Science.gov

Sample records for corneum membrane domains

  1. Direct Visualization of Lipid Domains in Human Skin Stratum Corneum's Lipid Membranes: Effect of pH and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, I.; Norlén, L.; Bagatolli, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10°C–90°C) using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28°C–32°C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral structure and stability. PMID:17631535

  2. Acute Acidification of Stratum Corneum Membrane Domains Using Polyhydroxyl Acids Improves Lipid Processing and Inhibits Degradation of Corneodesmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roelandt, Truus; Schürer, Nanna; Pu, Xu; Fluhr, Joachim; Giddelo, Christina; Man, Mao-Qiang; Crumrine, Debra; Roseeuw, Diane; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization of the normally acidic stratum corneum (SC) has deleterious consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion attributable to serine proteases (SPs) activation leading to deactivation/degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and corneodesmosomes (CD). As an elevated pH compromises SC structure and function, we asked here whether SC hyperacidification would improve the structure and function. We lowered the pH of mouse SC using two polyhydroxyl acids (PHA), lactobionic acid (LBA), or gluconolactone (GL). Applications of the PHA reduced the pH at all levels of SC of hairless mouse, with further selective acidification of SC membrane domains, as shown by fluorescence lifetime imaging. Hyperacidification improved permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to increased activities of two key membrane-localized, ceramide-generating hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase), which correlated with accelerated extracellular maturation of SC lamellar membranes. Hyperacidification generated “supernormal” SC integrity/cohesion, attributable to an SP-dependent decreased degradation of desmoglein-1 (DSG1) and the induction of DSG3 expression in lower SC. As SC hyperacidification improves the structure and function, even of normal epidermis, these studies lay the groundwork for an assessment of the potential utility of SC acidification as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory dermatoses, characterized by abnormalities in barrier function, cohesion, and surface pH. PMID:19741713

  3. Proposed human stratum corneum water domain in chemical absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Compounds with varying physical and chemical properties may have different affinities to the stratum corneum (SC) and/or its intercellular lipids, keratin protein, and possible water domains. To better understand the mechanism of percutaneous absorption, we utilized 21 carbon-14 labeled chemicals, with wide hydrophilicity (log P = -0.05 to 6.17), and quantified their absorption/adsorption properties for a short incubation time (15 min) with regards to intact SC membrane, delipidized SC membrane and SC lipid. A facile method was developed for SC/lipid absorption, providing a more equivalent procedure and comparable data. SC lipid absorption of chemical solutes positively correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P). Differences between the percent dose of chemical absorption to intact SC and the total percent dose contributed by the protein and lipid domains suggest the possibility and significance of a water domain. Absorption rate experiments showed a longer lag time for intact SC than for delipidized SC or SC lipid, suggesting that the water domain may delay chemical binding to protein and lipid domains, and may be a factor in the resistance of many chemicals to current decontamination methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The physics of stratum corneum lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chinmay

    2016-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, comprises rigid corneocytes (keratin-filled dead cells) in a specialized lipid matrix. The continuous lipid matrix provides the main barrier against uncontrolled water loss and invasion of external pathogens. Unlike all other biological lipid membranes (such as intracellular organelles and plasma membranes), molecules in the SC lipid matrix show small hydrophilic groups and large variability in the length of the alkyl tails and in the numbers and positions of groups that are capable of forming hydrogen bonds. Molecular simulations provide a route for systematically probing the effects of each of these differences separately. In this article, we present the results from atomistic molecular dynamics of selected lipid bilayers and multi-layers to probe the effect of these polydispersities. We address the nature of the tail packing in the gel-like phase, the hydrogen bond network among head groups, the bending moduli expected for leaflets comprising SC lipids and the conformation of very long ceramide lipids in multi-bilayer lipid assemblies. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298438

  5. Mechanics, morphology, and mobility in stratum corneum membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, Peter; Das, Chinmay; Noro, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of skin, and serves as a protective barrier against external agents, and to control moisture. It comprises keratin bodies (corneocytes) embedded in a matrix of lipid bilayers. Unlike the more widely studied phospholipid bilayers, the SC bilayers are typically in a gel-like state. Moreover, the SC membrane composition is radically different from more fluid counterparts: it comprises single tailed fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol; with many distinct ceramides possessing different lengths of tails, and always with two tails of different lengths. I will present insight from computer simulations into the morphology, mechanical properties, and diffusion (barrier) properties of these highly heterogeneous membranes. Our results provide some clue as to the design principles for the SC membrane, and is an excellent example of the use of wide polydispersity by natural systems.

  6. Chemical Enhancer Solubility in Human Stratum Corneum Lipids and Enhancer Mechanism of Action on Stratum Corneum Lipid Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sarah A.; Li, S. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Previously, chemical enhancer-induced permeation enhancement on human stratum corneum (SC) lipoidal pathway at enhancer thermodynamic activities approaching unity in the absence of cosolvents (defined as Emax) was determined and hypothesized to be related to the enhancer solubilities in the SC lipid domain. The objectives of the present study were to (a) quantify enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain at saturation, (b) elucidate enhancer mechanism(s) of action, and (c) study the SC lipid phase behavior at Emax. It was concluded that direct quantification of enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain using intact SC was complicated. Therefore a liposomal model of extracted human SC lipids was used. In the liposome study, enhancer uptake into extracted human SC lipid liposomes (EHSCLL) was shown to correlate with Emax. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate lipid phase alterations in enhancer-treated intact SC. IR spectra demonstrated an increase in the lipid domain fluidity and DSC thermograms indicated a decrease in the phase transition temperature with increasing Emax. These results suggest that the enhancer mechanism of action is through enhancer intercalation into SC intercellular lipids and subsequent lipid lamellae fluidization related to enhancer lipid concentration. PMID:19747970

  7. Infrared spectroscopic study of stratum corneum model membranes prepared from human ceramides, cholesterol, and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2007-04-15

    The outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, consists of corneocytes surrounded by lipid domains. The main lipid classes in stratum corneum are cholesterol, ceramides (CER), and free fatty acids forming two crystalline lamellar phases. However, only limited information is available on whether the various lipid classes participate in the same crystalline lattices or if separate domains are formed within the lipid lamellae. In this article infrared spectroscopic studies are reported of hydrated mixtures prepared from cholesterol, human CER, and free fatty acids. Evaluation of the methylene stretching vibrations revealed a conformational disordering starting at approximately 60 degrees C for all mixtures. Examination of the rotational ordering (scissoring and rocking vibrations) of mixtures prepared from equimolar cholesterol and CER with a variation in the level of free fatty acids showed that at lower free fatty acid content orthorhombic and hexagonal domains coexist in the lipid lamellae. Increasing the fatty acid level to an equimolar cholesterol/CER/fatty acid mixture reveals the dominant presence of an orthorhombic lattice, confirming x-ray diffraction studies. Replacing the protonated free fatty acid chains by their perdeuterated counterparts demonstrates that free fatty acids and CER participate in the same orthorhombic lattice up to a level of slightly less than 1:1:0.75 cholesterol/CER/free fatty acids molar ratio but that free fatty acids also form separate domains within the lipid lamellae at equimolar ratios at room temperature. However, no evidence for this has been observed at 32 degrees C. Extrapolating these findings to the situation in stratum corneum led us conclude that in stratum corneum, fatty acids and CER participate in the orthorhombic lattice at 32 degrees C, the skin temperature.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Stratum Corneum Model Membranes Prepared from Human Ceramides, Cholesterol, and Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gooris, G. S.; Bouwstra, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, consists of corneocytes surrounded by lipid domains. The main lipid classes in stratum corneum are cholesterol, ceramides (CER), and free fatty acids forming two crystalline lamellar phases. However, only limited information is available on whether the various lipid classes participate in the same crystalline lattices or if separate domains are formed within the lipid lamellae. In this article infrared spectroscopic studies are reported of hydrated mixtures prepared from cholesterol, human CER, and free fatty acids. Evaluation of the methylene stretching vibrations revealed a conformational disordering starting at ∼60°C for all mixtures. Examination of the rotational ordering (scissoring and rocking vibrations) of mixtures prepared from equimolar cholesterol and CER with a variation in the level of free fatty acids showed that at lower free fatty acid content orthorhombic and hexagonal domains coexist in the lipid lamellae. Increasing the fatty acid level to an equimolar cholesterol/CER/fatty acid mixture reveals the dominant presence of an orthorhombic lattice, confirming x-ray diffraction studies. Replacing the protonated free fatty acid chains by their perdeuterated counterparts demonstrates that free fatty acids and CER participate in the same orthorhombic lattice up to a level of slightly less than 1:1:0.75 cholesterol/CER/free fatty acids molar ratio but that free fatty acids also form separate domains within the lipid lamellae at equimolar ratios at room temperature. However, no evidence for this has been observed at 32°C. Extrapolating these findings to the situation in stratum corneum led us conclude that in stratum corneum, fatty acids and CER participate in the orthorhombic lattice at 32°C, the skin temperature. PMID:17277189

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    PubMed

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dehydration of multilamellar fatty acid membranes: Towards a computational model of the stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M.; DeVane, Russell H.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The level of hydration controls the cohesion between apposed lamellae of saturated free fatty acids found in the lipid matrix of stratum corneum, the outermost layer of mammalian skin. This multilamellar lipid matrix is highly impermeable to water and ions, so that the local hydration shell of its fatty acids may not always be in equilibrium with the acidity and relative humidity, which significantly change over a course of days during skin growth. The homeostasis of the stratum corneum at each moment of its growth likely requires a balance between two factors, which affect in opposite ways the diffusion of hydrophilic species through the stratum corneum: (i) an increase in water order as the lipid lamellae come in closer contact, and (ii) a decrease in water order as the fraction of charged fatty acids is lowered by pH. Herein molecular dynamics simulations are employed to estimate the impact of both effects on water molecules confined between lamellae of fatty acids. Under conditions where membrane undulations are energetically favorable, the charged fatty acids are able to sequester cations around points of contact between lamellae that are fully dehydrated, while essentially maintaining a multilamellar structure for the entire system. This observation suggests that the undulations of the fatty acid lamellae control the diffusion of hydrophilic species through the water phase by altering the positional and rotational order of water molecules in the embedded/occluded "droplets."

  11. Effects of nerolidol and limonene on stratum corneum membranes: A probe EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mendanha, Sebastião Antonio; Marquezin, Cássia Alessandra; Ito, Amando Siuiti; Alonso, Antonio

    2017-10-30

    The sesquiterpene nerolidol and the monoterpene limonene are potent skin-permeation enhancers that have also been shown to have antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitic activities. Because terpenes are membrane-active compounds, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of three membrane spin labels combined with the fluorescence spectroscopy of three lipid probes to study the interactions of these terpenes with stratum corneum (SC) intercellular membranes. An experimental apparatus was developed to assess the lipid fluidity of hydrated SC membranes via the fluorescence anisotropy of extrinsic membrane probes. Both EPR and fluorescence probes indicated that the intercellular membranes of neonatal SC rats undergo a main phase transition at approximately 50°C. Taken together, the results indicated that treatment with 1% nerolidol (v/v) caused large fluidity increases in the more ordered phases of SC membranes and that these effects gradually decreased with increasing temperature. Additionally, compared with (+)-limonene, nerolidol was better able to change the SC membrane dynamics. EPR and fluorescence data suggest that these terpenes act as spacers in lipid packaging and create increased lipid disorder in the more ordered regions and phases of SC membranes, notably leading to a population of probes with less restricted motion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Coexistence of two domains in intercellular lipid matrix of stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Ichiro; Ohta, Noboru; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto

    2006-11-01

    The outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of corneocytes and an intercellular lipid matrix. The matrix acts as both the main barrier and also as the pathway of water, drugs, etc. across the SC. In the mammalian SC, the longitudinal arrangement of the lipid molecules, consisting of long and short lamellar structures with repeat distances of about 13 nm and 6 nm, respectively, has been observed by small-angle X-ray diffraction. In the lateral arrangement of the lipid molecules, hexagonal and orthorhombic hydrocarbon-chain packing has been observed by wide-angle X-ray diffraction. From the systematic study of the temperature dependence of simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction patterns, we demonstrate that the intercellular lipid matrix forms two domains, which consist at room temperature of a long lamellar structure with hexagonal hydrocarbon-chain packing and a short lamellar structure with orthorhombic hydrocarbon-chain packing.

  13. Effects of anionic surfactants on the water permeability of a model stratum corneum lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Tettey, Kwadwo E; Yarovoy, Yury; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-01-14

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the ourtermost layer of the epidermis and has a brick-and-mortar-like structure, in which multilamellar lipid bilayers surround flattened dead cells known as corneocytes. The SC lipid membranes provide the main pathway for the transport of water and other substances through the SC. While the physicochemical properties of the SC can be affected by exogenous materials such as surfactants, little is known about how the water barrier function of the SC lipid membranes is compromised by common surfactants. Here, we study the effect of common anionic surfactants on the water permeability of a model SC lipid membrane using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Particularly, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) is compared. These two surfactants share commonality in their molecular structure: sulfate in the polar headgroup and the same apolar tail. The mass of the lipid membranes increases after the surfactant treatment at or above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactants due to their absorption into the membranes. The incorporation of the surfactants into the lipid membranes is also accompanied by partial dissolution of the lipids from the model SC lipid membranes as confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Although the water sorption of pure SDS is much lower than that of pure SLES, the water sorption of SDS-treated membranes increases significantly similar to that of SLES-treated membranes. By combining QCM-D and FT-IR spectroscopy, we find that the chain conformational order and stiffness of the lipid membranes decrease after SDS treatment, resulting in the increased water sorption and diffusivity. In contrast, the conformational order and stiffness of the SLES-treated lipid membranes increase, suggesting that the increased water sorption capacity of SLES-treated lipid membranes is due to the hygroscopic nature of SLES.

  14. Models of stratum corneum intercellular membranes: 2H NMR of macroscopically oriented multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, D B; Thewalt, J L; Bloom, M; Kitson, N

    1994-01-01

    Deuterium NMR was used to characterize model membrane systems approximating the composition of the intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC). The SC models, equimolar mixtures of ceramide:cholesterol:palmitic acid (CER:CHOL:PA) at pH 5.2, were contrasted with the sphingomyelin:CHOL:PA (SPM:CHOL:PA) system, where the SPM differs from the CER only in the presence of a phosphocholine headgroup. The lipids were prepared both as oriented samples and as multilamellar dispersions, and contained either perdeuterated palmitic acid (PA-d31) or [2,2,3,4,6-2H5]CHOL (CHOL-d5). SPM:CHOL:PA-d31 formed liquid-ordered membranes over a wide range of temperatures, with a maximum order parameter of approximately 0.4 at 50 degrees C for positions C3-C10 (the plateau region). The quadrupolar splitting at C2 was significantly smaller, suggesting an orientational change at this position, possibly because of hydrogen bonding with water and/or other surface components. A comparison of the longitudinal relaxation times obtained at theta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta is the angle between the normal to the glass plates and the magnetic field) revealed a significant T1Z anisotropy for all positions. In contrast to the behavior observed with the SPM system, lipid mixtures containing CER exhibited a complex polymorphism. Between 20 and 50 degrees C, a significant portion of the entire membrane (as monitored by both PA-d31 and CHOL-d5) was found to exist as a solid phase, with the remainder either a gel or liquid-ordered phase. The proportion of solid decreased as the temperature was increased and disappeared entirely above 50 degrees C. Between 50 and 70 degrees C, the membrane underwent a liquid-ordered to isotropic phase transition. These transitions were reversible but displayed considerable hysteresis, especially the conversion from a fluid phase to solid. The order profiles, relaxation behavior, and angular dependence of these parameters suggest strongly that

  15. Molecular dynamics and partitioning of di-tert-butyl nitroxide in stratum corneum membranes: effect of terpenes.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Heverton Silva; Silva, Adolfo Henrique Moraes; Anjos, Jorge Luiz Vieira; Alonso, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the small spin label di-tert-butyl nitroxide (DTBN), which partitions the aqueous and hydrocarbon phases, to study the interaction of the terpenes alpha-terpineol, 1,8-cineole, L(-)-carvone and (+)-limonene with the uppermost skin layer, the stratum corneum, and the membrane models of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The EPR spectra indicated that the terpenes increase both the partition coefficient and the rotational correlation time of the spin labels in the stratum corneum membranes, whereas similar effects were observed in the DMPC and DPPC bilayers only at temperatures below the liquid-crystalline phase. The EPR parameter associated to probe polarity inside the membranes showed thermotropically induced changes, suggesting relocations of spin probe, which were dependent on the membrane phases. While the DMPC and DPPC bilayers showed abrupt changes in the partitioning and rotational correlation time parameters in the phase transitions, the SC membranes were characterized by slight changes in the total range of measured temperatures, presenting the greatest changes or membranes reorganizations in the temperature range of approximately 50 to approximately 74 degrees C. The results suggest that terpenes act as spacers, weakening the hydrogen-bonded network at the polar interface and thus fluidizing the stratum corneum lipids.

  16. Comparison of lipid membrane-water partitioning with various organic solvent-water partitions of neutral species and ionic species: Uniqueness of cerasome as a model for the stratum corneum in partition processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keda; Fahr, Alfred; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Tobin, Desmond J; Liu, Xiangli

    2015-10-15

    Lipid membrane-water partitions (e.g., immobilized artificial membrane systems where the lipid membrane is a neutral phospholipid monolayer bound to gel beads) were compared to various organic solvent-water partitions using linear free energy relationships. To this end, we also measured the retention factors of 36 compounds (including neutral and ionic species) from water to liposomes made up of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 3-sn-phosphatidyl-l-serine (80:20, mol/mol), employing liposome electrokinetic chromatography in this work. The results show that lipid membranes exhibit a considerably different chemical environment from those of organic solvents. For both neutral species and ionic species, partitions into the more polar hydroxylic solvents are chemically closer to partition into the lipid membrane as compared to partitions into the less polar hydroxylic solvents and into aprotic solvents. This means that solutes partition into the polar parts of lipid membranes, regardless of whether they are charged or not. In addition, cerasome (i.e., liposome composed mainly of stratum corneum lipids) was compared with regular phospholipid liposomes as a possible model for human stratum corneum in partitions. It was found that the cerasome-water partition exhibits a better chemical similarity to skin permeation. This is probably due to the unique structures of ceramides that occur in cerasome and in the stratum corneum lipid domain. We further show that membranes in membrane-water partitions exhibit very different properties.

  17. Interaction of lipophilic moisturizers on stratum corneum lipid domains in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Caussin, J; Gooris, G S; Groenink, H W W; Wiechers, J W; Bouwstra, J A

    2007-01-01

    Dry skin symptoms such as scaling and itching are often treated with lipophilic moisturizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lipophilic moisturizers on the stratum corneum (SC) ultra-structure and lipid organization. Lipophilic moisturizers were applied on the forearms of 4 healthy volunteers for 3 h. Subsequently, the application sites were tape stripped, and selected tape strips prepared for Freeze Fracture Electron Microscopy (FFEM), a method to visualize the SC intercellular lipid parallel to the skin surface. To investigate the effect of lipid moisturizers on the lipid lamellae, isolated SC was pretreated with the lipophilic moisturizers for 24 h prior to performing small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD) measurements. Additionally, the lipid organization of mixtures prepared with ceramides, cholesterol, free fatty acids and lipophilic moisturizer in a 2:1:1:1 molar ratio were studied using SAXD. The FFEM data (in vivo) as well as the SAXD data (in vitro) show that the lipophilic moisturizers do not change the lipid lamellar organization in the SC. Addition of 20% m/m lipophilic moisturizer to the ceramide:cholesterol:free fatty acids mixture did not inhibit the formation of the long periodicity phase, the characteristic lamellar phase in the SC, even though there was clear evidence that two of the three moisturizers were at least partially incorporated in the long periodicity phase. Concluding, all findings suggest that the lipophilic moisturizers investigated in this study do not drastically change the lamellar organization of the SC intracellular lipid matrix, but that the moisturizers form separate domains in the SC, as was visualized by FFEM. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Effect of ceramide acyl chain length on skin permeability and thermotropic phase behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Janůšová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Lorenc, Petr; Vavrysová, Helena; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2011-03-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides play an essential role in the barrier properties of skin. However, their structure-activity relationships are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of acyl chain length in the non-hydroxy acyl sphingosine type (NS) ceramides on the skin permeability and their thermotropic phase behavior. Neither the long- to medium-chain ceramides (8-24 C) nor free sphingosine produced any changes of the skin barrier function. In contrast, the short-chain ceramides decreased skin electrical impedance and increased skin permeability for two marker drugs, theophylline and indomethacin, with maxima in the 4-6C acyl ceramides. The thermotropic phase behavior of pure ceramides and model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesterol sulfate was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. Differences in thermotropic phase behavior of these lipids were found: those ceramides that had the greatest impact on the skin barrier properties displayed the lowest phase transitions and formed the least dense model stratum corneum lipid membranes at 32°C. In conclusion, the long hydrophobic chains in the NS-type ceramides are essential for maintaining the skin barrier function. However, this ability is not shared by their short-chain counterparts despite their having the same polar head structure and hydrogen bonding ability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure of lamellar lipid domains and corneocyte envelopes of murine stratum corneum. An X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Mirejovsky, D.; King, G.I.

    1988-05-17

    The lipid of the outermost layer of the skin is confined largely to the extracellular spaces surrounding the corneocytes of the stratum corneum where it forms a multilamellar adhesive matrix to act as the major permeability barrier of the skin. Knowledge of the molecular architecture of these intercellular domains is important for understanding various skin pathologies and their treatment, percutaneous drug delivery, and the cosmetic maintenance of the skin. The authors have surveyed by X-ray diffraction the structure of the intercellular domains and the extracted lipids of murine stratum corneum (SC) at 25, 45, and 70/sup 0/C which are temperatures in the vicinity of known thermal phase transitions. The intercellular domains produce lamellar diffraction patterns with a Bragg spacing of 131 +/- 2 A. Lipid extracted from the SC and dispersed in excess water does not produce a simple lamellar diffraction pattern at any temperature studied, however. This and other facts suggest that another component, probably a protein, must be present to control the architecture of the intercellular lipid domains. They have also obtained diffraction patterns attributable to the protein envelopes of the corneocytes. The patterns suggest a ..beta..-pleated sheet organizational scheme. No diffraction patterns were observed that could be attributed to keratin.

  20. Short periodicity phase based on ceramide [AP] in the model lipid membranes of stratum corneum does not change during hydration.

    PubMed

    Gruzinov, A Yu; Zabelin, A V; Kiselev, M A

    2017-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering technique was used to determine electron density profiles of short periodicity phase in the model lipid membranes of stratum corneum at different pH. Basic quaternary system was prepared as used previously in the neutron experiments at partial hydration. It was shown that electron density profiles of partially hydrated and fully hydrated model lipid membranes with four basic components were quite similar and demonstrated almost no interbilayer water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  2. Monounsaturated fatty acids reduce the barrier of stratum corneum lipid membranes by enhancing the formation of a hexagonal lateral packing.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Enamul H; Helder, Richard W J; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-06-10

    The effectiveness of the skin barrier underlies the outer layer of the skin: the stratum corneum (SC). However, in several skin diseases this barrier is impaired. In two inflammatory skin diseases, atopic eczema and Netherton syndrome, an increased level of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) has been observed as opposed to healthy skin. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of MUFAs on the lipid organization and skin lipid barrier using an in vitro model membrane system, the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), mimicking the SC lipid composition and organization. To achieve our goal, the SCS has been prepared with increasing levels of MUFAs using various chain length. Permeation studies and trans-epidermal water loss measurements show that an increment of MUFAs reduces the lipid barrier in the SCS. The increased level of unsaturation exerts its effect by reducing the packing density in the lipid organization, while the lamellar phases are not affected. Our findings indicate that increased levels of MUFAs may contribute to the impaired skin barrier in diseased skin.

  3. Effects of sphingomyelin/ceramide ratio on the permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Pullmannová, Petra; Staňková, Klára; Pospíšilová, Markéta; Skolová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sphingomyelin (SM) to a ceramide (Cer) by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) is an important event in skin barrier development. A deficiency in aSMase in diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease and atopic dermatitis coincides with impaired skin barrier recovery after disruption. We studied how an increased SM/Cer ratio influences the barrier function and microstructure of model stratum corneum (SC) lipid membranes. In the membranes composed of isolated human SC Cer (hCer)/cholesterol/free fatty acids/cholesteryl sulfate, partial or full replacement of hCer by SM increased water loss. Partial replacement of 25% and 50% of hCer by SM also increased the membrane permeability to theophylline and alternating electric current, while a higher SM content either did not alter or even decreased the membrane permeability. In contrast, in a simple membrane model with only one type of Cer (nonhydroxyacyl sphingosine, CerNS), an increased SM/Cer ratio provided a similar or better barrier against the permeation of various markers. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that the replacement of hCer by SM interferes with the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase with a repeat distance of d=12.7nm. Our results suggest that SM-to-Cer processing in the human epidermis is essential for preventing excessive water loss, while the permeability barrier to exogenous compounds is less sensitive to the presence of sphingomyelin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes containing ceramides with long (C16) and very long (C24) acyl chains.

    PubMed

    Pullmannová, Petra; Pavlíková, Ludmila; Kováčik, Andrej; Sochorová, Michaela; Školová, Barbora; Slepička, Petr; Maixner, Jaroslav; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    The Stratum corneum (SC) prevents water loss from the body and absorption of chemicals. SC intercellular spaces contain ceramides (Cer), free fatty acids (FFA), cholesterol (Chol) and cholesteryl sulfate (CholS). Cer with "very long" acyl chains (for example, N-lignoceroyl-sphingosine, CerNS24) are important for skin barrier function, whereas increased levels of "long" acyl Cer (for example, N-palmitoyl-sphingosine, CerNS16) occur in patients suffering from atopic eczema or psoriasis. We studied the impact of the replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 on the barrier properties and microstructure of model SC lipid membranes composed of Cer/FFA/Chol/CholS. Membranes containing the long CerNS16 were significantly more permeable to water (by 38-53%), theophylline (by 50-55%) and indomethacin (by 83-120%) than those containing the very long CerNS24 (either with lignoceric acid or a mixture of long to very long chain FFA). Langmuir monolayers with CerNS24 were more condensed than with CerNS16 and atomic force microscopy showed differences in domain formation. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that CerNS24-based membranes formed one lamellar phase and separated Chol, whereas the CerNS16-based membranes formed up to three phases and Chol. These results suggest that replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 has a direct negative impact on membrane structure and permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-02-15

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species.

  6. Domain-driven morphogenesis of cellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shnyrova, Anna V.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular shape is defined by its boundary: the membrane. Extremely dynamic at small scales, biological membranes retain identifiable stationary shape as large structures, such as organelles. The lipid bilayer serves as a matrix for this shape-defining membrane, linking membrane dynamics and structural stability. Here, we analyze the central role of proteo-lipid membrane domains in the coordination of membrane dynamics and in the self-organization of membrane shape. PMID:19906579

  7. Homogeneous transport in a heterogeneous membrane: water diffusion across human stratum corneum in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Y N; Pirot, F; Guy, R H

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a structurally heterogeneous biomembrane, human stratum corneum (SC), behaved as a homogeneous barrier to water transport. The question is relevant because the principal function of the SC in vivo is to provide a barrier to the insensible loss of tissue water across the skin. Impedance spectra (IS) of the skin and measurements of the rate of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were recorded sequentially in vivo in human subjects as layers of the SC were progressively removed by the serial application of adhesive tape strips. The low-frequency (< or = 100 rad s-1) impedance of skin was much more significantly affected by tape stripping than the higher frequency values; removal of the outermost SC layer had the largest effect. In contrast, TEWL changed little as the outer SC layers were stripped off, but increased dramatically when 6-8 microns of the tissue had been removed. It follows that the two noninvasive techniques probe SC barrier integrity in somewhat different ways. After SC removal, recovery of barrier function, as assessed by increasing values of the low-frequency impedance, apparently proceeded faster than TEWL decreased to the prestripping control. The variation of TEWL as a function of SC removal behaved in a manner entirely consistent with a homogeneous barrier, thereby permitting the apparent SC diffusivity of water to be found. Skin impedance (low frequency) was correlated with the relative concentration of water within the SC, thus providing an in vivo probe for skin hydration. Finally, the SC permeability coefficient to water, as a function of SC thickness, was calculated and correlated with the corresponding values of skin admittance derived from IS. PMID:8913606

  8. Lipid membrane domains in the brain.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Grassi, Sara; Prioni, Simona; Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The brain is characterized by the presence of cell types with very different functional specialization, but with the common trait of a very high complexity of structures originated by their plasma membranes. Brain cells bear evident membrane polarization with the creation of different morphological and functional subcompartments, whose formation, stabilization and function require a very high level of lateral order within the membrane. In other words, the membrane specialization of brain cells implies the presence of distinct membrane domains. The brain is the organ with the highest enrichment in lipids like cholesterol, glycosphingolipids, and the most recently discovered brain membrane lipid, phosphatidylglucoside, whose collective behavior strongly favors segregation within the membrane leading to the formation of lipid-driven membrane domains. Lipid-driven membrane domains function as dynamic platforms for signal transduction, protein processing, and membrane turnover. Essential events involved in the development and in the maintenance of the functional integrity of the brain depend on the organization of lipid-driven membrane domains, and alterations in lipid homeostasis, leading to deranged lipid-driven membrane organization, are common in several major brain diseases. In this review, we summarize the forces behind the formation of lipid membrane domains and their biological roles in different brain cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  9. Membrane-Mediated Interactions Measured Using Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Stefan; Idema, Timon; Schmidt, Thomas; Storm, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cell membrane organization is the result of the collective effect of many driving forces. Several of these, such as electrostatic and van der Waals forces, have been identified and studied in detail. In this article, we investigate and quantify another force, the interaction between inclusions via deformations of the membrane shape. For electrically neutral systems, this interaction is the dominant organizing force. As a model system to study membrane-mediated interactions, we use phase-separated biomimetic vesicles that exhibit coexistence of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered lipid domains. The membrane-mediated interactions between these domains lead to a rich variety of effects, including the creation of long-range order and the setting of a preferred domain size. Our findings also apply to the interaction of membrane protein patches, which induce similar membrane shape deformations and hence experience similar interactions. PMID:19527649

  10. Membrane Domain Formation on Nanostructured Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Charles; Liu, Fangjie; Srijanto, Bernadeta

    The spatial organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes seems to have a functional role in the life of a cell. Separation of the lipids into distinct domains of greater order and anchoring to the cytoskeleton are two main mechanisms for organizing the membrane in cells. We propose a novel model membrane consisting of a lipid bilayer suspended over a nanostructured scaffold consisting of arrays of fabricated nanopillars. Unlike traditional model membranes, our model will have well-defined lateral structure and distributed substrate attachments that will emulate the connections of cellular membranes to the underlying cytoskeleton. Membranes will be characterized using neutron reflectometry, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence to verify a suspended, planar geometry with restricted diffusion at suspension points, and free diffusion in between. This architecture will allow the controlled study of lipid domain reorganization, viral infection and signal transduction that depend on the lateral structure of the membrane.

  11. Ethanol perturbs lipid organization in models of stratum corneum membranes: An investigation combining differential scanning calorimetry, infrared and (2)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sungjong; Brief, Elana; Langlais, Denis; Kitson, Neil; Lafleur, Michel; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2012-05-01

    Ethanol is used in a variety of topical products. It is known to enhance the permeability of the skin by altering the ability of the stratum corneum (SC) intercellular membranes to form an effective barrier. In addition, ethanol and other alcohols are key components of antiseptic gels currently used for hand wash. Using infrared and deuterium NMR spectroscopy as well as calorimetry, we have investigated the effect of ethanol on a model membrane composed of lipids representing the three classes of SC lipids, an equimolar mixture of N-palmitoylsphingosine (ceramide), palmitic acid and cholesterol. Ethanol is found to influence the membrane in a dose dependent manner, disrupting packing and increasing lipid motion at low concentrations and selectively extracting lipids at moderate concentrations.

  12. Effect of the ω-acylceramides on the lipid organization of stratum corneum model membranes evaluated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR studies (Part I).

    PubMed

    de Sousa Neto, Diogenes; Gooris, Gert; Bouwstra, Joke

    2011-03-01

    The lipid organization in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, is important for the skin barrier function. The stratum corneum lipids are composed of ceramides (CER), free fatty acids (FFA) and cholesterol (CHOL). In the present study Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques were utilized to evaluate the effect of three C18 fatty acid esterified ω-acylceramides (CER EOS) on the lipid organization of stratum corneum model membranes. FTIR spectra (scissoring and rocking bands) showed as a function of temperature significant line-shape changes for both components assigned to the orthorhombic phase. Second-derivative analyzes revealed a significant decrease in the interchain coupling strength (Δν values) for the samples formed by CER EOS with the linoleate (CER EOS-L) and oleate (CER EOS-O) moiety around 28.5°C. However, only a gradual decrease in the Δν values was noticed for the mixture formed with CER EOS with the stearate moiety (CER EOS-S) over the whole temperature range. In the absence of CER EOS the decrease started already at 25.5°C, demonstrating that CER EOS stabilized the orthorhombic lattice. This stabilization was most pronounced for the CER EOS-S. Spectral fittings allowed to evaluate the orientation changes of the skeletal plane within the orthorhombic unit cell (θ values) for a given temperature range. From the best-fit parameters (peak area values), a decrease in the orthorhombic phase contribution to the scissoring band was also monitored as a function of the temperature. SAXS studies showed the coexistence of two lamellar phases with a periodicity of ∼5.5 nm (short periodicity phase, SPP) and ∼12 nm (LPP) in the presence of the CER EOS-L and CER EOS-O. However, no diffraction peaks associated to the LPP were detected for CER EOS-S. While CER EOS-S most efficiently stabilized the orthorhombic phase, CER EOS-L and CER EOS-O promoted the presence of the LPP. Therefore, the

  13. Budding of domains in mixed bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Jean; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the budding behavior of domains in lipid bilayers, where each of the bilayer leaflets has a coupling between its local curvature and the local lipid composition. The compositional asymmetry between the two monolayers leads to an overall spontaneous curvature. The membrane free energy contains three contributions: the bending energy, the line tension, and a Landau free energy for a lateral phase separation. Within a mean-field treatment, we obtain various phase diagrams which contain fully budded, dimpled, and flat states. In particular, for some range of membrane parameters, the phase diagrams exhibit a tricritical behavior as well as a three-phase coexistence region. The global phase diagrams can be divided into three types and are analyzed in terms of the curvature-composition coupling parameter and domain size.

  14. Influence of the penetration enhancer isopropyl myristate on stratum corneum lipid model membranes revealed by neutron diffraction and (2)H NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Adina; Stahlberg, Sören; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Lange, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E; Hauß, Thomas; Schroeter, Annett; Huster, Daniel; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2017-05-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides the main barrier properties in native skin. The barrier function is attributed to the intercellular lipids, forming continuous multilamellar membranes. In this study, SC lipid membranes in model ratios were enriched with deuterated lipids in order to investigate structural and dynamical properties by neutron diffraction and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Further, the effect of the penetration enhancer isopropyl myristate (IPM) on the structure of a well-known SC lipid model membrane containing synthetically derived methyl-branched ceramide [EOS], ceramide [AP], behenic acid and cholesterol (23/10/33/33wt%) was investigated. IPM supported the formation of a single short-periodicity phase (SPP), in which we determined the molecular organization of CER[AP] and CER[EOS]-br for the first time. Furthermore, the thermotropic phase behavior of the lipid system was analyzed by additional neutron diffraction studies as well as by (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy, covering temperatures of 32°C (physiological skin temperature), 50°C, and 70°C with a subsequent cooldown back to skin temperature. Both techniques revealed a phase transition and a hysteresis effect. During the cooldown, Bragg peaks corresponding to a long-periodicity phase (LPP) appeared. Additionally, (2)H NMR revealed that the IPM molecules are isotopic mobile at all temperatures.

