. -- Abstract: Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) have unique photo-physical properties: high photostability, brightness and narrow size-tunable fluorescence spectra. Due to their unique properties, QD-based single molecule studies have become increasingly more popular during the last years. However QDs show a strong blinking effect (random and intermittent light emission), which may limit their use in single molecule fluorescence studies. QD blinking has been widely studied and some hypotheses have been done to explain this effect. Here we summarise what is known about the blinking effect in QDs, how this phenomenon may affect single molecule studies and, on the other hand, how the 'on'/'off' states can be exploited in diverse experimental settings. In addition, we present results showing that site-directed binding of QD to cysteine residues of proteins reduces the blinking effect. This option opens a new possibility of using QDs to study protein-protein interactions and dynamics by single molecule fluorescence without modifying the chemical composition of the solution or the QD surface.

  10. The Reflexive Suffix -V in Hualapai.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Joong-Sun

    1995-01-01

    Like many other languages, Hualapai employs the reflexive suffix for several different grammatical purposes. Unlike those languages, however, constructions with a reflexive marker in Hualapai are usually not ambiguous with respect to the expected meanings. This paper identifies four functions that the reflexive suffix may have: reflexive,…

  11. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  12. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  13. Proprioceptive reflexes in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, A C; Van de Beek, W J T; Van Hilten, J J; Van der Helm, F C T

    2003-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a syndrome that frequently follows an injury and is characterized by sensory, autonomic and motor features of the affected extremities. One of the more common motor features of RSD is tonic dystonia, which is caused by impairment of inhibitory interneuronal spinal circuits. In this study the circuits that modulate the gain of proprioceptive reflexes of the shoulder musculature are quantitatively assessed in 19 RSD patients, 9 of whom presented with dystonia. The proprioceptive reflexes are quantified by applying two types of force disturbances: (1) disturbances with a fixed low frequency and a variable bandwidth and (2) disturbances with a small bandwidth around a prescribed centre frequency. Compared to controls, patients have lower reflex gains for velocity feedback in response to the disturbances around a prescribed centre frequency. Additionally, patients with dystonia lack the ability to generate negative reflex gains for position feedback, for these same disturbances. Proprioceptive reflexes to the disturbances with a fixed low frequency and variable bandwidth present no difference between patients and controls. Although dystonia in the RSD patients was limited to the distal musculature, the results suggest involvement of interneuronal circuits that mediate postsynaptic inhibition of the motoneurons of the proximal musculature.

  14. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  15. Corneal Stroma Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Samuel D.; Behzad, Ali R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.; Burns, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Elastic tissue was first described well over a hundred years ago and has since been identified in nearly every part of the body. In this review, we examine elastic tissue in the corneal stroma with some mention of other ocular structures which have been more thoroughly described in the past. True elastic fibers consist of an elastin core surrounded by fibrillin microfibrils. However, the presence of elastin fibers is not a requirement and some elastic tissue is comprised of non-elastin-containing bundles of microfibrils. Fibers containing a higher relative amount of elastin are associated with greater elasticity and those without elastin, with structural support. Recently it has been shown that the microfibrils, not only serve mechanical roles, but are also involved in cell signaling through force transduction and the release of TGF-β. A well characterized example of elastin-free microfibril bundles (EFMBs) is found in the ciliary zonules which suspend the crystalline lens in the eye. Through contraction of the ciliary muscle they exert enough force to reshape the lens and thereby change its focal point. It is believed that the molecules comprising these fibers do not turn-over and yet retain their tensile strength for the life of the animal. The mechanical properties of the cornea (strength, elasticity, resiliency) would suggest that EFMBs are present there as well. However, many authors have reported that, although present during embryonic and early postnatal development, EFMBs are generally not present in adults. Serial-block-face imaging with a scanning electron microscope enabled 3D reconstruction of elements in murine corneas. Among these elements were found fibers that formed an extensive network throughout the cornea. In single sections these fibers appeared as electron dense patches. Transmission electron microscopy provided additional detail of these patches and showed them to be composed of fibrils (∼10nm diameter). Immunogold evidence clearly

  16. Corneal injury by wild taro.

    PubMed

    Tang, Emily W H; Law, Ricky W K; Lai, Jimmy S M

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of crystalline keratopathy caused by Alocasia macrorrhiza. The diagnosis was made based on the observation of needle-like crystals in the corneal stroma following injury to that eye. The condition resolved in 3 months with the disappearance of the crystals confirmed by follow-up confocal microscopy.

  17. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  18. Immunological aspects of corneal transplant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Asha

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplant is the most common solid tissue transplant in humans. Advances in microsurgical techniques, eye banking and the use of corticosteroids have improved the success of corneal transplants. Over 65,000 corneal transplants are being performed worldwide annually. Most of these transplants are performed in developed countries. Cornea is considered an immune privileged site. Despite this, immune mediated graft rejection is the most single cause of cornea graft failure and is one of the major postoperative complications. Incidences from as low as 2% to as high as 50% have been reported depending upon the degree of vascularization. Rejection involves donor tissue recognition and various factors may influence this rejection. Major factors include the antigenic load of the donor tissue; other factors include death to enucleation time, methods and temperature of preserving the tissue. Host factors that may impact the graft include ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, chemical burns and autoimmune diseases such as mucous membrane pemphigoid. Following infection, surgery or trauma, cells of the innate immune system invade the cornea as a result of up-regulation of cytokines, cellular adhesion molecules and growth and angiogenic factors. These factors results in neoangiogenesis and lymphoangiogenesis, leading to immune activation and graft rejection. The various immunological mechanisms that may play a role in the corneal transplant are discussed.

  19. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    corneal collagen as a treatment for keratoconus (1) indicating that it is a safe photosensitizer. The maximum percent inhibition using RF and blue light...Seiler (2003) Riboflavin/ultraviolet-a-induced collagen crosslinking for the treatment of keratoconus . Am J Ophthalmol, 135, 620-7. 2. Fujisato, T

  20. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    blue light. RF-5P with UVA irradiation has recently been used to crosslink corneal collagen as a treatment for keratoconus (2). Thus, RF-5P appears...induced collagen crosslinking for the treatment of keratoconus . American journal of ophthalmology. 2003 May;135(5):620-7. 3. McCall AS, Kraft S

  1. Corneal microprojections in coleoid cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Christopher; Jordan, Thomas M; Roberts, Nicholas W; Collin, Shaun P; Marshall, N Justin; Temple, Shelby E

    2012-12-01

    The cornea is the first optical element in the path of light entering the eye, playing a role in image formation and protection. Corneas of vertebrate simple camera-type eyes possess microprojections on the outer surface in the form of microridges, microvilli, and microplicae. Corneas of invertebrates, which have simple or compound eyes, or both, may be featureless or may possess microprojections in the form of nipples. It was previously unknown whether cephalopods (invertebrates with camera-type eyes like vertebrates) possess corneal microprojections and, if so, of what form. Using scanning electron microscopy, we examined corneas of a range of cephalopods and discovered nipple-like microprojections in all species. In some species, nipples were like those described on arthropod compound eyes, with a regular hexagonal arrangement and sizes ranging from 75 to 103 nm in diameter. In others, nipples were nodule shaped and irregularly distributed. Although terrestrial invertebrate nipples create an antireflective surface that may play a role in camouflage, no such optical function can be assigned to cephalopod nipples due to refractive index similarities of corneas and water. Their function may be to increase surface-area-to-volume ratio of corneal epithelial cells to increase nutrient, gas, and metabolite exchange, and/or stabilize the corneal mucous layer, as proposed for corneal microprojections of vertebrates.