  15. Membrane domains and the "lipid raft" concept.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, S; Prinetti, A

    2013-01-01

    The bulk structure of biological membranes consists of a bilayer of amphipathic lipids. According to the fluid mosaic model proposed by Singer and Nicholson, the glycerophospholipid bilayer is a two-dimensional fluid construct that allows the lateral movement of membrane components. Different types of lateral interactions among membrane components can take place, giving rise to multiple levels of lateral order that lead to highly organized structures. Early observations suggested that some of the lipid components of biological membranes may play active roles in the creation of these levels of order. In the late 1980s, a diverse series of experimental findings collectively gave rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts were originally defined as membrane domains, i.e., ordered structures created as a consequence of the lateral segregation of sphingolipids and differing from the surrounding membrane in their molecular composition and properties. This definition was subsequently modified to introduce the notion that lipid rafts correspond to membrane areas stabilized by the presence of cholesterol within a liquid-ordered phase. During the past two decades, the concept of lipid rafts has become extremely popular among cell biologists, and these structures have been suggested to be involved in a great variety of cellular functions and biological events. During the same period, however, some groups presented experimental evidence that appeared to contradict the basic tenets that underlie the lipid raft concept. The concept is currently being re-defined, with greater consistency regarding the true nature and role of lipid rafts. In this article we will review the concepts, criticisms, and the novel confirmatory findings relating to the lipid raft hypothesis.

  16. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  17. Structural alterations of fully hydrated human stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambopoulou, G. Ch.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Hauss, Th.; Stubos, A. K.; Kanellopoulos, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The diffusional barrier function of skin is associated with the superficial epidermal layer, the stratum corneum, a highly complex biomembrane consisting of a staggered corneocyte arrangement in a lipid lamellar continuum. One of the key elements for stratum corneum barrier function is its hydration state. In the present work, the membrane neutron diffraction method is employed to reveal important stratum corneum structural changes that emanate upon water uptake. Increasing stratum corneum water content was observed to lead reversibly to the progressive disruption of the highly ordered lipid configuration and the distortion of the system's barrier function.

  18. Localization of methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species within the long-periodicity phase in stratum corneum lipid model membranes: A neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Adina; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Hauß, Thomas; Schroeter, Annett; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-11-01

    The outermost layer of the mammalian skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is a very thin structure and realizes simultaneously the main barrier properties. The penetration barrier for xenobiotica is mostly represented by a complex lipid matrix. There is great interest in the subject of getting information about the arrangement of the lipids, which are mainly ceramides (CER), free fatty acids (FFA) and cholesterol (CHOL). SC lipid model membranes containing synthetically derived lipids in a non-physiological ratio were investigated. To compare the study to a former experiment, a methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species in presence of the ultra-long chain CER[AP], CHOL and behenic acid (23/10/33/33, wt%) was applied. The membrane structure was studied using the very versatile technique of neutron diffraction. We were able to identify a long-periodicity phase (LPP) with a size of 114Å or 118Å with CER[EOS]-br in a ratio of >60wt% of the ceramides. Furthermore, we figured out two additional coexisting short-periodicity phases (SPP) with repeat distances of 48Å and 45Å, respectively. Partial deuterations of CER[EOS]-br and CER[AP] enabled the localization of the molecules within the multiphase system. CER[EOS]-d3 was present in the LPP, but absent in both SPP. CER[AP]-d3 was determined in both short phases but not localized within the LPP. Besides, we revealed influences of humidity and time with respect to the long-periodicity phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  20. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-30

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  1. Computer modeling of the membrane interaction of FYVE domains.

    PubMed

    Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Stahelin, Robert V; Cho, Wonhwa; Murray, Diana

    2003-05-02

    FYVE domains are membrane targeting domains that are found in proteins involved in endosomal trafficking and signal transduction pathways. Most FYVE domains bind specifically to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), a lipid that resides mainly in endosomal membranes. Though the specific interactions between FYVE domains and the headgroup of PI(3)P have been well characterized, principally through structural studies, the available experimental structures suggest several different models for FYVE/membrane association. Thus, the manner in which FYVE domains adsorb to the membrane surface remains to be elucidated. Towards this end, recent experiments have shown that FYVE domains bind PI(3)P in the context of phospholipid bilayers and that hydrophobic residues on a conserved loop are able to penetrate the membrane interface in a PI(3)P-dependent manner.Here, the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann (FDPB) method has been used to calculate the energetic interactions of FYVE domains with phospholipid membranes. Based on the computational analysis, it is found that (1) recruitment to membranes is facilitated by non-specific electrostatic interactions that occur between basic residues on the domains and acidic phospholipids in the membrane, (2) the energetic analysis can quantitatively differentiate among the modes of membrane association proposed by the experimentally determined structures, (3) FDPB calculations predict energetically feasible models for the membrane-associated states of FYVE domains, (4) these models are consistent with the observation that conserved hydrophobic residues insert into the membrane interface, and (5) the calculations provide a molecular model for the hydrophobic partitioning: binding of PI(3)P significantly neutralizes positive potential in the region of the hydrophobic residues, which acts as an "electrostatic switch" by reducing the energetic barrier for membrane penetration. Finally, the computational results are extended to FYVE

  2. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  3. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  4. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  5. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  6. Mechanisms of membrane deformation by lipid-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2009-09-01

    Among an increasing number of lipid-binding domains, a group that not only binds to membrane lipids but also changes the shape of the membrane has been found. These domains are characterized by their strong ability to transform globular liposomes as well as flat plasma membranes into elongated membrane tubules both in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical studies on the structures of these proteins have revealed the importance of the amphipathic helix, which potentially intercalates into the lipid bilayer to induce and/or sense membrane curvature. Among such membrane-deforming domains, BAR and F-BAR/EFC domains form crescent-shaped dimers, suggesting a preference for a curved membrane, which is important for curvature sensing. Bioinformatics in combination with structural analyses has been identifying an increasing number of novel families of lipid-binding domains. This review attempts to summarize the evidence obtained by recent studies in order to gain general insights into the roles of membrane-deforming domains in a variety of biological events.

  7. Membrane-bound mucin modular domains: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Skrypek, Nicolas; Frénois, Frédéric; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    Mucins belong to a heterogeneous family of large O-glycoproteins composed of a long peptidic chain called apomucin on which are linked hundreds of oligosaccharidic chains. Among mucins, membrane-bound mucins are modular proteins and have a structural organization usually containing Pro/Thr/Ser-rich O-glycosylated domains (PTS), EGF-like and SEA domains. Via these modular domains, the membrane-bound mucins participate in cell signalling and cell interaction with their environment in normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, the recent knowledge of these domains and their biological activities led to the development of new therapeutic approaches involving mucins. In this review, we show 3D structures of EGF and SEA domains. We also describe the functional features of the evolutionary conserved domains of membrane-bound mucins and discuss consequences of splice events.

  8. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations. PMID:26639944

  9. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations.

  10. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  11. The role of the membrane-spanning domain sequence in glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G M; Sanders, D A

    1999-09-01

    The role of glycoprotein membrane-spanning domains in the process of membrane fusion is poorly understood. It has been demonstrated that replacing all or part of the membrane-spanning domain of a viral fusion protein with sequences that encode signals for glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage attachment abrogates membrane fusion activity. It has been suggested, however, that the actual amino acid sequence of the membrane-spanning domain is not critical for the activity of viral fusion proteins. We have examined the function of Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins with substitutions in the membrane-spanning domain. Envelope proteins bearing substitutions for proline 617 are processed and incorporated into virus particles normally and bind to the viral receptor. However, they possess greatly reduced or undetectable capacities for the promotion of membrane fusion and infectious virus particle formation. Our results imply a direct role for the residues in the membrane-spanning domain of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein in membrane fusion and its regulation. They also support the thesis that membrane-spanning domains possess a sequence-dependent function in other protein-mediated membrane fusion events.

  12. [The stratum corneum].

    PubMed

    Haftek, M

    2002-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation is a continuous process, constituting and renewing a protective layer at the skin surface: the stratum corneum, composed of cornified keratinocytes that is a barrier to water diffusion. Massive loss of physiologic liquids is one of the severest consequences of extensive burns. The stratum corneum also protects the subjacent tissues from xenobiotic aggression, ultraviolet radiation (70 p. cent of UVB absorption) and from mechanic aggression. The integrity of the stratum corneum depends on three elements: 1) the physico-chemical quality of the cornified cells, 2) the persistence of mechanical junctions uniting these cells and 3) the organization and composition of the lipid "mortar" in the intercellular spaces. Since all these components are issued from the keratinocyte differentiation process, any perturbation may, in time, induce modifications in the "barrier" function of the epidermis. The barrier quality varies, depending on its localization (soles of the feet, palms of the hands and transitional epidermis of the lips), during skin healing (priority to keratinocyte proliferation to the detriment of maturation) under the influence of treatment (retinoids, vitamin D derivatives), in the course of aging and diseases: ichtyosis and other keratinization genodermatoses, benign (including psoriasis) and malignant hyperproliferative diseases. Furthermore, the relative impermeability of the stratum corneum is an important factor limiting the penetration and diffusion of allergens, but also local drugs delivered with local and systemic trans-epidermal treatments. Further knowledge is required on the function of the epidermal barrier and the mechanism regulating cohesion/desquamation of the stratum corneum to understand certain hereditary diseases, improve efficacy of topical therapeutic products and optimize cosmetic formulations.

  13. Supported lipid bilayers as models for studying membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Volker; Yang, Sung-Tae; Tamm, Lukas K

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers have been in use for over 30 years. They have been employed to study the structure, composition, and dynamics of lipid bilayer phases, the binding and distribution of soluble, integral, and lipidated proteins in membranes, membrane fusion, and interactions of membranes with elements of the cytoskeleton. This review focuses on the unique ability of supported lipid bilayers to study liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains in membranes. We highlight methods to produce asymmetric lipid bilayers with lipid compositions that mimic those of the extracellular and cytoplasmic leaflets of cell membranes and the functional reconstitution of membrane proteins into such systems. Questions related to interleaflet domain coupling and membrane protein activation have been addressed and answered using advanced reconstitution and imaging procedures in symmetric and asymmetric supported membranes with and without coexisting lipid phase domains. Previously controversial topics regarding anomalous and anisotropic diffusion in membranes have been resolved by using supported membrane approaches showing that the propensity of certain lipid compositions to form "rafts" are important but overlaid with "picket-fence" interactions that are imposed by a subtended cytoskeletal network.

  14. Nanoviscosity Measurements Revealing Domain Formation in Biomimetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imad Younus; Mechler, Adam

    2017-02-07

    Partitioning of lipid molecules in biomimetic membranes is a model system for the study of naturally occurring domains, such as rafts, in biological membranes. The existence of nanometer scale membrane domains in binary lipid mixtures has been shown with microscopy methods; however, the nature of these domains has not been established unequivocally. A common notion is to ascribe domain separation to thermodynamic phase equilibria. However, characterizing thermodynamic phases of single bilayer membranes has not been possible due to their extreme dimensions: the size of the domains falls to the order of tens to hundreds of nanometers whereas the membrane thickness is only a few nanometers. Here, we present direct measurements of phase transitions in single bilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) phospholipid mixtures using quartz crystal microbalance-based nanoviscosity measurements. Coexisting thermodynamic phases have been successfully identified, and a phase diagram was constructed for the single bilayer binary lipid system. It was demonstrated that domain separation only takes place in planar membranes, and thus, it is absent in liposomes and not detectable in calorimetric measurements on liposome suspensions. On the basis of energetic analysis, the main transition was identified as the breaking of van der Waals interactions between the acyl chains.

  15. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain.

    PubMed

    Liefhebber, Jolanda M P; Brandt, Bernd W; Broer, Rene; Spaan, Willy J M; van Leeuwen, Hans C

    2009-05-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B) has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD) of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  16. Stratum corneum lipids in disorders of cornification. Steroid sulfatase and cholesterol sulfate in normal desquamation and the pathogenesis of recessive X-linked ichthyosis.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, P M; Williams, M L; Maloney, M E; Bonifas, J A; Brown, B E; Grayson, S; Epstein, E H

    1984-01-01

    The pathological scaling in recessive x-linked ichthyosis is associated with accumulation of abnormal quantities of cholesterol sulfate in stratum corneum (J. Clin. Invest. 68:1404-1410, 1981). To determine whether or not cholesterol sulfate accumulates in recessive x-linked ichthyosis as a direct result of the missing enzyme, steroid sulfatase, we quantitated both steroid sulfatase and its substrate, we quantitated both steroid sulfatase and its substrate, cholesterol sulfate, in different epidermal strata, as well as within stratum corneum subcellular fractions obtained from normal human and neonatal mouse epidermis and from patients with recessive x-linked ichthyosis. In normal human and mouse epidermis, steroid sulfatase activity peaked in the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum, and negligible activity was detectable in lower epidermal layers. In contrast, in recessive x-linked ichthyosis epidermis, enzyme levels were virtually undetectable at all levels. In normal human stratum corneum, up to 10 times more steroid sulfatase activity was present in purified peripheral membrane preparations than in the whole tissue. Whereas in normal human epidermis cholesterol sulfate levels were lowest in the basal/spinous layer, and highest in the stratum granulosum, in recessive x-linked ichthyosis the levels were only slightly higher in the lower epidermis, but continued to climb in the stratum corneum. In both normal and in recessive x-linked ichthyosis stratum corneum, cholesterol sulfate appeared primarily within membrane domains, paralleling the pattern of steroid sulfatase localization. Finally, the role of excess cholesterol sulfate in the pathogenesis of recessive x-linked ichthyosis was directly tested by topical applications of this substance, which produced visible scaling in hairless mice in parallel to an increased cholesterol sulfate content of the stratum corneum. These results demonstrate an intimate relationship between steroid sulfatase and cholesterol

  17. A PH domain in ACAP1 possesses key features of the BAR domain in promoting membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Bingquan; Ma, Jun; Li, Jian; Deng, Yuchen; Zhou, Qiangjun; Egelman, Edward H.; Hsu, Victor W.; Sun, Fei

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs) domain undergoes dimerization to produce a curved protein structure, which superimposes onto membrane through electrostatic interactions to sense and impart membrane curvature. In some cases, a BAR domain also possesses an amphipathic helix that inserts into the membrane to induce curvature. ACAP1 (Arfgap with Coil coil, Ankyrin repeat and PH domain protein 1) contains a BAR domain. Here, we show that this BAR domain can neither bind membrane nor impart curvature, but instead, requires a neighboring PH (Pleckstrin Homology) domain to achieve these functions. Specific residues within the PH domain are responsible for both membrane binding and curvature generation. The BAR domain adjacent to the PH domain instead interacts with the BAR domains of neighboring ACAP1 proteins to enable clustering at the membrane. Thus, we have uncovered the molecular basis for an unexpected and unconventional collaboration between PH and BAR domains in membrane bending. PMID:25284369

  18. A PH domain in ACAP1 possesses key features of the BAR domain in promoting membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Bingquan; Ma, Jun; Li, Jian; Deng, Yuchen; Zhou, Qiangjun; Egelman, Edward H; Hsu, Victor W; Sun, Fei

    2014-10-13

    The BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs) domain undergoes dimerization to produce a curved protein structure, which superimposes onto membrane through electrostatic interactions to sense and impart membrane curvature. In some cases, a BAR domain also possesses an amphipathic helix that inserts into the membrane to induce curvature. ACAP1 (Arfgap with Coil coil, Ankyrin repeat, and PH domain protein 1) contains a BAR domain. Here, we show that this BAR domain can neither bind membrane nor impart curvature, but instead requires a neighboring PH (Pleckstrin Homology) domain to achieve these functions. Specific residues within the PH domain are responsible for both membrane binding and curvature generation. The BAR domain adjacent to the PH domain instead interacts with the BAR domains of neighboring ACAP1 proteins to enable clustering at the membrane. Thus, we have uncovered the molecular basis for an unexpected and unconventional collaboration between PH and BAR domains in membrane bending. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  20. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kucerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad; Katsaras, John; Shi, A-C; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476 4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size lo domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment.

  1. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Clare L.; Marquardt, Drew; Dies, Hannah; Kučerka, Norbert; Yamani, Zahra; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered () phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476–4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment. PMID:23823623

  2. Rafting through traffic: Membrane domains in cellular logistics.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca; Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2014-12-01

    The intricate and tightly regulated organization of eukaryotic cells into spatially and functionally distinct membrane-bound compartments is a defining feature of complex organisms. These compartments are defined by their lipid and protein compositions, with their limiting membrane as the functional interface to the rest of the cell. Thus, proper segregation of membrane proteins and lipids is necessary for the maintenance of organelle identity, and this segregation must be maintained despite extensive, rapid membrane exchange between compartments. Sorting processes of high efficiency and fidelity are required to avoid potentially deleterious mis-targeting and maintain cellular function. Although much molecular machinery associated with membrane traffic (i.e. membrane budding/fusion/fission) has been characterized both structurally and biochemically, the mechanistic details underlying the tightly regulated distribution of membranes between subcellular locations remain to be elucidated. This review presents evidence for the role of ordered lateral membrane domains known as lipid rafts in both biosynthetic sorting in the late secretory pathway, as well as endocytosis and recycling to/from the plasma membrane. Although such evidence is extensive and the involvement of membrane domains in sorting is definitive, specific mechanistic details for raft-dependent sorting processes remain elusive.

  3. Cholesterol-rich Fluid Membranes Solubilize Ceramide Domains

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Bruno M.; Silva, Liana C.; Fedorov, Alexander; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    A uniquely sensitive method for ceramide domain detection allowed us to study in detail cholesterol-ceramide interactions in lipid bilayers with low (physiological) ceramide concentrations, ranging from low or no cholesterol (a situation similar to intracellular membranes, such as endoplasmic reticulum) to high cholesterol (similar to mammalian plasma membrane). Diverse fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy experiments were conducted showing that for low cholesterol amounts ceramide segregates into gel domains that disappear upon increasing cholesterol levels. This was observed in different raft (sphingomyelin/cholesterol-containing) and non-raft (sphingomyelin-absent) membranes, i.e. mimicking different types of cell membranes. Cholesterol-ceramide interactions have been described mainly as raft sphingomyelin-dependent. Here sphingomyelin independence is demonstrated. In addition, ceramide-rich domains re-appear when either cholesterol is converted by cholesterol oxidase to cholestenone or the temperature is decreased. Ceramide is more soluble in cholesterol-rich fluid membranes than in cholesterol-poor ones, thereby increasing the chemical potential of cholesterol. Ceramide solubility depends on the average gel-fluid transition temperature of the remaining membrane lipids. The inability of cholestenone-rich membranes to dissolve ceramide gel domains shows that the cholesterol ordering and packing properties are fundamental to the mixing process. We also show that the solubility of cholesterol in ceramide domains is low. The results are rationalized by a ternary phospholipid/ceramide/cholesterol phase diagram, providing the framework for the better understanding of biochemical phenomena modulated by cholesterol-ceramide interactions such as cholesterol oxidase activity, lipoprotein metabolism, and lipid targeting in cancer therapy. It also suggests that the lipid compositions of different organelles are such that ceramide gel domains are not formed unless a

  4. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  5. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  6. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin contains three additional membrane-binding domains including spectrin-like repeats (R)1-3, R10-12 and C-terminus (CT). To systematically study dystrophin membrane binding, we split full-length dystrophin into ten fragments and examined subcellular localizations of each fragment by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, R1-3, CR domain and CT were exclusively localized at the sarcolemma. R10-12 showed both cytosolic and sarcolemmal localization. Importantly, the CR-independent membrane binding was conserved in murine and canine muscles. A critical function of the CR-mediated membrane interaction is the assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). While R1-3 and R10-12 did not restore the DGC, surprisingly, CT alone was sufficient to establish the DGC at the sarcolemma. Additional studies suggest that R1-3 and CT also bind to the sarcolemma in the heart, though relatively weak. Taken together, our study provides the first conclusive in vivo evidence that dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains. These structurally and functionally distinctive membrane-binding domains provide a molecular framework for dystrophin to function as a shock absorber and signaling hub. Our results not only shed critical light on dystrophin biology and DMD pathogenesis, but also provide a foundation for rationally engineering minimized dystrophins for DMD gene therapy.

  7. Focus on membrane differentiation and membrane domains in the prokaryotic cell.

    PubMed

    Boekema, Egbert J; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Bolhuis, Henk; Folea, I Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A summary is presented of membrane differentiation in the prokaryotic cell, with an emphasis on the organization of proteins in the plasma/cell membrane. Many species belonging to the Eubacteria and Archaea have special membrane domains and/or membrane proliferation, which are vital for different cellular processes. Typical membrane domains are found in bacteria where a specific membrane protein is abundantly expressed. Lipid rafts form another example. Despite the rareness of conventional organelles as found in eukaryotes, some bacteria are known to have an intricate internal cell membrane organization. Membrane proliferation can be divided into curvature and invaginations which can lead to internal compartmentalization. This study discusses some of the clearest examples of bacteria with such domains and internal membranes. The need for membrane specialization is highest among the heterogeneous group of bacteria which harvest light energy, such as photosynthetic bacteria and halophilic archaea. Most of the highly specialized membranes and domains, such as the purple membrane, chromatophore and chlorosome, are found in these autotrophic organisms. Otherwise the need for membrane differentiation is lower and variable, except for those structures involved in cell division. Microscopy techniques have given essential insight into bacterial membrane morphology. As microscopy will further contribute to the unraveling of membrane organization in the years to come, past and present technology in electron microscopy and light microscopy is discussed. Electron microscopy was the first to unravel bacterial morphology because it can directly visualize membranes with inserted proteins, which no other technique can do. Electron microscopy techniques developed in the 1950s and perfected in the following decades involve the thin sectioning and freeze fractioning of cells. Several studies from the golden age of these techniques show amazing examples of cell membrane morphology

  8. Transient translocation of the cytoplasmic (endo) domain of a type I membrane glycoprotein into cellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The E2 glycoprotein of the alphavirus Sindbis is a typical type I membrane protein with a single membrane spanning domain and a cytoplasmic tail (endo domain) containing 33 amino acids. The carboxyl terminal domain of the tail has been implicated as (a) attachment site for nucleocapsid protein, and (b) signal sequence for integration of the other alpha-virus membrane proteins 6K and E1. These two functions require that the carboxyl terminus be exposed in the cell cytoplasm (a) and exposed in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (b). We have investigated the orientation of this glycoprotein domain with respect to cell membranes by substituting a tyrosine for the normally occurring serine, four amino acids upstream of the carboxyl terminus. Using radioiodination of this tyrosine as an indication of the exposure of the glycoprotein tail, we have provided evidence that this domain is initially translocated into a membrane and is returned to the cytoplasm after export from the ER. This is the first demonstration of such a transient translocation of a single domain of an integral membrane protein and this rearrangement explains some important aspects of alphavirus assembly. PMID:8432728

  9. Stratum corneum evaluation methods: overview.

    PubMed

    Myer, Kaley; Maibach, Howard

    2013-08-01

    The stratum corneum serves as a main barrier for the skin, minimizing water loss and regulating absorption of substances. Because of its surface location, it is readily available for analysis. Consequently, many techniques are amenable to investigating its content and function. Here, we review the methods employed to evaluate the stratum corneum and its function. We reviewed Pubmed and Embase search results for 'stratum corneum, 'method,' methods,' 'technique,' and 'evaluation' and extracted pertinent articles that discussed ways to examine the stratum corneum and its constituents. Traditional and novel methods vary by accuracy, ease of use, time requirements, cost, invasiveness, and equipment requirements. The methods reviewed all contribute to our current picture of the stratum corneum. Tape stripping continues to be the most widely used, but variations in the use of the corneocytes obtained further contribute to the diversity in evaluation methods. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Kinetics of enzymatic reactions in lipid membranes containing domains.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-03-06

    An appreciable part of enzymes operating in vivo is associated with lipid membranes. The function of such enzymes can be influenced by the presence of domains containing proteins and/or composed of different lipids. The corresponding experimental model-system studies can be performed under well controlled conditions, e.g., on a planar supported lipid bilayer or surface-immobilized vesicles. To clarify what may happen in such systems, we propose general kinetic equations describing the enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion occurring via the Michaelis-Menten (MM) mechanism on a membrane with domains which do not directly participate in reaction. For two generic situations when a relatively slow reaction takes place primarily in or outside domains, we take substrate saturation and lateral substrate-substrate interactions at domains into account and scrutinize the dependence of the reaction rate on the average substrate coverage. With increasing coverage, depending on the details, the reaction rate reaches saturation via an inflection point or monotonously as in the conventional MM case. In addition, we show analytically the types of reaction kinetics occurring primarily at domain boundaries. In the physically interesting situation when the domain growth is fast on the reaction time scale, the latter kinetics are far from conventional. The opposite situation when the reaction is fast and controlled by diffusion has been studied by using the Monte Carlo technique. The corresponding results indicate that the dependence of the reaction kinetics on the domain size may be weak.

  11. Kinetics of enzymatic reactions in lipid membranes containing domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-04-01

    An appreciable part of enzymes operating in vivo is associated with lipid membranes. The function of such enzymes can be influenced by the presence of domains containing proteins and/or composed of different lipids. The corresponding experimental model-system studies can be performed under well controlled conditions, e.g., on a planar supported lipid bilayer or surface-immobilized vesicles. To clarify what may happen in such systems, we propose general kinetic equations describing the enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion occurring via the Michaelis-Menten (MM) mechanism on a membrane with domains which do not directly participate in reaction. For two generic situations when a relatively slow reaction takes place primarily in or outside domains, we take substrate saturation and lateral substrate-substrate interactions at domains into account and scrutinize the dependence of the reaction rate on the average substrate coverage. With increasing coverage, depending on the details, the reaction rate reaches saturation via an inflection point or monotonously as in the conventional MM case. In addition, we show analytically the types of reaction kinetics occurring primarily at domain boundaries. In the physically interesting situation when the domain growth is fast on the reaction time scale, the latter kinetics are far from conventional. The opposite situation when the reaction is fast and controlled by diffusion has been studied by using the Monte Carlo technique. The corresponding results indicate that the dependence of the reaction kinetics on the domain size may be weak.

  12. Review: Placental syncytiotrophoblast membranes--domains, subdomains and microdomains.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, G

    2011-03-01

    Human placental syncytiotrophoblast (STB) is an epithelium responsible for materno-fetal exchange. Ions play multiple roles in STB, as in other transport epithelia. We have been interested in the character and functional expression of ion channels in STB membrane fractions. Characterization of ion channels and their relationship with different domains, subdomains and microdomains of STB membranes is important to explain the intracellular mechanisms operating in the placental barrier. The aim of this paper is to summarize our work on this subject. We isolated and purified basal membrane (BM) and two fractions from the apical membrane, a classical fraction (MVM) and a light fraction (LMVM). They were used either for reconstitution into giant liposomes or for transplantation into Xenopus oocyte membranes followed by electrophysiological recordings to characterize chloride and cationic channels in STB from term human placenta. In addition, Western blot analysis, using ion channel antibodies, was performed on purified apical and basal membrane fractions. We also reported the presence of two functional microdomains (lipid rafts) in LMVM and MVM, using detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) and cholesterol-sensitive depletion. Moreover we found evidence of cytoskeletal participation in lipid rafts of different composition. Our results contribute to knowledge of the ion channels present in STB membranes and their participation in the physiology of this epithelium in normal and pathological pregnancies.

  13. Lipid domains in model membranes: a brief historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    All biological membranes consist of a complex composite of macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies, of which the fluid lipid-bilayer component is a core element with regard to cell encapsulation and barrier properties. The fluid lipid bilayer also supports the functional machinery of receptors, channels and pumps that are associated with the membrane. This bilayer is stabilized by weak physical and colloidal forces, and its nature is that of a self-assembled system of amphiphiles in water. Being only approximately 5 nm in thickness and still encapsulating a cell that is three orders of magnitude larger in diameter, the lipid bilayer as a material has very unusual physical properties, both in terms of structure and dynamics. Although the lipid bilayer is a fluid, it has a distinct and structured trans-bilayer profile, and in the plane of the bilayer the various molecular components, viz different lipid species and membrane proteins, have the capacity to organize laterally in terms of differentiated domains on different length and time scales. These elements of small-scale structure and order are crucial for the functioning of the membrane. It has turned out to be difficult to quantitatively study the small-scale structure of biological membranes. A major part of the insight into membrane micro- and nano-domains and the concepts used to describe them have hence come from studies of simple lipid bilayers as models of membranes, by use of a wide range of theoretical, experimental and simulational approaches. Many questions remain to be answered as to which extent the result from model studies can carry over to real biological membranes.

  14. Designing lipids for selective partitioning into liquid ordered membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Momin, Noor; Lee, Stacey; Gadok, Avinash K; Busch, David J; Bachand, George D; Hayden, Carl C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2015-04-28

    Self-organization of lipid molecules into specific membrane phases is key to the development of hierarchical molecular assemblies that mimic cellular structures. While the packing interaction of the lipid tails should provide the major driving force to direct lipid partitioning to ordered or disordered membrane domains, numerous examples show that the headgroup and spacer play important but undefined roles. We report here the development of several new biotinylated lipids that examine the role of spacer chemistry and structure on membrane phase partitioning. The new lipids were prepared with varying lengths of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (EGn) spacers to examine how spacer hydrophilicity and length influence their partitioning behavior following binding with FITC-labeled streptavidin in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexisting membranes. Partitioning coefficients (Kp Lo/Ld) of the biotinylated lipids were determined using fluorescence measurements in studies with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Compared against DPPE-biotin, DPPE-cap-biotin, and DSPE-PEG2000-biotin lipids, the new dipalmityl-EGn-biotin lipids exhibited markedly enhanced partitioning into liquid ordered domains, achieving Kp of up to 7.3 with a decaethylene glycol spacer (DP-EG10-biotin). We further demonstrated biological relevance of the lipids with selective partitioning to lipid raft-like domains observed in giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from mammalian cells. Our results found that the spacer group not only plays a pivotal role for designing lipids with phase selectivity but may also influence the structural order of the domain assemblies.

  15. Domain formation in membranes caused by lipid wetting of protein.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Sergey A; Frolov, Vladimir A J; Kuzmin, Peter I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chizmadzhev, Yuri A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2008-05-01

    Formation of rafts and other domains in cell membranes is considered as wetting of proteins by lipids. The membrane is modeled as a continuous elastic medium. Thermodynamic functions of the lipid films that wet proteins are calculated using a mean-field theory of liquid crystals as adapted to biomembranes. This approach yields the conditions necessary for a macroscopic wetting film to form; its thickness could also be determined. It is shown that films of macroscopic thicknesses form around large (tens nanometers in diameter) lipid-protein aggregates; only thin adsorption films form around single proteins or small complexes. The means by which wetting films can facilitate the merger of these aggregates is considered. It is shown that a wetting film prevents a protein from leaving an aggregate. Using experimentally derived values of elastic moduli and spontaneous curvatures as well as height mismatch between aggregates and bulk membrane, we obtained numerical results, which can be compared with the experimental data.

  16. C2 domain membrane penetration by group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 induces membrane curvature changes[S

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Katherine E.; Ropa, James P.; Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Stahelin, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) is an 85 kDa enzyme that regulates the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from the sn-2 position of membrane phospholipids. It is well established that cPLA2α binds zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine in a Ca2+-dependent manner through its N-terminal C2 domain, which regulates its translocation to cellular membranes. In addition to its role in AA synthesis, it has been shown that cPLA2α promotes tubulation and vesiculation of the Golgi and regulates trafficking of endosomes. Additionally, the isolated C2 domain of cPLA2α is able to reconstitute Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, suggesting that C2 domain membrane binding is sufficient for phagosome formation. These reported activities of cPLA2α and its C2 domain require changes in membrane structure, but the ability of the C2 domain to promote changes in membrane shape has not been reported. Here we demonstrate that the C2 domain of cPLA2α is able to induce membrane curvature changes to lipid vesicles, giant unilamellar vesicles, and membrane sheets. Biophysical assays combined with mutagenesis of C2 domain residues involved in membrane penetration demonstrate that membrane insertion by the C2 domain is required for membrane deformation, suggesting that C2 domain-induced membrane structural changes may be an important step in signaling pathways mediated by cPLA2α. PMID:22991194

  17. Organized living: formation mechanisms and functions of plasma membrane domains in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2012-03-01

    Plasma membrane proteins and lipids organize into lateral domains of specific composition. Domain formation is achieved by a combination of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, membrane-binding protein scaffolds and protein fences. The resulting domains function in membrane protein turnover and homeostasis, as well as in cell signaling. We review the mechanisms generating plasma membrane domains and the functional consequences of this organization, focusing on recent findings from research on the yeast model system.

  18. Interactions between the HIV TAT domain and cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard

    2005-03-01

    Biologically active molecules such as proteins and oligonucleotides can be transduced into cells with high efficiency when covalently linked to a Protein Transduction Domain (PTD), such as the TAT domain in the HIV virus. All PTDs have a high content of basic amino acids resulting in a net positive charge. Electrostatic interactions between cationic PTDs and the negatively charged phospholipids that constitute the plasma membrane seem to be responsible for peptide uptake, but no detailed structural studies exist. We present recent results on the structures of self-assembled complexes of the cationic TAT domain and anionic lipid bilayers using synchrotron x-ray scattering and electron microscopy, and examine possible mechanisms of the anomalous transduction.

  19. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Feigenson, Gerald; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  20. Nitrocellulose membrane sample holder using for terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Shangjian; Wang, Cuicui; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cunlin

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has promising applications for the detection and identification of materials because it has a great advantage in measuring material fingerprint spectrum. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a key technique that is applied to spectroscopic measurement of materials. However, it is difficult to press a pellet with small mass of sample and a bulking medium such as polyethylene (PE) powder usually need to be added. Characteristic absorption peaks of the solution in liquid cell is hard to be observed due to the interaction between materials and water molecules. Therefore, one method using the hydrophilic nitrocellulose (NC) membrane as a sample holder was applied to detect samples in an aqueous medium by THz-TDS. In this study, the α-lactose samples were mixed with 20 μl of deionized water and then applied directly onto the double-layered NC membrane sample holder. This mixture is located on the gap of two piece of NC membranes. Firstly the NC membranes with different pore sizes were tested in the experiment. And then the α-lactose solutions with different concentrations were measured on the NC with different pore sizes. Consequently, the small mass of samples can be detected and the characteristic absorption peaks become stronger with the increase of NC pore size. Moreover, compared to the traditional pellet-making and liquid cell detection, this membrane method is more convenient and easy to operate.

  1. Cytoskeleton-dependent membrane domain segregation during neutrophil polarization.

    PubMed

    Seveau, S; Eddy, R J; Maxfield, F R; Pierini, L M

    2001-11-01

    On treatment with chemoattractant, the neutrophil plasma membrane becomes organized into detergent-resistant membrane domains (DRMs), the distribution of which is intimately correlated with cell polarization. Plasma membrane at the front of polarized cells is susceptible to extraction by cold Triton X-100, whereas membrane at the rear is resistant to extraction. After cold Triton X-100 extraction, DRM components, including the transmembrane proteins CD44 and CD43, the GPI-linked CD16, and the lipid analog, DiIC(16), are retained within uropods and cell bodies. Furthermore, CD44 and CD43 interact concomitantly with DRMs and with the F-actin cytoskeleton, suggesting a mechanism for the formation and stabilization of DRMs. By tracking the distribution of DRMs during polarization, we demonstrate that DRMs progress from a uniform distribution in unstimulated cells to small, discrete patches immediately after activation. Within 1 min, DRMs form a large cap comprising the cell body and uropod. This process is dependent on myosin in that an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase can arrest DRM reorganization and cell polarization. Colabeling DRMs and F-actin revealed a correlation between DRM distribution and F-actin remodeling, suggesting that plasma membrane organization may orient signaling events that control cytoskeletal rearrangements and, consequently, cell polarity.