  2. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  3. Diffractive corneal inlay for presbyopia.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; García-Delpech, Salvador; Udaondo, Patricia; Remón, Laura; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2017-09-01

    A conceptually new type of corneal inlays for a customized treatment of presbyopia is presented. The diffractive inlay consists on a small aperture disc having an array of micro-holes distributed inside the open zones of a Fresnel zone plate. In this way, the central hole of the disc lets pass the zero order diffraction and produces an extension of the depth of far focus of the eye, while the diffracted light through the holes in the periphery produce the near focus. Additionally, the micro-holes in the inlay surface fulfill the essential requirement of allowing the flow of nutrients through it to the cells of the corneal stroma. Theoretical and optical-bench experimental results for the polychromatic axial Point Spread Function (PSF) were obtained, showing an improved performance compared to the small aperture corneal inlay currently in the market (Kamra). Images of a test object, obtained at several vergences in the surroundings of the far and near foci, are also shown. Picture: Simulation of the appearance of the Diffractive corneal inlay on a real eye. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Reflex Principles of Immunological Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reasoning that neural reflexes maintain homeostasis in other body organs, and that the immune system is innervated, prompted a search for neural circuits that regulate innate and adaptive immunity. This elucidated the inflammatory reflex, a prototypical reflex circuit that maintains immunological homeostasis. Molecular products of infection or injury activate sensory neurons traveling to the brainstem in the vagus nerve. The arrival of these incoming signals generates action potentials that travel from the brainstem to the spleen and other organs. This culminates in T cell release of acetylcholine, which interacts with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) on immunocompetent cells to inhibit cytokine release in macrophages. Herein is reviewed the neurophysiological basis of reflexes that provide stability to the immune system, the neural- and receptor-dependent mechanisms, and the potential opportunities for developing novel therapeutic devices and drugs that target neural pathways to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:22224768

  5. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills.

  6. Low Dimensional Temporal Organization of Spontaneous Eye Blinks in Adults with Developmental Disabilities and Stereotyped Movement Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W.; Lewis, Mark H.; Newell, Karl M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD + SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD + SMD group than the IDD…

  7. Low Dimensional Temporal Organization of Spontaneous Eye Blinks in Adults with Developmental Disabilities and Stereotyped Movement Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mei-Hua; Bodfish, James W.; Lewis, Mark H.; Newell, Karl M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mean rate and time-dependent sequential organization of spontaneous eye blinks in adults with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and individuals from this group who were additionally categorized with stereotypic movement disorder (IDD + SMD). The mean blink rate was lower in the IDD + SMD group than the IDD…

  8. PROSE treatment of corneal ectasia.

    PubMed

    Baran, Inna; Bradley, James A; Alipour, Fateme; Rosenthal, Perry; Le, Hong-Gam; Jacobs, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) uses custom designed and fabricated prosthetic devices in a treatment that restores vision, supports healing, reduces symptoms and improves quality of life in patients with complex corneal disease. We report the success rate for PROSE treatment of corneal ectasia. Records of 59 patients with corneal ectasia seen in consultation over 6 months were reviewed. Candidacy for treatment, topographic indices, change in visual acuity, achievement of satisfactory fit, device wear status and change in visual function at 6 months were recorded. Sixteen eyes were non-candidates because conventional correction was adequate. Trial devices were inserted but not dispensed for 13 eyes. No eyes were excluded for severity of ectasia. In the remaining 89 eyes, satisfactory fit was achieved and a device was dispensed. Twenty-one eyes (15 patients) had undergone penetrating keratoplasty. Device wear at 6 months was documented in 78/89 eyes (88%). NEI VFQ-25 score improved 27.6 points (p<0.001) on a 100 point scale in patients wearing a device at 6 months. All candidate eyes with corneal ectasia could be fitted with a PROSE device. PROSE treatment has a high success rate when measured by ability to achieve satisfactory fit, impact on visual acuity and 6 month data on both rate of continued wear and impact on visual function. PROSE treatment is an alternative to penetrating keratoplasty for patients with corneal ectasia who are contact lens intolerant. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The plantar cushion reflex circuit: an oligosynaptic cutaneous reflex

    PubMed Central

    Egger, M. David; Wall, Patrick D.

    1971-01-01

    1. Reflex toe extension elicited by pressure on the plantar cushion (PC) was studied in cats anaesthetized with Dial. Receptive fields and adequate stimuli for the reflex were evaluated. It was concluded that the receptors for the reflex were chiefly cutaneous pressure receptors in PC. 2. The fastest impulses from the PC receptors for this reflex are conducted to the spinal cord at about 64 m/sec via fibres about 10-11 μm in diameter, i.e. the largest afferent fibres from PC. The motoneurones active in the reflex mainly supplied the intrinsic plantar muscles. Most active axons ran in the S1 ventral root. 3. Extracellular recordings of interneurones in the dorsal horn of L7 spinal segment revealed that many units at the medial edge of the dorsal horn, chiefly in Rexed's laminae IV and V, were activated by stimuli similar to those eliciting the PC—toe extension reflex. These were termed intermediate threshold PC units. Some of these medially located units were activated monosynaptically by PC stimulation. Intermediate threshold PC units activated disynaptically or polysynaptically were also found in this medial region of the dorsal horn, as well as ventrolaterally and caudally in lamina V. 4. No intermediate threshold PC units sent axons into dorsolateral ipsilateral thoracic white matter, in contrast to lower threshold PC units, 42% of which were driven by lateral column stimulation. 5. Extracellular and intracellular recordings were made from motoneurones activated by adequate stimuli for the reflex. Minimum latencies of EPSPs revealed that, for the fastest component of the reflex, at most two interneurones could be interposed between a primary sensory neurone and a motoneurone. 6. Although convergence of low threshold PC units on to intermediate threshold PC units or on to motoneurones may play a part in the PC—toe extension reflex, it appears probable that the two populations of intermediate threshold PC interneurones described above, that is, the

  10. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  11. Musical minds: attentional blink reveals modality-specific restrictions.

    PubMed

    Martens, Sander; Wierda, Stefan M; Dun, Mathijs; de Vries, Michal; Smid, Henderikus G O M

    2015-01-01

    Formal musical training is known to have positive effects on attentional and executive functioning, processing speed, and working memory. Consequently, one may expect to find differences in the dynamics of temporal attention between musicians and non-musicians. Here we address the question whether that is indeed the case, and whether any beneficial effects of musical training on temporal attention are modality specific or generalize across sensory modalities. When two targets are presented in close temporal succession, most people fail to report the second target, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB). We measured and compared AB magnitude for musicians and non-musicians using auditory or visually presented letters and digits. Relative to non-musicians, the auditory AB was both attenuated and delayed in musicians, whereas the visual AB was larger. Non-musicians with a large auditory AB tended to show a large visual AB. However, neither a positive nor negative correlation was found in musicians, suggesting that at least in musicians, attentional restrictions within each modality are completely separate. AB magnitude within one modality can generalize to another modality, but this turns out not to be the case for every individual. Formal musical training seems to have a domain-general, but modality-specific beneficial effect on selective attention. The results fit with the idea that a major source of attentional restriction as reflected in the AB lies in modality-specific, independent sensory systems rather than a central amodal system. The findings demonstrate that individual differences in AB magnitude can provide important information about the modular structure of human cognition.

  12. Revisiting the spread of sparing in the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-07-01

    The attentional blink (AB) refers to a deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream when this target is presented less than 500 ms after the onset of the first target (T1). It is under debate whether the AB originates from a limitation of cognitive resources or from an attentional suppression process triggered by a distractor or by target discontinuity. In this study, we placed a distractor (D(inter)) or an extra target (T(inter)) between T1 and T2 while at the same time manipulating the time interval between D(inter) (or T(inter)) and T2 (0, 200, or 500 ms). The level of attentional enhancement induced by the detection of T1 was also manipulated by adding external noise to T1. The results showed that, as compared to the dual-target condition, T2 performance was better in the consecutive-target condition, when T2 was close in time to T(inter) (i.e., the spread of sparing), but was worse with a longer interval between T2 and the preceding item. Adding external noise to T1 improved T2 performance when T2 was close in time to the preceding item, irrespective of whether this item was D(inter) or T(inter). These findings present difficulties for the existing models of the AB, although the overall pattern observed is generally more consistent with the episodic simultaneous-type, serial-token (eSTST) model than with conventional resource accounts or distractor-based attentional selection accounts of the AB.

  13. Fixational Eye Movement Correction of Blink-Induced Gaze Position Errors

    PubMed Central

    Costela, Francisco M.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; McCamy, Michael B.; Macknik, Stephen L.; Troncoso, Xoana G.; Jazi, Ali Najafian; Crook, Sharon M.; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes move continuously. Even when we attempt to fix our gaze, we produce “fixational” eye movements including microsaccades, drift and tremor. The potential role of microsaccades versus drifts in the control of eye position has been debated for decades and remains in question today. Here we set out to determine the corrective functions of microsaccades and drifts on gaze-position errors due to blinks in non-human primates (Macaca mulatta) and humans. Our results show that blinks contribute to the instability of gaze during fixation, and that microsaccades, but not drifts, correct fixation errors introduced by blinks. These findings provide new insights about eye position control during fixation, and indicate a more general role of microsaccades in fixation correction than thought previously. PMID:25333481

  14. Suppressed blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS QDs by polymer coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aidi; Bian, Yannan; Wang, Jinjie; Chen, Kuiyong; Dong, Chaoqing; Ren, Jicun

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are mostly focused on the introduction of an inorganic shell and organic small molecule compounds. In this study, we described a ``bottom up'' approach for the synthesis of CdSe/CdS/polymer core/shell/shell QDs via the in situ one-pot polymerization approach in order to control the blinking behavior of QDs. Three monomers (dithiothreitol (DTT), phenylenediamine (PDA), and hexamethylenediamine (HDA)) were respectively used to polymerize with hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP), and then the polyphosphazene polymers were obtained with cyclotriphosphazene as the basic macromolecular backbone. By regulating the molar ratios of the activated comonomers, we can control the blinking behavior of CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs. Under the optimal conditions, the percentage of ``non-blinking'' CdSe/CdS/polymer QDs (the ``on time'' fraction > 99% of the overall observation time) was up to 78%. The suppression mechanism was attributed to the efficient passivation of QD surface traps by the sulfhydryl or phenyl groups in the polyphosphazene polymers.Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are very important fluorescent nanocrystals with excellent optical properties. However, QDs, at the single-particle level, show severe fluorescence intermittency (or blinking) on a wide time scale from milliseconds to minutes, which limits certain optical and biological applications. Generally, blinking behavior of QDs strongly depends on their surface state and surrounding environment. Therefore, current blinking suppression approaches are

  15. Emotional modulation of the attentional blink by pleasant and unpleasant pictures.

    PubMed

    de Oca, Beatrice M; Villa, Marie; Cervantes, Miguel; Welbourne, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    When shown a rapid series of images, attention to a second target that follows in short proximity to a first is diminished--a phenomenon sometimes called an "attentional blink." Three experiments compared detection of motivationally relevant pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral pictures when they appeared as the second target following a neutral (Experiment 1), unpleasant (Experiment 2) and pleasant (Experiment 3) picture target. The second target followed at lags of 2, 3 or 8 pictures. In all three experiments, detection of neutral pictures was reduced at lags 2 and 3, indicative of an attentional blink. In contrast, unpleasant pictures were detected more than neutral pictures at lags 2 and 3. Unexpectedly, pleasant pictures not only resisted the attentional blink, but they were detected substantially more than other pictures at all lags in all three experiments. Overall, the experiments support the idea that motivationally relevant stimuli preferentially capture attention more than motivationally neutral stimuli.

  16. Turning the tide of corneal blindness

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Matthew S; Schottman, Tim; Gulati, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Corneal diseases represent the second leading cause of blindness in most developing world countries. Worldwide, major investments in public health infrastructure and primary eye care services have built a strong foundation for preventing future corneal blindness. However, there are an estimated 4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind persons worldwide who could potentially have their sight restored through corneal transplantation. Traditionally, barriers to increased corneal transplantation have been daunting, with limited tissue availability and lack of trained corneal surgeons making widespread keratoplasty services cost prohibitive and logistically unfeasible. The ascendancy of cataract surgical rates and more robust eye care infrastructure of several Asian and African countries now provide a solid base from which to dramatically expand corneal transplantation rates. India emerges as a clear global priority as it has the world's largest corneal blind population and strong infrastructural readiness to rapidly scale its keratoplasty numbers. Technological modernization of the eye bank infrastructure must follow suit. Two key factors are the development of professional eye bank managers and the establishment of Hospital Cornea Recovery Programs. Recent adaptation of these modern eye banking models in India have led to corresponding high growth rates in the procurement of transplantable tissues, improved utilization rates, operating efficiency realization, and increased financial sustainability. The widespread adaptation of lamellar keratoplasty techniques also holds promise to improve corneal transplant success rates. The global ophthalmic community is now poised to scale up widespread access to corneal transplantation to meet the needs of the millions who are currently blind. PMID:22944753

  17. Imaging, Reconstruction, And Display Of Corneal Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyce, Stephen D.; Wilson, Steven E.

    1989-12-01

    The cornea is the major refractive element in the eye; even minor surface distortions can produce a significant reduction in visual acuity. Standard clinical methods used to evaluate corneal shape include keratometry, which assumes the cornea is ellipsoidal in shape, and photokeratoscopy, which images a series of concentric light rings on the corneal surface. These methods fail to document many of the corneal distortions that can degrade visual acuity. Algorithms have been developed to reconstruct the three dimensional shape of the cornea from keratoscope images, and to present these data in the clinically useful display of color-coded contour maps of corneal surface power. This approach has been implemented on a new generation video keratoscope system (Computed Anatomy, Inc.) with rapid automatic digitization of the image rings by a rule-based approach. The system has found clinical use in the early diagnosis of corneal shape anomalies such as keratoconus and contact lens-induced corneal warpage, in the evaluation of cataract and corneal transplant procedures, and in the assessment of corneal refractive surgical procedures. Currently, ray tracing techniques are being used to correlate corneal surface topography with potential visual acuity in an effort to more fully understand the tolerances of corneal shape consistent with good vision and to help determine the site of dysfunction in the visually impaired.

  18. Turning the tide of corneal blindness.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Matthew S; Schottman, Tim; Gulati, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Corneal diseases represent the second leading cause of blindness in most developing world countries. Worldwide, major investments in public health infrastructure and primary eye care services have built a strong foundation for preventing future corneal blindness. However, there are an estimated 4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind persons worldwide who could potentially have their sight restored through corneal transplantation. Traditionally, barriers to increased corneal transplantation have been daunting, with limited tissue availability and lack of trained corneal surgeons making widespread keratoplasty services cost prohibitive and logistically unfeasible. The ascendancy of cataract surgical rates and more robust eye care infrastructure of several Asian and African countries now provide a solid base from which to dramatically expand corneal transplantation rates. India emerges as a clear global priority as it has the world's largest corneal blind population and strong infrastructural readiness to rapidly scale its keratoplasty numbers. Technological modernization of the eye bank infrastructure must follow suit. Two key factors are the development of professional eye bank managers and the establishment of Hospital Cornea Recovery Programs. Recent adaptation of these modern eye banking models in India have led to corresponding high growth rates in the procurement of transplantable tissues, improved utilization rates, operating efficiency realization, and increased financial sustainability. The widespread adaptation of lamellar keratoplasty techniques also holds promise to improve corneal transplant success rates. The global ophthalmic community is now poised to scale up widespread access to corneal transplantation to meet the needs of the millions who are currently blind.