  2. Synaptobrevin transmembrane domain influences exocytosis by perturbing vesicle membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2015-07-07

    Membrane fusion requires that nearly flat lipid bilayers deform into shapes with very high curvature. This makes membrane bending a critical force in determining fusion mechanisms. A lipid bilayer will bend spontaneously when material is distributed asymmetrically between its two monolayers, and its spontaneous curvature (C0) will influence the stability of curved fusion intermediates. Prior work on Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis revealed that fusion pore lifetime (τ) varies with vesicle content (Q), and showed that this relation reflects membrane bending energetics. Lipids that alter C0 change the dependence of τ on Q. These results suggested that the greater stability of an initial exocytotic fusion pore associated with larger vesicles reflects the need to bend more membrane during fusion pore dilation. In this study, we explored the possibility of manipulating C0 by mutating the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the vesicle membrane protein synaptobrevin 2 (syb2). Amperometric measurements of exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells revealed that syb2 TMD mutations altered the relation between τ and Q. The effects of these mutations showed a striking periodicity, changing sign as the structural perturbation moved through the inner and outer leaflets. Some glycine and charge mutations also influenced the dependence of τ on Q in a manner consistent with expected changes in C0. These results suggest that side chains in the syb2 TMD influence the kinetics of exocytosis by perturbing the packing of the surrounding lipids. The present results support the view that membrane bending occurs during fusion pore expansion rather than during fusion pore formation. This supports the view of an initial fusion pore through two relatively flat membranes formed by protein. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acetylcholine Receptor Organization in Membrane Domains in Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, Joachim; Schreiter, Christoph; Segura, Jean-Manuel; Vogel, Horst; Hovius, Ruud

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in muscle fibers are densely packed in the postsynaptic region at the neuromuscular junction. Rapsyn plays a central role in directing and clustering nAChR during cellular differentiation and neuromuscular junction formation; however, it has not been demonstrated whether rapsyn is the only cause of receptor immobilization. Here, we used single-molecule tracking methods to investigate nAChR mobility in plasma membranes of myoblast cells during their differentiation to myotubes in the presence and absence of rapsyn. We found that in myoblasts the majority of nAChR were immobile and that ∼20% of the receptors showed restricted diffusion in small domains of ∼50 nm. In myoblasts devoid of rapsyn, the fraction of mobile nAChR was considerably increased, accompanied by a 3-fold decrease in the immobile population of nAChR with respect to rapsyn-expressing cells. Half of the mobile receptors were confined to domains of ∼120 nm. Measurements performed in heterologously transfected HEK cells confirmed the direct immobilization of nAChR by rapsyn. However, irrespective of the presence of rapsyn, about one-third of nAChR were confined in 300-nm domains. Our results show (i) that rapsyn efficiently immobilizes nAChR independently of other postsynaptic scaffold components; (ii) nAChR is constrained in confined membrane domains independently of rapsyn; and (iii) in the presence of rapsyn, the size of these domains is strongly reduced. PMID:20978122

  4. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  5. Targeting proteins to liquid-ordered domains in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sanchez, Mari Angelica A; Wang, Julia; Bunker, Bruce C; Voigt, James A; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the construction of novel protein-lipid assemblies through the design of a lipid-like molecule, DPIDA, endowed with tail-driven affinity for specific lipid membrane phases and head-driven affinity for specific proteins. In studies performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with varying mole fractions of dipalymitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC), DPIDA selectively partitioned into the more ordered phases, either solid or liquid-ordered (L(o)) depending on membrane composition. Fluorescence imaging established the phase behavior of the resulting quaternary lipid system. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy confirmed the fluidity of the L(o) phase containing DPIDA. In the presence of CuCl(2), the iminodiacetic acid (IDA) headgroup of DPIDA forms the Cu(II)-IDA complex that exhibits a high affinity for histidine residues. His-tagged proteins were bound specifically to domains enriched in DPIDA, demonstrating the capacity to target protein binding selectively to both solid and L(o) phases. Steric pressure from the crowding of surface-bound proteins transformed the domains into tubules with persistence lengths that depended on the phase state of the lipid domains.

  6. Domain Formation in Membranes Near the Onset of Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Irene; Hayrapetyan, Gurgen; Leoni, Giovanni; Zwicknagl, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    The formation of microdomains, also called rafts, in biomembranes can be attributed to the surface tension of the membrane. In order to model this phenomenon, a model involving a coupling between the local composition and the local curvature was proposed by Seul and Andelman in 1995. In addition to the familiar Cahn-Hilliard/Modica-Mortola energy, there are additional `forces' that prevent large domains of homogeneous concentration. This is taken into account by the bending energy of the membrane, which is coupled to the value of the order parameter, and reflects the notion that surface tension associated with a slightly curved membrane influences the localization of phases as the geometry of the lipids has an effect on the preferred placement on the membrane. The main result of the paper is the study of the Γ -convergence of this family of energy functionals, involving nonlocal as well as negative terms. Since the minimizers of the limiting energy have minimal interfaces, the physical interpretation is that, within a sufficiently strong interspecies surface tension and a large enough sample size, raft microdomains are not formed.

  7. Plasma membrane domains enriched in cortical endoplasmic reticulum function as membrane protein trafficking hubs.

    PubMed

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Weigel, Aubrey V; Higgins, Jenny L; Akin, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Matthew J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2013-09-01

    In mammalian cells, the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) is a network of tubules and cisterns that lie in close apposition to the plasma membrane (PM). We provide evidence that PM domains enriched in underlying cER function as trafficking hubs for insertion and removal of PM proteins in HEK 293 cells. By simultaneously visualizing cER and various transmembrane protein cargoes with total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that the majority of exocytotic delivery events for a recycled membrane protein or for a membrane protein being delivered to the PM for the first time occur at regions enriched in cER. Likewise, we observed recurring clathrin clusters and functional endocytosis of PM proteins preferentially at the cER-enriched regions. Thus the cER network serves to organize the molecular machinery for both insertion and removal of cell surface proteins, highlighting a novel role for these unique cellular microdomains in membrane trafficking.

  8. Porous Nanocomposites with Integrated Internal Domains: Application to Separation Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenle; Walz, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric membranes with layered structure have made significant achievements due to their balanced properties and multi-functionalities that come from a combination of multiple layers. However, issues such as delamination and substructure resistance are generated by the intrinsic layered structure. Here, we present a strategy to integrate the traditional layered structure into an asymmetric but continuous porous network. Through infiltrations of microparticles and nanoparticles to targeted regions, active domains are created inside the porous scaffold versus having them applied externally. The fabricated internal active domains are highly adjustable in terms of its dimensions, pore size, and materials. We demonstrate that it is a general method that can be applicable to a wide variety of particles regardless of their material, dimensions, or geometry. By eliminating the external layered structure, problems such as those mentioned above can be eliminated. This integration technique can be extended to other devices required a layered structure, such as solid oxide fuel cells and lithium ion battery. PMID:24646923

  9. Effects of cholesterol and PIP2 on membrane domain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul; Byfield, Fitzroy; Christian, David; Levental, Ilya

    2009-03-01

    Lipid head group size, acyl chain saturation, the relative amounts of cholesterol, phospholipids and sphingolipids, and electrostatic effects due to highly charged anionic lipids such as phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) all contribute to the force balance that determines the conditions at which domains form as well as their size, shape and stability. Giant plasma membrane vesicles derived from intact cells reveal lipid phase separation in a system with appropriate biological complexity. Formation of liquid ordered domains large enough to visualize by light microscopy form under physiologically realistic conditions in cell-derived vesicles, and their dependence on cholesterol content and temperature are consistent with studies of purified lipids. Compared to the effects of cholesterol, PIP2 has a smaller but still significant effect on liquid ordered / liquid disordered domain formation, but compared to other lipids, PIP2 is much more strongly segregated in the liquid disordered domains, away from those enriched in cholesterol. These results suggest physical mechanisms by which the cell can rapidly alter local PIP2 concentration to trigger cellular signals.

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; p<0.05) over the same temperature range, suggesting a more uniform maintenance of lipid dynamics despite the presence of cholesterol. These data indicate that EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published

  11. Membrane binding and self-association of the epsin N-terminal homology domain.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L; Peter, Brian J; McMahon, Harvey T; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-09

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-lipid-targeting and membrane-curvature-generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H(0)) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher-order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH-domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bile acids modulate signaling by functional perturbation of plasma membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Maxwell, Kelsey N; Sezgin, Erdinc; Lu, Maryia; Liang, Hong; Hancock, John F; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Levental, Ilya

    2013-12-13

    Eukaryotic cell membranes are organized into functional lipid and protein domains, the most widely studied being membrane rafts. Although rafts have been associated with numerous plasma membrane functions, the mechanisms by which these domains themselves are regulated remain undefined. Bile acids (BAs), whose primary function is the solubilization of dietary lipids for digestion and absorption, can affect cells by interacting directly with membranes. To investigate whether these interactions affected domain organization in biological membranes, we assayed the effects of BAs on biomimetic synthetic liposomes, isolated plasma membranes, and live cells. At cytotoxic concentrations, BAs dissolved synthetic and cell-derived membranes and disrupted live cell plasma membranes, implicating plasma membrane damage as the mechanism for BA cellular toxicity. At subtoxic concentrations, BAs dramatically stabilized domain separation in Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles without affecting protein partitioning between coexisting domains. Domain stabilization was the result of BA binding to and disordering the nonraft domain, thus promoting separation by enhancing domain immiscibility. Consistent with the physical changes observed in synthetic and isolated biological membranes, BAs reorganized intact cell membranes, as evaluated by the spatial distribution of membrane-anchored Ras isoforms. Nanoclustering of K-Ras, related to nonraft membrane domains, was enhanced in intact plasma membranes, whereas the organization of H-Ras was unaffected. BA-induced changes in Ras lateral segregation potentiated EGF-induced signaling through MAPK, confirming the ability of BAs to influence cell signal transduction by altering the physical properties of the plasma membrane. These observations suggest general, membrane-mediated mechanisms by which biological amphiphiles can produce their cellular effects.

  13. Alternate pleckstrin homology domain orientations regulate dynamin-catalyzed membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Niharika; Nichols, Justin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembling GTPase dynamin catalyzes endocytic vesicle scission via membrane insertion of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PH domain-dependent membrane fission remain obscure. Membrane-curvature-sensing and membrane-curvature-generating properties have been attributed, but it remains to be seen whether the PH domain is involved in either process independent of dynamin self-assembly. Here, using multiple fluorescence spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, we demonstrate that the isolated PH domain does not act to bend membranes but instead senses high membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion into the membrane bilayer. Furthermore, we use a complementary set of short- and long-distance Förster resonance energy transfer approaches to distinguish PH-domain orientation from proximity at the membrane surface in full-length dynamin. We reveal, in addition to the GTP-sensitive "hydrophobic mode," the presence of an alternate, GTP-insensitive "electrostatic mode" of PH domain-membrane interactions that retains dynamin on the membrane surface during the GTP hydrolysis cycle. Stabilization of this alternate orientation produces dramatic variations in the morphology of membrane-bound dynamin spirals, indicating that the PH domain regulates membrane fission through the control of dynamin polymer dynamics.

  14. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  15. Membrane-Tethered Intracellular Domain of Amphiregulin Promotes Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan W.; Stuart, Philip E.; Lambert, Sylviane; Gandarillas, Alberto; Rittié, Laure; Johnston, Andrew; Elder, James T.

    2016-01-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its ligands are essential regulators of epithelial biology, which are often amplified in cancer cells. We have previously shown that shRNA-mediated silencing of one of these ligands, amphiregulin (AREG), results in keratinocyte growth arrest that cannot be rescued by soluble extracellular EGFR ligands. To further explore the functional importance of specific AREG domains, we stably transduced keratinocytes expressing tetracycline-inducible AREG-targeted shRNA with lentiviruses expressing silencing-proof, membrane-tethered AREG cytoplasmic and extracellular domains (AREG-CTD and AREG-ECD), as well as full-length AREG precursor (proAREG). Here we show that growth arrest of AREG-silenced keratinocytes occurs in G2/M and is significantly restored by proAREG and AREG-CTD, but not by AREG-ECD. Moreover, the AREG-CTD was sufficient to normalize cell cycle distribution profiles and expression of mitosis-related genes. Our findings uncover an important role of the AREG-CTD in regulating cell division, which may be relevant to tumor resistance to EGFR-directed therapies. PMID:26802239

  16. Modeling membrane shaping by proteins: focus on EHD2 and N-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Felix; Fabrikant, Gur; McMahon, Harvey T; Kozlov, Michael M

    2010-05-03

    Cellular membranes are highly dynamic, undergoing both persistent and dynamic shape changes driven by specialized proteins. The observed membrane shaping can be simple deformations of existing shapes or membrane remodeling involving fission or fusion. Here we describe several mechanistic principles by which membrane shaping proteins act. We especially consider models for membrane bending and fission by EHD2 proteins and membrane bending by N-BAR domains. There are major challenges ahead to understand the general principles by which diverse membrane bending proteins act and to understand how some proteins appear to span multiple modes of action from driving curvature to inducing membrane remodeling.

  17. Pathobiology of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S M; Williams, M L; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1993-01-01

    The epidermis is a dynamic system whose metabolic activity is regulated in large part by the integrity of the permeability barrier. This barrier resides in the stratum corneum and comprises a unique 2-compartment system of structural protein-enriched corneocytes embedded in a lipid-enriched intercellular matrix. Lipid extraction or metabolic imbalances, such as essential fatty acid deficiency, produce barrier abnormalities that in turn result in epidermal hyperproliferation, scaling, and inflammation. When the barrier remains intact, lipid imbalances, such as an abnormal cholesterol sulfate:cholesterol ratio in recessive X-linked ichthyosis, can lead to abnormal corneocyte adhesion (visible scale). Both cellular and intercellular proteins also participate in normal desquamation, and protein abnormalities may provoke abnormal scaling (such as filaggrin in ichthyosis vulgaris). Thus, perturbations of the stratum corneum may be the catalyst for a number of skin diseases, rather than the end result of processes that are initiated in subjacent skin layers. PMID:8460510

  18. Alternate pleckstrin homology domain orientations regulate dynamin-catalyzed membrane fission

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Niharika; Nichols, Justin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembling GTPase dynamin catalyzes endocytic vesicle scission via membrane insertion of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PH domain–dependent membrane fission remain obscure. Membrane-curvature–sensing and membrane-curvature–generating properties have been attributed, but it remains to be seen whether the PH domain is involved in either process independent of dynamin self-assembly. Here, using multiple fluorescence spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, we demonstrate that the isolated PH domain does not act to bend membranes but instead senses high membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion into the membrane bilayer. Furthermore, we use a complementary set of short- and long-distance Förster resonance energy transfer approaches to distinguish PH-domain orientation from proximity at the membrane surface in full-length dynamin. We reveal, in addition to the GTP-sensitive “hydrophobic mode,” the presence of an alternate, GTP-insensitive “electrostatic mode” of PH domain–membrane interactions that retains dynamin on the membrane surface during the GTP hydrolysis cycle. Stabilization of this alternate orientation produces dramatic variations in the morphology of membrane-bound dynamin spirals, indicating that the PH domain regulates membrane fission through the control of dynamin polymer dynamics. PMID:24478459

  19. Desmoglein Isoform Distribution Affects Stratum Corneum Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Matsuyoshi, Norihisa; Wu, Hong; Lin, Chenyan; Wang, Zhi Hong; Brown, Barbara E.; Stanley, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Desmogleins are desmosomal cadherins that mediate cell–cell adhesion. In stratified squamous epithelia there are two major isoforms of desmoglein, 1 and 3, with different distributions in epidermis and mucous membrane. Since either desmoglein isoform alone can mediate adhesion, the reason for their differential distribution is not known. To address this issue, we engineered transgenic mice with desmoglein 3 under the control of the involucrin promoter. These mice expressed desmoglein 3 with the same distribution in epidermis as found in normal oral mucous membranes, while expression of other major differentiation molecules was unchanged. Although the nucleated epidermis appeared normal, the epidermal stratum corneum was abnormal with gross scaling, and a lamellar histology resembling that of normal mucous membrane. The mice died shortly after birth with severe dehydration, suggesting excessive transepidermal water loss, which was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo measurement. Ultrastructure of the stratum corneum showed premature loss of cohesion of corneocytes. This dysadhesion of corneocytes and its contribution to increased transepidermal water loss was confirmed by tape stripping. These data demonstrate that differential expression of desmoglein isoforms affects the major function of epidermis, the permeability barrier, by altering the structure of the stratum corneum. PMID:11309406

  20. Higher-order assemblies of BAR domain proteins for shaping membranes.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Shiro

    2016-06-01

    Most cellular organelles contain lipid bilayer membranes. The earliest characterization of cellular organelles was performed by electron microscopy observation of such membranes. However, the precise mechanisms for shaping the membrane in particular subcellular organelles is poorly understood. Classically, the overall cellular shape, i.e. the shape of the plasma membrane, was thought to be governed by the reorganization of cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. The plasma membrane contains various submicron structures such as clathrin-coated pits, caveolae, filopodia and lamellipodia. These subcellular structures are either invaginations or protrusions and are associated with the cytoskeleton. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that there are membrane-binding proteins that cooperates with cytoskeleton in shaping of plasma membrane organelles. Proteins with the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain connect a variety of membrane shapes to actin filaments. The BAR domains themselves bend the membranes by their rigidity and then mold the membranes into tubules through their assembly as spiral polymers, which are thought to be involved in the various submicron structures. Membrane tubulation by polymeric assembly of the BAR domains is supposed to be regulated by binding proteins, binding lipids and the mechanical properties of the membrane. This review gives an overview of BAR protein assembly, describes the significance of the assembly and discusses how to study the assembly in the context of membrane and cellular morphology. The technical problems encountered in microscopic observation of BAR domain assembly are also discussed.

  1. Domain-specific disassembly and reassembly of nuclear membranes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Buendia, B; Courvalin, J C

    1997-01-10

    The nuclear envelope contains three distinct membrane domains, the outer membrane, the inner membrane, and the pore membrane, that reversibly vesiculate in mitosis. We previously suggested from single-labeling immunofluorescence microscopy analysis of mitotic cells in culture that mitotic vesiculation of the nuclear membranes may proceed in a domain-specific manner (Chaudhary and Courvalin, J. Cell. Biol. 122, 295-306, 1993). In the present study, we add biochemical support to this hypothesis by sorting domain-specific mitotic vesicles. Antibodies directed against the lamin B receptor, a marker of the inner membrane, and glycoprotein gp210, a marker of the pore membrane, were used to isolate by affinity two populations of mitotic vesicles that were selectively enriched in each of these markers. These two vesicle populations were of different size distribution; the pore membrane-derived vesicles were smaller (80% being < or = 200 nm) than the inner membrane-derived vesicles (80% > or = 200 nm). Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopy analysis of mitotic cells in culture showed that the time course and topology of disassembly and reassembly of inner and pore membrane domains were different, confirming that domain-specific vesicles are generated during mitosis. In these studies, protein LAP2/thymopoietin beta, another marker of the inner nuclear membrane, was segregating as lamin B receptor, suggesting that both proteins were contained in the same mitotic vesicles.

  2. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos S; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of proteins that recognize membrane curvature created a paradigm shift by suggesting that membrane shape may act as a cue for protein localization that is independent of lipid or protein composition. Here we review recent data on membrane curvature sensing by three structurally unrelated motifs: BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins. We discuss the conclusion that the curvature of the BAR dimer is not responsible for sensing and that the sensing properties of all three motifs can be rationalized by the physicochemical properties of the curved membrane itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology.

  3. Membrane Sculpting by F-BAR Domains Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hang; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Interplay between cellular membranes and their peripheral proteins drives many processes in eukaryotic cells. Proteins of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain family, in particular, play a role in cellular morphogenesis, for example curving planar membranes into tubular membranes. However, it is still unclear how F-BAR domain proteins act on membranes. Electron microscopy revealed that, in vitro, F-BAR proteins form regular lattices on cylindrically deformed membrane surfaces. Using all-atom and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, we show that such lattices, indeed, induce tubes of observed radii. A 250 ns all-atom simulation reveals that F-BAR domain curves membranes via the so-called scaffolding mechanism. Plasticity of the F-BAR domain permits conformational change in response to membrane interaction, via partial unwinding of the domains 3-helix bundle structure. A CG simulation covering more than 350 µs provides a dynamic picture of membrane tubulation by lattices of F-BAR domains. A series of CG simulations identified the optimal lattice type for membrane sculpting, which matches closely the lattices seen through cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:23382665

  4. Beyond polarity: functional membrane domains in astrocytes and Müller cells.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Amin; Pannicke, Thomas; Haseleu, Julia; Blaess, Sandra; Grosche, Jens; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Various ependymoglial cells display varying degrees of process specialization, in particular processes contacting mesenchymal borders (pia, blood vessels, vitreous body), or those lining the ventricular surface. Within the neuropil, glial morphology, cellular contacts, and interaction partners are complex. It appears that glial processes contacting neurons, specific parts of neurons, or mesenchymal or ventricular borders are characterized by specialized membranes. We propose a concept of membrane domains in addition to the existing concept of ependymoglial polarity. Such membrane domains are equipped with certain membrane-bound proteins, enabling them to function in their specific environment. This review focuses on Müller cells and astrocytes and discusses exemplary the localization of established glial markers in membrane domains. We distinguish three functional glial membrane domains based on their typical molecular arrangement. The domain of the endfoot specifically displays the complex of dystrophin-associated proteins, aquaporin 4 and the potassium channel Kir4.1. We show that the domain of microvilli and the peripheral glial process in the Müller cell share the presence of ezrin, as do peripheral astrocyte processes. As a third domain, the Müller cell has peripheral glial processes related to a specific subtype of synapse. Although many details remain to be studied, the idea of glial membrane domains may permit new insights into glial function and pathology.

  5. Atopic Dermatitis and the Stratum Corneum: Part 1: The Role of Filaggrin in the Stratum Corneum Barrier and Atopic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the barrier properties of the epidermis, especially the stratum corneum and various specific immunological responses in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicts the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while Part 2 (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and related barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Filaggrin is a key component of the stratum corneum that is derived from a larger precursor protein and contributes to its physical strength, hydration status, skin pH, and buffering capacity among other physiochemical properties. Filaggrin gene loss of function mutations appear to play a pathophysiological role; however, they are not the sole pathogenic factor in atopic dermatitis. Adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum are caused by upregulation of serine proteases activity, which causes degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to barrier functions; interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient; and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is characteristic of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of epidermal barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. Part 3 of this review (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) discusses how immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity all play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis

  6. Atopic dermatitis and the stratum corneum: part 1: the role of filaggrin in the stratum corneum barrier and atopic skin.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jacquelyn; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q

    2013-10-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the barrier properties of the epidermis, especially the stratum corneum and various specific immunological responses in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicts the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while Part 2 (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and related barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Filaggrin is a key component of the stratum corneum that is derived from a larger precursor protein and contributes to its physical strength, hydration status, skin pH, and buffering capacity among other physiochemical properties. Filaggrin gene loss of function mutations appear to play a pathophysiological role; however, they are not the sole pathogenic factor in atopic dermatitis. Adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum are caused by upregulation of serine proteases activity, which causes degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to barrier functions; interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient; and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is characteristic of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of epidermal barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. Part 3 of this review (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) discusses how immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity all play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis

  7. Regulation of membrane-shape transitions induced by I-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiming; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-07-21

    I-BAR proteins are well-known actin-cytoskeleton adaptors and have been observed to be involved in the formation of plasma membrane protrusions (filopodia). I-BAR proteins contain an all-helical, crescent-shaped IRSp53-MIM domain (IMD) dimer that is believed to be able to couple with a membrane shape. This coupling could involve the sensing and even the generation of negative plasma membrane curvature. Indeed, the in vitro studies have shown that IMDs can induce inward tubulation of liposomes. While N-BAR domains, which generate positive membrane curvature, have received a considerable amount of attention from both theory and experiments, the mechanisms of curvature coupling through IMDs are comparatively less studied and understood. Here we used a membrane-shape stability assay developed recently in our lab to quantitatively characterize IMD-induced membrane-shape transitions. We determined a membrane-shape stability diagram for IMDs that reveals how membrane tension and protein density can comodulate the generation of IMD-induced membrane protrusions. From comparison to analytical theory, we determine three key parameters that characterize the curvature coupling of IMD. We find that the curvature generation capacity of IMDs is significantly stronger compared to that of endophilin, an N-BAR protein known to be involved in plasma membrane shape transitions. Contrary to N-BAR domains, where amphipathic helix insertion is known to promote its membrane curvature generation, for IMDs we find that amphipathic helices inhibit membrane shape transitions, consistent with the inverse curvature that IMDs generate. Importantly, in both of these types of BAR domains, electrostatic interactions affect membrane-binding capacity, but do not appear to affect the curvature generation capacity of the protein. These two types of BAR domain proteins show qualitatively similar membrane shape stability diagrams, suggesting an underlying ubiquitous mechanism by which peripheral proteins

  8. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are distributed to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb detergent-resistant domains on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Ito, Shiho; Kato, Reiko; Shimizu, Yuji; Kobayashi, Aya; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and ABCG4 are lipid transporters that mediate the efflux of cholesterol from cells. To analyze the characteristics of these lipid transporters, we examined and compared their distributions and lipid efflux activity on the plasma membrane. The efflux of cholesterol mediated by ABCA1 and ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was affected by a reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels. Detergent solubility and gradient density ultracentrifugation assays indicated that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 were distributed to domains that were solubilized by Triton X-100 and Brij 96, resistant to Triton X-100 and Brij 96, and solubilized by Triton X-100 but resistant to Brij 96, respectively. Furthermore, ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was colocalized with flotillin-1 on the plasma membrane. The amounts of cholesterol extracted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin were increased by ABCA1, ABCG1, or ABCG4, suggesting that cholesterol in non-raft domains was increased. Furthermore, ABCG1 and ABCG4 disturbed the localization of caveolin-1 to the detergent-resistant domains and the binding of cholera toxin subunit B to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are localized to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb the meso-domain structures by reorganizing lipids on the plasma membrane; collectively, these observations may explain the different substrate profiles and lipid efflux roles of these transporters.

  9. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S; Gaus, Katharina; de Wet, Ben; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai; Harder, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate the accumulation of specific molecular lipid species with the specific plasma membrane condensation at sites of TCR activation and with early TCR activation responses. PMID:19177148

  10. Membrane Fission Is Promoted by Insertion of Amphipathic Helices and Is Restricted by Crescent BAR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Pick, Adi; Çamdere, Gamze; Liska, Nicole; Evergren, Emma; McMahon, Harvey T.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Shallow hydrophobic insertions and crescent-shaped BAR scaffolds promote membrane curvature. Here, we investigate membrane fission by shallow hydrophobic insertions quantitatively and mechanistically. We provide evidence that membrane insertion of the ENTH domain of epsin leads to liposome vesiculation, and that epsin is required for clathrin-coated vesicle budding in cells. We also show that BAR-domain scaffolds from endophilin, amphiphysin, GRAF, and β2-centaurin limit membrane fission driven by hydrophobic insertions. A quantitative assay for vesiculation reveals an antagonistic relationship between amphipathic helices and scaffolds of N-BAR domains in fission. The extent of vesiculation by these proteins and vesicle size depend on the number and length of amphipathic helices per BAR domain, in accord with theoretical considerations. This fission mechanism gives a new framework for understanding membrane scission in the absence of mechanoenzymes such as dynamin and suggests how Arf and Sar proteins work in vesicle scission. PMID:22464325

  11. Membrane interaction of the factor VIIIa discoidin domains in atomistic detail

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jesper J.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.; Faber, Johan H.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Olsen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor (F)VIIIa, the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid membrane by partial or full insertion of their extruding loops (the spikes). However, the two domains adopted different molecular orientations in their membrane-bound states; FVIII C2 roughly positioned normal to the membrane plane, while FVIII C1 displayed a multitude of tilted orientations. The results indicate that FVIII C1 may be important in modulating the orientation of the FVIIIa molecule to optimize the interaction with FIXa, which is anchored to the membrane via its γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich (Gla)-domain. Additionally, a structural change was observed in FVIII C1 in the coiled main chain leading the first spike. A tight interaction with one lipid per domain, similar to what has been suggested for the homologous FVa C2, is characterized. Finally, we rationalize known FVIII antibody epitopes and the scarcity of documented hemophilic missense mutations related to improper membrane binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent non-specificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2. PMID:26346528

  12. BAR Domains as Sensors of Membrane Curvature: The Amphiphysin BAR Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Brian J.; Kent, Helen M.; Mills, Ian G.; Vallis, Yvonne; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Evans, Philip R.; McMahon, Harvey T.

    2004-01-01

    The BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain is the most conserved feature in amphiphysins from yeast to human and is also found in endophilins and nadrins. We solved the structure of the Drosophila amphiphysin BAR domain. It is a crescent-shaped dimer that binds preferentially to highly curved negatively charged membranes. With its N-terminal amphipathic helix and BAR domain (N-BAR), amphiphysin can drive membrane curvature in vitro and in vivo. The structure is similar to that of arfaptin2, which we find also binds and tubulates membranes. From this, we predict that BAR domains are in many protein families, including sorting nexins, centaurins, and oligophrenins. The universal and minimal BAR domain is a dimerization, membrane-binding, and curvature-sensing module.

  13. The Plasma Membrane of the Cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus Contains Segregated Bioenergetic Domains[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Rexroth, Sascha; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Ellinger, Dorothea; Sendtko, Esther; Rögner, Matthias; Koenig, Friederike

    2011-01-01

    The light reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis almost invariably take place in the thylakoid membranes, a highly specialized internal membrane system located in the stroma of chloroplasts and the cytoplasm of cyanobacteria. The only known exception is the primordial cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus, which evolved before the appearance of thylakoids and harbors the photosynthetic complexes in the plasma membrane. Thus, studies on G. violaceus not only shed light on the evolutionary origin and the functional advantages of thylakoid membranes but also might include insights regarding thylakoid formation during chloroplast differentiation. Based on biochemical isolation and direct in vivo characterization, we report here structural and functional domains in the cytoplasmic membrane of a cyanobacterium. Although G. violaceus has no internal membranes, it does have localized domains with apparently specialized functions in its plasma membrane, in which both the photosynthetic and the respiratory complexes are concentrated. These bioenergetic domains can be visualized by confocal microscopy, and they can be isolated by a simple procedure. Proteomic analysis of these domains indicates their physiological function and suggests a protein sorting mechanism via interaction with membrane-intrinsic terpenoids. Based on these results, we propose specialized domains in the plasma membrane as evolutionary precursors of thylakoids. PMID:21642550

  14. Heterogeneous Drying Stresses in Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    German, G.K.; Engl, W.C.; Pashkovski, E.; Banerjee, S.; Xu, Y.; Mertz, A.F.; Hyland, C.; Dufresne, E.R.

    2012-01-01

    We study the drying of stratum corneum, the skin's outermost layer and an essential barrier to mechanical and chemical stresses from the environment. Even though stratum corneum exhibits structural features across multiple length-scales, contemporary understanding of the mechanical properties of stratum corneum is based on the assumption that its thickness and composition are homogeneous. We quantify spatially resolved in-plane traction stress and deformation at the interface between a macroscopic sample of porcine stratum corneum and an adherent deformable elastomer substrate. At length-scales greater than a millimeter, the skin behaves as a homogeneous elastic material. At this scale, a linear elastic model captures the spatial distribution of traction stresses and the dependence of drying behavior on the elastic modulus of the substrate. At smaller scales, the traction stresses are strikingly heterogeneous and dominated by the heterogeneous structure of the stratum corneum. PMID:22713557

  15. Heterogeneous drying stresses in stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    German, G K; Engl, W C; Pashkovski, E; Banerjee, S; Xu, Y; Mertz, A F; Hyland, C; Dufresne, E R

    2012-06-06

    We study the drying of stratum corneum, the skin's outermost layer and an essential barrier to mechanical and chemical stresses from the environment. Even though stratum corneum exhibits structural features across multiple length-scales, contemporary understanding of the mechanical properties of stratum corneum is based on the assumption that its thickness and composition are homogeneous. We quantify spatially resolved in-plane traction stress and deformation at the interface between a macroscopic sample of porcine stratum corneum and an adherent deformable elastomer substrate. At length-scales greater than a millimeter, the skin behaves as a homogeneous elastic material. At this scale, a linear elastic model captures the spatial distribution of traction stresses and the dependence of drying behavior on the elastic modulus of the substrate. At smaller scales, the traction stresses are strikingly heterogeneous and dominated by the heterogeneous structure of the stratum corneum. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Membrane raft domains and remodeling in aging brain.

    PubMed

    Colin, Julie; Gregory-Pauron, Lynn; Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Claudepierre, Thomas; Corbier, Catherine; Yen, Frances T; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine; Oster, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Lipids are the fundamental structural components of biological membranes. For a long time considered as simple barriers segregating aqueous compartments, membranes are now viewed as dynamic interfaces providing a molecular environment favorable to the activity of membrane-associated proteins. Interestingly, variations in membrane lipid composition, whether quantitative or qualitative, play a crucial role in regulation of membrane protein functionalities. Indeed, a variety of alterations in brain lipid composition have been associated with the processes of normal and pathological aging. Although not establishing a direct cause-and-effect relationship between these complex modifications in cerebral membranes and the process of cognitive decline, evidence shows that alterations in membrane lipid composition affect important physicochemical properties notably impacting the lateral organization of membranes, and thus microdomains. It has been suggested that preservation of microdomain functionality may represent an effective strategy for preventing or decelerating neuronal dysfunction and cerebral vulnerability, processes that are both aggravated by aging. The working hypothesis developed in this review proposes that preservation of membrane organization, for example, through nutritional supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid, could prevent disturbances in and preserve effective cerebral function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. HIV gp41-Mediated Membrane Fusion Occurs at Edges of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Simmons, James A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts in plasma membranes have emerged as possible platforms for entry of HIV and other viruses into cells. However, how lipid phase heterogeneity contributes to viral entry is little known due to the fine-grained and still poorly understood complexity of biological membranes. We used model systems mimicking HIV envelopes and T-cell membranes and showed that raft-like (Lo phase) lipid domains are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane targeting and fusion. Interestingly, membrane binding and fusion was low in homogeneous Ld and Lo phase membranes, indicating that lipid phase heterogeneity is essential. The HIV fusion peptide preferentially targeted to Lo/Ld boundary regions and promoted full fusion at the interface between ordered and disordered lipids. Ld phase vesicles proceeded only to hemifusion. Thus, we propose that the edges, but not the areas of raft-like ordered lipid domains are vital for HIV entry and membrane fusion. PMID:25915200

  18. Importance of the REM (Ras exchange) domain for membrane interactions by RasGRP3.

    PubMed

    Czikora, Agnes; Kedei, Noemi; Kalish, Heather; Blumberg, Peter M

    2017-09-11

    RasGRP comprises a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, regulating the dissociation of GDP from Ras GTPases to enhance the formation of the active GTP-bound form. RasGRP1 possesses REM (Ras exchange), GEF (catalytic), EF-hand, C1, SuPT (suppressor of PT), and PT (plasma membrane-targeting) domains, among which the C1 domain drives membrane localization in response to diacylglycerol or phorbol ester and the PT domain recognizes phosphoinositides. The homologous family member RasGRP3 shows less plasma membrane localization. The objective of this study was to explore the role of the different domains of RasGRP3 in membrane translocation in response to phorbol esters. The full-length RasGRP3 shows limited translocation to the plasma membrane in response to PMA, even when the basic hydrophobic cluster in the PT domain, reported to be critical for RasGRP1 translocation to endogenous activators, is mutated to resemble that of RasGRP1. Moreover, exchange of the C-termini (SuPT-PT domain) of the two proteins had little effect on their plasma membrane translocation. On the other hand, while the C1 domain of RasGRP3 alone showed partial plasma membrane translocation, truncated RasGRP3 constructs, which contain the PT domain and are missing the REM, showed stronger translocation, indicating that the REM of RasGRP3 was a suppressor of its membrane interaction. The REM of RasGRP1 failed to show comparable suppression of RasGRP3 translocation. The marked differences between RasGRP3 and RasGRP1 in membrane interaction necessarily will contribute to their different behavior in cells and are relevant to the design of selective ligands as potential therapeutic agents. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. C-terminal domain of mammalian complexin-1 localizes to highly curved membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jihong; Lai, Ying; Li, Xiaohong; Wang, Mengxian; Leitz, Jeremy; Hu, Yachong; Zhang, Yunxiang; Choi, Ucheor B.; Cipriano, Daniel; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Yang, Xiaofei; Brunger, Axel T.

    2016-01-01

    In presynaptic nerve terminals, complexin regulates spontaneous “mini” neurotransmitter release and activates Ca2+-triggered synchronized neurotransmitter release. We studied the role of the C-terminal domain of mammalian complexin in these processes using single-particle optical imaging and electrophysiology. The C-terminal domain is important for regulating spontaneous release in neuronal cultures and suppressing Ca2+-independent fusion in vitro, but it is not essential for evoked release in neuronal cultures and in vitro. This domain interacts with membranes in a curvature-dependent fashion similar to a previous study with worm complexin [Snead D, Wragg RT, Dittman JS, Eliezer D (2014) Membrane curvature sensing by the C-terminal domain of complexin. Nat Commun 5:4955]. The curvature-sensing value of the C-terminal domain is comparable to that of α-synuclein. Upon replacement of the C-terminal domain with membrane-localizing elements, preferential localization to the synaptic vesicle membrane, but not to the plasma membrane, results in suppression of spontaneous release in neurons. Membrane localization had no measurable effect on evoked postsynaptic currents of AMPA-type glutamate receptors, but mislocalization to the plasma membrane increases both the variability and the mean of the synchronous decay time constant of NMDA-type glutamate receptor evoked postsynaptic currents. PMID:27821736

  20. ELASTIC MEMBRANE DEFORMATIONS GOVERN INTERLEAFLET COUPLING OF LIPID-ORDERED DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components nor interactions at the membrane midplane. PMID:26340212

  1. Elastic Membrane Deformations Govern Interleaflet Coupling of Lipid-Ordered Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2015-08-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components or interactions at the membrane midplane.

  2. Closed membrane shapes with attached BAR domains subject to external force of actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Mesarec, Luka; Góźdź, Wojciech; Iglič, Veronika Kralj; Kralj, Samo; Iglič, Aleš

    2016-05-01

    Membrane deformations induced by attached BAR superfamily domains could trigger or facilitate the growth of plasma membrane protrusions. The BAR domain family consists of BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR domains, each enforcing a different local curvature when attached to the membrane surface. Our theoretical study mainly focuses on the role of I-BAR in the membrane tubular deformations generated or stabilised by actin filaments. The influence of the area density of membrane attached BAR domains and their intrinsic curvature on the closed membrane shapes (vesicles) was investigated numerically. We derived an analytical approximative expression for the critical relative area density of BARs at which the membrane tubular protrusions on vesicles are most prominent. We have shown that the BARs with a higher intrinsic curvature induce thinner and longer cylindrical protrusions. The average orientation of the membrane attached BARs is altered when the vesicle shape is subjected to external force of growing actin rod-like structure inside a vesicle. The average orientation angle of membrane attached BARs may indicate whether the actin filaments are just stabilising the protrusion or generating it by stretching the vesicle.

  3. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  4. Lipid Cooperativity as a General Membrane-Recruitment Principle for PH Domains.

    PubMed

    Vonkova, Ivana; Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Deghou, Samy; Anand, Kanchan; Ceschia, Stefano; Doerks, Tobias; Galih, Augustinus; Kugler, Karl G; Maeda, Kenji; Rybin, Vladimir; van Noort, Vera; Ellenberg, Jan; Bork, Peer; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Many cellular processes involve the recruitment of proteins to specific membranes, which are decorated with distinctive lipids that act as docking sites. The phosphoinositides form signaling hubs, and we examine mechanisms underlying recruitment. We applied a physiological, quantitative, liposome microarray-based assay to measure the membrane-binding properties of 91 pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, the most common phosphoinositide-binding target. 10,514 experiments quantified the role of phosphoinositides in membrane recruitment. For most domains examined, the observed binding specificity implied cooperativity with additional signaling lipids. Analyses of PH domains with similar lipid-binding profiles identified a conserved motif, mutations in which-including some found in human cancers-induced discrete changes in binding affinities in vitro and protein mislocalization in vivo. The data set reveals cooperativity as a key mechanism for membrane recruitment and, by enabling the interpretation of disease-associated mutations, suggests avenues for the design of small molecules targeting PH domains.

  5. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGES

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; ...

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  6. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  7. Num1 anchors mitochondria to the plasma membrane via two domains with different lipid binding specificities

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Holly A.; Kraft, Lauren M.; Chen, WeiTing; Nilles, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria–ER cortex anchor (MECA) is required for proper mitochondrial distribution and functions by tethering mitochondria to the plasma membrane. The core component of MECA is the multidomain protein Num1, which assembles into clusters at the cell cortex. We show Num1 adopts an extended, polarized conformation. Its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (Num1CC) is proximal to mitochondria, and the C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain is associated with the plasma membrane. We find that Num1CC interacts directly with phospholipid membranes and displays a strong preference for the mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin. This direct membrane interaction is critical for MECA function. Thus, mitochondrial anchoring is mediated by a protein that interacts directly with two different membranes through lipid-specific binding domains, suggesting a general mechanism for interorganelle tethering. PMID:27241910

  8. Num1 anchors mitochondria to the plasma membrane via two domains with different lipid binding specificities.

    PubMed

    Ping, Holly A; Kraft, Lauren M; Chen, WeiTing; Nilles, Amy E; Lackner, Laura L

    2016-06-06

    The mitochondria-ER cortex anchor (MECA) is required for proper mitochondrial distribution and functions by tethering mitochondria to the plasma membrane. The core component of MECA is the multidomain protein Num1, which assembles into clusters at the cell cortex. We show Num1 adopts an extended, polarized conformation. Its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (Num1CC) is proximal to mitochondria, and the C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain is associated with the plasma membrane. We find that Num1CC interacts directly with phospholipid membranes and displays a strong preference for the mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin. This direct membrane interaction is critical for MECA function. Thus, mitochondrial anchoring is mediated by a protein that interacts directly with two different membranes through lipid-specific binding domains, suggesting a general mechanism for interorganelle tethering. © 2016 Ping et al.

  9. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Dylan M.; Gaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes. PMID:24376453

  10. An N-terminal Domain of Adenovirus Protein VI Fragments Membranes By Inducing Positive Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oana; Galan, Debra L.; Wodrich, Harald; Wiethoff, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) membrane penetration during cell entry is poorly understood. Here we show that antibodies which neutralize the membrane lytic activity of the Ad capsid protein VI interfere with Ad endosomal membrane penetration. In vitro studies using a peptide corresponding to an N-terminal amphipathic α-helix of protein VI (VI-Φ), as well as other truncated forms of protein VI suggest that VI-Φ is largely responsible for protein VI binding to and lysing of membranes. Additional studies suggest that VI-Φ lies nearly parallel to the membrane surface. Protein VI fragments membranes and induces highly curved structures. Further studies suggest that Protein VI induces positive membrane curvature. These data support a model in which protein VI binds membranes, inducing positive curvature strain which ultimately leads to membrane fragmentation. These results agree with previous observations of Ad membrane permeabilization during cell entry and provide an initial mechanistic description of a nonenveloped virus membrane lytic protein. PMID:20409568

  11. Charge density influences C1 domain ligand affinity and membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Nancy E.; Kedei, Noemi; Hill, Colin S.; Selezneva, Julia S.; Valle, Christopher J.; Woo, Wonhee; Gorshkova, Inna; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The C1 domain, which represents the recognition motif on protein kinase C for the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol and its ultrapotent analog the phorbol esters, has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer and other indications. Potential target selectivity is markedly enhanced both because binding reflects ternary complex formation between ligand, the C1 domain, and phospholipid, and because binding drives membrane insertion of the C1 domain, permitting aspects of the C1 domain surface outside the binding site per se to influence binding energetics. Here, focusing on charged residues identified in atypical C1 domains which contribute to their loss of ligand binding activity, we show that increasing charge along the rim of the binding cleft of the protein kinase C δ C1b domain raises the requirement for anionic phospholipids. Correspondingly, it shifts the selectivity of C1 domain translocation to the plasma membrane, which is more negatively charged than internal membranes. This change in localization is most pronounced in the case of more hydrophilic ligands, which provide weaker membrane stabilization than do the more hydrophobic ligands, and thus contributes an element to the structure activity relations for C1 domain ligands. Co-expressing pairs of C1 containing constructs with differing charges each expressing a distinct fluorescent tag provided a powerful tool to demonstrate the effect of increasing charge in the C1 domain. PMID:24777910

  12. Raft-like membrane domains in pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Farnoud, Amir M; Toledo, Alvaro M; Konopka, James B; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist, and reports on the presence of sterol- or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing. Despite increasing attention, little is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The current literature on characterization of microdomains in pathogens is reviewed, and their potential role in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance is discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of their pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for therapy.

  13. Functional relevance of transmembrane domains in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Jörg; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Membrane fusion is ubiquitous in life. Fusion of biological membranes is mediated by specialized fusion proteins anchored to the bilayers destined to fuse. Here we describe these proteins as being instrumental in viral, intracellular and developmental fusion. Next, we review experimental and theoretical evidence that points to fusion in the different systems as following a common 'fusion through hemifusion' pathway. We also focus on the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane segment that anchors the fusion proteins to the bilayer, and its role in driving fusion. In particular, we highlight the influence of this single segment on the surrounding membrane lipids and on the overall shape of the membrane along the way to fusion.

  14. Membrane-binding properties of the Factor VIII C2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Valerie A.; Cullinan, David B.; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Fay, Philip J.; Baleja, James D.; Gilbert, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Factor VIII functions as a cofactor for Factor IXa in a membrane-bound enzyme complex. Membrane binding accelerates the activity of the Factor VIIIa–Factor IXa complex approx. 100000-fold, and the major phospholipid-binding motif of Factor VIII is thought to be on the C2 domain. In the present study, we prepared an fVIII-C2 (Factor VIII C2 domain) construct from Escherichia coli, and confirmed its structural integrity through binding of three distinct monoclonal antibodies. Solution-phase assays, performed with flow cytometry and FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer), revealed that fVIII-C2 membrane affinity was approx. 40-fold lower than intact Factor VIII. In contrast with the similarly structured C2 domain of lactadherin, fVIII-C2 membrane binding was inhibited by physiological NaCl. fVIII-C2 binding was also not specific for phosphatidylserine over other negatively charged phospholipids, whereas a Factor VIII construct lacking the C2 domain retained phosphatidyl-L-serine specificity. fVIII-C2 slightly enhanced the cleavage of Factor X by Factor IXa, but did not compete with Factor VIII for membrane-binding sites or inhibit the Factor Xase complex. Our results indicate that the C2 domain in isolation does not recapitulate the characteristic membrane binding of Factor VIII, emphasizing that its role is cooperative with other domains of the intact Factor VIII molecule. PMID:21210768

  15. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: From rafts to submicrometric domains.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-04-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicolson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decades, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (>min vs s) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryot es to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: from rafts to submicrometric domains

    PubMed Central

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-01-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicholson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decade, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (> min vs sec) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryotes to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. PMID:26738447

  17. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  18. The pleckstrin-homology domain of dynamin is dispensable for membrane constriction and fission

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Srishti; Pucadyil, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical dynamins bind the plasma membrane–localized phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate using the pleckstrin-homology domain (PHD) and engage in rapid membrane fission during synaptic vesicle recycling. This domain is conspicuously absent among extant bacterial and mitochondrial dynamins, however, where loop regions manage membrane recruitment. Inspired by the core design of bacterial and mitochondrial dynamins, we reengineered the classical dynamin by replacing its PHD with a polyhistidine or polylysine linker. Remarkably, when recruited via chelator or anionic lipids, respectively, the reengineered dynamin displayed the capacity to constrict and sever membrane tubes. However, when analyzed at single-event resolution, the tube-severing process displayed long-lived, highly constricted prefission intermediates that contributed to 10-fold reduction in bulk rates of membrane fission. Our results indicate that the PHD acts as a catalyst in dynamin-induced membrane fission and rationalize its adoption to meet the physiologic requirement of a fast-acting membrane fission apparatus. PMID:28035046

  19. Near-field scanning optical microscopy detects nanoscale glycolipid domains in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Abulrob, A; Lu, Z; Brunette, E; Pulla, D; Stanimirovic, D; Johnston, L J

    2008-11-01

    The localization of asialo-GM1 in ordered membrane raft domains in HeLa cells has been examined using a combination of membrane fractionation and fluorescence imaging. The glycolipid is enriched in Triton X-100 insoluble membrane fractions that contain high concentrations of cholesterol and caveolin-1 but is also found in detergent soluble membrane fractions. Near-field fluorescence microscopy shows that a fraction of the asialo-GM1 is localized in small nanoscale clusters that have an upper limit for the average diameter of approximately 90 nm and are partially colocalized with caveolae membrane domains. In addition to clusters, a diffuse, non-clustered population of asialo-GM1 is observed and is hypothesized to correspond to glycolipid isolated in detergent soluble membrane fractions.

  20. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-09-30

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS.

  1. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2*

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, M. Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A.

    2016-01-01

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP. PMID:26578515

  2. Cell Migration and Invadopodia Formation Require a Membrane-binding Domain of CARMIL2.

    PubMed

    Lanier, M Hunter; McConnell, Patrick; Cooper, John A

    2016-01-15

    CARMILs regulate capping protein (CP), a critical determinant of actin assembly and actin-based cell motility. Vertebrates have three conserved CARMIL genes with distinct functions. In migrating cells, CARMIL2 is important for cell polarity, lamellipodial assembly, ruffling, and macropinocytosis. In cells, CARMIL2 localizes with a distinctive dual pattern to vimentin intermediate filaments and to membranes at leading edges and macropinosomes. The mechanism by which CARMIL2 localizes to membranes has not been defined. Here, we report that CARMIL2 has a conserved membrane-binding domain composed of basic and hydrophobic residues, which is necessary and sufficient for membrane localization, based on expression studies in cells and on direct binding of purified protein to lipids. Most important, we find that the membrane-binding domain is necessary for CARMIL2 to function in cells, based on rescue expression with a set of biochemically defined mutants. CARMIL1 and CARMIL3 contain similar membrane-binding domains, based on sequence analysis and on experiments, but other CPI motif proteins, such as CD2AP, do not. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the membrane-binding domain of CARMIL2 tethers this multidomain protein to the membrane, where it links dynamic vimentin filaments with regulation of actin assembly via CP. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Positioning lipid membrane domains in giant vesicles by micro-organization of aqueous cytoplasm mimic.

    PubMed

    Cans, Ann-Sofie; Andes-Koback, Meghan; Keating, Christine D

    2008-06-11

    We report localization of lipid membrane microdomains to specific "poles" of asymmetric giant vesicles (GVs) in response to local internal composition. Interior aqueous microdomains were generated in a simple model cytoplasm composed of a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) encapsulated in the vesicles. The GV membrane composition used here was a modification of a DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol mixture known to form micrometer-scale liquid ordered and liquid disordered domains; we added lipids with PEG 2000 Da-modified headgroups. Osmotically induced budding of the ATPS-containing GVs led to structures where the PEG-rich and dextran-rich interior aqueous phases were in contact with different regions of the vesicle membrane. Liquid ordered (L o) membrane domains rich in PEG-terminated lipids preferentially coated the PEG-rich aqueous phase vesicle "body", while coexisting liquid disordered (L d) membrane domains coated the dextran-rich aqueous phase "bud". Membrane domain positioning resulted from interactions between lipid headgroups and the interior aqueous polymer solutions, e.g., PEGylated headgroups with PEG and dextran polymers. Heating resulted first in patchy membranes where L o and L d domains no longer showed any preference for coating the PEG-rich vs dextran-rich interior aqueous volumes, and eventually complete lipid mixing. Upon cooling lipid domains again coated their preferred interior aqueous microvolume. This work shows that nonspecific interactions between interior aqueous contents and the membrane that encapsulates them can drive local chemical heterogeneity, and offers a primitive experimental model for membrane and cytoplasmic polarity in biological cells.

  4. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  5. Saturation solubility of nicotine, scopolamine and paracetamol in model stratum corneum lipid matrices.

    PubMed

    Mundstock, Anne; Lee, Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    The saturation solubilities of nicotine and scopolamine bases as well as acidic paracetamol were measured in two different model stratum corneum lipid matrices. Light microscopy visualized the presence of drug above its solubility either as droplets or crystalline particles. Neither wide-angle X-ray diffraction nor DSC detected the drugs. The saturation solubilities of the nicotine and scopolamine bases are 3-5% w/w and 5-10% w/w respectively. Paracetamol strongly disrupts the lamellar phase formed by the lipids and could be dissolved to >20% w/w. Based on these results the saturation solubilities of nicotine and scopolamine in an intact stratum corneum membrane are estimated to be up to 17.5 μg and 35 μg drug per milligrams of stratum corneum membrane respectively. These concentrations are well above values obtained by tape stripping of intact stratum corneum during a permeation experiment. The drug's saturation solubility in the stratum corneum's lipid phase is therefore unlikely to be rate-limiting for permeation of these two drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Is membrane occupation and recognition nexus domain functional in plant phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases?

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koji; Saavedra, Laura; Sommarin, Marianne

    2010-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) catalyzes a key step controlling cellular contents of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], a critical intracellular messenger involved in vesicle trafficking and modulation of actin cytoskeleton and also a substrate of phospholipase C to produce the two intracellular messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. In addition to the conserved C-terminal PIPK catalytic domain, plant PIPKs contain a unique structural feature consisting of a repeat of membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) motifs, called the MORN domain, in the N-terminal half. The MORN domain has previously been proposed to regulate plasma membrane localization and phosphatidic acid (PA)-inducible activation. Recently, the importance of the catalytic domain, but not the MORN domain, in these aspects was demonstrated. These conflicting data raise the question about the function of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs. We therefore performed analyses of PpPIPK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens to elucidate the importance of the MORN domain in the control of enzymatic activity; however, we found no effect on either enzymatic activity or activation by PA. Taken together with our previous findings of lack of function in plasma membrane localization, there is no positive evidence indicating roles of the MORN domain in enzymatic and functional regulations of PpPIPK1. Therefore, further biochemical and reverse genetic analyses are necessary to understand the biological significance of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs.

  7. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  8. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-10

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation.

  9. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  10. Targeting of passenger protein domains to multiple intracellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Janiak, F; Glover, J R; Leber, B; Rachubinski, R A; Andrews, D W

    1994-01-01

    The role of passenger domains in protein targeting was examined by fusing previously characterized targeting motifs to different protein sequences. To compare the targeting requirements for a variety of subcellular compartments, targeting of the fusion proteins was examined for endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and peroxisomes in vitro and in yeast. Although most passenger domains were only partially passive to translocation, motif-dependent targeting via motifs positioned at either end of one passenger domain (gPA) was demonstrated for all of the subcellular compartments tested. The data presented extend earlier suggestions that translocation competence is an intrinsic property of the passenger protein. However, the properties that determine protein targeting are not mutually exclusive for the compartments tested. Therefore, although the primary determinant of specificity is the targeting motif, our results suggest that translocation competence of the targeted protein augments the fidelity of transport. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8198533

  11. Monitoring Protein Fouling on Polymeric Membranes Using Ultrasonic Frequency-Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Kujundzic, Elmira; Greenberg, Alan R.; Fong, Robin; Hernandez, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Novel signal-processing protocols were used to extend the in situ sensitivity of ultrasonic frequency-domain reflectometry (UFDR) for real-time monitoring of microfiltration (MF) membrane fouling during protein purification. Different commercial membrane materials, with a nominal pore size of 0.2 μm, were challenged using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amylase as model proteins. Fouling induced by these proteins was observed in flat-sheet membrane filtration cells operating in a laminar cross-flow regime. The detection of membrane-associated proteins using UFDR was determined by applying rigorous statistical methodology to reflection spectra of ultrasonic signals obtained during membrane fouling. Data suggest that the total power reflected from membrane surfaces changes in response to protein fouling at concentrations as low as 14 μg/cm2, and results indicate that ultrasonic spectra can be leveraged to detect and monitor protein fouling on commercial MF membranes. PMID:24957732

  12. Exosomes and HIV Gag bud from endosome-like domains of the T cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Amy M.; Fang, Yi; Fallon, Jonathan K.; Yang, Jr-Ming; Hildreth, James E.K.; Gould, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted, single membrane organelles of ∼100 nm diameter. Their biogenesis is typically thought to occur in a two-step process involving (1) outward vesicle budding at limiting membranes of endosomes (outward = away from the cytoplasm), which generates intralumenal vesicles, followed by (2) endosome–plasma membrane fusion, which releases these internal vesicles into the extracellular milieu as exosomes. In this study, we present evidence that certain cells, including Jurkat T cells, possess discrete domains of plasma membrane that are enriched for exosomal and endosomal proteins, retain the endosomal property of outward vesicle budding, and serve as sites of immediate exosome biogenesis. It has been hypothesized that retroviruses utilize the exosome biogenesis pathway for the formation of infectious particles. In support of this, we find that Jurkat T cells direct the key budding factor of HIV, HIV Gag, to these endosome-like domains of plasma membrane and secrete HIV Gag from the cell in exosomes. PMID:16533950

  13. Sizes of lipid domains: What do we know from artificial lipid membranes? What are the possible shared features with membrane rafts in cells?

    PubMed

    Rosetti, Carla M; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2017-01-28

    In model lipid membranes with phase coexistence, domain sizes distribute in a very wide range, from the nanometer (reported in vesicles and supported films) to the micrometer (observed in many model membranes). Domain growth by coalescence and Ostwald ripening is slow (minutes to hours), the domain size being correlated with the size of the capture region. Domain sizes thus strongly depend on the number of domains which, in the case of a nucleation process, depends on the oversaturation of the system, on line tension and on the perturbation rate in relation to the membrane dynamics. Here, an overview is given of the factors that affect nucleation or spinodal decomposition and domain growth, and their influence on the distribution of domain sizes in different model membranes is discussed. The parameters analyzed respond to very general physical rules, and we therefore propose a similar behavior for the rafts in the plasma membrane of cells, but with obstructed mobility and with a continuously changing environment.

  14. Stratum corneum dysfunction in dandruff

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G A; Hoptroff, M; Harding, C R

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synopsis Dandruff is characterized by a flaky, pruritic scalp and affects up to half the world’s population post-puberty. The aetiology of dandruff is multifactorial, influenced by Malassezia, sebum production and individual susceptibility. The commensal yeast Malassezia is a strong contributory factor to dandruff formation, but the presence of Malassezia on healthy scalps indicates that Malassezia alone is not a sufficient cause. A healthy stratum corneum (SC) forms a protective barrier to prevent water loss and maintain hydration of the scalp. It also protects against external insults such as microorganisms, including Malassezia, and toxic materials. Severe or chronic barrier damage can impair proper hydration, leading to atypical epidermal proliferation, keratinocyte differentiation and SC maturation, which may underlie some dandruff symptoms. The depleted and disorganized structural lipids of the dandruff SC are consistent with the weakened barrier indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss. Further evidence of a weakened barrier in dandruff includes subclinical inflammation and higher susceptibility to topical irritants. We are proposing that disruption of the SC of the scalp may facilitate dandruff generation, in part by affecting susceptibility to metabolites from Malassezia. Treatment of dandruff with cosmetic products to directly improve SC integrity while providing effective antifungal activity may thus be beneficial. Résumé Les pellicules se caractérisent par un cuir chevelu prurigineux, squameux, et affectent jusqu’à la moitié de la population post-pubertaire du monde. L’étiologie des pellicules est multifactorielle, influencée par Malassezia, par la production de sébum, et par la susceptibilité individuelle. La levure commensale Malassezia est un facteur fortement contributif à la formation de pellicules, mais la présence de Malassezia aussi sur les cuirs chevelus sains indique que Malassezia seule n’est pas une cause

  15. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Madsen, K L; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U; Stamou, D

    2010-05-03

    The internal membranes of eukaryotic cells are all twists and bends characterized by high curvature. During recent years it has become clear that specific proteins sustain these curvatures while others simply recognize membrane shape and use it as "molecular information" to organize cellular processes in space and time. Here we discuss this new important recognition process termed membrane curvature sensing (MCS). First, we review a new fluorescence-based experimental method that allows characterization of MCS using measurements on single vesicles and compare it to sensing assays that use bulk/ensemble liposome samples of different mean diameter. Next, we describe two different MCS protein motifs (amphipathic helices and BAR domains) and suggest that in both cases curvature sensitive membrane binding results from asymmetric insertion of hydrophobic amino acids in the lipid membrane. This mechanism can be extended to include the insertion of alkyl chain in the lipid membrane and consequently palmitoylated and myristoylated proteins are predicted to display similar curvature sensitive binding. Surprisingly, in all the aforementioned cases, MCS is predominantly mediated by a higher density of binding sites on curved membranes instead of higher affinity as assumed so far. Finally, we integrate these new insights into the debate about which motifs are involved in sensing versus induction of membrane curvature and what role MCS proteins may play in biology.

  16. Quantitation of the Calcium and Membrane Binding Properties of the C2 Domains of Dysferlin

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Nazish; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Marty, Naomi J.; Johnson, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    Dysferlin is a large membrane protein involved in calcium-triggered resealing of the sarcolemma after injury. Although it is generally accepted that dysferlin is Ca2+ sensitive, the Ca2+ binding properties of dysferlin have not been characterized. In this study, we report an analysis of the Ca2+ and membrane binding properties of all seven C2 domains of dysferlin as well as a multi-C2 domain construct. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that all seven dysferlin C2 domains interact with Ca2+ with a wide range of binding affinities. The C2A and C2C domains were determined to be the most sensitive, with Kd values in the tens of micromolar, whereas the C2D domain was least sensitive, with a near millimolar Kd value. Mutagenesis of C2A demonstrates the requirement for negatively charged residues in the loop regions for divalent ion binding. Furthermore, dysferlin displayed significantly lower binding affinity for the divalent cations magnesium and strontium. Measurement of a multidomain construct indicates that the solution binding affinity does not change when C2 domains are linked. Finally, sedimentation assays suggest all seven C2 domains bind lipid membranes, and that Ca2+ enhances but is not required for interaction. This report reveals for the first time, to our knowledge, that all dysferlin domains bind Ca2+ albeit with varying affinity and stoichiometry. PMID:24461013

  17. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  18. Coordinated autoinhibition of F-BAR domain membrane binding and WASp activation by Nervous Wreck

    PubMed Central

    Stanishneva-Konovalova, Tatiana B.; Kelley, Charlotte F.; Eskin, Tania L.; Messelaar, Emily M.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Sokolova, Olga S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane remodeling by Fes/Cip4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs167 (F-BAR) proteins is regulated by autoinhibitory interactions between their SRC homology 3 (SH3) and F-BAR domains. The structural basis of autoregulation, and whether it affects interactions of SH3 domains with other cellular ligands, remain unclear. Here we used single-particle electron microscopy to determine the structure of the F-BAR protein Nervous Wreck (Nwk) in both soluble and membrane-bound states. On membrane binding, Nwk SH3 domains do not completely dissociate from the F-BAR dimer, but instead shift from its concave surface to positions on either side of the dimer. Unexpectedly, along with controlling membrane binding, these autoregulatory interactions inhibit the ability of Nwk-SH3a to activate Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp)/actin related protein (Arp) 2/3-dependent actin filament assembly. In Drosophila neurons, Nwk autoregulation restricts SH3a domain-dependent synaptopod formation, synaptic growth, and actin organization. Our results define structural rearrangements in Nwk that control F-BAR–membrane interactions as well as SH3 domain activities, and suggest that these two functions are tightly coordinated in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27601635

  19. Cholesterol segregates into submicrometric domains at the living erythrocyte membrane: evidence and regulation.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Conrard, Louise; Pollet, Hélène; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Cominelli, Antoine; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2015-12-01

    Although cholesterol is essential for membrane fluidity and deformability, the level of its lateral heterogeneity at the plasma membrane of living cells is poorly understood due to lack of appropriate probe. We here report on the usefulness of the D4 fragment of Clostridium perfringens toxin fused to mCherry (theta*), as specific, non-toxic, sensitive and quantitative cholesterol-labeling tool, using erythrocyte flat membrane. By confocal microscopy, theta* labels cholesterol-enriched submicrometric domains in coverslip-spread but also gel-suspended (non-stretched) fresh erythrocytes, suggesting in vivo relevance. Cholesterol domains on spread erythrocytes are stable in time and space, restricted by membrane:spectrin anchorage via 4.1R complexes, and depend on temperature and sphingomyelin, indicating combined regulation by extrinsic membrane:cytoskeleton interaction and by intrinsic lipid packing. Cholesterol domains partially co-localize with BODIPY-sphingomyelin-enriched domains. In conclusion, we show that theta* is a useful vital probe to study cholesterol organization and demonstrate that cholesterol forms submicrometric domains in living cells.

  20. Characterization of the membrane-targeting C1 domain in Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Shigeki; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Toshima, Hirono; Fukui, Aya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Masami; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2010-08-13

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a virulence factor responsible for the pathogenesis of some forms of pasteurellosis. The toxin activates G(q)- and G(12/13)-dependent pathways through the deamidation of a glutamine residue in the alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric GTPases. We recently reported the crystal structure of the C terminus (residues 575-1285) of PMT (C-PMT), which is composed of three domains (C1, C2, and C3), and that the C1 domain is involved in the localization of C-PMT to the plasma membrane, and the C3 domain possesses a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad. In this study, we analyzed the membrane-targeting function of the C1 domain in detail. The C1 domain consists of seven helices of which the first four (residues 590-670), showing structural similarity to the N terminus of Clostridium difficile toxin B, were found to be involved in the recruitment of C-PMT to the plasma membrane. C-PMT lacking these helices (C-PMT DeltaC1(4H)) neither localized to the plasma membrane nor stimulated the G(q/12/13)-dependent signaling pathways. When the membrane-targeting property was complemented by a peptide tag with an N-myristoylation motif, C-PMT DeltaC1(4H) recovered the PMT activity. Direct binding between the C1 domain and liposomes containing phospholipids was evidenced by surface plasmon resonance analyses. These results indicate that the C1 domain of C-PMT functions as a targeting signal for the plasma membrane.

  1. Stratum corneum dysfunction in dandruff.

    PubMed

    Turner, G A; Hoptroff, M; Harding, C R

    2012-08-01

    Dandruff is characterized by a flaky, pruritic scalp and affects up to half the world's population post-puberty. The aetiology of dandruff is multifactorial, influenced by Malassezia, sebum production and individual susceptibility. The commensal yeast Malassezia is a strong contributory factor to dandruff formation, but the presence of Malassezia on healthy scalps indicates that Malassezia alone is not a sufficient cause. A healthy stratum corneum (SC) forms a protective barrier to prevent water loss and maintain hydration of the scalp. It also protects against external insults such as microorganisms, including Malassezia, and toxic materials. Severe or chronic barrier damage can impair proper hydration, leading to atypical epidermal proliferation, keratinocyte differentiation and SC maturation, which may underlie some dandruff symptoms. The depleted and disorganized structural lipids of the dandruff SC are consistent with the weakened barrier indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss. Further evidence of a weakened barrier in dandruff includes subclinical inflammation and higher susceptibility to topical irritants. We are proposing that disruption of the SC of the scalp may facilitate dandruff generation, in part by affecting susceptibility to metabolites from Malassezia. Treatment of dandruff with cosmetic products to directly improve SC integrity while providing effective antifungal activity may thus be beneficial.

  2. E-Syts, a family of membranous Ca2+-sensor proteins with multiple C2 domains

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Won; Chang, Wen-Pin; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    C2 domains are autonomously folded protein modules that generally act as Ca2+- and phospholipid-binding domains and/or as protein–protein interaction domains. We now report the primary structures and biochemical properties of a family of evolutionarily conserved mammalian proteins, referred to as E-Syts, for extended synaptotagmin-like proteins. E-Syts contain an N-terminal transmembrane region, a central juxtamembranous domain that is conserved from yeast to human, and five (E-Syt1) or three (E-Syt2 and E-Syt3) C-terminal C2 domains. Only the first E-Syt C2 domain, the C2A domain, includes the complete sequence motif that is required for Ca2+ binding in C2 domains. Recombinant protein fragments of E-Syt2 that include the first C2 domain are capable of Ca2+-dependent phospholipid binding at micromolar concentrations of free Ca2+, suggesting that E-Syts bind Ca2+ through their first C2 domain in a phospholipid complex. E-Syts are ubiquitously expressed, but enriched in brain. Expression of myc-tagged E-Syt proteins in transfected cells demonstrated localization to intracellular membranes for E-Syt1 and to plasma membranes for E-Syt2 and E-Syt3. Structure/function studies showed that the plasma-membrane localization of E-Syt2 and E-Syt3 was directed by their C-terminal C2C domains. This result reveals an unexpected mechanism by which the C2C domains of E-Syt2 and E-Syt3 functions as a targeting motif that localizes these proteins into the plasma membrane independent of their transmembrane region. Viewed together, our findings suggest that E-Syts function as Ca2+-regulated intrinsic membrane proteins with multiple C2 domains, expanding the repertoire of such proteins to a fourth class beyond synaptotagmins, ferlins, and MCTPs (multiple C2 domain and transmembrane region proteins). PMID:17360437

  3. Quantifying Membrane Curvature Generation of Drosophila Amphiphysin N-BAR Domains

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Michael C.; Capraro, Benjamin R.; Tian, Aiwei; Isas, Jose M.; Langen, Ralf; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Biological membrane functions are coupled to membrane curvature, the regulation of which often involves membrane-associated proteins. The membrane-binding N-terminal amphipathic helix-containing BIN/Amphiphysin/Rvs (N-BAR) domain of amphiphysin is implicated in curvature generation and maintenance. Improving the mechanistic understanding of membrane curvature regulation by N-BAR domains requires quantitative experimental characterization. We have measured tube pulling force modulation by the N-BAR domain of Drosophila amphiphysin (DA-N-BAR) bound to tubular membranes pulled from micropipette-aspirated giant vesicles. We observed that fluorescently-labeled DA-N-BAR showed significantly higher protein density on tubules compared to the connected low-curvature vesicle membrane. Furthermore, we found the equilibrium tube pulling force to be systematically dependent on the aqueous solution concentration of DA-N-BAR, thereby providing the first quantitative assessment of spontaneous curvature generation. At sufficiently high protein concentrations, pulled tubes required no external force to maintain mechanical equilibrium, in agreement with the qualitative spontaneous tubulation previously reported for amphiphysin. PMID:23772271

  4. Synergistic effect of Pb2+ and PIP2 on C2 domain-membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Krystal A.; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-responsive C2 domains are peripheral membrane modules that target their host proteins to anionic membranes upon binding Ca2+ ions. Several C2-domain containing proteins, such as Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes, have been identified as molecular targets of Pb2+, a known environmental toxin. We demonstrated previously that the C2 domain from PKCα (C2α) binds Pb2+ with high affinity and undergoes membrane insertion in the Pb2+-complexed form. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of phosphatidylinostiol-4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) on the C2α-Pb2+ interactions. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments, we show that Pb2+ and PIP2 synergistically enhance each other’s affinity to C2α. Moreover, the affinity of C2α to PIP2 increases upon progressive saturation of the metal-binding sites. Combining the NMR data with the results of protein-to-membrane Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and vesicle sedimentation experiments, we demonstrate that PIP2 can influence two aspects of C2α-Pb2+-membrane interactions: the affinity of C2α to Pb2+, and the association of Pb2+ with the anionic sites on the membrane. Both factors may contribute to the toxic effect of Pb2+ resulting from the aberrant modulation of PKCα activity. Finally, we propose a mechanism for Pb2+ outcompeting Ca2+ from the membrane-bound C2α. PMID:22475207

  5. Kinetics of Endophilin N-BAR Domain Dimerization and Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Benjamin R.; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Zhiming; Dunn, Joanna M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Baumgart, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment to plasma membrane invaginations of the protein endophilin is a temporally regulated step in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endophilin is believed to sense or stabilize membrane curvature, which in turn likely depends on the dimeric structure of the protein. The dynamic nature of the membrane association and dimerization of endophilin is thus functionally important and is illuminated herein. Using subunit exchange Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determine dimer dissociation kinetics and find a dimerization equilibrium constant orders of magnitude lower than previously published values. We characterize N-BAR domain membrane association kinetics under conditions where the dimeric species predominates, by stopped flow, observing prominent electrostatic sensitivity of membrane interaction kinetics. Relative to membrane binding, we find that protein monomer/dimer species equilibrate with far slower kinetics. Complementary optical microscopy studies reveal strikingly slow membrane dissociation and an increase of dissociation rate constant for a construct lacking the amphipathic segment helix 0 (H0). We attribute the slow dissociation kinetics to higher-order protein oligomerization on the membrane. We incorporate our findings into a kinetic scheme for endophilin N-BAR membrane binding and find a significant separation of time scales for endophilin membrane binding and subsequent oligomerization. This separation may facilitate the regulation of membrane trafficking phenomena. PMID:23482561

  6. Detergent-free domain isolated from Xenopus egg plasma membrane with properties similar to those of detergent-resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Vegelyte-Avery, Vaida; Stith, Brad; Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Wolkers, Willem F; Crowe, John H; Tablin, Fern; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2002-11-05

    Microdomains known as "rafts" have been isolated from many cell types as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) and are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. However, there has been considerable controversy over whether such domains are found in native membranes or are artificially generated by the purification procedure. This controversy is based at least in part on the fact that raft membranes were first detected following detergent extraction in the cold. We isolated two plasma membrane fractions, without detergent treatment, using a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. One fraction was designated "light" and the other "heavy." These fractions were compared with DRMs, which were isolated in the presence of 1% Triton X-100. We found that Xenopus DRMs are enriched with sphingomyelin and cholesterol and exhibit a phase state similar to the liquid-ordered phase. Comparison of DRM complexes with the light and heavy plasma membrane fractions revealed some physical and biochemical similarities between the light fraction of the plasma membrane and the DRM complexes, based on (1) the phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio and (2) the protein composition visualized on a two-dimensional gel. These two fractions are also quite similar in their thermotropic phase behavior, and their high levels of ganglioside GM1. We conclude that the light membrane fraction isolated in a detergent-free environment has many of the characteristics normally associated with DRMs.