  19. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training Using Eye Blink Switch for Locked-in Syndrome Patient.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Woon; Yim, You-Lim; Yi, Sook-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Seung-Min

    2012-04-01

    Locked-in Syndrome is a severe pontine stroke causing quadriplegia, lower cranial nerve paralysis, and mutism with preservation of only vertical gaze and upper eyelid movement in a conscious patient. We present a case of a Locked-in Syndrome patient who received communication training with augmentative and alternative communication equipment by using eye blinks. After 3 weeks of training, the patient was able to make an attempt to interact with other people, and associate a new word by Korean alphabet selection. Augmentative and alternative communication equipment which uses eye blinks might be considered to be beneficial in improving the communication skills of locked-in syndrome patients.

  20. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Aaron M.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Cleyrat, Cedric; Lidke, Diane S.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Stewart, Michael H.; Stich, Dominik G.; Phipps, Mary E.

    2015-03-12

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. As a result, signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  1. Observation and control of blinking nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bradac, C; Gaebel, T; Naidoo, N; Sellars, M J; Twamley, J; Brown, L J; Barnard, A S; Plakhotnik, T; Zvyagin, A V; Rabeau, J R

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond can undergo strong, spin-sensitive optical transitions under ambient conditions, which makes them attractive for applications in quantum optics, nanoscale magnetometry and biolabelling. Although nitrogen-vacancy centres have been observed in aggregated detonation nanodiamonds and milled nanodiamonds, they have not been observed in very small isolated nanodiamonds. Here, we report the first direct observation of nitrogen-vacancy centres in discrete 5-nm nanodiamonds at room temperature, including evidence for intermittency in the luminescence (blinking) from the nanodiamonds. We also show that it is possible to control this blinking by modifying the surface of the nanodiamonds.

  2. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training Using Eye Blink Switch for Locked-in Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Woon; Yi, Sook-hee; Kim, Hyun-young; Jung, Seung-min

    2012-01-01

    Locked-in Syndrome is a severe pontine stroke causing quadriplegia, lower cranial nerve paralysis, and mutism with preservation of only vertical gaze and upper eyelid movement in a conscious patient. We present a case of a Locked-in Syndrome patient who received communication training with augmentative and alternative communication equipment by using eye blinks. After 3 weeks of training, the patient was able to make an attempt to interact with other people, and associate a new word by Korean alphabet selection. Augmentative and alternative communication equipment which uses eye blinks might be considered to be beneficial in improving the communication skills of locked-in syndrome patients. PMID:22639753

  3. The effects of anomalous diffusion on power-law blinking statistics of CdSe nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jau

    2008-08-28

    In this study of fluorescence blinking statistics for nanorods, we present a diffusion-controlled reaction model that leads to a more general formula: t(-m) exp[-(Gammat)(n)]. This formula describes a short-time power law with a crossover to a stretched exponential decay at later times. Based on quantum Brownian motion for a coupled central harmonic oscillator coupled to heat bath oscillators, we show that the position distribution follows anomalous diffusion with time-dependent diffusion coefficient and drift coefficient. The first and the second moments of the energy fluctuations are shown to be related to the exponent m and n for the blinking statistics.

  4. Infectious keratitis with corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, E D; Schrier, A; Perry, H D; Ingraham, H J; Lasonde, R; Epstein, A; Farber, B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corneal perforation is an uncommon complication associated with keratoconus. The first cases of infectious keratitis and corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear are reported in two keratoconus patients. METHODS: A retrospective chart review and histopathological examination were carried out. RESULTS: Both patients progressed to corneal perforation and emergency penetrating keratoplasty. One patient cultured Fusarium and the second patient Serratia marcesens. Both patients wore contact lenses against medical advice. CONCLUSIONS: The tear in Descement's membrane, stromal oedema, and epithelial bedewing associated with corneal hydrops results in loss of the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the cornea, creating a conduit for infectious organisms through the cornea. Acute hydrops associated with epithelial keratitis, stromal swelling, and a Descement's membrane tear may be a significant risk factor for infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Contact lenses should not be worn during an active corneal hydrops owing to the increased risk for severe infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Images PMID:8695560

  5. Effect of Rebamipide Ophthalmic Suspension on Intraocular Light Scattering for Dry Eye After Corneal Refractive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Akihito; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Kobashi, Hidenaga; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-08-01

    To assess the changes in intraocular scattering before and after instillation of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in patients with dry eye after corneal refractive surgery. This study enrolled 60 eyes of 30 dry eye patients undergoing corneal refractive surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to start topical administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension (rebamipide group) or artificial tears (control group) 4 times daily for 4 weeks. Tear secretion, tear break-up time (TBUT), and the fluorescein score were measured before and after treatment. Intraocular light scattering was also measured as the objective scattering index (OSI) at 0.5-second intervals over 10 seconds. In the rebamipide group, the Schirmer I test, TBUT, and fluorescein score improved significantly, from 11.4 ± 9.0 mm, 2.2 ± 0.7 seconds, and 4.3 ± 1.3 to 14.9 ± 7.4 mm, 4.5 ± 1.7 seconds, and 1.9 ± 1.0, respectively (P = 0.006, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). We found significant improvements in OSI at 5.0 to 10.0 seconds after blinking (5-8 seconds, P = 0.01; 9 seconds, P = 0.02; 10 seconds, P < 0.001). The mean OSI, the OSI change rate, and the OSI slope of the linear regression line improved significantly, from 2.73 ± 1.52, 74.7 ± 69.5%, and 0.10 ± 0.12 to 2.19 ± 1.19, 28.6 ± 48.7%, and 0.04 ± 0.08, respectively (P = 0.02, 0.003, and 0.03). Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was effective for improving both ocular surface parameters and optical quality in patients with dry eye undergoing corneal refractive surgery, suggesting that it may hold promise for the treatment of such patients.

  6. Determination of corneal image-forming properties from corneal topography.

    PubMed

    Maloney, R K; Bogan, S J; Waring, G O

    1993-01-01

    Keratometry provides useful information about the cornea's image-forming properties, such as corneal astigmatism, but is inaccurate on irregular corneas. Quantitative corneal topographic information is now obtainable on irregular corneas, but is difficult for the clinician to interpret. We developed a method to determine the spherical power, astigmatism, and topographic irregularity of a cornea by finding the best-fit spherocylinder that was closest to its measured topography. Keratometric measurements and two videokeratographs were gathered prospectively on 262 normal and abnormal corneas. The best-fit measurements of spherical power, astigmatism, and topographic irregularity were reproducible with one standard deviation of 0.75 diopter or better; agreement with keratometric measurements in normal eyes was good (0.60 diopter or better). Topographic irregularity averaged 0.1 diopter on precision spheres, 0.4 diopter on 146 normal eyes, 0.8 diopter on 29 eyes after radial keratotomy, 2.0 diopters on 58 eyes after penetrating keratoplasty, and 3.0 diopters on 29 eyes with advanced keratoconus. We conclude the following: basic corneal image-forming properties can be measured from videokeratographs; the properties can be determined, by our methods, on irregular corneas in which keratometry is unreliable; and topographic irregularity provides a measure of irregular astigmatism.

  7. [Regeneration and fibrosis of corneal tissues].

    PubMed

    Simirskiĭ, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the features of the regeneration of corneal tissue and its disorders leading to the development of fibrosis are considered. The data on the presence of stem (clonogenic) cell pool in the corneal tissues (epithelium, endothelium, stroma) are given; these cells can serve as a source for regeneration of the tissues at injury or various diseases. The main steps of regeneration of corneal tissues and their disorders that lead to outstripping proliferation of myofibroblasts and secretion of extracellular matrix in the wound area and eventually cause the formation of connective tissue scar and corneal opacity are considered. Particular attention is given to the successes of translational medicine in the treatment of corneal tissue fibrosis. The methods of cell therapy aimed at the restoration of stem cell pool of corneal tissues are the most promising. Gene therapy provides more opportunities; one of its main objectives is the suppression of the myofibroblast proliferation responsible for the development of fibrosis.

  8. Glaucoma and Corneal Transplant Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahmood, Ammar M.; Al-Swailem, Samar A.; Edward, Deepak P.