  7. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  8. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaindl, T.; Oelke, J.; Pasc, A.; Kaufmann, S.; Konovalov, O. V.; Funari, S. S.; Engel, U.; Wixforth, A.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-07-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling α-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  9. Membrane Domains Based on Ankyrin and Spectrin Associated with Cell–Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Vann; Healy, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Nodes of Ranvier and axon initial segments of myelinated nerves, sites of cell–cell contact in early embryos and epithelial cells, and neuromuscular junctions of skeletal muscle all perform physiological functions that depend on clustering of functionally related but structurally diverse ion transporters and cell adhesion molecules within microdomains of the plasma membrane. These specialized cell surface domains appeared at different times in metazoan evolution, involve a variety of cell types, and are populated by distinct membrane-spanning proteins. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that these domains all share on their cytoplasmic surfaces a membrane skeleton comprised of members of the ankyrin and spectrin families. This review will summarize basic features of ankyrins and spectrins, and will discuss emerging evidence that these proteins are key players in a conserved mechanism responsible for assembly and maintenance of physiologically important domains on the surfaces of diverse cells. PMID:20457566

  10. Interactions between the HIV-TAT transduction domain and cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Biologically active molecules such as proteins and oligonucleotides can be transduced into cells with high efficiency when covalently linked to a Protein Transduction Domain (PTD), such as the TAT domain in the HIV virus. All PTDs have a high content of basic amino acids resulting in a net positive charge. Electrostatic interactions between cationic PTDs and the negatively charged phospholipids that constitute the plasma membrane are likely to be responsible for peptide uptake, but no detailed structural studies exist. We compare membrane structures induced by the cationic TAT domain and those induced by other cationic polypeptides as a function of membrane composition using synchrotron x-ray scattering, and examine possible mechanisms of the anomalous transduction.

  11. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  12. Spectrin- and ankyrin-based membrane domains and the evolution of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Vann; Lorenzo, Damaris N

    2013-01-01

    Spectrin and ankyrin are membrane skeletal proteins that contribute to mechanical support of plasma membranes and micron-scale organization of diverse membrane-spanning proteins. This chapter provides a plausible scenario for the evolution of ankyrin- and spectrin-based membrane domains with a focus on vertebrates. The analysis integrates recent phylogenetic information with functional analyses of spectrin and ankyrin in erythrocytes, axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier in neurons, T-tubules and intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes, lateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, and costameres of striated muscle. A core spectrin-ankyrin mechanism for coordinating membrane-spanning proteins and mechanically stabilizing membrane bilayers was expanded in vertebrates by gene duplication events, insertion of giant alternately spliced exons of axonal ankyrins, and a versatile peptide-binding fold of ANK repeats that facilitated acquisition of new protein partners. Cell adhesion molecules (CAM), including dystroglycan, L1 CAM family members, and cadherins, are the earliest examples of membrane-spanning proteins with ankyrin-binding motifs and were all present in urochordates. In contrast, ion channels have continued to evolve ankyrin-binding sites in vertebrates. These considerations suggest a model where proto-domains formed through interaction of ankyrin and spectrin with CAMs. These proto-domains then became populated with ion channels that developed ankyrin-binding activity with selective pressure provided by optimization of physiological function. The best example is the axon initial segment where ankyrin-binding activity evolved sequentially and independently first in L1 CAMs, then in voltage-gated sodium channels, and finally in KCNQ2/3 channels, with the selective advantage of fast and precisely regulated signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Macro, micro and nano domains in the membrane of parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Wanderley

    2007-09-01

    The structural organization of the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is briefly revised taking into consideration the organization of proteins and lipids and the concept of microdomains, lipid rafts and detergent resistant membranes. The biochemical data available concerning the presence of microdomains in parasitic protozoa is reviewed and emphasis is given on the identification of special domains recognized by morphological approaches, especially with the use of the freeze-fracture technique.

  14. Regulation of Rac1 translocation and activation by membrane domains and their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Kiessling, Volker; Wan, Chen; Hoffman, Brenton D.; Norambuena, Andres; Tamm, Lukas K.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activation of Rac1 and related Rho GTPases involves dissociation from Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor proteins and translocation to membranes, where they bind effectors. Previous studies have suggested that the binding of Rac1 to membranes requires, and colocalizes with, cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered (lo) membrane domains (lipid rafts). Here, we have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that robustly detects Rac1 membrane targeting in living cells. Surprisingly, FRET with acceptor constructs that were targeted to either raft or non-raft areas indicated that Rac1 was present in both regions. Functional studies showed that Rac1 localization to non-raft regions decreased GTP loading as a result of inactivation by GTPase-activating proteins. In vitro, Rac1 translocation to supported lipid bilayers also required lo domains, yet Rac1 was concentrated in the liquid-disordered (ld) phase. Single-molecule analysis demonstrated that translocation occurred preferentially at lo–ld boundaries. These results, therefore, suggest that Rac1 translocates to the membrane at domain boundaries, then diffuses into raft and non-raft domains, which controls interactions. These findings resolve discrepancies in our understanding of Rac biology and identify novel mechanisms by which lipid rafts modulate Rho GTPase signaling. PMID:24695858

  15. LdFlabarin, a New BAR Domain Membrane Protein of Leishmania Flagellum

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Salin, Bénédicte; Boissier, Fanny; Blancard, Corinne; Sauvanet, Cécile; Metzler, Christelle; Espiau, Benoît; Sahin, Annelise; Merlin, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    During the Leishmania life cycle, the flagellum undergoes successive assembly and disassembly of hundreds of proteins. Understanding these processes necessitates the study of individual components. Here, we investigated LdFlabarin, an uncharacterized L. donovani flagellar protein. The gene is conserved within the Leishmania genus and orthologous genes only exist in the Trypanosoma genus. LdFlabarin associates with the flagellar plasma membrane, extending from the base to the tip of the flagellum as a helicoidal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis, deletions and chimera constructs showed that LdFlabarin flagellar addressing necessitates three determinants: an N-terminal potential acylation site and a central BAR domain for membrane targeting and the C-terminal domain for flagellar specificity. In vitro, the protein spontaneously associates with liposomes, triggering tubule formation, which suggests a structural/morphogenetic function. LdFlabarin is the first characterized Leishmania BAR domain protein, and the first flagellum-specific BAR domain protein. PMID:24086735

  16. A C-terminal membrane association domain of phototropin 2 is necessary for chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Nagatani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), plant-specific blue light receptor kinases, mediate a range of physiological responses in Arabidopsis, including phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, stomatal opening and leaf flattening. Phototropins consist of two photoreceptive domains at their N-terminus, LOV1 (light, oxygen or voltage 1) and LOV2, and a serine/threonine kinase domain at their C-terminus. Here, we determined the molecular moiety for the membrane association of phototropins using the yeast CytoTrap and Arabidopsis protoplast systems. We then examined the physiological significance of the membrane association of phototropins. This detailed study with serial deletions narrowed down the association domain to a relatively small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropin. The functional analysis of phot2 deletion mutants in the phot2-deficient Adiantum and Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the ability to mediate the chloroplast avoidance response correlated well with phot2's membrane association, especially with the Golgi apparatus. Taken together, our data suggest that a small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropins is necessary not only for membrane association but also for the physiological activities that elicit phototropin-specific responses.

  17. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  18. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  19. Status of caveolin-1 in various membrane domains of the bovine lens.

    PubMed

    Cenedella, Richard J; Sexton, Patricia S; Brako, Lawrence; Lo, Woo-Kuen; Jacob, Robert F

    2007-10-01

    Recent studies of the distribution and relative concentration of caveolin-1 in fractions of bovine lens epithelial and fiber cells have led to the novel concept that caveolin-1 may largely exist as a peripheral membrane protein in some cells. Caveolin-1 is typically viewed as a scaffolding protein for caveolae in plasma membrane. In this study, membrane from cultured bovine lens epithelial cells and bovine lens fiber cells were divided into urea soluble and insoluble fractions. Cytosolic lipid vesicles were also recovered from the lens epithelial cells. Lipid-raft domains were recovered from fiber cells following treatment with detergents and examined for caveolin and lipid content. Aliquots of all fractions were Western blotted for caveolin-1. Fluorescence microscopy and double immunofluorescence labeling were used to examine the distribution of caveolin-1 in cultured epithelial cells. Electron micrographs revealed an abundance of caveolae in plasma membrane of cultured lens epithelial cells. About 60% of the caveolin-1 in the epithelial-crude membrane was soluble in urea, a characteristic of peripheral membrane proteins. About 30% of the total was urea-insoluble membrane protein that likely supports the structure of caveolae. The remaining caveolin was part of cytosolic lipid vesicles. By contrast, most caveolin in the bovine lens fiber cell membrane was identified as intrinsic protein, being present at relatively low concentrations in caveolae-free lipid raft domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. We estimate that these domains occupied 25-30% of the fiber cell membrane surface. Thus, the status of caveolin-1 in lens epithelial cells appears markedly different from that in fiber cells.

  20. Domain Formation Induced by the Adsorption of Charged Proteins on Mixed Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mbamala, Emmanuel C.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral proteins can trigger the formation of domains in mixed fluid-like lipid membranes. We analyze the mechanism underlying this process for proteins that bind electrostatically onto a flat two-component membrane, composed of charged and neutral lipid species. Of particular interest are membranes in which the hydrocarbon lipid tails tend to segregate owing to nonideal chain mixing, but the (protein-free) lipid membrane is nevertheless stable due to the electrostatic repulsion between the charged lipid headgroups. The adsorption of charged, say basic, proteins onto a membrane containing anionic lipids induces local lipid demixing, whereby charged lipids migrate toward (or away from) the adsorption site, so as to minimize the electrostatic binding free energy. Apart from reducing lipid headgroup repulsion, this process creates a gradient in lipid composition around the adsorption zone, and hence a line energy whose magnitude depends on the protein's size and charge and the extent of lipid chain nonideality. Above a certain critical lipid nonideality, the line energy is large enough to induce domain formation, i.e., protein aggregation and, concomitantly, macroscopic lipid phase separation. We quantitatively analyze the thermodynamic stability of the dressed membrane based on nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory, accounting for both the microscopic characteristics of the proteins and lipid composition modulations at and around the adsorption zone. Spinodal surfaces and critical points of the dressed membranes are calculated for several different model proteins of spherical and disk-like shapes. Among the models studied we find the most substantial protein-induced membrane destabilization for disk-like proteins whose charges are concentrated in the membrane-facing surface. If additional charges reside on the side faces of the proteins, direct protein-protein repulsion diminishes considerably the propensity for domain formation. Generally, a highly charged flat face

  1. The Phenyltetraene Lysophospholipid Analog PTE-ET-18-OMe as a Fluorescent Anisotropy Probe of Liquid Ordered Membrane Domains (Lipid Rafts) and Ceramide-Rich Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Bakht, Omar; Delgado, Javier; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Acuña, A. Ulises; London, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The conjugated phenyltetraene PTE-ET-18-OMe (all-(E)-1-O-(15’-Phenylpentadeca-8’,10’,12’,14’-tetraenyl)-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine), is a recently developed fluorescent lysophospholipid analog of edelfosine, (Quesada et al. (2004) J. Med. Chem. 47, 5333–5335). We investigated the use of this analog as a probe of membrane structure. PTE-ET-18-OMe was found to have several properties that are favorable for fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) experiments in membranes, including low fluorescence in water and moderately strong association with lipid bilayers. PTE-ET-18-OMe has absorbance and fluorescence properties similar to those of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) probes, with about as large a difference between its fluorescence anisotropy in liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered states (gel and Lo) as observed for DPH. Also like DPH, PTE-ET-18-OMe has a moderate affinity for both gel state ordered domains and Lo state ordered domains (rafts). However, unlike fluorescent sterols or DPH (Megha and London (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 9997–10004), PTE-ET-18-OMe is not displaced from ordered domains by ceramide. Also unlike DPH, PTE-ET-18-OMe shows only slow exchange between the inner and outer leaflets of membrane bilayers, and can thus be used to examine anisotropy of an individual leaflet of a lipid bilayer. Since PTE-ET-18-OMe is a zwitterionic molecule, it should not be as influenced by electrostatic interactions as are other probes that do not cross the lipid bilayer but have a net charge. We conclude that PTE-ET-18-OMe has some unique properties that should make it a useful fluorescence probe of membrane structure. PMID:17573036

  2. Identification of routing determinants in the cytosolic domain of a secretory granule-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Milgram, S L; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1996-07-19

    We have investigated the trafficking of integral membrane peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) in the neuroendocrine AtT-20 cell line. This bifunctional enzyme has two domains which together catalyze the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates yielding amidated products stored in secretory granules. As soluble proteins, both catalytic domains were independently targeted to secretory granules. In contrast, membrane PAM was largely localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Upon truncation of its cytoplasmic COOH-terminal domain, membrane PAM was less efficiently cleaved by secretory granule enzymes and accumulated on the plasma membrane. When transferred to the lumenal domain of the interleukin 2 receptor alpha-chain (Tac protein), the cytoplasmic domain of PAM caused rerouting of Tac from the surface to the TGN and supported internalization of Tac antibody from the plasma membrane. To define sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of integral membrane PAM involved in its trafficking, we expressed PAM proteins containing truncations, deletions, or point mutations in the COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain. PAM proteins were not retained in the TGN when half of the cytoplasmic domain was deleted; such proteins accumulated on the plasma membrane, were not efficiently internalized, and were cleaved to generate a bifunctional PAM protein that was not stored in secretory granules. A tyrosine-based internalization motif was identified, which was not required for efficient cleavage of full-length integral membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes. Deletion of an 18-amino acid domain surrounding this Tyr residue both diminished cleavage of membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes and eliminated internalization of PAM from the plasma membrane. The cytoplasmic domain is responsible for retaining membrane PAM in the TGN and for retrieving membrane PAM from the cell surface, while the lumenal catalytic domains of PAM appear to be responsible for

  3. Evidence for annexin A6-dependent plasma membrane remodelling of lipid domains

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Vilà de Muga, Sandra; Owen, Dylan M; Williamson, David; Magenau, Astrid; García-Melero, Ana; Reverter, Meritxell; Hoque, Monira; Cairns, Rose; Cornely, Rhea; Tebar, Francesc; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina; Ayala-Sanmartín, Jesús; Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Annexin A6 (AnxA6) is a calcium-dependent phospholipid-binding protein that can be recruited to the plasma membrane to function as a scaffolding protein to regulate signal complex formation, endo- and exocytic pathways as well as distribution of cellular cholesterol. Here, we have investigated how AnxA6 influences the membrane order. Experimental Approach We used Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ staining in (i) artificial membranes; (ii) live cells to investigate membrane packing and ordered lipid phases; and (iii) a super-resolution imaging (photoactivated localization microscopy, PALM) and Ripley's K second-order point pattern analysis approach to assess how AnxA6 regulates plasma membrane order domains and protein clustering. Key Results In artificial membranes, purified AnxA6 induced a global increase in membrane order. However, confocal microscopy using di-4-ANEPPDHQ in live cells showed that cells expressing AnxA6, which reduces plasma membrane cholesterol levels and modifies the actin cytoskeleton meshwork, displayed a decrease in membrane order (∼15 and 30% in A431 and MEF cells respectively). PALM data from Lck10 and Src15 membrane raft/non-raft markers revealed that AnxA6 expression induced clustering of both raft and non-raft markers. Altered clustering of Lck10 and Src15 in cells expressing AnxA6 was also observed after cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or actin cytoskeleton disruption with latrunculin B. Conclusions and Implications AnxA6-induced plasma membrane remodelling indicated that elevated AnxA6 expression decreased membrane order through the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis and the actin cytoskeleton. This study provides the first evidence from live cells that support current models of annexins as membrane organizers. PMID:25409976

  4. Interfacial pre-transmembrane domains in viral proteins promoting membrane fusion and fission.

    PubMed

    Lorizate, Maier; Huarte, Nerea; Sáez-Cirión, Asier; Nieva, José L

    2008-01-01

    Membrane fusion and fission underlie two limiting steps of enveloped virus replication cycle: access to the interior of the host-cell (entry) and dissemination of viral progeny after replication (budding), respectively. These dynamic processes proceed mediated by specialized proteins that disrupt and bend the lipid bilayer organization transiently and locally. We introduced Wimley-White membrane-water partitioning free energies of the amino acids as an algorithm for predicting functional domains that may transmit protein conformational energy into membranes. It was found that many viral products possess unusually extended, aromatic-rich pre-transmembrane stretches predicted to stably reside at the membrane interface. Here, we review structure-function studies, as well as data reported on the interaction of representative peptides with model membranes, all of which sustain a functional role for these domains in viral fusion and fission. Since pre-transmembrane sequences also constitute antigenic determinants in a membrane-bound state, we also describe some recent results on their recognition and blocking at membrane interface by neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Topology of the membrane domain of human erythrocyte anion exchange protein, AE1.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, J; Tang, X B; Casey, J R

    1999-03-05

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the chloride/bicarbonate exchange protein of the erythrocyte membrane. By using a combination of introduced cysteine mutants and sulfhydryl-specific chemistry, we have mapped the topology of the human AE1 membrane domain. Twenty-seven single cysteines were introduced throughout the Leu708-Val911 region of human AE1, and these mutants were expressed by transient transfection of human embryonic kidney cells. On the basis of cysteine accessibility to membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and to membrane-impermeant lucifer yellow iodoacetamide, we have proposed a model for the topology of AE1 membrane domain. In this model, AE1 is composed of 13 typical transmembrane segments, and the Asp807-His834 region is membrane-embedded but does not have the usual alpha-helical conformation. To identify amino acids that are important for anion transport, we analyzed the anion exchange activity for all introduced cysteine mutants, using a whole cell fluorescence assay. We found that mutants G714C, S725C, and S731C have very low transport activity, implying that this region has a structurally and/or catalytically important role. We measured the residual anion transport activity after mutant treatment with the membrane-impermeant, cysteine-directed compound, sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate) (MTSES). Only two mutants, S852C and A858C, were inhibited by MTSES, indicating that these residues may be located in a pore-lining region.

  6. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent; Peters, Günther H.

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also direct the activity of the enzyme by inducing hydrolysis of certain lipid components due to preferential activity of the enzyme toward lipid domains susceptible to sPLA2. Specifically, we show that the presence of Lα/Lβ and Lα/Pβ′ phase coexistence in a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) system results in the preferential hydrolysis of the shorter-chained lipid component in the mixture, leading to an enrichment in the longer-chained component. The restructuring process is monitored by atomic force microscopy on supported single and double bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We observe that during preferential hydrolysis of the DMPC-rich Lα regions, the Lβ and Pβ′ regions grow and reseal, maintaining membrane integrity. This result indicates that a sharp reorganization of the membrane structure can occur during sPLA2 hydrolysis without necessarily destroying the membrane. We confirm by high-performance liquid chromatography the preferential hydrolysis of DMPC within the phase coexistence region of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, showing that this preferential hydrolysis is accentuated close to the solidus phase boundary. Differential scanning calorimetry results show that this preferential hydrolysis in the presence of lipid domains leads to a membrane system with a higher-temperature melting profile due to enrichment in DSPC. Together, these results show that the presence of lipid domains can induce specificity in the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme, resulting in marked differences in the physical properties of the membrane end-product. PMID:21723818

  7. Tracking Cholesterol/Sphingomyelin-Rich Membrane Domains with the Ostreolysin A-mCherry Protein

    PubMed Central

    Skočaj, Matej; Resnik, Nataša; Grundner, Maja; Ota, Katja; Rojko, Nejc; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Sobota, Andrzej; Maček, Peter; Veranič, Peter; Sepčić, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Ostreolysin A (OlyA) is an ∼15-kDa protein that has been shown to bind selectively to membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. In this study, we investigated whether OlyA fluorescently tagged at the C-terminal with mCherry (OlyA-mCherry) labels cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in artificial membrane systems and in membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. OlyA-mCherry showed similar lipid binding characteristics to non-tagged OlyA. OlyA-mCherry also stained cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in the plasma membranes of both fixed and living MDCK cells, and in the living cells, this staining was abolished by pretreatment with either methyl-β-cyclodextrin or sphingomyelinase. Double labelling of MDCK cells with OlyA-mCherry and the sphingomyelin-specific markers equinatoxin II–Alexa488 and GST-lysenin, the cholera toxin B subunit as a probe that binds to the ganglioside GM1, or the cholesterol-specific D4 domain of perfringolysin O fused with EGFP, showed different patterns of binding and distribution of OlyA-mCherry in comparison with these other proteins. Furthermore, we show that OlyA-mCherry is internalised in living MDCK cells, and within 90 min it reaches the juxtanuclear region via caveolin-1–positive structures. No binding to membranes could be seen when OlyA-mCherry was expressed in MDCK cells. Altogether, these data clearly indicate that OlyA-mCherry is a promising tool for labelling a distinct pool of cholesterol/sphingomyelin membrane domains in living and fixed cells, and for following these domains when they are apparently internalised by the cell. PMID:24664106

  8. An integral membrane protein of the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope contains a nucleoporin-like region

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have identified an integral membrane protein of 145 kD (estimated by SDS-PAGE) of rat liver nuclear envelopes that binds to WGA. We obtained peptide sequence from purified p145 and cloned and sequenced several cDNA clones and one genomic clone. The relative molecular mass of p145 calculated from its complete, cDNA deduced primary structure is 120.7 kD. Antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide represented in p145 reacted monospecifically with p145. In indirect immunofluorescence these antibodies gave punctate staining of the nuclear envelope. Immunogold EM showed specific decoration of the nuclear pores. Thus p145 is an integral membrane protein located specifically in the "pore membrane" domain of the nuclear envelope. To indicate this specific location, and based on its calculated relative molecular mass, the protein is termed POM 121 (pore membrane protein of 121 kD). The 1,199- residue-long primary structure shows a hydrophobic region (residues 29- 72) that is likely to form one (or two adjacent) transmembrane segment(s). The bulk of the protein (residues 73-1199) is predicted to be exposed not on the cisternal side but on the pore side of the pore membrane. It contains 36 consensus sites for various kinases. However, its most striking feature is a repetitive pentapeptide motif XFXFG that has also been shown to occur in several nucleoporins. This nucleoporin- like domain of POM 121 is proposed to function in anchoring components of the nuclear pore complex to the pore membrane. PMID:8335683

  9. Thermodynamics of membrane insertion and refolding of the diphtheria toxin T-domain

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; Rodnin, Mykola V.; Öjemalm, Karin; Holgado, Aurora; Kyrychenko, Alexander; Nilsson, IngMarie; Posokhov, Yevgen O.; Makhatadze, George; von Heijne, Gunnar; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain inserts into the endosomal membrane in response to the endosomal acidification and enables the delivery of the catalytic domain into the cell. The insertion pathway consists of a series of conformational changes that occur in solution and in the membrane and leads to the conversion of a water-soluble state into a transmembrane state. In this work, we utilize various biophysical techniques to characterize the insertion pathway from the thermodynamic perspective. Thermal and chemical unfolding measured by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence reveal that the free energy of unfolding of the T-domain at neutral and mildly acidic pH differ by 3–5 kcal/mol, depending on the experimental conditions. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements show that the free energy change from the membrane-competent state to the interfacial state is approximately −8 kcal/mol and is pH-independent, while that from the membrane-competent state to the transmembrane state ranges between −9.5 to −12 kcal/mol, depending on the membrane lipid composition and pH. Finally, the thermodynamics of transmembrane insertion of individual helices was tested using an in vitro assay that measures the translocon-assisted integration of test sequences into the microsomal membrane. These experiments suggest that even the most hydrophobic helix TH8 has only a small favorable free energy of insertion. The free energy for the insertion of the consensus insertion unit TH8-TH9 is slightly more favorable, yet less favorable than that measured for the entire protein, suggesting a cooperative effect for the membrane insertion of the helices of the T-domain. PMID:25281329

  10. Structural characterization of AS1-membrane interactions from a subset of HAMP domains

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Mäler, Lena; Draheim, Roger R.

    2011-01-01

    HAMP domains convert an extracellular sensory input into an intracellular signaling response in a wide variety of membrane-embedded bacterial proteins. These domains are almost invariably found adjacent to the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. We therefore examined the interaction of peptides corresponding to either AS1 or AS2 of four different, well-characterized HAMP domains with several membrane model systems. The proteins included an Archaeoglobus fulgidus protein (Af1503), the Escherichia coli osmosensor EnvZEc, the E. coli nitrate/nitrite sensor NarXEc, and the aspartate chemoreceptor of E. coli (TarEc). Far-UV CD and NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the induction of secondary structure upon association with neutral or acidic large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and bicelles. We observed significant increases in α-helicity within AS1 from NarXEc and TarEc but not in AS1 from the other proteins. To characterize these interactions further, we determined the solution structure of AS1 from TarEc associated with acidic bicelles. The bulk of AS1 formed an amphipathic α-helix, whereas the N-terminal control cable, the region between TM2 and AS1, remained unstructured. We observed that the conserved prolyl residue found in AS1 of many membrane-adjacent HAMP domains defined the boundary between the unstructured and helical regions. In addition, two positively charged residues that flank the hydrophobic surface of AS1 are thought to facilitate electrostatic interactions with the membrane. We interpret these results within the context of the helix-interaction model for HAMP signaling and propose roles for AS1-membrane interactions during the membrane assembly and transmembrane communication of HAMP-containing receptors. PMID:21763270

  11. Measuring microelastic properties of stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yonghui; Verma, Ritu

    2006-03-01

    We explore the compression moduli of a thin biological tissue through probe microscopy. The elastic modulus (E') of isolated stratum corneum is measured at varying depths through the use of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as well as a nano-indentor (Hysitron Triboscope). In addition, a nano-DMA is used to measure visco-elastic properties. Measurements on dry and hydrated stratum corneum show an order of magnitude difference in E' and the measured tandelta (E''/E') is seen to increase from approximately 0.1 to 0.25. In addition, extensive validation of the experiments is conducted with different indentation probes at different force ranges to reveal the effects of indentor geometry and indentation depth on the measured elastic modulus. The sensitivity of the measurements is tested with applying known treatments to stratum corneum and exploring their effects on biomechanical parameters.

  12. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Joshua M.; Gettel, Douglas L.; Tabaei, Seyed R.; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Groves, Jay T.; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N.

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity. PMID:26745420

  13. Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of the CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEIN Family1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Roppolo, Daniele; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Pfister, Alexandre; Boutet, Emmanuel; Rubio, Maria C.; Dénervaud-Tendon, Valérie; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Xenarios, Ioannis; Geldner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs) are four-membrane-span proteins that mediate the deposition of Casparian strips in the endodermis by recruiting the lignin polymerization machinery. CASPs show high stability in their membrane domain, which presents all the hallmarks of a membrane scaffold. Here, we characterized the large family of CASP-like (CASPL) proteins. CASPLs were found in all major divisions of land plants as well as in green algae; homologs outside of the plant kingdom were identified as members of the MARVEL protein family. When ectopically expressed in the endodermis, most CASPLs were able to integrate the CASP membrane domain, which suggests that CASPLs share with CASPs the propensity to form transmembrane scaffolds. Extracellular loops are not necessary for generating the scaffold, since CASP1 was still able to localize correctly when either one of the extracellular loops was deleted. The CASP first extracellular loop was found conserved in euphyllophytes but absent in plants lacking Casparian strips, an observation that may contribute to the study of Casparian strip and root evolution. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CASPL showed specific expression in a variety of cell types, such as trichomes, abscission zone cells, peripheral root cap cells, and xylem pole pericycle cells. PMID:24920445

  14. Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of the CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEIN Family.

    PubMed

    Roppolo, Daniele; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Pfister, Alexandre; Boutet, Emmanuel; Rubio, Maria C; Dénervaud-Tendon, Valérie; Vermeer, Joop E M; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Xenarios, Ioannis; Geldner, Niko

    2014-08-01

    CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs) are four-membrane-span proteins that mediate the deposition of Casparian strips in the endodermis by recruiting the lignin polymerization machinery. CASPs show high stability in their membrane domain, which presents all the hallmarks of a membrane scaffold. Here, we characterized the large family of CASP-like (CASPL) proteins. CASPLs were found in all major divisions of land plants as well as in green algae; homologs outside of the plant kingdom were identified as members of the MARVEL protein family. When ectopically expressed in the endodermis, most CASPLs were able to integrate the CASP membrane domain, which suggests that CASPLs share with CASPs the propensity to form transmembrane scaffolds. Extracellular loops are not necessary for generating the scaffold, since CASP1 was still able to localize correctly when either one of the extracellular loops was deleted. The CASP first extracellular loop was found conserved in euphyllophytes but absent in plants lacking Casparian strips, an observation that may contribute to the study of Casparian strip and root evolution. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CASPL showed specific expression in a variety of cell types, such as trichomes, abscission zone cells, peripheral root cap cells, and xylem pole pericycle cells.

  15. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study diffusion in the presence of a hierarchy of membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a commonly used experimental technique to study molecular transport, especially in biological systems. FCS is particularly useful in two-dimensional systems such as the cell membrane, where molecules approximately move in a plane over several hundreds of nanometers, and the signal to noise ratio is high. Recent observations showed that proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane (the outermost membrane of a cell) can become temporarily confined in a hierarchy of membrane domains, induced by actin filaments and dynamic clusters formed by lipids and proteins (rafts). There has been considerable interest in measuring the characteristic size and lifetime of these domains via microscopy techniques, including FCS. Even though FCS is widely applicable, interpretation of the results is often indirect, as data has to be fit to model predictions in order to extract transport coefficients. In this talk, I will present our recent theoretical and computational findings on how FCS measurements would reflect diffusion in the simultaneous presence of cytoskeleton induced membrane compartments, and raft-like domains.

  16. Confining Domains Lead to Reaction Bursts: Reaction Kinetics in the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Ziya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Confinement of molecules in specific small volumes and areas within a cell is likely to be a general strategy that is developed during evolution for regulating the interactions and functions of biomolecules. The cellular plasma membrane, which is the outermost membrane that surrounds the entire cell, was considered to be a continuous two-dimensional liquid, but it is becoming clear that it consists of numerous nano-meso-scale domains with various lifetimes, such as raft domains and cytoskeleton-induced compartments, and membrane molecules are dynamically trapped in these domains. In this article, we give a theoretical account on the effects of molecular confinement on reversible bimolecular reactions in a partitioned surface such as the plasma membrane. By performing simulations based on a lattice-based model of diffusion and reaction, we found that in the presence of membrane partitioning, bimolecular reactions that occur in each compartment proceed in bursts during which the reaction rate is sharply and briefly increased even though the asymptotic reaction rate remains the same. We characterized the time between reaction bursts and the burst amplitude as a function of the model parameters, and discussed the biological significance of the reaction bursts in the presence of strong inhibitor activity. PMID:22479350

  17. A domain-specific marker for the hepatocyte plasma membrane: localization of leucine aminopeptidase to the bile canalicular domain

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to establish a domain-specific marker for hepatocyte plasma membranes. In frozen sections of fixed rat liver (0.5-4 microns), antibodies directed against rat intestinal leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) recognized an antigen that was restricted to the bile canalicular plasma membrane. Fluorescence was not observed on the sinusoidal or lateral membranes, and intracellular staining was not detected. The liver antigen was identified as LAP, based on its chemical similarity to intestinal LAP. First, immunoprecipitation experiments using trypsin-solubilized intestinal LAP (G-200 fraction, 91% pure) established a correlation between the loss of LAP enzyme activity from the soluble fraction and the appearance in the specific immunoprecipitates of polypeptides migrating on SDS PAGE between 110,000 and 130,000 daltons. The antigen precipitated from a detergent extract of liver plasma membranes had the same electrophoretic mobility. Second, the chymotryptic map of the major band in the liver immunoprecipitate was similar to that of purified intestinal LAP. PMID:6304108

  18. SMP-domain proteins at membrane contact sites: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Karin M; De Camilli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    SMP-domains are found in proteins that localize to membrane contact sites. Elucidation of the properties of these proteins gives clues as to the molecular bases underlying processes that occur at such sites. Described here are recent discoveries concerning the structure, function, and regulation of the Extended-Synaptotagmin proteins and ERMES complex subunits, SMP-domain proteins at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane and ER-mitochondrial contacts, respectively. They act as tethers contributing to the architecture of these sites and as lipid transporters that convey glycerolipids between apposed membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  20. Two-component membrane material properties and domain formation from dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Illya, G; Lipowsky, R; Shillcock, J C

    2006-09-21

    The material parameters (area stretch modulus and bending rigidity) of two-component amphiphilic membranes are determined from dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The preferred area per molecule for each species is varied so as to produce homogeneous mixtures or nonhomogeneous mixtures that form domains. If the latter mixtures are composed of amphiphiles with the same tail length, but different preferred areas per molecule, their material parameters increase monotonically as a function of composition. By contrast, mixtures of amphiphiles that differ in both tail length and preferred area per molecule form both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous mixtures that both exhibit smaller values of their material properties compared to the corresponding pure systems. When the same nonhomogeneous mixtures of amphiphiles are assembled into planar membrane patches and vesicles, the resulting domain shapes are different when the bending rigidities of the domains are sufficiently different. Additionally, both bilayer and monolayer domains are observed in vesicles. We conclude that the evolution of the domain shapes is influenced by the high curvature of the vesicles in the simulation, a result that may be relevant for biological vesicle membranes.

  1. Saturation-recovery electron paramagnetic resonance discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method for characterizing membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, Witold K; Widomska, Justyna; Wisniewska, Anna; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2007-01-01

    The discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method is a dual-probe saturation-recovery electron paramagnetic resonance approach in which the observable parameter is the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of lipid spin labels, and the measured value is the bimolecular collision rate between molecular oxygen and the nitroxide moiety of spin labels. This method has proven to be extremely sensitive to changes in the local oxygen diffusion-concentration product (around the nitroxide moiety) because of the long T1 of lipid spin labels (1-10 micros) and also because molecular oxygen is a unique probe molecule. Molecular oxygen is paramagnetic, small, and has the appropriate level of hydrophobicity that allows it to partition into various supramolecular structures such as different membrane domains. When located in two different membrane domains, the spin label alone most often cannot differentiate between these domains, giving very similar (indistinguishable) conventional electron paramagnetic resonance spectra and similar T1 values. However, even small differences in lipid packing in these domains will affect oxygen partitioning and oxygen diffusion, which can be easily detected by observing the different T1s from spin labels in these two locations in the presence of molecular oxygen. The DOT method allows one not only to distinguish between the different domains, but also to obtain the value of the oxygen diffusion-concentration product in these domains, which is a useful physical characteristic of the organization of lipids in domains. Profiles of the oxygen diffusion-concentration product (the oxygen transport parameter) in coexisting domains can be obtained in situ without the need for the physical separation of the two domains. Furthermore, under optimal conditions, the exchange rate of spin-labeled molecules between the two domains could be measured.

  2. Plasma membrane partitioning: from macro-domains to new views on plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Moreau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular functions relies on partitioning of domains of diverse sizes within the plasma membrane (PM). Macro-domains measure several micrometers and contain specific proteins concentrated to specific sides (apical, basal, and lateral) of the PM conferring a polarity to the cell. Cell polarity is one of the driving forces in tissue and growth patterning. To maintain macro-domains within the PM, eukaryotic cells exert diverse mechanisms to counteract the free lateral diffusion of proteins. Protein activation/inactivation, endocytosis, PM recycling of transmembrane proteins and the role of diffusion barriers in macro-domains partitioning at PM will be discussed. Moreover, as plasmodesmata (PDs) are domains inserted within the PM which also mediate tissue and growth patterning, it is essential to understand how segregation of specific set of proteins is maintained at PDs while PDs domains are smaller in size compared to macro-domains. Here, we will present mechanisms allowing restriction of proteins at PM macro-domains, but for which molecular components have been found in PDs proteome. We will explore the hypothesis that partitioning of macro-domains and PDs may be ruled by similar mechanisms.

  3. Membrane lipid domains and rafts: current applications of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Loura, Luís M S; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-02-01

    Membrane microdomains and their involvement in cellular processes are part of the current paradigm of biomembranes. However, a better characterization of domains, namely lipid rafts, is needed. In this review, it is shown how the use of time-resolved fluorescence, with the adequate parameters and probes, helps elucidating the type, number, fraction, composition and size of lipid phases and domains in multicomponent model systems. The determination of phase diagrams for lipid mixtures containing sphingolipids and/or cholesterol is exemplified. The use of fluorescence quenching and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are also illustrated. Strategies for studying protein-induced domains are presented. The advantages of using single point microscopic decays and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in systems with three-phase coexistence are explained. Finally, the introduction of FLIM allows studies in live cell membranes, and the nature of the microdomains observed is readily elucidated due to the information retrieved from fluorescence lifetimes.

  4. Spatial control of plasma membrane domains: ROP GTPase-based symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Lavagi, Irene

    2012-12-01

    Breaking of the cell membrane symmetry to form polarized or localized domains/regions of the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs in essentially all cellular organisms, and is required for a wide variety of cellular functions/behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. In plants, the development of localized or polarized PM domains has been linked to a vast array of cellular and developmental processes such as polar cell expansion, asymmetric cell division, cell morphogenesis, the polarization of auxin transporters (and thus auxin polar transport), secondary cell wall patterning, cell type specification, and tissue pattern formation. Rho GTPases from plants (ROPs) are known to be involved in many of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge on ROP involvement in breaking symmetry and propose that ROP-based self-organizing signaling may provide a common mechanism for the spatial control of PM domains required in various cellular and developmental processes in plants.

  5. A study of the membrane association and regulatory effect of the phospholemman cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Eleri; Whittaker, Christopher A P; Barsukov, Igor L; Esmann, Mikael; Middleton, David A

    2011-04-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) is a single-span transmembrane protein belonging to the FXYD family of proteins. PLM (or FXYD1) regulates the Na,K-ATPase (NKA) ion pump by altering its affinity for K(+) and Na(+) and by reducing its hydrolytic activity. Structural studies of PLM in anionic detergent micelles have suggested that the cytoplasmic domain, which alone can regulate NKA, forms a partial helix which is stabilized by interactions with the charged membrane surface. This work examines the membrane affinity and regulatory function of a 35-amino acid peptide (PLM(38-72)) representing the PLM cytoplasmic domain. Isothermal titration calorimetry and solid-state NMR measurements confirm that PLM(38-72) associates strongly with highly anionic phospholipid membranes, but the association is weakened substantially when the negative surface charge is reduced to a more physiologically relevant environment. Membrane interactions are also weakened when the peptide is phosphorylated at S68, one of the substrate sites for protein kinases. PLM(38-72) also lowers the maximal velocity of ATP hydrolysis (V(max)) by NKA, and phosphorylation of the peptide at S68 gives rise to a partial recovery of V(max). These results suggest that the PLM cytoplasmic domain populates NKA-associated and membrane-associated states in dynamic equilibrium and that phosphorylation may alter the position of the equilibrium. Interestingly, peptides representing the cytoplasmic domains of two other FXYD proteins, Mat-8 (FXYD3) and CHIF (FXYD4), have little or no interaction with highly anionic phospholipid membranes and have no effect on NKA function. This suggests that the functional and physical properties of PLM are not conserved across the entire FXYD family.

  6. Membrane domain formation—a key factor for targeted intracellular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein molecules, toxins and viruses internalize into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) using specific proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a barrier for many pharmaceutical agents to enter into the cytoplasm of target cells. In the case of cancer cells, tissue-specific biomarkers in the plasma membrane, like cancer-specific growth factor receptors, could be excellent candidates for RME-dependent drug delivery. Recent data suggest that agent binding to these receptors at the cell surface, resulting in membrane domain formation by receptor clustering, can be used for the initiation of RME. As a result, these pharmaceutical agents are internalized into the cells and follow different routes until they reach their final intracellular targets like lysosomes or Golgi. We propose that clustering induced formation of plasma membrane microdomains enriched in receptors, sphingolipids, and inositol lipids, leads to membrane bending which functions as the onset of RME. In this review we will focus on the role of domain formation in RME and discuss potential applications for targeted intracellular drug delivery. PMID:25520666

  7. The Topography of the Hydrophilic Helices of Membrane-Inserted Diphtheria Toxin T Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Rosconi, Michael P.; London, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    After low pH-triggered membrane insertion, the T domain of diphtheria toxin helps translocate the catalytic domain of the toxin across membranes. In this study the hydrophilic N-terminal helices of the T domain (TH1-TH3) were studied. Both the changes in conformation triggered by exposure to low pH and topography upon membrane insertion were studied. These experiments involved bimane or BODIPY labeling of single Cys introduced at various positions, followed by measurement of bimane emission wavelength, bimane exposure to fluorescence quenchers, and antibody binding to BODIPY groups. Upon exposure of T domain in solution to low pH it was found that the hydrophobic face of TH1, which is buried in the native state at neutral pH, became exposed to solution. When T domain was added externally to lipid vesicles at low pH, the hydrophobic face of TH1 became buried within the lipid bilayer. Helices TH2 and TH3 also inserted into the bilayer after exposure to low pH. However, in contrast to helices TH5-TH9, overall TH1-3 insertion was shallow and there was no significant change in TH1-TH3 insertion depth when the T domain switched from the shallowly-inserting (P) to deeply-inserting (TM) conformation. Binding of streptavidin to biotinylated Cys residues was used to investigate whether solution-exposed residues of membrane-inserted T domain were exposed on the external or internal surface of the bilayer. These experiments showed that when T domain is externally added to vesicles, the entire TH1-TH3 segment remains on the cis (outer) side of the bilayer. The results of this study suggest that membrane-inserted TH 1-3 form autonomous segments that neither deeply penetrate the bilayer nor interact tightly with translocation-promoting structure formed by the hydrophobic TH 5-9 sub-domain. Instead, TH1-3 may aid translocation by acting as an A chain-attached flexible tether. PMID:16800637

  8. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-04-21

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  9. Domain 4 (D4) of Perfringolysin O to Visualize Cholesterol in Cellular Membranes-The Update.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masashi

    2017-03-03

    The cellular membrane of eukaryotes consists of phospholipids, sphingolipids, cholesterol and membrane proteins. Among them, cholesterol is crucial for various cellular events (e.g., signaling, viral/bacterial infection, and membrane trafficking) in addition to its essential role as an ingredient of steroid hormones, vitamin D, and bile acids. From a micro-perspective, at the plasma membrane, recent emerging evidence strongly suggests the existence of lipid nanodomains formed with cholesterol and phospholipids (e.g., sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine). Thus, it is important to elucidate how cholesterol behaves in membranes and how the behavior of cholesterol is regulated at the molecular level. To elucidate the complexed characteristics of cholesterol in cellular membranes, a couple of useful biosensors that enable us to visualize cholesterol in cellular membranes have been recently developed by utilizing domain 4 (D4) of Perfringolysin O (PFO, theta toxin), a cholesterol-binding toxin. This review highlights the current progress on development of novel cholesterol biosensors that uncover new insights of cholesterol in cellular membranes.

  10. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  11. The tail domain of tomosyn controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Fujikura, Kohei; Sakaue, Mio; Okimura, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Yuta; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} The tail domain of tomosyn has no effect on the tomosyn-SNARE complex formation. {yields} The tail domain binding to the VAMP-like domain allows VAMP2 to displace tomosyn. {yields} Tomosyn displacement by VAMP2 leads to SNARE complex formation. {yields} The SNARE complex formation drives membrane fusion. -- Abstract: Neurotransmitter release is regulated by SNARE complex-mediated synaptic vesicle fusion. Tomosyn sequesters target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) through its C-terminal VAMP-like domain (VLD). Cumulative biochemical results suggest that the tomosyn-SNARE complex is so tight that VAMP2 cannot displace tomosyn. Based on these results, the tomosyn-SNARE complex has been believed to be a dead-end complex to inhibit neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, some studies using siRNA depletion of tomosyn suggest that tomosyn positively regulates exocytosis. Therefore, it is still controversial whether tomosyn is a simple inhibitor for neurotransmitter release. We recently reported that the inhibitory activity of tomosyn is regulated by the tail domain binding to the VLD. In this study, we employed the liposome fusion assay in order to further understand modes of action of tomosyn in detail. The tail domain unexpectedly had no effect on binding of the VLD to t-SNARE-bearing liposomes. Nonetheless, the tail domain decreased the inhibitory activity of the VLD on the SNARE complex-mediated liposome fusion. These results indicate that the tail domain controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2. Deletion of the tail domain-binding region in the VLD retained the binding to t-SNAREs and promoted the liposome fusion. Together, we propose here a novel mechanism of tomosyn that controls synaptic vesicle fusion positively by serving as a placeholder for VAMP2.

  12. Structure of spin-coated lipid films and domain formation in supported membranes formed by hydration.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2004-10-26

    An atomic force and fluorescence microscopy investigation of the structure of spin-coated lipid films is presented. In the surface of the dry film, lipids are found to orient in a conformation where acyl chains are pointing outward while laterally the individual layers of the multilamellar film exhibit a dewetting pattern similar to what is found in polymer thin films. Hydration of the film in liquid water promotes detachment of bilayers from the surface while a single membrane remains on the mica substrate. This supported membrane is highly uniform and defect-free as compared to supported membranes prepared by conventional methods. It is further demonstrated that supported membranes of binary lipid mixtures prepared by this method exhibit gel-fluid domain coexistence in accordance with expectations from the phase diagrams.

  13. Regulatory Conformational Coupling between CLC Anion Channel Membrane and Cytoplasmic Domains.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiki; Strange, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    CLC anion channels are homodimeric proteins. Each subunit is comprised of 18 α-helices designated "A-R" and an intracellular carboxy-terminus containing two cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS1 and CBS2) domains. Conformational coupling between membrane and intracellular domains via poorly understood mechanisms is required for CLC regulation. The activity of the C. elegans CLC channel CLH-3b is reduced by phosphorylation of a carboxy-terminus "activation domain," which disrupts its interaction with CBS domains. CBS2 interfaces with a short intracellular loop, the H-I loop, connecting membrane helices H and I. Alanine mutation of a conserved H-I loop tyrosine residue, Y232, prevents regulation demonstrating that the loop functions to couple phosphorylation-dependent CBS domain conformational changes to channel membrane domains. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of this coupling, we mutated conserved amino acid residues in membrane helices H and I. Only mutation of the H-helix valine residue V228 to leucine prevented phosphorylation-dependent channel regulation. Structural and functional studies of other CLC proteins suggest that V228 may interact with Y529, a conserved R-helix tyrosine residue that forms part of the CLC ion conduction pathway. Mutation of Y529 to alanine also prevented CLH-3b regulation. Intracellular application of the sulfhydryl reactive reagent MTSET using CLH-3b channels engineered with single-cysteine residues in CBS2 indicate that V228L, Y529A, and Y232A disrupt putative regulatory intracellular conformational changes. Extracellular Zn(2+) inhibits CLH-3b and alters the effects of intracellular MTSET on channel activity. The effects of Zn(2+) are disrupted by V228L, Y529A, and Y232A. Collectively, our findings indicate that there is conformational coupling between CBS domains and the H and R membrane helices mediated by the H-I loop. We propose a simple model by which conformational changes in H and R helices mediate CLH-3b regulation

  14. Stratum corneum lipids serve as a bound-water modulator.

    PubMed

    Imokawa, G; Kuno, H; Kawai, M

    1991-06-01

    Stratum corneum lipids have been found to be an important determinant involved in the water-holding function of the stratum corneum. In order to further elucidate the significance of stratum corneum lipids in the water-holding properties, the hydration behavior of the stratum corneum following depletion and replenishment of the lipids has been studied, using an isolated human forearm stratum corneum sheet, by differential scanning calorimetry parallel to ultrastructural changes of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum. Extraction of the stratum corneum sheet with acetone/ether (1/1) decreased the bound-water content from 33.3% to 19.7%, where the melting temperature of ice remained constant. Further extraction with water, which released a large amount of water-soluble materials such as amino acids, did not change the bound-water content, but definitely raised the melting temperature of ice. The application of the stratum corneum lipids, which were solubilized in squalane containing 1% alpha-monomethyl heptadecyl glyceryl ether to the lipid-depleted stratum corneum sheet, caused a significant recovery of bound-water content to the previous, almost normal level. In accordance with the hydration behavior, electron microscopic analysis of the acetone/ether-treated stratum corneum sheet revealed selective depletion of lipids from the intercellular spaces, accompanied by a marked disruption of multiple lamellar structures. In contrast, the application of stratum corneum lipids into the lipid-depleted stratum corneum sheet resulted in the restoration of the lamellar structure between the stratum corneum cells. These findings strongly suggest that stratum corneum lipids serve a water-holding function through the formation of lamellar structures within the stratum corneum.

  15. Structure Enhancement Relationship of Chemical Penetration Enhancers in Drug Transport across the Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    Chantasart, Doungdaw; Li, S. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum is a major barrier of drug penetration across the skin in transdermal delivery. For effective transdermal drug delivery, skin penetration enhancers are used to overcome this barrier. In the past decades, a number of research studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms of skin penetration enhancers and to develop a structure enhancement relationship. Such understanding allows effective prediction of the effects of skin penetration enhancers, assists topical and transdermal formulation development, and avoids extensive enhancer screening in the transdermal delivery industry. In the past two decades, several hypotheses on chemical enhancer-induced penetration enhancement for transport across the skin lipoidal pathway have been examined based on a systematic approach. Particularly, a hypothesis that skin penetration enhancement is directly related to the concentration of the enhancers in the stratum corneum lipid domain was examined. A direct relationship between skin penetration enhancer potency (based on enhancer aqueous concentration in the diffusion cell chamber) and enhancer n-octanol-water partition coefficient was also established. The nature of the microenvironment of the enhancer site of action in the stratum corneum lipid domain was found to be mimicked by n-octanol. The present paper reviews the work related to these hypotheses and the relationships between skin penetration enhancement and enhancer concentration in the drug delivery media and stratum corneum lipids. PMID:24300181

  16. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  17. Sampling the stratum corneum for toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Blattner, Collin M; Andersen, Rosa; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important pathway in environmental health. Exposure comes from contaminated water, soil, treated surfaces, textiles, aerosolized chemicals, and agricultural products. It can occur in homes, schools, play areas, and work settings in the form of industrial sources, consumer products, or hazardous wastes. Dermal exposure is most likely to occur through contact with liquids, water, soil, sediment, and contaminated surfaces. The ability to detect and measure exposure to toxic materials on the skin is an important environmental health issue. The stratum corneum is the skin's first and principal barrier layer of protection from the outside world. It has a complex structure that can effectively protect against a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological contaminants. However, there are a variety of chemical agents that can damage the stratum corneum and the underlying epidermis, dermis and subcutis, and/or enter systemic circulation through the skin. There are numerous ways of sampling the stratum corneum for these toxic materials like abrasion techniques, biopsy, suction blistering, imaging, washing, wipe sampling, tape stripping, and spot testing. Selecting a method likely depends on the particular needs of the situation. Hence, there is a need to review practical considerations for their use in sampling the stratum corneum for toxins.

  18. Atopic Dermatitis and the Stratum Corneum: Part 2: Other Structural and Functional Characteristics of the Stratum Corneum Barrier in Atopic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the epidermal barrier and immune response in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicted the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while this article, Part 2, evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and its multiple barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Upregulation of serine protease activity causes adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum due to degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to epidermal structure and functions, interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient, and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is the hallmark profile of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. In Part 3, immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity are discussed. The roles of the stratum corneum permeability barrier, the immune defense barrier, and antimicrobial barrier in AD pathogenesis are explained in detail. With this explanation, the interdependence of the multitude of polymorphisms and dysregulations seen in AD skin will become clear. The condensing of these impaired and/or dysregulated functions and how they interact should provide further knowledge about the pathogenic mechanisms that cause atopic dermatitis, how they are clinically relevant, and how they may assist in developing more specific therapies directed at the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. PMID:24307926

  19. Atopic dermatitis and the stratum corneum: part 2: other structural and functional characteristics of the stratum corneum barrier in atopic skin.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jacquelyn; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q

    2013-11-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the epidermal barrier and immune response in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicted the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while this article, Part 2, evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and its multiple barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Upregulation of serine protease activity causes adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum due to degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to epidermal structure and functions, interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient, and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is the hallmark profile of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. In Part 3, immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity are discussed. The roles of the stratum corneum permeability barrier, the immune defense barrier, and antimicrobial barrier in AD pathogenesis are explained in detail. With this explanation, the interdependence of the multitude of polymorphisms and dysregulations seen in AD skin will become clear. The condensing of these impaired and/or dysregulated functions and how they interact should provide further knowledge about the pathogenic mechanisms that cause atopic dermatitis, how they are clinically relevant, and how they may assist in developing more specific therapies directed at the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  20. Transmembrane domains interactions within the membrane milieu: principles, advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fink, Avner; Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions within the membrane are involved in many vital cellular processes. Consequently, deficient oligomerization is associated with known diseases. The interactions can be partially or fully mediated by transmembrane domains (TMD). However, in contrast to soluble regions, our knowledge of the factors that control oligomerization and recognition between the membrane-embedded domains is very limited. Due to the unique chemical and physical properties of the membrane environment, rules that apply to interactions between soluble segments are not necessarily valid within the membrane. This review summarizes our knowledge on the sequences mediating TMD-TMD interactions which include conserved motifs such as the GxxxG, QxxS, glycine and leucine zippers, and others. The review discusses the specific role of polar, charged and aromatic amino acids in the interface of the interacting TMD helices. Strategies to determine the strength, dynamics and specificities of these interactions by experimental (ToxR, TOXCAT, GALLEX and FRET) or various computational approaches (molecular dynamic simulation and bioinformatics) are summarized. Importantly, the contribution of the membrane environment to the TMD-TMD interaction is also presented. Studies utilizing exogenously added TMD peptides have been shown to influence in vivo the dimerization of intact membrane proteins involved in various diseases. The chirality independent TMD-TMD interactions allows for the design of novel short d- and l-amino acids containing TMD peptides with advanced properties. Overall these studies shed light on the role of specific amino acids in mediating the assembly of the TMDs within the membrane environment and their contribution to protein function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Folding in Membranes.

  1. Structural Basis for Ca2+-mediated Interaction of the Perforin C2 Domain with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hiromasa; Conroy, Paul J.; Leung, Eleanor W. W.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Whisstock, James C.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes deploy perforin and granzymes to kill infected host cells. Perforin, secreted by immune cells, binds target membranes to form pores that deliver pro-apoptotic granzymes into the target cell. A crucial first step in this process is interaction of its C2 domain with target cell membranes, which is a calcium-dependent event. Some aspects of this process are understood, but many molecular details remain unclear. To address this, we investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ and lipid binding to the C2 domain by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Calcium titrations, together with dodecylphosphocholine micelle experiments, confirmed that multiple Ca2+ ions bind within the calcium-binding regions, activating perforin with respect to membrane binding. We have also determined the affinities of several of these binding sites and have shown that this interaction causes a significant structural rearrangement in CBR1. Thus, it is proposed that Ca2+ binding at the weakest affinity site triggers changes in the C2 domain that facilitate its interaction with lipid membranes. PMID:26306037

  2. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  3. Protein sorting by lipid phase-like domains supports emergent signaling function in B lymphocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Núñez, Marcos F; Wisser, Kathleen; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Diverse cellular signaling events, including B cell receptor (BCR) activation, are hypothesized to be facilitated by domains enriched in specific plasma membrane lipids and proteins that resemble liquid-ordered phase-separated domains in model membranes. This concept remains controversial and lacks direct experimental support in intact cells. Here, we visualize ordered and disordered domains in mouse B lymphoma cell membranes using super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy, demonstrate that clustered BCR resides within ordered phase-like domains capable of sorting key regulators of BCR activation, and present a minimal, predictive model where clustering receptors leads to their collective activation by stabilizing an extended ordered domain. These results provide evidence for the role of membrane domains in BCR signaling and a plausible mechanism of BCR activation via receptor clustering that could be generalized to other signaling pathways. Overall, these studies demonstrate that lipid mediated forces can bias biochemical networks in ways that broadly impact signal transduction.

  4. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue ‘communities’) within the translocation domain (especially around β12–β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03532.001 PMID:25271373

  5. Dendritic Domains with Hexagonal Symmetry Formed by X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Stefan; Ebert, Helgard; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Lange, Frank; Achilles, Anja; Bärenwald, Ruth; Poppe, Silvio; Blume, Alfred; Saalwächter, Kay; Tschierske, Carsten; Bacia, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of bolapolyphile (BP) molecules are shown to integrate into phospholipid bilayers and self-assemble into unique sixfold symmetric domains of snowflake-like dendritic shapes. The BPs comprise three philicities: a lipophilic, rigid, π–π stacking core; two flexible lipophilic side chains; and two hydrophilic, hydrogen-bonding head groups. Confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, XRD, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy confirm BP-rich domains with transmembrane-oriented BPs and three to four lipid molecules per BP. Both species remain well organized even above the main 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine transition. The BP molecules only dissolve in the fluid membrane above 70 °C. Structural variations of the BP demonstrate that head-group hydrogen bonding is a prerequisite for domain formation. Independent of the head group, the BPs reduce membrane corrugation. In conclusion, the BPs form nanofilaments by π stacking of aromatic cores, which reduce membrane corrugation and possibly fuse into a hexagonal network in the dendritic domains. PMID:25940233

  6. Membrane-Pore Forming Characteristics of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin Domain.

    PubMed

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-04-30

    Previously, the 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA pore-forming/hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was shown to retain its hemolytic activity causing lysis of susceptible erythrocytes. Here, we have succeeded in producing, at large quantity and high purity, the His-tagged CyaA-Hly domain over-expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble hemolytically-active form. Quantitative assays of hemolysis against sheep erythrocytes revealed that the purified CyaA-Hly domain could function cooperatively by forming an oligomeric pore in the target cell membrane with a Hill coefficient of ~3. When the CyaA-Hly toxin was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) under symmetrical conditions at 1.0 M KCl, 10 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.4), it produced a clearly resolved single channel with a maximum conductance of ~35 pS. PLB results also revealed that the CyaA-Hly induced channel was unidirectional and opened more frequently at higher negative membrane potentials. Altogether, our results first provide more insights into pore-forming characteristics of the CyaA-Hly domain as being the major pore-forming determinant of which the ability to induce such ion channels in receptor-free membranes could account for its cooperative hemolytic action on the target erythrocytes.

  7. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  8. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  9. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities.

    PubMed

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M; Marquez, Victor E; Jelinek, Raz

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a 'molecular rod', namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Use of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques revealed that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of the PKC translocation from the cytosol to membranes that is induced by the molecular-rod DAG lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side residues of DAG lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions, and thus may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands.

  10. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes.

    PubMed

    Sekereš, Juraj; Pejchar, Přemysl; Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Transmembrane-domain shape is a novel endocytosis signal for single-spanning membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Ayelén González; Bigliani, Gonzalo; Taubas, Javier Valdez

    2017-10-02

    Endocytosis is crucial for all cells as it allows them to incorporate material from the extracellular space and control the availability of transmembrane proteins at the plasma membrane. In yeast, endocytosis followed by recycling to the plasma membrane results in a polarised distribution of membrane proteins by a kinetic mechanism. Here we report that increasing the volume of the residues that constitute the exoplasmic half of the transmembrane domain in the yeast SNARE Sso1, a type II membrane protein, results in its polarised distribution at the plasma membrane. Expression of this chimera in strains affected in either endocytosis or recycling revealed that this polarisation is achieved by endocytic cycling. A bioinformatics search of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome identified several proteins with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs. Our experiments indicate that TMDs from these proteins can confer a polarised distribution to the Sso1 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the shape of the TMD can act as a novel endocytosis and polarity signal in yeast. Additionally, a high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMD can act as an endocytosis signal in a mammalian cell line. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Emerin suppresses Notch signaling by restricting the Notch intracellular domain to the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byongsun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Shim, Jaekyung

    2017-02-01

    Emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein that is involved in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the nuclear membrane. Increasing evidence supports the involvement of emerin in the regulation of gene expression; however, its precise function remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that emerin downregulated genes downstream of Notch signaling, which are activated exclusively by the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Deletion mutant experiments revealed that the transmembrane domain of emerin is important for the inhibition of Notch signaling. Emerin interacted directly and colocalized with the NICD at the nuclear membrane. Emerin knockdown induced the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, increased endogenous Notch signaling, and inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Notably, the downregulation of barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) or lamin A/C increased Notch signaling by inducing the release of emerin into the cytosol, implying that nuclear membrane-bound emerin acts as an endogenous inhibitor of Notch signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that emerin negatively regulates Notch signaling by promoting the retention of the NICD at the nuclear membrane. This mechanism could constitute a new therapeutic target for the treatment of emerin-related diseases.

  13. The Dysferlin Domain-Only Protein, Spo73, Is Required for Prospore Membrane Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yuuya; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi S; Tanaka, Takayuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Suda, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shugo; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process in which an ascus containing four haploid spores forms from a diploid cell. During this process, newly formed membrane structures called prospore membranes extend along the nuclear envelope and engulf and package daughter nuclei along with cytosol and organelles to form precursors of spores. Proteins involved in prospore membrane extension, Vps13 and Spo71, have recently been reported; however, the overall mechanism of membrane extension remains unclear. Here, we identified Spo73 as an additional factor involved in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of a spo73∆ mutant revealed that it shows defects similar to those of a spo71∆ mutant during prospore membrane formation. Spo73 localizes to the prospore membrane, and this localization is independent of Spo71 and Vps13. In contrast, a Spo73 protein carrying mutations in a surface basic patch mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and overexpression of Spo71 can partially rescue localization to the prospore membrane. Similar to spo71∆ mutants, spo73∆ mutants display genetic interactions with the mutations in the SMA2 and SPO1 genes involved in prospore membrane bending. Further, our bioinformatic analysis revealed that Spo73 is a dysferlin domain-only protein. Thus, these results suggest that a dysferlin domain-only protein, Spo73, functions with a dual pleckstrin homology domain protein, Spo71, in prospore membrane extension. Analysis of Spo73 will provide insights into the conserved function of dysferlin domains, which is related to dysferlinopathy. IMPORTANCE Prospore membrane formation consists of de novo double-membrane formation, which occurs during the developmental process of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Membranes are formed into their proper size and shape, and thus, prospore membrane formation has been studied as a general model of membrane formation. We identified SPO73, previously shown to be required for spore wall formation

  14. ABCA1-dependent sterol release: sterol molecule specificity and potential membrane domain for HDL biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shinji; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells synthesize various sterol molecules, including the C30 sterol, lanosterol, as cholesterol precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum. The build-up of precursor sterols, including lanosterol, displays cellular toxicity. Precursor sterols are found in plasma HDL. How these structurally different sterols are released from cells is poorly understood. Here, we show that newly synthesized precursor sterols arriving at the plasma membrane (PM) are removed by extracellular apoA-I in a manner dependent on ABCA1, a key macromolecule for HDL biogenesis. Analysis of sterol molecules by GC-MS and tracing the fate of radiolabeled acetate-derived sterols in normal and mutant Niemann-Pick type C cells reveal that ABCA1 prefers newly synthesized sterols, especially lanosterol, as the substrates before they are internalized from the PM. We also show that ABCA1 resides in a cholesterol-rich membrane domain resistant to the mild detergent, Brij 98. Blocking ACAT activity increases the cholesterol contents of this domain. Newly synthesized C29/C30 sterols are transiently enriched within this domain, but rapidly disappear from this domain with a half-life of less than 1 h. Our work shows that substantial amounts of precursor sterols are transported to a certain PM domain and are removed by the ABCA1-dependent pathway. PMID:26497474

  15. L-selectin transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains are monomeric in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Deng, Wei; Li, Renhao

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant protein termed CLS, which corresponds to the C-terminal portion of human L-selectin and contains its entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains (residues Ser473-Arg542), has been produced and its oligomeric state in detergents characterized. CLS migrates in the SDS polyacrylamide gel at a pace that is typically expected from a complex twice of its molecular weight. Additional studies revealed however that this is due to residues in the cytoplasmic domain, as mutations in this region or its deletion significantly increased the electrophoretic rate of CLS. Analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies indicated that CLS reconstituted in dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles is monomeric. When the transmembrane domain of L-selectin is inserted into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli as a part of a chimeric protein in the TOXCAT assay, little oligomerization of the chimeric protein is observed. Overall, these results suggest that transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin lack the propensity to self-associate in membranes, in contrast to the previously documented dimerization of the transmembrane domain of closely related P-selectin. This study will provide constraints for future investigations on the interaction of L-selectin and its associating proteins. PMID:21316337

  16. Lipid domains in supported SM-Chol membranes measured by GISANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Dubey, Manish; Toperverg, Boris; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Cell membranes are known to contain regions (called lipid domains, or rafts) described as sphingolipid-cholesterol assemblies which also may contain a subset of membrane proteins. Currently, the main point of discussion is the methodology to study lipid domains and their sizes. We report on Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GISANS) measurements of lipid domains in supported sphingomyelin(SM)-cholesterol(Chol) bilayers in a fully aqueous environment. The model bilayers SM:Chol(2:1), SM:Chol(1:2), and a pure SM were deposited using Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schaefer technique at a surface pressure of 10 mN/m and measured at 25rC. First measurements revealed short range inhomogeneities of the order of 100 AA in both binary systems. The control measurement of a pure SM bilayer exhibited nearly no GISANS indicating an absence of lipid domains in the SM bilayer. This observation is consistent with the notion that a single component system studied below the liquid-gel transition temperature will not produce lipid domains. Work was supported by DOE-BES.

  17. Disruption of CEP290 microtubule/membrane-binding domains causes retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Drivas, Theodore G; Holzbaur, Erika L F; Bennett, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the gene centrosomal protein 290 kDa (CEP290) cause an array of debilitating and phenotypically distinct human diseases, ranging from the devastating blinding disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to Senior-Løken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, and the lethal Meckel-Gruber syndrome. Despite its critical role in biology and disease, very little is known about CEP290's function. Here, we have identified 4 functional domains of the protein. We found that CEP290 directly binds to cellular membranes through an N-terminal domain that includes a highly conserved amphipathic helix motif and to microtubules through a domain located within its myosin-tail homology domain. Furthermore, CEP290 activity was regulated by 2 autoinhibitory domains within its N and C termini, both of which were found to play critical roles in regulating ciliogenesis. Disruption of the microtubule-binding domain in a mouse model of LCA was sufficient to induce significant deficits in cilium formation, which led to retinal degeneration. These data implicate CEP290 as an integral structural and regulatory component of the cilium and provide insight into the pathological mechanisms of LCA and related ciliopathies. Further, these data illustrate that disruption of particular CEP290 functional domains may lead to particular disease phenotypes and suggest innovative strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  18. The SAM domain inhibits EphA2 interactions in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deo R; Ahmed, Fozia; Paul, Michael D; Gedam, Manasee; Pasquale, Elena B; Hristova, Kalina

    2017-01-01

    All members of the Eph receptor family of tyrosine kinases contain a SAM domain near the C terminus, which has been proposed to play a role in receptor homotypic interactions and/or interactions with binding partners. The SAM domain of EphA2 is known to be important for receptor function, but its contribution to EphA2 lateral interactions in the plasma membrane has not been determined. Here we use a FRET-based approach to directly measure the effect of the SAM domain on the stability of EphA2 dimers on the cell surface in the absence of ligand binding. We also investigate the functional consequences of EphA2 SAM domain deletion. Surprisingly, we find that the EphA2 SAM domain inhibits receptor dimerization and decreases EphA2 tyrosine phosphorylation. This role is dramatically different from the role of the SAM domain of the related EphA3 receptor, which we previously found to stabilize EphA3 dimers and increase EphA3 tyrosine phosphorylation in cells in the absence of ligand. Thus, the EphA2 SAM domain likely contributes to a unique mode of EphA2 interaction that leads to distinct signaling outputs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  20. Structural feature extraction protocol for classifying reversible membrane binding protein domains.

    PubMed

    Källberg, Morten; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Machine learning based classification protocols for automated function annotation of protein structures have in many instances proven superior to simpler sequence based procedures. Here we present an automated method for extracting features from protein structures by construction of surface patches to be used in such protocols. The utility of the developed patch-growing procedure is exemplified by its ability to identify reversible membrane binding domains from the C1, C2, and PH families.

  1. Electrostatics, hydration, and proton transfer dynamics in the membrane domain of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Kaila, Ville R I; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-05-13

    Complex I serves as the primary electron entry point into the mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains. It catalyzes the reduction of quinones by electron transfer from NADH, and couples this exergonic reaction to the translocation of protons against an electrochemical proton gradient. The membrane domain of the enzyme extends ∼180 Å from the site of quinone reduction to the most distant proton pathway. To elucidate possible mechanisms of the long-range proton-coupled electron transfer process, we perform large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane domain of complex I from Escherichia coli. We observe spontaneous hydration of a putative proton entry channel at the NuoN/K interface, which is sensitive to the protonation state of buried glutamic acid residues. In hybrid quantum mechanics/classical mechanics simulations, we find that the observed water wires support rapid proton transfer from the protein surface to the center of the membrane domain. To explore the functional relevance of the pseudosymmetric inverted-repeat structures of the antiporter-like subunits NuoL/M/N, we constructed a symmetry-related structure of a possible alternate-access state. In molecular dynamics simulations, we find the resulting structural changes to be metastable and reversible at the protein backbone level. However, the increased hydration induced by the conformational change persists, with water molecules establishing enhanced lateral connectivity and pathways for proton transfer between conserved ionizable residues along the center of the membrane domain. Overall, the observed water-gated transitions establish conduits for the unidirectional proton translocation processes, and provide a possible coupling mechanism for the energy transduction in complex I.

  2. Binding of the Munc13-1 MUN domain to membrane-anchored SNARE complexes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rong; Dai, Han; Rizo, Josep

    2008-02-12

    The core of the membrane fusion machinery that governs neurotransmitter release includes the SNARE proteins syntaxin-1, SNAP-25 and synaptobrevin, which form a tight "SNARE complex", and Munc18-1, which binds to the SNARE complex and to syntaxin-1 folded into a closed conformation. Release is also controlled by specialized proteins such as complexins, which also bind to the SNARE complex, and unc13/Munc13s, which are crucial for synaptic vesicle priming and were proposed to open syntaxin-1, promoting SNARE complex assembly. However, the biochemical basis for unc13/Munc13 function and its relationship to other SNARE interactions are unclear. To address this question, we have analyzed interactions of the MUN domain of Munc13-1, which is key for this priming function, using solution binding assays and cofloatation experiments with SNARE-containing proteoliposomes. Our results indicate that the Munc13-1 MUN domain binds to membrane-anchored SNARE complexes, even though binding is barely detectable in solution. The MUN domain appears to compete with Munc18-1 but not with complexin-1 for SNARE complex binding, although more quantitative assays will be required to verify these conclusions. Moreover, our data also uncover interactions of membrane-anchored syntaxin-1/SNAP-25 heterodimers with the MUN domain, Munc18-1 and complexin-1. The interaction with complexin-1 is surprising, as it was not observed in previous solution studies. Our results emphasize the importance of studying interactions within the neurotransmitter release machinery in a native membrane environment, and suggest that unc13/Munc13s may provide a template to assemble syntaxin-1/SNAP-25 heterodimers, leading to an acceptor complex for synaptobrevin.

  3. Nano-domains of high viscosity and stiffness mapped in the cell membrane by thermal noise imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yunhsiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2012-02-01

    The cell membrane is thought to contain spatial domains, created by cholesterol-lipid clusters and by interactions with the membrane cytoskeleton. The influence of these domains on membrane protein mobility and cell signaling has clearly been demonstrate. Yet, due to their small size and transient nature, the cholesterol stabilized domains cannot be visualized directly. We show here that thermal noise imaging (TNI) which tracks the diffusion of a colloid labeled membrane protein with microsecond and nanometer precision, can visualize cholesterol stabilized domains, also know as lipid raft, in intact cells. Using TNI to confine a single membrane protein to diffuse for seconds in an area of 300nm x 300nm provides sufficient data for high resolutions maps of the local diffusion, local attraction potentials and membrane stiffness. Using a GPI-anchored GFP molecule to probe the membrane of PtK2 cells we detect domains of increased membrane stiffness, which also show increase viscosity and are the preferred location for the GPI-anchored protein. These domains are further stabilized by addition of ganglioside cross linking toxins and disappear after removal of the cholesterol.