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma after corneal transplantation is a leading cause of ocular morbidity after penetrating keratoplasty. The incidence reported is highly variable and a number of etiologic factors have been identified. A number of treatment options are available; surgical intervention for IOP control is associated with a high incidence of graft failure. IOP elevation is less frequently seen following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. Descemet's striping-automated endothelial keratoplasty is also associated with postprocedure intraocular pressure elevation and secondary glaucoma and presents unique surgical challenges in patients with preexisting glaucoma surgeries. Glaucoma exists in up to three-quarters of patients who undergo keratoprosthesis surgery and the management if often challenging. The aim of this paper is to highlight the incidence, etiology, and management of glaucoma following different corneal transplant procedures. It also focuses on the challenges in the diagnosis of glaucoma and intraocular pressure monitoring in this group of patients. PMID:22315661

  9. Secondary corneal amyloidosis in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Sameer; Sahu, Debendra; Jeffry, Margaret; Boase, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old caucasian man with a history of keratoconus and long-term hard contact lens wear. Histological analysis of the corneal button after penetrating keratoplasty revealed staining with Congo red and apple green birefringence detected using polarized light. In the absence of other systemic or ocular pathology, the authors infer this amyloid deposition to be secondary to keratoconus and endeavor to discuss the possible etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  10. [Developments in corneal transplants: lamellar techniques emerging].

    PubMed

    Steijns, Daan; Bral, Nathalie; Tang, Mei Lie; van der Lelij, Allegonda

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplants are the most frequently performed human transplant procedure. In the last decade, we have seen large developments in the field of corneal transplant surgery. Currently, several techniques are being used in the Netherlands, each with its own advantages and disadvantages and with distinct indications. In penetrating keratoplasty all layers of the cornea are replaced by a donor cornea. In so-called lamellar corneal transplantation only the affected layer of the cornea is replaced by donor tissue. The developments in corneal transplantation surgery have resulted in an improved prognosis in terms of vision and fewer complications.

  11. Corneal Toxicity Following Exposure to Asclepias Tuberosa

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Lauge Hjorth; Hamoudi, Hassan; Gül, Cigdem Altuntas; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case of corneal toxicity following exposure to milky plant latex from Asclepias tuberosa. Methods: A 70-year-old female presented with blurred vision and pain in her left eye after handling an Ascepias tuberosa. Clinical examination revealed a corneal stromal oedema with small epithelial defects. The corneal endothelium was intact and folds in Descemets membrane were observed. The oedema was treated with chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and scopolamine. Results: The corneal oedema had appeared after corneal exposure to the plant, Asclepias tuberosa, whose latex contains cardenolides that inhibit the Na+/ K+-ATPase in the corneal endothelium. The oedema resolved after 96 hours. After nine months the best corrected visual acuity was 20/20. Conclusion: Corneal toxicity has previously been reported for plants of the Asclepias family. This is a rare case describing severe corneal toxicity caused by exposure to latex from Asclepias tuberosa. Handling of plants of the Asclepias family should be kept as a differential diagnosis in cases of acute corneal toxicity.

  12. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate.

    PubMed

    Röck, Tobias; Bramkamp, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly (P=0.0181 and P=0.0006). We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families.

  13. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate

    PubMed Central

    Röck, Tobias; Bramkamp, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly (P=0.0181 and P=0.0006). We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families. PMID:28730094

  14. Obtaining corneal tissue for keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Navarro Martínez-Cantullera, A; Calatayud Pinuaga, M

    2016-10-01

    Cornea transplant is the most common tissue transplant in the world. In Spain, tissue donation activities depend upon transplant coordinator activities and the well-known Spanish model for organ and tissue donation. Tissue donor detection system and tissue donor evaluation is performed mainly by transplant coordinators using the Spanish model on donation. The evaluation of a potential tissue donor from detection until recovery is based on an exhaustive review of the medical and social history, physical examination, family interview to determine will of the deceased, and a laboratory screening test. Corneal acceptance criteria for transplantation have a wider spectrum than other tissues, as donors with active malignancies and infections are accepted for kearatoplasty in most tissue banks. Corneal evaluation during the whole process is performed to ensure the safety of the donor and the recipient, as well as an effective transplant. Last step before processing, corneal recovery, must be performed under standard operating procedures and in a correct environment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  16. Variables involved in the cue modulation of the startle reflex in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Gabriel; Borrell, José; Jiménez, Mónica; Jurado, Rosa; Grüsser, Sabine M; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cue modulation of the startle reflex is a paradigm that has been used to understand the emotional mechanisms involved in alcohol dependence. Attenuation of the startle reflex has been demonstrated when alcohol-dependent subjects are exposed to alcohol-related stimuli. However, the role of clinical variables on the magnitude of this response is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between a number of clinical variables-severity of alcoholism, family history of alcoholism (FHA+), personality traits related to the sensitivity to reward-and the startle reflex response when subjects with alcohol dependence were viewing alcohol-related cues. After detoxification, 98 participants completed self-report instruments and had eye blink electromyograms measured to acoustic startle probes [100-millisecond burst of white noise at 95 dB(A)] while viewing alcohol-related pictures, and standardised appetitive, aversive and neutral control scenes. Ninety-eight healthy controls were also assessed with the same instruments. There were significant differences on alcohol-startle magnitude between patients and controls. Comparisons by gender showed that women perceived alcohol cues and appetitive cues more appetitive than men. Male and female patients showed more appetitive responses to alcohol cues when compared with their respective controls. Our patients showed an appetitive effect of alcohol cues that was positively related to severity of alcohol dependence, sensitivity to reward and a FHA+. The data confirmed that the pattern of the modulation of the acoustic startle reflex reveals appetitive effects of the alcohol cues and extended it to a variety of clinical variables.

  17. Sneeze reflex: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Songu, Murat; Cingi, Cemal

    2009-06-01

    Sneezing is a protective reflex, and is sometimes a sign of various medical conditions. Sneezing has been a remarkable sign throughout the history. In Asia and Europe, superstitions regarding sneezing extend through a wide range of races and countries, and it has an ominous significance. Although sneezing is a protective reflex response, little else is known about it. A sneeze (or sternutation) is expulsion of air from the lungs through the nose and mouth, most commonly caused by the irritation of the nasal mucosa. Sneezing can further be triggered through sudden exposure to bright light, a particularly full stomach and physical stimulants of the trigeminal nerve, as a result of central nervous system pathologies such as epilepsy, posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome or as a symptom of psychogenic pathologies. In this first comprehensive review of the sneeze reflex in the English literature, we aim to review the pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications of sneezing.

  18. Eye-Blink Conditioning Is Associated with Changes in Synaptic Ultrastructure in the Rabbit Interpositus Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Andrew C. W.; Connor, Steve; Hinchcliff, Richard; LeBoutillier, Janelle C.; Thompson, Richard F.; Petit, Ted L.