  4. The role of sulfatide lipid domains in the membrane pore-forming activity of cobra cardiotoxin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Long; Chiu, Chang-Ru; Huang, Wei-Ning; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2012-05-01

    Cobra CTX A3, the major cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja atra, is a cytotoxic, basic β-sheet polypeptide that is known to induce a transient membrane leakage of cardiomyocytes through a sulfatide-dependent CTX membrane pore formation and internalization mechanism. The molecular specificity of CTX A3-sulfatide interaction at atomic levels has also been shown by both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction techniques to reveal a role of CTX-induced sulfatide conformational changes for CTX A3 binding and dimer formation. In this study, we investigate the role of sulfatide lipid domains in CTX pore formation by various biophysical methods, including fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy, and suggest an important role of liquid-disordered (ld) and solid-ordered (so) phase boundary in lipid domains to facilitate the process. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on the kinetics of membrane leakage and CTX oligomerization further reveal that, although most CTXs can oligomerize on membranes, only a small fraction of CTXs oligomerizations form leakage pores. We therefore suggest that CTX binding at the boundary between the so and so/ld phase coexistence sulfatide lipid domains could form effective pores to significantly enhance the CTX-induced membrane leakage of sulfatide-containing phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The model is consistent with our earlier observations that CTX may penetrate and lyse the bilayers into small aggregates at a lipid/protein molar ratio of about 20 in the ripple P(β)' phase of phosphatidylcholine bilayers and suggest a novel mechanism for the synergistic action of cobra secretary phospholipase A2 and CTXs.

  5. A conserved polybasic domain mediates plasma membrane targeting of Lgl and its regulation by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xuejing; Liu, Weijie; Chen, Yi-jiun; Huang, Juan; Austin, Erin; Celotto, Alicia M.; Jiang, Wendy Z.; Palladino, Michael J.; Jiang, Yu; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2015-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays essential and conserved functions in regulating both cell polarity and tumorigenesis in Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates. It is well recognized that plasma membrane (PM) or cell cortex localization is crucial for Lgl function in vivo, but its membrane-targeting mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that hypoxia acutely and reversibly inhibits Lgl PM targeting through a posttranslational mechanism that is independent of the well-characterized atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) or Aurora kinase–mediated phosphorylations. Instead, we identified an evolutionarily conserved polybasic (PB) domain that targets Lgl to the PM via electrostatic binding to membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. Such PB domain–mediated PM targeting is inhibited by hypoxia, which reduces inositol phospholipid levels on the PM through adenosine triphosphate depletion. Moreover, Lgl PB domain contains all the identified phosphorylation sites of aPKC and Aurora kinases, providing a molecular mechanism by which phosphorylations neutralize the positive charges on the PB domain to inhibit Lgl PM targeting. PMID:26483556

  6. Membrane binding and insertion of the predicted transmembrane domain of human scramblase 1.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Busto, Jon V; Goñi, Félix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) was originally described as an intrinsic membrane protein catalyzing transbilayer phospholipid transfer in the absence of ATP. More recently, a role as a nuclear transcription factor has been proposed for SCR, either in addition or alternatively to its capacity to facilitate phospholipid flip-flop. Uncertainties exist as well from the structural point of view. A predicted α-helix (aa residues 288-306) located near the C-terminus has been alternatively proposed as a transmembrane domain, or as a protein core structural element. This paper explores the possibilities of the above helical segment as a transmembrane domain. To this aim two peptides were synthesized, one corresponding to the 19 α-helical residues, and one containing both the helix and the subsequent 12-residues constituting the C-end of the protein. The interaction of these peptides with lipid monolayers and bilayers was tested with Langmuir balance surface pressure measurements, proteoliposome reconstitution and analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tests of bilayer permeability, and fluorescence confocal microscopy. Bilayers of 28 different lipid compositions were examined in which lipid electric charge, bilayer fluidity and lateral heterogeneity (domain formation) were varied. All the results concur in supporting the idea that the 288-306 peptide of SCR becomes membrane inserted in the presence of lipid bilayers. Thus, the data are in agreement with the possibility of SCR as an integral membrane protein, without rejecting alternative cell locations. © 2013.

  7. Revealing the topography of cellular membrane domains by combined atomic force microscopy/fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Frankel, D J; Pfeiffer, J R; Surviladze, Z; Johnson, A E; Oliver, J M; Wilson, B S; Burns, A R

    2006-04-01

    Simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to observe in aqueous buffer the three-dimensional landscape of the inner surface of membrane sheets stripped from fixed tumor mast cells. The AFM images reveal prominent, irregularly shaped raised domains that label with fluorescent markers for both resting and activated immunoglobin E receptors (FcepsilonRI), as well as with cholera toxin-aggregated GM1 and clathrin. The latter suggests that coated pits bud from these regions. These features are interspersed with flatter regions of membrane and are frequently surrounded and interconnected by cytoskeletal assemblies. The raised domains shrink in height by approximately 50% when cholesterol is extracted with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Based on composition, the raised domains seen by AFM correspond to the cholesterol-enriched dark patches observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These patches were previously identified as sites of signaling and endocytosis based on their localization of activated FcepsilonRI, at least 10 associated signaling molecules, and the presence of clathrin-coated pits. Overall the data suggest that signaling and endocytosis occur in mast cells from raised membrane regions that depend on cholesterol for their integrity and may be organized in specific relationship with the cortical cytoskeleton.

  8. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  9. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions differentially tune membrane binding kinetics of the C2 domain of protein kinase Cα.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela M; Antal, Corina E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2013-06-07

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca(2+)-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca(2+)-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes.

  10. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Differentially Tune Membrane Binding Kinetics of the C2 Domain of Protein Kinase Cα*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela M.; Antal, Corina E.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca2+-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca2+-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes. PMID:23589289

  11. Understanding the role of amphipathic helices in N-BAR domain driven membrane remodeling.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haosheng; Mim, Carsten; Vázquez, Francisco X; Lyman, Edward; Unger, Vinzenz M; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-01-22

    Endophilin N-BAR (N-terminal helix and Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain tubulates and vesiculates lipid membranes in vitro via its crescent-shaped dimer and four amphipathic helices that penetrate into membranes as wedges. Like F-BAR domains, endophilin N-BAR also forms a scaffold on membrane tubes. Unlike F-BARs, endophilin N-BARs have N-terminal H0 amphipathic helices that are proposed to interact with other N-BARs in oligomer lattices. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions shed light on the organization of the N-BAR lattice coats on a nanometer scale. However, because of the resolution of the reconstructions, the precise positioning of the amphipathic helices is still ambiguous. In this work, we applied a coarse-grained model to study various membrane remodeling scenarios induced by endophilin N-BARs. We found that H0 helices of N-BARs prefer to align in an antiparallel manner at two ends of the protein to form a stable lattice. The deletion of H0 helices causes disruption of the lattice. In addition, we analyzed the persistence lengths of the protein-coated tubes and found that the stiffness of endophilin N-BAR-coated tubules qualitatively agrees with previous experimental work studying N-BAR-coated tubules. Large-scale simulations on membrane liposomes revealed a systematic relation between H0 helix density and local membrane curvature fluctuations. The data also suggest that the H0 helix is required for BARs to form organized structures on the liposome, further illustrating its important function.

  12. Characterization of the reversible conformational equilibrium of the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane band 3.

    PubMed

    Low, P S; Westfall, M A; Allen, D P; Appell, K C

    1984-11-10

    The cytoplasmic domain of the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3, contains binding sites for hemoglobin, several glycolytic enzymes, and ankyrin, the linkage to the cytoskeleton. In an earlier study, we found evidence which suggested that band 3 might undergo a native conformational change. We demonstrate here that the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 does exist in a reversible, pH-dependent conformational equilibrium among 3 native states. At physiological salt concentrations this equilibrium is characterized by apparent pKa values of 7.2 and 9.2; however, these apparent pKa values change if the domain's sulfhydryl groups are modified. A major component of the structural change appears to involve the pivoting of two subdomains of the cytoplasmic domain at a central hinge, as evidenced by both hydrodynamic and fluorescence energy transfer measurements. The probable site of this hinge is between residues 176 and 191, a region highly accessible to proteases and also rich in proline. These structural rearrangements also apparently extend to the cluster of tryptophan residues near the N terminus, since the domain's intrinsic fluorescence more than doubles between pH 6.5 and 9.5. No measurable change in band 3 secondary or quaternary structure could be detected during the conformational transitions. A structural model of the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 is presented to show the possible spatial relationships between the regions of conformational change and the sites of peripheral protein binding.

  13. Electroporation of the photosynthetic membrane: structural changes in protein and lipid-protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Y; Rotenberg, M; Korenstein, R

    1994-01-01

    A biological membrane undergoes a reversible permeability increase through structural changes in the lipid domain when exposed to high external electric fields. The present study shows the occurrence of electric field-induced changes in the conductance of the proton channel of the H(+)-ATPase as well as electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domain of photosystem (PS) II in the photosynthetic membrane. The study was carried out by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (EPL), which originates from charge recombination in the protein complexes of PS I and II of photosynthetic vesicles. We established that a small fraction of the total electric field-induced conductance change was abolished by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the H(+)-ATPase. This reversible electric field-induced conductance change has characteristics of a small channel and possesses a lifetime < or = 1 ms. To detect electric field-induced changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II, we examined the effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on EPL. Higher values of EPL were observed from vesicles that were exposed in the presence of PLA2 to an electroporating electric field than to a nonelectroporating electric field. The effect of the electroporating field was a long-lived one, lasting for a period > or = 2 min. This effect was attributed to long-lived electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II. PMID:7811916

  14. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis recognize a region within the nucleoplasmic domain of inner nuclear membrane protein LBR.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Noyer, C M; Ye, Q; Courvalin, J C; Worman, H J

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies from rare patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) recognize LBR, or lamin B receptor, an integral membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Human LBR has a nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain of 208 amino acids followed by a carboxyl-terminal domain with eight putative transmembrane segments. Autoantibodies against LBR from four patients with PBC recognized the nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain but not the carboxyl-terminal domain. Immunoblotting of smaller fusion proteins demonstrated that these autoantibodies recognized a conformational epitope(s) contained within the stretch of amino acids from 1 to 60. These results, combined with those of previous studies, show that autoepitopes of nuclear membrane proteins are located within their nucleocytoplasmic domains and that autoantibodies from patients with PBC predominantly react with one domain of a protein antigen. This work also provides further characterization of anti-LBR antibodies that have found utility as reagents in cell biology research.

  15. Stratum corneum barrier integrity controls skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Smith, W

    1999-04-01

    The stratum corneum water barrier controls structural and functional properties of both the epidermis and the dermis. Treatments which chronically disrupt the stratum corneum water barrier can induce changes similar to those seen with 'anti-aging' treatments such as (-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) and Retin Atrade mark. Barrier disruption via daily tape stripping increases epidermal and dermal thickness, superficial and integral skin firmness, and improves skin surface texture. Modest or transitory disruption did not produce such effects. Similar results were observed with topical application of AHAs, retinoids or mild irritants after about 4-6 weeks provided such treatments resulted in prolonged elevation in TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss). Treatments that did not chronically elevate TEWL could also produce positive cosmetic effects, but such effects were in general restricted to the skin surface or epidermis. Irritation, which was observed with some treatments, was not solely responsible for the positive effects observed.

  16. Lipid organization in pig stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Bouwstra, J A; Gooris, G S; Bras, W; Downing, D T

    1995-04-01

    The lipid and keratin structure of pig stratum corneum has been elucidated by small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The measurements were carried out as a function of hydration and temperature. In addition, the stratum corneum was measured after recrystallization of the lipids at various temperatures. The results led us to conclude that the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum are organized in at least two different lamellar structures with repeat distances of 6 and 13.2 nm. There is an indication for the presence of a third phase with a periodicity of 9 nm. The wide-angle pattern revealed a hexagonal (0.414 nm spacing) and liquid lateral packing (approximately 0.46 nm spacing). The 0.414 nm reflection started to decrease in intensity between 60 and 66 degrees C and disappeared between 72 and 95 degrees C. Furthermore, crystalline cholesterol has been indicated by both, wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, while the reflections of alpha-keratin were observed in the wide-angle X-ray diffraction pattern.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  18. The Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Domain Is an Amphipathic Helical Hairpin That Functions by Inducing Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Smrt, Sean T.; Draney, Adrian W.; Lorieau, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. PMID:25398882

  19. Effect of some penetration enhancers on epithelial membrane lipid domains: evidence from fluorescence spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Turunen, T M; Urtti, A; Paronen, P; Audus, K L; Rytting, J H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of the penetration enhancers Azone, oleic acid, 1-dodecanol, dodecyl N,N-dimethylaminoacetate (DDAA), and dodecyl N,N-dimethylaminoisopropionate (DDAIP) on epithelial membrane lipids was examined using human buccal cell membranes as a model for epithelial lipid bilayer. Buccal epithelial cells (BEC) were labeled with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), 1-(4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl)-6- phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH), and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorophores to characterize enhancer-induced changes in the hydrophobic core, in the superficial polar head region, and on the exterior surface, respectively, with fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetimes. All the enhancers studied were found to decrease the BEC membrane lipid packing order in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner in the deep bilayer region, as shown by a 37-66% decrease in anisotropy. Oleic acid was also found to disrupt membrane lipids strongly in the polar head region, causing at least a 34% decrease in anisotropy values. Azone and DDAA were shown to alter molecular movement on the surface of the bilayers (24 and 19% decrease in anisotropy, respectively). The results suggest that interaction with membrane lipid domains is an important, but not the only, mode of action for the penetration enhancers studied.

  20. POM152 is an integral protein of the pore membrane domain of the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a concanavalin A-reactive glycoprotein of 150 kD that coenriches with isolated yeast nuclear pore complexes. Molecular cloning and sequencing of this protein revealed a single canonical transmembrane segment. Epitope tagging and localization by both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that it is a pore membrane protein. The protein was termed POM152 (for pore membrane protein of 152 kD) on the basis of its location and cDNA-deduced molecular mass. POM152 is likely to be a type II membrane protein with its NH2-terminal region (175 residues) and its COOH-terminal region (1,142 residues) positioned on the pore side and cisternal side of the pore membrane, respectively. The proposed cisternally exposed domain contains eight repetitive motifs of approximately 24 residues. Surprisingly, POM152 deletion mutants were viable and their growth rate was indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells at temperatures between 17 and 37 degrees C. However, overproduction of POM152 inhibited cell growth. When expressed in mouse 3T3 cells, POM152 was found to be localized to the pore membrane, suggesting a conserved sorting pathway between yeast and mammals. PMID:8138573

  1. Structural Plasticity in the Topology of the Membrane-Interacting Domain of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J. Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J.; Wimley, William C.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662–683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning. PMID:24507601

  2. Structural plasticity in the topology of the membrane-interacting domain of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J; Wimley, William C; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2014-02-04

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662-683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning.

  3. Unique Structural Features of Membrane-Bound C-Terminal Domain Motifs Modulate Complexin Inhibitory Function

    PubMed Central

    Snead, David; Lai, Alex L.; Wragg, Rachel T.; Parisotto, Daniel A.; Ramlall, Trudy F.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Freed, Jack H.; Eliezer, David

    2017-01-01

    Complexin is a small soluble presynaptic protein that interacts with neuronal SNARE proteins in order to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. While the SNARE-binding central helix of complexin is required for both the inhibition of spontaneous fusion and the facilitation of synchronous fusion, the disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) of complexin is specifically required for its inhibitory function. The CTD of worm complexin binds to membranes via two distinct motifs, one of which undergoes a membrane curvature dependent structural transition that is required for efficient inhibition of neurotransmitter release, but the conformations of the membrane-bound motifs remain poorly characterized. Visualizing these conformations is required to clarify the mechanisms by which complexin membrane interactions regulate its function. Here, we employ optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to precisely define the boundaries of the two CTD membrane-binding motifs and to characterize their conformations. We show that the curvature dependent amphipathic helical motif features an irregular element of helical structure, likely a pi-bulge, and that this feature is important for complexin inhibitory function in vivo. PMID:28596722

  4. Selective anchoring in the specific plasma membrane domain: a role in epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the role of restrictions to lateral mobility in the segregation of proteins to apical and basolateral domains of MDCK epithelial cells. Radioimmunoassay and semiquantitative video analysis of immunofluorescence on frozen sections showed that one apical and three basolateral glycoproteins, defined by monoclonal antibodies and binding of beta-2-microglobulin, were incompletely extracted with 0.5% Triton X-100 in a buffer that preserves the cortical cytoskeleton (Fey, E. G., K. M. Wan, and S. Penman. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 98:1973-1984; Nelson, W. T. and P. J. Veshnock. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:1751-1766). The marker proteins were preferentially extracted from the "incorrect" domain (i.e., the apical domain for a basolateral marker), indicating that the cytoskeletal anchoring was most effective on the "correct" domain. The two basolateral markers were unpolarized and almost completely extractable in cells prevented from establishing cell-cell contacts by incubation in low Ca++ medium, while an apical marker was only extracted from the basal surface under the same conditions. Procedures were developed to apply fluorescent probes to either the apical or the basolateral surface of live cells grown on native collagen gels. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of predominantly basolateral antigens showed a large percent of cells (28- 52%) with no recoverable fluorescence on the basal domain but normal fluorescence recovery on the apical surface of most cells (92-100%). Diffusion coefficients in cells with normal fluorescence recovery were in the order of 1.1 x 10(-9) cm2/s in the apical domain and 0.6-0.9 x 10(-9) cm2/s in the basal surface, but the difference was not significant. The data from both techniques indicate (a) the existence of mobile and immobile protein fractions in both plasma membrane domains, and (b) that linkage to a domain specific submembrane cytoskeleton plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial cell surface polarity

  5. Role of Pam16's degenerate J domain in protein import across the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Patrick R; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2005-08-30

    Translocation of proteins across the mitochondrial inner membrane is an essential process requiring an import motor having mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) at its core. The J protein partner of mtHsp70, Pam18, is an integral part of this motor, serving to stimulate the ATPase activity of mtHsp70. Pam16, an essential protein having an inactive J domain that is unable to stimulate mtHsp70's ATPase activity, forms a heterodimer with Pam18, but its function is unknown. We set out to test the importance of three properties of Pam16: (i) a stable interaction between Pam16 and Pam18, (ii) the inability of Pam16's degenerate J domain to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase domain, and (iii) the innately lower stimulatory activity of the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer, compared to Pam18 alone. Neither substantial reduction in the ability of Pam18 to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase activity, nor the presence of an active J domain in Pam16, had deleterious effects on cell growth, indicating the lack of importance of two of these biochemical properties. However, a stable interaction between Pam16's degenerate J domain and Pam18's J domain was found to be critical for function. Alterations that destabilized the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer had deleterious effects on cell growth and mitochondrial protein import; intragenic suppressors that restored robust growth also restored heterodimer stability. Our results support the idea that Pam16's J-like domain strongly interacts with Pam18's J domain, leading to a productive interaction of Pam18 with mtHsp70 at the import channel.

  6. Role of Pam16's degenerate J domain in protein import across the mitochondrial inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, Patrick R.; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    Translocation of proteins across the mitochondrial inner membrane is an essential process requiring an import motor having mitochondrial Hsp70 (mtHsp70) at its core. The J protein partner of mtHsp70, Pam18, is an integral part of this motor, serving to stimulate the ATPase activity of mtHsp70. Pam16, an essential protein having an inactive J domain that is unable to stimulate mtHsp70's ATPase activity, forms a heterodimer with Pam18, but its function is unknown. We set out to test the importance of three properties of Pam16: (i) a stable interaction between Pam16 and Pam18, (ii) the inability of Pam16's degenerate J domain to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase domain, and (iii) the innately lower stimulatory activity of the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer, compared to Pam18 alone. Neither substantial reduction in the ability of Pam18 to stimulate Ssc1's ATPase activity, nor the presence of an active J domain in Pam16, had deleterious effects on cell growth, indicating the lack of importance of two of these biochemical properties. However, a stable interaction between Pam16's degenerate J domain and Pam18's J domain was found to be critical for function. Alterations that destabilized the Pam16:Pam18 heterodimer had deleterious effects on cell growth and mitochondrial protein import; intragenic suppressors that restored robust growth also restored heterodimer stability. Our results support the idea that Pam16's J-like domain strongly interacts with Pam18's J domain, leading to a productive interaction of Pam18 with mtHsp70 at the import channel. PMID:16105940

  7. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol-lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J.; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways, downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol, that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG-lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a “molecular rod”, namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Application of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques reveals that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG-lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit displayed at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG-lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of PKC translocation from cytosol to membranes induced by the molecular-rod DAG-lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side-residues of DAG-lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions and in that fashion may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands. PMID:19961537

  8. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  9. Structure of the outer membrane translocator domain of the Haemophilus influenzae Hia trimeric autotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guoyu; Surana, Neeraj K; St Geme, Joseph W; Waksman, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Autotransporter proteins are defined by the ability to drive their own secretion across the bacterial outer membrane. The Hia autotransporter of Haemophilus influenzae belongs to the trimeric autotransporter subfamily and mediates bacterial adhesion to the respiratory epithelium. In this report, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal end of Hia, corresponding to the entire Hia translocator domain and part of the passenger domain (residues 992–1098). This domain forms a β-barrel with 12 transmembrane β-strands, including four strands from each subunit. The β-barrel has a central channel of 1.8 nm in diameter that is traversed by three N-terminal α-helices, one from each subunit. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that the transmembrane portion of the three α-helices and the loop region between the α-helices and the neighboring β-strands are essential for stability of the trimeric structure of the translocator domain, and that trimerization of the translocator domain is a prerequisite for translocator activity. Overall, this study provides important insights into the mechanism of translocation in trimeric autotransporters. PMID:16688217

  10. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Toppozini, L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Fragneto, Giovanna; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  11. Energy of the interaction between membrane lipid domains calculated from splay and tilt deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzyanov, T. R.; Molotkovsky, R. J.; Kheyfets, B. B.; Akimov, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific domains, called rafts, are formed in cell membranes. Similar lipid domains can be formed in model membranes as a result of phase separation with raft size may remaining small (˜10-100 nm) for a long time. The characteristic lifetime of a nanoraft ensemble strongly depends on the nature of mutual raft interactions. The interaction energy between the boundaries of two rafts has been calculated under the assumption that the thickness of the raft bilayer is greater than that of the surrounding membrane, and elastic deformations appear in order to smooth the thickness mismatch at the boundary. When rafts approach each other, deformations from their boundaries overlap, making interaction energy profile sophisticated. It has been shown that raft merger occurs in two stages: rafts first merge in one monolayer of the lipid bilayer and then in another monolayer. Each merger stage requires overcoming of an energy barrier of about 0.08-0.12 k BT per 1 nm of boundary length. These results allow us to explain the stability of the ensemble of finite sized rafts.

  12. Multiscale Simulations Suggest a Mechanism for the Association of the Dok7 PH Domain with PIP-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buyan, Amanda; Kalli, Antreas C.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Dok7 is a peripheral membrane protein that is associated with the MuSK receptor tyrosine kinase. Formation of the Dok7/MuSK/membrane complex is required for the activation of MuSK. This is a key step in the complex exchange of signals between neuron and muscle, which lead to neuromuscular junction formation, dysfunction of which is associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes. The Dok7 structure consists of a Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain and a Phosphotyrosine Binding (PTB) domain. The mechanism of the Dok7 association with the membrane remains largely unknown. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations we have explored the formation of the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. Our simulations indicate that the PH domain of Dok7 associates with membranes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) via interactions of the β1/β2, β3/β4, and β5/β6 loops, which together form a positively charged surface on the PH domain and interact with the negatively charged headgroups of PIP molecules. The initial encounter of the Dok7 PH domain is followed by formation of additional interactions with the lipid bilayer, and especially with PIP molecules, which stabilizes the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. We have quantified the binding of the PH domain to the model bilayers by calculating a density landscape for protein/membrane interactions. Detailed analysis of the PH/PIP interactions reveal both a canonical and an atypical site to be occupied by the anionic lipid. PH domain binding leads to local clustering of PIP molecules in the bilayer. Association of the Dok7 PH domain with PIP lipids is therefore seen as a key step in localization of Dok7 to the membrane and formation of a complex with MuSK. PMID:27459095

  13. Analysis of Bovine Leukemia Virus Gag Membrane Targeting and Late Domain Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huating; Norris, Kendra M.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2002-01-01

    Assembly of retrovirus-like particles only requires the expression of the Gag polyprotein precursor. We have exploited this in the development of a model system for studying the virus particle assembly pathway for bovine leukemia virus (BLV). BLV is closely related to the human T-cell leukemia viruses (HTLVs), and all are members of the Deltaretrovirus genus of the Retroviridae family. Overexpression of a BLV Gag polyprotein containing a carboxy-terminal influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag in mammalian cells led to the robust production of virus-like particles (VLPs). Site-directed mutations were introduced into HA-tagged Gag to test the usefulness of this model system for studying certain aspects of the virus assembly pathway. First, mutations that disrupted the amino-terminal glycine residue that is important for Gag myristylation led to a drastic reduction in VLP production. Predictably, the nature of the VLP production defect was correlated to Gag membrane localization. Second, mutation of the PPPY motif (located in the MA domain) greatly reduced VLP production in the absence of the viral protease. This reduction in VLP production was more severe in the presence of an active viral protease. Examination of particles by electron microscopy revealed an abundance of particles that began to pinch off from the plasma membrane but were not completely released from the cell surface, indicating that the PPPY motif functions as a late domain (L domain). PMID:12134053

  14. Spatial control of plasma membrane domains: ROP GTPase-based symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Lavagi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Breaking of the cell membrane symmetry to form polarized or localized domains/regions of the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs in essentially all cellular organisms, and is required for a wide variety of cellular functions/behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. In plants, the development of localized or polarized PM domains has been linked to a vast array of cellular and developmental processes such as polar cell expansion, asymmetric cell division, cell morphogenesis, the polarization of auxin transporters (and thus auxin polar transport), secondary cell wall patterning, cell type specification, and tissue pattern formation. Rho GTPases from plants (ROPs) are known to be involved in many of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge on ROP involvement in breaking symmetry and propose that ROP-based self-organizing signaling may provide a common mechanism for the spatial control of PM domains required in various cellular and developmental processes in plants. PMID:23177207

  15. Interaction of human apolipoprotein A-I with model membranes exhibiting lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Arnulphi, Cristina; Sánchez, Susana A; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Gratton, Enrico; Jonas, Ana

    2005-07-01

    Several mechanisms for cell cholesterol efflux have been proposed, including membrane microsolubilization, suggesting that the existence of specific domains could enhance the transfer of lipids to apolipoproteins. In this work isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and two-photon microscopy are used to study the interaction of lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), with and without cholesterol. Below 30 degrees C the calorimetric results show that apoA-I interaction with POPC/SM SUVs produces an exothermic reaction, characterized as nonclassical hydrophobic binding. The heat capacity change (DeltaCp degrees ) is small and positive, whereas it was larger and negative for pure POPC bilayers, in the absence of SM. Inclusion of cholesterol in the membranes induces changes in the observed thermodynamic pattern of binding and counteracts the formation of alpha-helices in the protein. Above 30 degrees C the reactions are endothermic. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of identical composition to the SUVs, and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques, were utilized to further characterize the interaction. Fluorescence imaging of the GUVs indicates coexistence of lipid domains under 30 degrees C. Binding experiments and Laurdan generalized-polarization measurements suggest that there is no preferential binding of the labeled apoA-I to any particular domain. Changes in the content of alpha-helix, binding, and fluidity data are discussed in the framework of the thermodynamic parameters.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Bovine lactadherin C2 Domain, a Membrane Binding Motif, Shows Similarity to the C2 Domains of Factor V and Factor VIII

    SciTech Connect

    Lin,L.

    2007-01-01

    Lactadherin, a glycoprotein secreted by a variety of cell types, contains two EGF domains and two C domains with sequence homology to the C domains of blood coagulation proteins factor V and factor VIII. Like these proteins, lactadherin binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes with high affinity. We determined the crystal structure of the bovine lactadherin C2 domain (residues 1 to 158) at 2.4 {angstrom}. The lactadherin C2 structure is similar to the C2 domains of factors V and VIII (rmsd of C{sub {alpha}} atoms of 0.9 {angstrom} and 1.2 {angstrom}, and sequence identities of 43% and 38%, respectively). The lactadherin C2 domain has a discoidin-like fold containing two {beta}-sheets of five and three antiparallel {beta}-strands packed against one another. The N and C termini are linked by a disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys158. One {beta}-turn and two loops containing solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues extend from the C2 domain {beta}-sandwich core. In analogy with the C2 domains of factors V and VIII, some or all of these solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues, Trp26, Leu28, Phe31, and Phe81, likely participate in membrane binding. The C2 domain of lactadherin may serve as a marker of cell surface phosphatidylserine exposure and may have potential as a unique anti-thrombotic agent.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Bovine lactadherin C2 Domain, a Membrane Binding Motif, Shows Similarity of the C2 Domains of Factor V and Factor VIII

    SciTech Connect

    Lin,L.; Huai, Q.; Huang, M.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2007-01-01

    Lactadherin, a glycoprotein secreted by a variety of cell types, contains two EGF domains and two C domains with sequence homology to the C domains of blood coagulation proteins factor V and factor VIII. Like these proteins, lactadherin binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes with high affinity. We determined the crystal structure of the bovine lactadherin C2 domain (residues 1 to 158) at 2.4 Angstroms. The lactadherin C2 structure is similar to the C2 domains of factors V and VIII (rmsd of C? atoms of 0.9 Angstroms and 1.2 Angstroms, and sequence identities of 43% and 38%, respectively). The lactadherin C2 domain has a discoidin-like fold containing two ?-sheets of five and three antiparallel ?-strands packed against one another. The N and C termini are linked by a disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys158. One ?-turn and two loops containing solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues extend from the C2 domain ?-sandwich core. In analogy with the C2 domains of factors V and VIII, some or all of these solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues, Trp26, Leu28, Phe31, and Phe81, likely participate in membrane binding. The C2 domain of lactadherin may serve as a marker of cell surface phosphatidylserine exposure and may have potential as a unique anti-thrombotic agent.

  18. Microneedle penetration and injection past the stratum corneum in humans.

    PubMed

    Sivamani, Raja K; Stoeber, Boris; Liepmann, Dorian; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-01-01

    Solid and hollow microneedles hold potential for painless vaccinations and drug injections. Hollow microneedles offer the potential for short-term bolus injections and long-term continuous injections. However, efficient injection requires complete penetration through the lipophilic stratum corneum. Furthermore, human skin is elastic, making microneedle penetration challenging. Here, we investigate whether hollow microneedles can penetrate and inject past the stratum corneum in human volunteers. Hexyl nicotinate (HN) induces skin capillary vasodilation and was used as the marker of stratum corneum penetration because of its lipophilic nature and slow partition from the lipophilic stratum corneum to the hydrophilic epidermis. We compared topical application of HN with microneedle injection at tape-stripped and unstripped sites on the volar forearms of five humans. Microneedle injections decreased the time to reach maximum cutaneous blood flow by threefold, regardless of whether the stratum corneum had or had not been tape-stripped (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that hollow microneedle arrays deliver past the stratum corneum and not into the stratum corneum. Therefore, microneedles improve delivery in humans by penetrating past the stratum corneum and would be especially useful in the delivery of lipophilic drugs that partition slowly from the stratum corneum into the epidermis.

  19. Differential Use of Signal Peptides and Membrane Domains Is a Common Occurrence in the Protein Output of Transcriptional Units

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa J; Hanson, Kelly A; Clark, Francis; Fink, J. Lynn; Zhang, Fasheng; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2006-01-01

    Membrane organization describes the orientation of a protein with respect to the membrane and can be determined by the presence, or absence, and organization within the protein sequence of two features: endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides and alpha-helical transmembrane domains. These features allow protein sequences to be classified into one of five membrane organization categories: soluble intracellular proteins, soluble secreted proteins, type I membrane proteins, type II membrane proteins, and multi-spanning membrane proteins. Generation of protein isoforms with variable membrane organizations can change a protein's subcellular localization or association with the membrane. Application of MemO, a membrane organization annotation pipeline, to the FANTOM3 Isoform Protein Sequence mouse protein set revealed that within the 8,032 transcriptional units (TUs) with multiple protein isoforms, 573 had variation in their use of signal peptides, 1,527 had variation in their use of transmembrane domains, and 615 generated protein isoforms from distinct membrane organization classes. The mechanisms underlying these transcript variations were analyzed. While TUs were identified encoding all pairwise combinations of membrane organization categories, the most common was conversion of membrane proteins to soluble proteins. Observed within our high-confidence set were 156 TUs predicted to generate both extracellular soluble and membrane proteins, and 217 TUs generating both intracellular soluble and membrane proteins. The differential use of endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides and transmembrane domains is a common occurrence within the variable protein output of TUs. The generation of protein isoforms that are targeted to multiple subcellular locations represents a major functional consequence of transcript variation within the mouse transcriptome. PMID:16683029

  20. PTEN Hopping on the Cell Membrane Is Regulated via a Positively-Charged C2 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Masato; Matsuoka, Satomi; Ueda, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    PTEN, a tumor suppressor that is frequently mutated in a wide spectrum of cancers, exerts PI(3,4,5)P3 phosphatase activities that are regulated by its dynamic shuttling between the membrane and cytoplasm. Direct observation of PTEN in the interfacial environment can offer quantitative information about the shuttling dynamics, but remains elusive. Here we show that positively charged residues located in the cα2 helix of the C2 domain are necessary for the membrane localization of PTEN via stable electrostatic interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule imaging analyses revealed that PTEN molecules moved distances much larger than expected had they been caused by lateral diffusion, a phenomenon we call “hopping.” Our novel single-particle tracking analysis method found that the cα2 helix aids in regulating the hopping and stable-binding states. The dynamically established membrane localization of PTEN was revealed to be essential for developmental processes and clarified a fundamental regulation mechanism of the protein quantity and activity on the plasma membrane. PMID:25211206

  1. Identification of Adducin-Binding Residues on the Cytoplasmic Domain of Erythrocyte Membrane Protein, Band 3

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Two major complexes form structural bridges that connect the erythrocyte membrane to its underlying spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Although the band 3-ankyrin bridge may account for most of the membrane-to-cytoskeleton interactions, the linkage between the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) and adducin has also been shown to be critical to membrane integrity. In this paper, we demonstrate that adducin, a major component of the spectrin-actin junctional complex, binds primarily to residues 246 through 264 of cdb3, and mutation of two exposed glutamic acid residues within this sequence completely abrogates both α- and β-adducin binding. Because these residues are located next to the ankyrin binding site on cdb3, it seems unlikely that band 3 can bind ankyrin and adducin concurrently, reducing the chances of an association between the ankyrin and junctional complexes that would significantly compromise erythrocyte membrane integrity. We also demonstrate the adducin binds the kidney isoform of cdb3, a spliceoform that lacks the first 65 amino acids of erythrocyte cdb3, including the central strand of a large beta-pleated sheet. Because kidney cdb3 is not known to bind any of the common peripheral protein partners of erythrocyte cdb3, including ankyrin, protein 4.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and phosphofructokinase, retention of this affinity for adducin was unexpected. PMID:27435097

  2. Mechanism of specific membrane targeting by C2 domains: localized pools of target lipids enhance Ca2+ affinity.

    PubMed

    Corbin, John A; Evans, John H; Landgraf, Kyle E; Falke, Joseph J

    2007-04-10

    The C2 domain is a ubiquitous, conserved protein signaling motif widely found in eukaryotic signaling proteins. Although considerable functional diversity exists, most C2 domains are activated by Ca2+ binding and then dock to a specific cellular membrane. The C2 domains of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha (cPLA2alpha), for example, are known to dock to different membrane surfaces during an intracellular Ca2+ signal. Ca2+ activation targets the PKCalpha C2 domain to the plasma membrane and the cPLA2alpha C2 domain to the internal membranes, with no detectable spatial overlap. It is crucial to determine how such targeting specificity is achieved at physiological bulk Ca2+ concentrations that during a typical signaling event rarely exceed 1 muM. For the isolated PKCalpha C2 domain in the presence of physiological Ca2+ levels, the target lipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) are together sufficient to recruit the PKCalpha C2 domain to a lipid mixture mimicking the plasma membrane inner leaflet. For the cPLA2alpha C2 domain, the target lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) appears to be sufficient to drive membrane targeting to an internal membrane mimic at physiological Ca2+ levels, although the results do not rule out a second, unknown target molecule. Stopped-flow kinetic studies provide additional information about the fundamental molecular events that occur during Ca2+-activated membrane docking. In principle, C2 domain-directed intracellular targeting, which requires coincidence detection of multiple signals (Ca2+ and one or more target lipids), can exhibit two different mechanisms: messenger-activated target affinity (MATA) and target-activated messenger affinity (TAMA). The C2 domains studied here both utilize the TAMA mechanism, in which the C2 domain Ca2+ affinity is too low to be activated by physiological Ca2+ signals in most regions of the cell. Only when the C2 domain nears its target

  3. Effect of Multimerization on Membrane Association of Rous Sarcoma Virus and HIV-1 Matrix Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Kamynina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In most retroviruses, plasma membrane (PM) association of the Gag structural protein is a critical step in viral assembly, relying in part on interaction between the highly basic Gag MA domain and the negatively charged inner leaflet of the PM. Assembly is thought to begin with Gag dimerization followed by multimerization, resulting in a hexameric lattice. To directly address the role of multimerization in membrane binding, we fused the MA domains of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and HIV-1 to the chemically inducible dimerization domain FK506-binding protein (FKBP) or to the hexameric protein CcmK4 from cyanobacteria. The cellular localization of the resulting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeric proteins was examined by fluorescence imaging, and the association of the proteins with liposomes was quantified by flotation in sucrose gradients, following synthesis in a reticulocyte extract or as purified proteins. Four lipid compositions were tested, representative of liposomes commonly reported in flotation experiments. By themselves, GFP-tagged RSV and HIV-1 MA proteins were largely cytoplasmic, but both hexamerized proteins were highly concentrated at the PM. Dimerization led to partial PM localization for HIV-1 MA. These in vivo effects of multimerization were reproduced in vitro. In flotation analyses, the intact RSV and HIV-1 Gag proteins were more similar to multimerized MA than to monomeric MA. RNA is reported to compete with acidic liposomes for HIV-1 Gag binding, and thus we also examined the effects of RNase treatment or tRNA addition on flotation. tRNA competed with liposomes in the case of some but not all lipid compositions and ionic strengths. Taken together, our results further underpin the model that multimerization is critical for PM association of retroviral Gag proteins. In addition, they suggest that the modulation of membrane binding by RNA, as previously reported for HIV-1, may not hold for RSV. PMID:24109216

  4. Subnanometer structure of an asymmetric model membrane: Interleaflet coupling influences domain properties

    DOE PAGES

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Marquardt, Drew; Doktorova, Milka; ...