    2007-01-01

    Eye-blink conditioning involves the pairing of a conditioned stimulus (usually a tone) to an unconditioned stimulus (air puff), and it is well established that an intact cerebellum and interpositus nucleus, in particular, are required for this form of classical conditioning. Changes in synaptic number or structure have long been proposed as a…

  19. Compulsive Behavior and Eye Blink in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Neurochemical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holsen, Laura; Thompson, Travis

    2004-01-01

    Compulsive behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome is well-documented, though the neurochemical basis of these behaviors remains unknown. We studied a group of 16 people with Prader-Willi syndrome and a comparison group of 19 people with intellectual disability. Using eye-blink rate as an indirect measure of central nervous system dopamine, we found a…

  20. The Beneficial Effects of Additional Task Load, Positive Affect, and Instruction on the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The attentional blink reflects the impaired ability to identify the 2nd of 2 targets presented in close succession--a phenomenon that is generally thought to reflect a fundamental cognitive limitation. However, the fundamental nature of this impairment has recently been called into question by the counterintuitive finding that task-irrelevant…

  1. Evidence against a Central Bottleneck during the Attentional Blink: Multiple Channels for Configural and Featural Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awh, Edward; Serences, John; Laurey, Paul; Dhaliwal, Harpreet; van der Jagt, Thomas; Dassonville, Paul

    2004-01-01

    When a visual target is identified, there is a period of several hundred milliseconds when the processing of subsequent targets is impaired, a phenomenon labeled the attentional blink (AB). The emerging consensus is that the identification of a visual target temporarily occupies a limited attentional resource that is essential for all visual…

  2. Cortical source of blink-related delta oscillations and their correlation with levels of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Luca; Olcese, Umberto; Rossi, Bruno; Frisoli, Antonio; Arrighi, Pieranna; Greco, Giovanni; Carozzo, Simone; Andre, Paolo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Recently, blink-related delta oscillations (delta BROs) have been observed in healthy subjects during spontaneous blinking at rest. Delta BROs have been linked with continuous gathering of information from the surrounding environment, which is classically attributed to the precuneus. Furthermore, fMRI studies have shown that precuneal activity is reduced or missing when consciousness is low or absent. We therefore hypothesized that the source of delta BROs in healthy subjects could be located in the precuneus and that delta BROs could be absent or reduced in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). To test these hypotheses, electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at rest was recorded in 12 healthy controls and nine patients with DOC (four vegetative states, and five minimally conscious states). Three-second-lasting EEG epochs centred on each blink instance were analyzed in both time- (BROs) and frequency domains (event-related spectral perturbation or ERSP and intertrial coherence or ITC). Cortical sources of the maximum blink-related delta power, corresponding to the positive peak of the delta BROs, were estimated by standardized Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography. In control subjects, as expected, the source of delta BROs was located in the precuneus, whereas in DOC patients, delta BROs were not recognizable and no precuneal localization was possible. Furthermore, we observed a direct relationship between spectral indexes and levels of cognitive functioning in all subjects participating in the study. This reinforces the hypothesis that delta BROs reflect neural processes linked with awareness of the self and of the environment.

  3. Attention Blinks for Selection, Not Perception or Memory: Reading Sentences and Reporting Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Mary C.; Wyble, Brad; Olejarczyk, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In whole report, a sentence presented sequentially at the rate of about 10 words/s can be recalled accurately, whereas if the task is to report only two target words (e.g., red words), the second target suffers an attentional blink if it appears shortly after the first target. If these two tasks are carried out simultaneously, is there an…

  4. Compulsive Behavior and Eye Blink in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Neurochemical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holsen, Laura; Thompson, Travis

    2004-01-01

    Compulsive behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome is well-documented, though the neurochemical basis of these behaviors remains unknown. We studied a group of 16 people with Prader-Willi syndrome and a comparison group of 19 people with intellectual disability. Using eye-blink rate as an indirect measure of central nervous system dopamine, we found a…

  5. The Role of the Magnocellular Visual Pathway in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Lambeth, Sandra E.; Day, Ross H.; Gould, Ian C.; Castles, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Visual attention has temporal limitations. In the attentional blink (AB) a stream of stimuli such as letters or digits are presented to a participant on a computer monitor at a rapid rate. Embedded in the stream are two targets that the participant must try to identify. Identification of the second target is severely impaired if it is presented…

  6. Attentional and Perceptual Factors Affecting the Attentional Blink for Faces and Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Ayelet N.; Bentin, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    When 2 different visual targets presented among different distracters in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) are separated by 400 ms or less, detection and identification of the 2nd targets are reduced relative to longer time intervals. This phenomenon, termed the "attentional blink" (AB), is attributed to the temporary engagement…

  7. Visual Search Is Postponed during the Attentional Blink until the System Is Suitably Reconfigured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghorashi, S. M. Shahab; Smilek, Daniel; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    J. S. Joseph, M. M. Chun, and K. Nakayama (1997) found that pop-out visual search was impaired as a function of intertarget lag in an attentional blink (AB) paradigm in which the 1st target was a letter and the 2nd target was a search display. In 4 experiments, the present authors tested the implication that search efficiency should be similarly…

  8. Eye-Blink Conditioning Is Associated with Changes in Synaptic Ultrastructure in the Rabbit Interpositus Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Andrew C. W.; Connor, Steve; Hinchcliff, Richard; LeBoutillier, Janelle C.; Thompson, Richard F.; Petit, Ted L.

    2007-01-01

    Eye-blink conditioning involves the pairing of a conditioned stimulus (usually a tone) to an unconditioned stimulus (air puff), and it is well established that an intact cerebellum and interpositus nucleus, in particular, are required for this form of classical conditioning. Changes in synaptic number or structure have long been proposed as a…

  9. Individuals Differ in the Attentional Blink: Mental Speed and Intra-Subject Stability Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Christoph; Arend, Isabel C.; Beauducel, Andre; Shapiro, Kimron L.

    2011-01-01

    The failure to correctly report two targets ("T[subscript 1]", "T[subscript 2]") that follow each other in close temporal proximity has been called the "attentional blink" (AB). The AB has, so far, mainly been studied using experimental approaches. The present studies investigated individual differences in AB performance, revealing (among further…

  10. Alteration of Attentional Blink in High Functioning Autism: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amirault, Marion; Etchegoyhen, Kattalin; Delord, Sandrine; Mendizabal, Sandrine; Kraushaar, Caroline; Hesling, Isabelle; Allard, Michele; Bouvard, Manuel; Mayo, Willy

    2009-01-01

    Autism is characterized by deficits in attention. However, no study has investigated the dynamics of attentional processes in autistic patients yet. The attentional blink (AB) paradigm provides information about the temporal dynamics of attention in particular about the allocation and the duration of an attentional episode. We compared 11 high…

  11. Too Much Control Can Hurt: A Threaded Cognition Model of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatgen, Niels A.; Juvina, Ion; Schipper, Marc; Borst, Jelmer P.; Martens, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Explanations for the attentional blink (AB; a deficit in identifying the second of two targets when presented 200-500ms after the first) have recently shifted from limitations in memory consolidation to disruptions in cognitive control. With a new model based on the threaded cognition theory of multi-tasking we propose a different explanation: the…

  12. Reevaluating Encoding-Capacity Limitations as a Cause of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell'Acqua, Roberto; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Luria, Roy; Pluchino, Patrik

    2009-01-01

    A number of researchers have emphasized the role of distractors intervening between successive targets as the primary determinant of the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon. They argued that the AB is abolished when 3 or more targets are displayed as temporally contiguous items in rapidly presented serial sequences. In 3 experiments, the authors…

  13. Seeing the Light: Adapting Luminance Reveals Low-Level Visual Processes in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Barry; Bischof, Walter F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2004-01-01

    It is widely assumed that high-level visual processes subserve the attentional blink (AB). Recent evidence from studies of visual masking during the AB that were designed to directly test the contributions of high-level masking effects, however, have failed to provide empirical support for this position.The implication is that low-level visual…

  14. Suppressed blinking in single quantum dots (QDs) immobilized near silver island films (SIFs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2007-10-01

    In this report, we use single-molecule spectroscopic method to study emission behaviors of streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots immobilized on a biotinylated BSA (bovine serum albumin) monolayer near non-continuous rough silver nanostructures. We observed greatly reduced blinking and enhanced emission fluorescence of quantum dots next to silver island films.

  15. Spontaneous eye blink rate predicts learning from negative, but not positive, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Slagter, Heleen A; Georgopoulou, Katerina; Frank, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A large body of research shows that striatal dopamine critically affects the extent to which we learn from the positive and negative outcomes of our decisions. In this study, we examined the relationship between reinforcement learning and spontaneous eye blink rate (sEBR), a cheap, non-invasive, and easy to obtain marker of striatal dopaminergic activity. Based on previous findings from pharmacological and patient studies, our main prediction was that in healthy individuals, low blink rates (and concomitant lower striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with better learning from negative choices, while high blink rates (and concomitant higher striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with learning from positive choices. Behavioral analyses showed that in healthy individuals, lower blink rates were indeed associated with greater learning from negative outcomes, indicating that lower dopamine levels per se may enhance avoidance learning. Yet, higher EBR was not associated with better learning from positive outcomes. These observations support the notion that sEBR reflects tonic dopamine levels, and suggest that sEBR may specifically relate to dopamine D2 receptor function, given the importance of the dopaminergic D2 pathway in avoidance learning. More generally, these findings highlight the usefulness of sEBR as a non-invasive and cheap method for assessing the relationship between striatal dopaminergic function and behavior.

  16. The Role of the Locus Coeruleus in Mediating the Attentional Blink: A Neurocomputational Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Gilzenrat, Mark S.; Holmes, Benjamin D.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    The attentional blink refers to the transient impairment in perceiving the 2nd of 2 targets presented in close temporal proximity. In this article, the authors propose a neurobiological mechanism for this effect. The authors extend a recently developed computational model of the potentiating influence of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system…

  17. Disruption reduces accuracy and P3b amplitudes in the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Pincham, Hannah L; Szücs, Dénes

    2014-10-03

    In everyday life, distracting stimuli often interfere with daily tasks, and disrupt successful task performance. The attentional blink paradigm (a deficit in reporting the second target (T2) in a rapid stream of visual stimuli) allows for an investigation of disruption by rapidly appearing stimuli. Specifically, the magnitude of the attentional blink deficit can be manipulated by positioning relevant stimuli at strategic locations within the visual stream. The current study therefore designed and tested a disruption paradigm that aimed to reduce T2 accuracy using a disruptor stimulus. Electroencephalography was used to reveal the neural correlates of the effect. To that end, targets were defined by task-set colours. The item immediately preceding T2 appeared in a task-set colour (disrupted trials) or a different colour (non-disrupted trials). The results revealed that T2 accuracy was reduced on disrupted trials, and disruption appeared to be worse when T2 appeared inside the attentional blink window. The behavioural data were paralleled by the neural results. On trials where T2 appeared within the AB window and was correctly reported, T2-P3b amplitude (a neural correlate of working memory consolidation) was significantly depressed on disrupted trials compared with non-disrupted trials. Single trial plots of P3b amplitude confirmed a weaker neural trace for T2 on disrupted trials. These data indicate that the magnitude and neural signature of the attentional blink deficit is malleable, and can be influenced by non-target, task-relevant stimuli.

  18. Correlation between Inter-Blink Interval and Episodic Encoding during Movie Watching.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Seok; Chang, Won-du; Park, Jinsick; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang In; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Human eye blinking is cognitively suppressed to minimize loss of visual information for important real-world events. Despite the relationship between eye blinking and cognitive state, the effect of eye blinks on cognition in real-world environments has received limited research attention. In this study, we focused on the temporal pattern of inter-eye blink interval (IEBI) during movie watching and investigated its relationship with episodic memory. As a control condition, 24 healthy subjects watched a nature documentary that lacked a specific story line while electroencephalography was performed. Immediately after viewing the movie, the subjects were asked to report its most memorable scene. Four weeks later, subjects were asked to score 32 randomly selected scenes from the movie, based on how much they were able to remember and describe. The results showed that the average IEBI was significantly longer during the movie than in the control condition. In addition, the significant increase in IEBI when watching a movie coincided with the most memorable scenes of the movie. The results suggested that the interesting episodic narrative of the movie attracted the subjects' visual attention relative to the documentary clip that did not have a story line. In the episodic memory test executed four weeks later, memory performance was significantly positively correlated with IEBI (p<0.001). In summary, IEBI may be a reliable bio-marker of the degree of concentration on naturalistic content that requires visual attention, such as a movie.

  19. Too Much Control Can Hurt: A Threaded Cognition Model of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatgen, Niels A.; Juvina, Ion; Schipper, Marc; Borst, Jelmer P.; Martens, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Explanations for the attentional blink (AB; a deficit in identifying the second of two targets when presented 200-500ms after the first) have recently shifted from limitations in memory consolidation to disruptions in cognitive control. With a new model based on the threaded cognition theory of multi-tasking we propose a different explanation: the…

  20. Seeing the Light: Adapting Luminance Reveals Low-Level Visual Processes in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Barry; Bischof, Walter F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2004-01-01

    It is widely assumed that high-level visual processes subserve the attentional blink (AB). Recent evidence from studies of visual masking during the AB that were designed to directly test the contributions of high-level masking effects, however, have failed to provide empirical support for this position.The implication is that low-level visual…

  1. Resting EEG in Alpha and Beta Bands Predicts Individual Differences in Attentional Blink Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Mary H.; Arnell, Karen M.; Cote, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced when it is presented within 500 ms of a first target (T1) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP)--an attentional blink (AB). There are reliable individual differences in the magnitude of the AB. Recent evidence has shown that the attentional approach that an individual typically adopts during a…

  2. Different Attentional Blink Tasks Reflect Distinct Information Processing Limitations: An Individual Differences Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ashleigh J.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    To study the temporal dynamics and capacity-limits of attentional selection and encoding, researchers often employ the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon: subjects' impaired ability to report the second of two targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream that appear within 200-500 ms of one another. The AB has now been the subject of…

  3. Alteration of Attentional Blink in High Functioning Autism: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amirault, Marion; Etchegoyhen, Kattalin; Delord, Sandrine; Mendizabal, Sandrine; Kraushaar, Caroline; Hesling, Isabelle; Allard, Michele; Bouvard, Manuel; Mayo, Willy

    2009-01-01

    Autism is characterized by deficits in attention. However, no study has investigated the dynamics of attentional processes in autistic patients yet. The attentional blink (AB) paradigm provides information about the temporal dynamics of attention in particular about the allocation and the duration of an attentional episode. We compared 11 high…

  4. Modulation of Attentional Blink with Emotional Faces in Typical Development and in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerys, Benjamin E.; Ruiz, Ericka; Strang, John; Sokoloff, Jennifer; Kenworthy, Lauren; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The attentional blink (AB) phenomenon was used to assess the effect of emotional information on early visual attention in typically developing (TD) children and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The AB effect is the momentary perceptual unawareness that follows target identification in a rapid serial visual processing…

  5. Reevaluating Encoding-Capacity Limitations as a Cause of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell'Acqua, Roberto; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Luria, Roy; Pluchino, Patrik

    2009-01-01

    A number of researchers have emphasized the role of distractors intervening between successive targets as the primary determinant of the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon. They argued that the AB is abolished when 3 or more targets are displayed as temporally contiguous items in rapidly presented serial sequences. In 3 experiments, the authors…

  6. The Role of the Magnocellular Visual Pathway in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Lambeth, Sandra E.; Day, Ross H.; Gould, Ian C.; Castles, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Visual attention has temporal limitations. In the attentional blink (AB) a stream of stimuli such as letters or digits are presented to a participant on a computer monitor at a rapid rate. Embedded in the stream are two targets that the participant must try to identify. Identification of the second target is severely impaired if it is presented…

  7. Individuals Differ in the Attentional Blink: Mental Speed and Intra-Subject Stability Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Christoph; Arend, Isabel C.; Beauducel, Andre; Shapiro, Kimron L.

    2011-01-01

    The failure to correctly report two targets ("T[subscript 1]", "T[subscript 2]") that follow each other in close temporal proximity has been called the "attentional blink" (AB). The AB has, so far, mainly been studied using experimental approaches. The present studies investigated individual differences in AB performance, revealing (among further…

  8. Heterostructuring Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Toward Intentional Suppression of Blinking and Auger Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    At the level of a single particle, nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) are observed to fluoresce intermittently or “blink.” They are also characterized by an efficient non-radiative recombination process known as Auger Recombination (AR). Recently, new approaches to NQD heterostructuring have been developed that directly impact both blinking and AR, resulting in dramatic suppression of these unwanted processes. The three successful hetero-NQD motifs are reviewed here: (1) interfacial alloying, (2) thick or “giant” shells, and (3) specific type-II electronic structures. These approaches, which rely on modifying or tuning internal NQD core/shell structures, are compared with alternative strategies for blinking suppression that rely, instead, on surface modifications or surface-mediated interactions. Finally, in each case, the unique synthetic approaches or challenges addressed that have driven the realization of novel and important functionality are discussed, along with the implications for development of a comprehensive ‘materials design’ strategy for blinking and AR-suppressed heterostructured NQDs. PMID:24062602

  9. Modulation of Attentional Blink with Emotional Faces in Typical Development and in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerys, Benjamin E.; Ruiz, Ericka; Strang, John; Sokoloff, Jennifer; Kenworthy, Lauren; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The attentional blink (AB) phenomenon was used to assess the effect of emotional information on early visual attention in typically developing (TD) children and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The AB effect is the momentary perceptual unawareness that follows target identification in a rapid serial visual processing…

  10. Combining Blink, Pupil, and Response Time Measures in a Concealed Knowledge Test

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Travis L.; Baker, Christopher A.; Gaunt, Joshua T.

    2013-01-01

    The response time (RT) based Concealed Knowledge Test (CKT) has been shown to accurately detect participants’ knowledge of mock-crime-related information. Tests based on ocular measures such as pupil-size and blink-rate have sometimes resulted in poor classification, or lacked detailed classification analyses. The present study examines the fitness of multiple pupil and blink related responses in the CKT paradigm. To maximize classification efficiency, participants’ concealed knowledge was assessed using both individual test measures and combinations of test measures. Results show that individual pupil-size, pupil-slope, and pre-response blink-rate measures produce efficient classifications. Combining pupil and blink measures yielded more accuracy classifications than individual ocular measures. Although RT-based tests proved efficient, combining RT with ocular measures had little incremental benefit. It is argued that covertly assessing ocular measures during RT-based tests may guard against effective countermeasure use in applied settings. A compound classification procedure was used to categorize individual participants and yielded high hit rates and low false-alarm rates without the need for adjustments between test paradigms and subject populations. We conclude that with appropriate test paradigms and classification analyses, ocular measures may prove as effective as other indices, though additional research is needed. PMID:23382718

  11. Photoluminescence blinking and carrier dynamics in giant nanocrystals with different electron confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampat, Sid; Guo, Yijun; Vela, Javier; Malko, Anton

    2012-02-01

    Quantum dots have shown great promise as high quantum yield photon sources for applications in bioimaging, LEDs, lasers, etc. However, their photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking) often complicates practical implementations. Recently, a new breed of giant nanocrystal quantum dots (gNQDs) with a large number of shell monolayers (ML) has been developed that show strongly suppressed blinkingootnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) and existence of multiexcitons.ootnotetextY.S. Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 187401 (2011)^,ootnotetextA. V. Malko et al., Nano Lett., accepted (2011) So far, their PL emission has been limited to around 630nm. In this work, we broadened this approach and extended gNQD emission to shorter wavelength in the visible spectrum. We investigated photostable CdSe/CdS gNQDs with small (480nm emission) core and compared them to large (625nm emission) core non-blinking gNQDs with similar shell thickness (14-17 ML). The small core dots show increased blinking behavior and shorter PL decay times in comparison to large core dots. The observed difference in blinking behavior is suggestive of different carrier confinement regimes leading to enhanced electron trapping at the dot's surface as well as modifications to non-radiative Auger recombination rates.

  12. Attentional and Perceptual Factors Affecting the Attentional Blink for Faces and Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Ayelet N.; Bentin, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    When 2 different visual targets presented among different distracters in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) are separated by 400 ms or less, detection and identification of the 2nd targets are reduced relative to longer time intervals. This phenomenon, termed the "attentional blink" (AB), is attributed to the temporary engagement…

  13. Perception of Temporal Order Is Impaired during the Time Course of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalek, Thomas M.; Lagroix, Hayley E. P.; Yanko, Matthew R.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Identification accuracy for the second of two target (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). Does this attentional blink (AB) also impair the perception of the order of presentation? In four experiments, three letter targets (T1, T2, T3) were inserted in a stream of digit distractors displayed in rapid serial visual…

  14. Right Hemisphere Involvement in the Attentional Blink: Evidence from a Split-Brain Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Barry; Kingstone, Alan

    2004-01-01

    When two masked targets are presented in a rapid sequence, correct identification of the first hinders identification of the second. This attentional blink (AB) is thought to be the result of capacity limitations in visual information processing. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence implicated the right hemisphere as the source of this…

  15. Spontaneous blinks of Parkinson's disease patients evaluated by EMG and EOG.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Sakamoto, K

    2001-03-01

    In a study of spontaneous blinks, both electromyographic (EMG) activities from m. orbicularis oculi which is responsible for initiating closure of the eyelid and electro-oculogram (EOG) of vertical direction to the movement of the eyelid were measured in ten patients with Parkinson's disease and in thirty normal subjects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the generative mechanism of the spontaneous blinks by comparison of both the EMG and the EOG waveforms in the patients with Parkinson's disease and those in the normal subjects. The mean duration and the amplitude of both the EMG and the EOG were evaluated by the averaging of ten waveforms for the spontaneous blinks. The time lag between the onset of the generation of the EMG and the onset of the EOG signal was analyzed. The mean duration of the EMG and the mean amplitude of both the EMG and the EOG in the patients with Parkinson's disease were shorter and smaller than those in the normal subjects by the significant level of 1%, respectively. There was no difference of the time lag between the subject groups. These results suggest that the function of m. orbicularis oculi for the spontaneous blinks is reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease, because the motoneurones of the facial nucleus innervating the m. orbicularis oculi becomes hypoactive due to abnormal output of basal ganglia.

  16. Different Attentional Blink Tasks Reflect Distinct Information Processing Limitations: An Individual Differences Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ashleigh J.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    To study the temporal dynamics and capacity-limits of attentional selection and encoding, researchers often employ the attentional blink (AB) phenomenon: subjects' impaired ability to report the second of two targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream that appear within 200-500 ms of one another. The AB has now been the subject of…

  17. Resting EEG in Alpha and Beta Bands Predicts Individual Differences in Attentional Blink Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Mary H.; Arnell, Karen M.; Cote, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced when it is presented within 500 ms of a first target (T1) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP)--an attentional blink (AB). There are reliable individual differences in the magnitude of the AB. Recent evidence has shown that the attentional approach that an individual typically adopts during a…

  18. Perception of Temporal Order Is Impaired during the Time Course of the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalek, Thomas M.; Lagroix, Hayley E. P.; Yanko, Matthew R.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Identification accuracy for the second of two target (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). Does this attentional blink (AB) also impair the perception of the order of presentation? In four experiments, three letter targets (T1, T2, T3) were inserted in a stream of digit distractors displayed in rapid serial visual…

  19. Distractor Devaluation Effect in the Attentional Blink: Direct Evidence for Distractor Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kihara, Ken; Yagi, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Kawahara, Jun I.

    2011-01-01

    When two targets (T1 and T2) are embedded in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), T2 is often missed (attentional blink, AB) if T2 follows T1 by less than 500 ms. Some have proposed that inhibition of a distractor following T1 contributes to the AB, but no direct evidence supports this proposal. This study examined distractor inhibition by…

  20. Distractor Devaluation Effect in the Attentional Blink: Direct Evidence for Distractor Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kihara, Ken; Yagi, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Kawahara, Jun I.

    2011-01-01

    When two targets (T1 and T2) are embedded in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), T2 is often missed (attentional blink, AB) if T2 follows T1 by less than 500 ms. Some have proposed that inhibition of a distractor following T1 contributes to the AB, but no direct evidence supports this proposal. This study examined distractor inhibition by…