    2016-04-29

    Cell membranes possess a complex three-dimensional architecture, including nonrandom lipid lateral organization within the plane of a bilayer leaflet, and compositional asymmetry between the two leaflets. As a result, delineating the membrane structure–function relationship has been a highly challenging task. Even in simplified model systems, the interactions between bilayer leaflets are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulty of preparing asymmetric model membranes that are free from the effects of residual organic solvent or osmotic stress. To address these problems, we have modified a technique for preparing asymmetric large unilamellar vesicles (aLUVs) via cyclodextrin-mediated lipid exchange in order tomore » produce tensionless, solvent-free aLUVs suitable for a range of biophysical studies. Leaflet composition and structure were characterized using isotopic labeling strategies, which allowed us to avoid the use of bulky labels. NMR and gas chromatography provided precise quantification of the extent of lipid exchange and bilayer asymmetry, while small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to resolve bilayer structural features with subnanometer resolution. Isotopically asymmetric POPC vesicles were found to have the same bilayer thickness and area per lipid as symmetric POPC vesicles, demonstrating that the modified exchange protocol preserves native bilayer structure. Partial exchange of DPPC into the outer leaflet of POPC vesicles produced chemically asymmetric vesicles with a gel/fluid phase-separated outer leaflet and a uniform, POPC-rich inner leaflet. SANS was able to separately resolve the thicknesses and areas per lipid of coexisting domains, revealing reduced lipid packing density of the outer leaflet DPPC-rich phase compared to typical gel phases. Lastly, our finding that a disordered inner leaflet can partially fluidize ordered outer leaflet domains indicates some degree of interleaflet coupling, and invites speculation on a role

  5. Differential dynamic and structural behavior of lipid-cholesterol domains in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Luis F; Pino, José A; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A; Cuevas, Francisco J; Sánchez, Susana; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the cholesterol (Chol) content of biological membranes are known to alter the physicochemical properties of the lipid lamella and consequently the function of membrane-associated enzymes. To characterize these changes, we used steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon-excitation microscopy techniques. The membrane systems were chosen according to the techniques that were used: large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) for cuvette and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) for microscopy measurements; they were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) in mixtures that are well known to form lipid domains. Two fluorescent probes, which insert into different regions of the bilayer, were selected: 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was located at the deep hydrophobic core of the acyl chain regions and 2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene (Laurdan) at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic membrane interface. Our spectroscopy results show that (i) the changes induced by cholesterol in the deep hydrophobic phospholipid acyl chain domain are different from the ones observed in the superficial region of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface, and these changes depend on the state of the lamella and (ii) the incorporation of cholesterol into the lamella induces an increase in the orientation dynamics in the deep region of the phospholipid acyl chains with a corresponding decrease in the orientation at the region close to the polar lipid headgroups. The microscopy data from DOPC/DPPC/Chol GUVs using Laurdan generalized polarization (Laurdan GP) suggest that a high cholesterol content in the bilayer weakens the stability of the water hydrogen bond network and hence the stability of the liquid-ordered phase (Lo).

  6. Plasma Membrane Domains Participate in pH Banding of Chara Internodal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmölzer, Patric M.; Höftberger, Margit; Foissner, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the identity and distribution of cortical domains, stained by the endocytic marker FM 1-43, in branchlet internodal cells of the characean green algae Chara corallina and Chara braunii. Co-labeling with NBD C6-sphingomyelin, a plasma membrane dye, which is not internalized, confirmed their location in the plasma membrane, and co-labelling with the fluorescent pH indicator Lysotracker red indicated an acidic environment. The plasma membrane domains co-localized with the distribution of an antibody against a proton-translocating ATPase, and electron microscopic data confirmed their identity with elaborate plasma membrane invaginations known as charasomes. The average size and the distribution pattern of charasomes correlated with the pH banding pattern of the cell. Charasomes were larger and more frequent at the acidic regions than at the alkaline bands, indicating that they are involved in outward-directed proton transport. Inhibition of photosynthesis by DCMU prevented charasome formation, and incubation in pH buffers resulted in smaller, homogenously distributed charasomes irrespective of whether the pH was clamped at 5.5 or 8.5. These data indicate that the differential size and distribution of charasomes is not due to differences in external pH but reflects active, photosynthesis-dependent pH banding. The fact that pH banding recovered within several minutes in unbuffered medium, however, confirms that pH banding is also possible in cells with evenly distributed charasomes or without charasomes. Cortical mitochondria were also larger and more abundant at the acid bands, and their intimate association with charasomes and chloroplasts suggests an involvement in carbon uptake and photorespiration. PMID:21659328

  7. Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty: intraoperative and postoperative imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Dubis, Adam M; Wilkins, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case report of using the same handheld spectral-domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) for rapid intraoperative and postoperative imaging in a case of Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A 67-year-old woman, with Fuchs dystrophy and corneal decompensation, underwent DMEK with intraoperative ASOCT imaging using the handheld Envisu spectral domain ASOCT system (Bioptigen, Inc., Morrisville, NC, USA). We found that this easy-to-use portable system with handheld probe allowed for rapid imaging of the anterior segment during donor manipulation to visualize the orientation of the DMEK donor, as well as to confirm the initial adhesion of the DMEK donor. Moreover, the same system may be used for postoperative monitoring of graft adhesion, corneal thickness, and stromal remodeling in the clinic with very high-definition images.

  8. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  9. Characterization of a dual-function domain that mediates membrane insertion and excision of Ff filamentous bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Nicholas J; Gagic, Dragana; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2011-09-02

    The filamentous phage Ff (f1, fd, or M13) of Escherichia coli is assembled at the cell membranes by a process that is morphologically similar to that of pilus assembly. The release of the filament virion is mediated by excision from the membrane; conversely, entry into a host cell is mediated by insertion of the virion coat proteins into the membrane. The N-terminal domains of the minor virion protein pIII have the sole role of binding to host receptors during infection. In contrast, the C domain of pIII is required for two opposite functions: insertion of the virion into the membrane during infection and excision at the termination step of assembly/secretion. We identified a 28-residue-long segment in the pIII C domain, which is required for phage entry but dispensable for release from the membrane at the end of assembly. This segment, which we named the infection-competence segment (ICS), works only in cis with the N-terminal receptor-binding domains and does not require the equivalent ICS sequences in other subunits within the virion cap. The ICS contains a predicted amphipathic α-helix and is rich in small amino acids, Gly, Ala, and Ser, which are arranged as a [small]XXX[small]XX[small]XXX[small]XXX[small] motif. Scanning Ala/Gly mutagenesis of ICS showed that small residues are compatible with infection. Overall, organization of the C domain is reminiscent of α-helical pore-forming toxins' membrane insertion domains. The unique ability of pIII to mediate both membrane insertion and excision allowed us to compare these two fundamental membrane transactions and to show that receptor-triggered insertion is a more complex process than excision from membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Membrane Docking of the Synaptotagmin 7 C2A Domain: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements Show Contributions from Two Membrane Binding Loops.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, J Ryan; Chon, Nara Lee; Boo, Arthur; Maynard, Favinn A; Lin, Hai; Knight, Jefferson D

    2015-09-22

    The synaptotagmin (Syt) family of proteins plays an important role in vesicle docking and fusion during Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis in a wide variety of cell types. Its role as a Ca(2+) sensor derives primarily from its two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, which insert into anionic lipid membranes upon binding Ca(2+). Syt isoforms 1 and 7 differ significantly in their Ca(2+) sensitivity; the C2A domain from Syt7 binds Ca(2+) and membranes much more tightly than the C2A domain from Syt1, at least in part because of greater contributions from the hydrophobic effect. While the structure and membrane activity of Syt1 have been extensively studied, the structural origins of differences between Syt1 and Syt7 are unknown. This study used site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine depth parameters for the Syt7 C2A domain, for comparison to analogous previous measurements with the Syt1 C2A domain. In a novel approach, the membrane docking geometry of both Syt1 and Syt7 C2A was modeled by mapping depth parameters onto multiple molecular dynamics-simulated structures of the Ca(2+)-bound protein. The models reveal membrane penetration of Ca(2+) binding loops 1 (CBL1) and 3 (CBL3), and membrane binding is more sensitive to mutations in CBL3. On average, Syt7 C2A inserts more deeply into the membrane than Syt1 C2A, although depths vary among the different structural models. This observation provides a partial structural explanation for the hydrophobically driven membrane docking of Syt7 C2A.

  11. Membrane-tethered monomeric neurexin LNS-domain triggers synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Ozgun; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-09-04

    Neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules such as neuroligins and leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs). When neuroligins or LRRTMs are expressed in a nonneuronal cell, cocultured neurons avidly form heterologous synapses onto that cell. Here we show that knockdown of all neurexins in cultured hippocampal mouse neurons did not impair synapse formation between neurons, but blocked heterologous synapse formation induced by neuroligin-1 or LRRTM2. Rescue experiments demonstrated that all neurexins tested restored heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons. Neurexin-deficient neurons exhibited a decrease in the levels of the PDZ-domain protein CASK (a calcium/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine kinase), which binds to neurexins, and mutation of the PDZ-domain binding sequence of neurexin-3β blocked its transport to the neuronal surface and impaired heterologous synapse formation. However, replacement of the C-terminal neurexin sequence with an unrelated PDZ-domain binding sequence that does not bind to CASK fully restored surface transport and heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons, suggesting that no particular PDZ-domain protein is essential for neurexin surface transport or heterologous synapse formation. Further mutagenesis revealed, moreover, that the entire neurexin cytoplasmic tail was dispensable for heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons, as long as the neurexin protein was transported to the neuronal cell surface. Furthermore, the single LNS-domain (for laminin/neurexin/sex hormone-binding globulin-domain) of neurexin-1β or neurexin-3β, when tethered to the presynaptic plasma membrane by a glycosylinositolphosphate anchor, was sufficient for rescuing heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons. Our data suggest that neurexins mediate heterologous synapse formation via an extracellular interaction with

  12. Eisosomes Are Dynamic Plasma Membrane Domains Showing Pil1-Lsp1 Heteroligomer Binding Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Couto, Agustina; Salzman, Valentina; Mailhos, Milagros; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2015-01-01

    Eisosomes are plasma membrane domains concentrating lipids, transporters, and signaling molecules. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, these domains are structured by scaffolds composed mainly by two cytoplasmic proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. Eisosomes are immobile domains, have relatively uniform size, and encompass thousands of units of the core proteins Pil1 and Lsp1. In this work we used fluorescence fluctuation analytical methods to determine the dynamics of eisosome core proteins at different subcellular locations. Using a combination of scanning techniques with autocorrelation analysis, we show that Pil1 and Lsp1 cytoplasmic pools freely diffuse whereas an eisosome-associated fraction of these proteins exhibits slow dynamics that fit with a binding-unbinding equilibrium. Number and brightness analysis shows that the eisosome-associated fraction is oligomeric, while cytoplasmic pools have lower aggregation states. Fluorescence lifetime imaging results indicate that Pil1 and Lsp1 directly interact in the cytoplasm and within the eisosomes. These results support a model where Pil1-Lsp1 heterodimers are the minimal eisosomes building blocks. Moreover, individual-eisosome fluorescence fluctuation analysis shows that eisosomes in the same cell are not equal domains: while roughly half of them are mostly static, the other half is actively exchanging core protein subunits. PMID:25863055

  13. The membrane topology of the amino-terminal domain of the red cell calcium pump.

    PubMed Central

    Castello, P. R.; González Flecha, F. L.; Caride, A. J.; Fernández, H. N.; Delfino, J. M.; Rossi, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic study of the membrane-associated regions in the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump of erythrocytes has been performed by hydrophobic photolabeling. Purified Ca2+ pump was labeled with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)-diazirine ([125I]TID), a generic photoactivatable hydrophobic probe. These results were compared with the enzyme labeled with a strictly membrane-bound probe, [3H]bis-phosphatidylethanolamine (trifluoromethyl) phenyldiazirine. A significant light-dependent labeling of an M(r) 135,000-140,000 peptide, corresponding to the full Ca2+ pump, was observed with both probes. After proteolysis of the pump labeled with each probe and isolation of fragments by SDS-PAGE, a common pattern of labeled peptides was observed. Similarly, labeling of the Ca2+ pump with [125I]TID, either in isolated red blood cell membranes or after the enzyme was purified, yields a similar pattern of labeled peptides. Taken together, these results validate the use of either probe to study the lipid interface of the membrane-embedded region of this protein, and sustain the notion that the conformation of the pump is maintained throughout the procedures of solubilization, affinity purification, and reconstitution into proteoliposomes. In this work, we put special emphasis on a detailed analysis of the N-terminal domain of the Ca2+ pump. A labeled peptide of M(r) 40,000 belonging to this region was purified and further digested with V8 protease. The specific incorporation of [125I]TID to proteolytic fragments pertaining to the amino-terminal region indicates the existence of two transmembrane stretches in this domain. A theoretical analysis based on the amino acid sequence 1-322 predicts two segments with high probability of membrane insertion, in agreement with the experimental data. Each segment shows a periodicity pattern of hydrophobicity and variability compatible with alpha-helical structure. These results strongly suggest the existence of a transmembrane helical hairpin

  14. FERM Domain Phosphoinositide Binding Targets Merlin to the Membrane and Is Essential for Its Growth-Suppressive Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Timmy; Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Conrady, Deborah G.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, merlin, is related to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton linkers. For ezrin, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding to the amino-terminal FERM domain is required for its conformational activation, proper subcellular localization, and function, but less is known about the role of phosphoinositide binding for merlin. Current evidence indicates that association with the membrane is important for merlin to function as a growth regulator; however, the mechanisms by which merlin localizes to the membrane are less clear. Here, we report that merlin binds phosphoinositides, including PIP2, via a conserved binding motif in its FERM domain. Abolition of FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding of merlin displaces merlin from the membrane and releases it into the cytosol without altering the folding of merlin. Importantly, a merlin protein whose FERM domain cannot bind phosphoinositide is defective in growth suppression. Retargeting the mutant merlin into the membrane using a dual-acylated amino-terminal decapeptide from Fyn is sufficient to restore the growth-suppressive properties to the mutant merlin. Thus, FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding and membrane association are critical for the growth-regulatory function of merlin. PMID:21402777

  15. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  16. Spatial Segregation of γ-Secretase and Substrates in Distinct Membrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chen, Ying; Barnes, Natalie Y.; Parent, Ange‘le T.; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    γ-Secretase facilitates the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of select type I membrane proteins that play diverse physiological roles in multiple cell types and tissue. In this study, we used biochemical approaches to examine the distribution of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and several additional γ-secretase substrates in membrane microdomains. We report that APP C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and γ-secretase reside in Lubrol WX detergent-insoluble membranes (DIM) of cultured cells and adult mouse brain. APP CTFs that accumulate in cells lacking γ-secretase activity preferentially associate with DIM. Cholesterol depletion and magnetic im-munoisolation studies indicate recruitment of APP CTFs into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich lipid rafts, and co-residence of APP CTFs, PS1, and syntaxin 6 in DIM patches derived from the trans-Golgi network. Photoaffinity cross-linking studies provided evidence for the preponderance of active γ-secretase in lipid rafts of cultured cells and adult brain. Remarkably, unlike the case of APP, CTFs derived from Notch1, Jagged2, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), and N-cadherin remain largely detergent-soluble, indicative of their spatial segregation in non-raft domains. In embryonic brain, the majority of PS1 and nicastrin is present in Lubrol WX-soluble membranes, wherein the CTFs derived from APP, Notch1, DCC, and N-cadherin also reside. We suggest that γ-secretase residence in non-raft membranes facilitates proteolysis of diverse substrates during embryonic development but that the translocation of γ-secretase to lipid rafts in adults ensures processing of certain substrates, including APP CTFs, while limiting processing of other potential substrates. PMID:15886206

  17. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    PubMed

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  18. Two Coiled-Coil Domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA Affect Membrane Fusion Events during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA’s fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection. PMID:23936096

  19. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB.

    PubMed

    Eng, Edward T; Jalilian, Amir R; Spasov, Krasimir A; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2008-01-25

    The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor-like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher-order organisms.

  20. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Edward T.; Jalilian, Amir R.; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP-binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their GDI-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher order organisms. PMID:18068722

  1. Molecular Details of the PH Domain of ACAP1(BAR-PH) Protein Binding to PIP-Containing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin Chun; Lu, Lanyuan; Sun, Fei; Fan, Jun

    2017-02-03

    ACAP1 proteins were previously reported to specifically bind PIP2-containing cell membranes and form well-structured protein lattices in order to conduct membrane tubulation. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations to characterize orientation of the PH domains with respect to the BAR domains inside the protein dimer. Followed by molecular dynamics simulations, we present a comprehensive orientation analysis of PH domain under different states including unbound and bound with lipids. We have examined two binding pockets on the PH domain and present PMF profiles of the two pockets to account for their preference to PIP2 lipids. Combining orientation analysis and studies of binding pockets, our simulations results reveal valuable molecular basis for protein-lipid interactions of ACAP1 proteins during membrane remodeling process.

  2. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  3. Membrane lipid domains distinct from cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich rafts are involved in the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mendez, A J; Lin, G; Wade, D P; Lawn, R M; Oram, J F

    2001-02-02

    Efflux of excess cellular cholesterol mediated by lipid-poor apolipoproteins occurs by an active mechanism distinct from passive diffusion and is controlled by the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1. Here we examined whether ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux involves the selective removal of lipids associated with membrane rafts, plasma membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. ABCA1 was not associated with cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich membrane raft domains based on detergent solubility and lack of colocalization with marker proteins associated with raft domains. Lipid efflux to apoA-I was accounted for by decreases in cellular lipids not associated with cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membranes. Treating cells with filipin, to disrupt raft structure, or with sphingomyelinase, to digest plasma membrane sphingomyelin, did not impair apoA-I-mediated cholesterol or phosphatidylcholine efflux. In contrast, efflux of cholesterol to high density lipoproteins (HDL) or plasma was partially accounted for by depletion of cholesterol from membrane rafts. Additionally, HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was partially inhibited by filipin and sphingomyelinase treatment. Apo-A-I-mediated cholesterol efflux was absent from fibroblasts with nonfunctional ABCA1 (Tangier disease cells), despite near normal amounts of cholesterol associated with raft domains and normal abilities of plasma and HDL to deplete cholesterol from these domains. Thus, the involvement of membrane rafts in cholesterol efflux applies to lipidated HDL particles but not to lipid-free apoA-I. We conclude that cholesterol and sphingomyelin-rich membrane rafts do not provide lipid for efflux promoted by apolipoproteins through the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway and that ABCA1 is not associated with these domains.

  4. Study on the lipid organization of stratum corneum lipid models by (cryo-) electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Pilgram, G S; Engelsma-van Pelt, A M; Oostergetel, G T; Koerten, H K; Bouwstra, J A

    1998-08-01

    The barrier function of the skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC). This outermost layer consists of protein-rich corneocytes and lipid-rich intercellular domains. These domains form the rate-limiting step for transepidermal water loss and the penetration of substances from the environment. To study the nature of the barrier function, stratum corneum lipid models have been examined with wide-angle X-ray diffraction. A disadvantage of this technique is that it requires bulk quantities of lipid and thus information on variations in the lateral packing cannot be obtained in the microm-range. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which electron diffraction is applied on SC lipid model systems. Using this technique, local structural information was obtained about mixtures prepared from isolated pig ceramides, cholesterol, and long-chain free fatty acids. It appeared that addition of free fatty acids caused a transition from a hexagonal to an orthorhombic packing and that electron diffraction can be applied to distinguish between these two lattices. The results are in good agreement with wide-angle X-ray diffraction data and suggest that application of electron diffraction in skin studies can provide new information on the lipid organization in well-defined areas of the stratum corneum.

  5. Syp1 is a conserved endocytic adaptor that contains domains involved in cargo selection and membrane tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reider, Amanda; Barker, Sarah L.; Mishra, Sanjay K.; Im, Young Jun; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Hurley, James H.; Traub, Linton M.; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-10-28

    Internalization of diverse transmembrane cargos from the plasma membrane requires a similarly diverse array of specialized adaptors, yet only a few adaptors have been characterized. We report the identification of the muniscin family of endocytic adaptors that is conserved from yeast to human beings. Solving the structures of yeast muniscin domains confirmed the unique combination of an N-terminal domain homologous to the crescent-shaped membrane-tubulating EFC/F-BAR domains and a C-terminal domain homologous to cargo-binding {mu} homology domains ({mu}HDs). In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed membrane-tubulation activity for muniscin EFC/F-BAR domains. The {mu}HD domain has conserved interactions with the endocytic adaptor/scaffold Ede1/eps15, which influences muniscin localization. The transmembrane protein Mid2, earlier implicated in polarized Rho1 signalling, was identified as a cargo of the yeast adaptor protein. These and other data suggest a model in which the muniscins provide a combined adaptor/membrane-tubulation activity that is important for regulating endocytosis.

  6. Sensory domain contraction in histidine kinase CitA triggers transmembrane signaling in the membrane-bound sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Michele; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Graf, Sabrina; Unden, Gottfried; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam; Griesinger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use membrane-integral sensor histidine kinases (HK) to perceive stimuli and transduce signals from the environment to the cytosol. Information on how the signal is transmitted across the membrane by HKs is still scarce. Combining both liquid- and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that structural rearrangements in the extracytoplasmic, citrate-sensing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of HK CitA are identical for the isolated domain in solution and in a longer construct containing the membrane-embedded HK and lacking only the kinase core. We show that upon citrate binding, the PAS domain contracts, resulting in a shortening of the C-terminal β-strand. We demonstrate that this contraction of the PAS domain, which is well characterized for the isolated domain, is the signal transmitted to the transmembrane (TM) helices in a CitA construct in liposomes. Putting the extracytoplasmic PAS domain into context of the membrane-embedded CitA construct slows down citrate-binding kinetics by at least a factor of 60, confirming that TM helix motions are linked to the citrate-binding event. Our results are confirmation of a hallmark of the HK signal transduction mechanism with atomic resolution on a full-length construct lacking only the kinase core domain. PMID:28265100

  7. Sensory domain contraction in histidine kinase CitA triggers transmembrane signaling in the membrane-bound sensor.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Michele; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Graf, Sabrina; Unden, Gottfried; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam; Griesinger, Christian

    2017-03-21

    Bacteria use membrane-integral sensor histidine kinases (HK) to perceive stimuli and transduce signals from the environment to the cytosol. Information on how the signal is transmitted across the membrane by HKs is still scarce. Combining both liquid- and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that structural rearrangements in the extracytoplasmic, citrate-sensing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of HK CitA are identical for the isolated domain in solution and in a longer construct containing the membrane-embedded HK and lacking only the kinase core. We show that upon citrate binding, the PAS domain contracts, resulting in a shortening of the C-terminal β-strand. We demonstrate that this contraction of the PAS domain, which is well characterized for the isolated domain, is the signal transmitted to the transmembrane (TM) helices in a CitA construct in liposomes. Putting the extracytoplasmic PAS domain into context of the membrane-embedded CitA construct slows down citrate-binding kinetics by at least a factor of 60, confirming that TM helix motions are linked to the citrate-binding event. Our results are confirmation of a hallmark of the HK signal transduction mechanism with atomic resolution on a full-length construct lacking only the kinase core domain.

  8. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  9. Functions of Cholesterol and the Cholesterol Bilayer Domain Specific to the Fiber-Cell Plasma Membrane of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Subczynski, Witold K.; Raguz, Marija; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman; Konovalov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The most unique feature of the eye lens fiber-cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content. Cholesterol saturates the bulk phospholipid bilayer and induces formation of immiscible cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) within the membrane. Our results (based on EPR spin-labeling experiments with lens-lipid membranes), along with a literature search, have allowed us to identify the significant functions of cholesterol specific to the fiber-cell plasma membrane, which are manifest through cholesterol-membrane interactions. The crucial role is played by the CBD. The presence of the CBD ensures that the surrounding phospholipid bilayer is saturated with cholesterol. The saturating cholesterol content in fiber-cell membranes keeps the bulk physical properties of lens-lipid membranes consistent and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. Thus, the CBD helps to maintain lens-membrane homeostasis when the membrane phospholipid composition changes significantly. The CBD raises the barrier for oxygen transport across the fiber-cell membrane, which should help to maintain a low oxygen concentration in the lens interior. It is hypothesized that the appearance of the CBD in the fiber-cell membrane is controlled by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. Saturation with cholesterol smoothes the phospholipid-bilayer surface, which should decrease light scattering and help to maintain lens transparency. Other functions of cholesterol include formation of hydrophobic and rigidity barriers across the bulk phospholipid-cholesterol domain and formation of hydrophobic channels in the central region of the membrane for transport of small, nonpolar molecules parallel to the membrane surface. In this review, we will provide data supporting these hypotheses. PMID:22207480

  10. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  11. New functional roles for non-collagenous domains of basement membrane collagens.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nathalie; Werb, Zena

    2002-11-15

    Collagens IV, XV and XVIII are major components of various basement membranes. In addition to the collagen-specific triple helix, these collagens are characterized by the presence of several non-collagenous domains. It is clear now that these ubiquitous collagen molecules are involved in more subtle and sophisticated functions than just the molecular architecture of basement membranes, particularly in the context of extracellular matrix degradation. Degradation of the basement membrane collagens occurs during numerous physiological and pathological processes such as embryonic development or tumorigenesis and generates collagen fragments. These fragments are involved in the regulation of functions differing from those of their original intact molecules. The non-collagenous C-terminal fragment NC1 of collagen IV, XV and XVIII have been recently highlighted in the literature because of their potential in reducing angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, but it is clear that their biological functions are not limited to these processes. Proteolytic release of soluble NC1 fragments stimulates migration, proliferation, apoptosis or survival of different cell types and suppresses various morphogenetic events.

  12. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation.

  13. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H+-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  14. Interaction of Human Apolipoprotein A-I with Model Membranes Exhibiting Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Arnulphi, Cristina; Sánchez, Susana A.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Gratton, Enrico; Jonas, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Several mechanisms for cell cholesterol efflux have been proposed, including membrane microsolubilization, suggesting that the existence of specific domains could enhance the transfer of lipids to apolipoproteins. In this work isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and two-photon microscopy are used to study the interaction of lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), with and without cholesterol. Below 30°C the calorimetric results show that apoA-I interaction with POPC/SM SUVs produces an exothermic reaction, characterized as nonclassical hydrophobic binding. The heat capacity change (ΔCp°) is small and positive, whereas it was larger and negative for pure POPC bilayers, in the absence of SM. Inclusion of cholesterol in the membranes induces changes in the observed thermodynamic pattern of binding and counteracts the formation of α-helices in the protein. Above 30°C the reactions are endothermic. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of identical composition to the SUVs, and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques, were utilized to further characterize the interaction. Fluorescence imaging of the GUVs indicates coexistence of lipid domains under 30°C. Binding experiments and Laurdan generalized-polarization measurements suggest that there is no preferential binding of the labeled apoA-I to any particular domain. Changes in the content of α-helix, binding, and fluidity data are discussed in the framework of the thermodynamic parameters. PMID:15849246

  15. Simulation Studies of Stratum Corneum Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chinmay; Noro, Massimo G.; Olmsted, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present atomistic molecular dynamics results for fully hydrated bilayers composed of ceramide NS-24:0, free fatty acid 24:0 and cholesterol, to address the effect of the different components in the stratum corneum (the outermost layer of skin) lipid matrix on its structural properties. Bilayers containing ceramide molecules show higher in-plane density and hence lower rate of passive transport compared to phospholipid bilayers. At physiological temperatures, for all composition ratios explored, the lipids are in a gel phase with ordered lipid tails. However, the large asymmetry in the lengths of the two tails of the ceramide molecule leads to a fluidlike environment at the bilayer midplane. The lateral pressure profiles show large local variations across the bilayer for pure ceramide or any of the two-component mixtures. Close to the skin composition ratio, the lateral pressure fluctuations are greatly suppressed, the ceramide tails from the two leaflets interdigitate significantly, the depression in local density at the interleaflet region is lowered, and the bilayers have lowered elastic moduli. This indicates that the observed composition ratio in the stratum corneum lipid layer is responsible for both the good barrier properties and the stability of the lipid structure against mechanical stresses. PMID:19804725

  16. Direct chemical evidence for sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts [High-Resolution Chemical Imaging of Sphingolipid Distribution in the Plasma Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Lou, Kaiyan; Klitzing, Haley A.; Hanafin, William P.; Lizunov, Vladimir; Wilson, Robert L.; Carpenter, Kevin J.; Kim, Raehyun; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-28

    Sphingolipids play important roles in plasma membrane structure and cell signaling. Yet, their lateral distribution in the plasma membrane is poorly understood. Here we quantitatively analyzed the sphingolipid organization on the entire dorsal surface of intact cells by mapping the distribution of 15N-enriched ions from metabolically labeled 15N-sphingolipids in the plasma membrane using high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry. Many types of control experiments (internal, positive, negative, and fixation temperature), along with parallel experiments involving the imaging of fluorescent sphingolipids$-$both in living cells and during fixation of living cells$-$exclude potential artifacts. Micrometer-scale sphingolipid patches consisting of numerous 15Nsphingolipid microdomains with mean diameters of ~200 nm are always present in the plasma membrane. Depletion of 30% of the cellular cholesterol did not eliminate the sphingolipid domains, but did reduce their abundance and long range organization in the plasma membrane. In contrast, disruption of the cytoskeleton eliminated the sphingolipid domains. These results indicate that these sphingolipid assemblages are not lipid rafts, and are instead a distinctly different type of sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane domain that depends upon cortical actin.

  17. Direct chemical evidence for sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts [High-Resolution Chemical Imaging of Sphingolipid Distribution in the Plasma Membrane

    DOE PAGES

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Lou, Kaiyan; Klitzing, Haley A.; ...

    2013-01-28

    Sphingolipids play important roles in plasma membrane structure and cell signaling. Yet, their lateral distribution in the plasma membrane is poorly understood. Here we quantitatively analyzed the sphingolipid organization on the entire dorsal surface of intact cells by mapping the distribution of 15N-enriched ions from metabolically labeled 15N-sphingolipids in the plasma membrane using high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry. Many types of control experiments (internal, positive, negative, and fixation temperature), along with parallel experiments involving the imaging of fluorescent sphingolipids$-$both in living cells and during fixation of living cells$-$exclude potential artifacts. Micrometer-scale sphingolipid patches consisting of numerous 15Nsphingolipid microdomains with mean diametersmore » of ~200 nm are always present in the plasma membrane. Depletion of 30% of the cellular cholesterol did not eliminate the sphingolipid domains, but did reduce their abundance and long range organization in the plasma membrane. In contrast, disruption of the cytoskeleton eliminated the sphingolipid domains. These results indicate that these sphingolipid assemblages are not lipid rafts, and are instead a distinctly different type of sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane domain that depends upon cortical actin.« less

  18. Membrane Anchoring and Interaction between Transmembrane Domains are Crucial for K+ Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Hoffgaard, Franziska; Hamacher, Kay; Kast, Stefan M.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The small viral channel Kcv is a Kir-like K+ channel of only 94 amino acids. With this simple structure, the tetramer of Kcv represents the pore module of all complex K+ channels. To examine the structural contribution of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) to channel function, we performed Ala scanning mutagenesis of the two domains and tested the functionality of the mutants in a yeast complementation assay. The data reveal, in combination with computational models, that the upper halves of both TMDs, which face toward the external medium, are rather rigid, whereas the inner parts are more flexible. The rigidity of the outer TMD is conferred by a number of essential aromatic amino acids that face the membrane and probably anchor this domain in the bilayer. The inner TMD is intimately connected with the rigid part of the outer TMD via π···π interactions between a pair of aromatic amino acids. This structural principle is conserved within the viral K+ channels and also present in Kir2.2, implying a general importance of this architecture for K+ channel function. PMID:21310959

  19. Bending Rigidities and Interdomain Forces in Membranes with Coexisting Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Heftberger, Peter; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nagle, John F.; Pabst, Georg

    2015-01-01

    To precisely quantify the fundamental interactions between heterogeneous lipid membranes with coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, we performed detailed osmotic stress small-angle x-ray scattering experiments by exploiting the domain alignment in raft-mimicking lipid multibilayers. Performing a Monte Carlo-based analysis allowed us to determine with high reliability the magnitude and functional dependence of interdomain forces concurrently with the bending elasticity moduli. In contrast to previous methodologies, this approach enabled us to consider the entropic undulation repulsions on a fundamental level, without having to take recourse to crudely justified mean-field-like additivity assumptions. Our detailed Hamaker-coefficient calculations indicated only small differences in the van der Waals attractions of coexisting Lo and Ld phases. In contrast, the repulsive hydration and undulation interactions differed significantly, with the latter dominating the overall repulsions in the Ld phase. Thus, alignment of like domains in multibilayers appears to originate from both, hydration and undulation repulsions. PMID:26083923

  20. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  1. Lipid Domains in Intact Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from Cortical and Nuclear Regions of Human Eye Lenses of Donors from Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2015-01-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors’ age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors’ age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  2. Phosphorylation of the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain of ACAP4 regulates membrane tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuannv; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xing; Liu, Lifang; Song, Zhenwei; Zhu, Tongge; Adams, Gregory; Gao, Xinjiao; Tian, Ruijun; Huang, Yuejia; Chen, Runhua; Wang, Fengsong; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xue; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhengjun; Teng, Maikun; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-01-01

    ArfGAP With Coiled-Coil, Ankyrin Repeat And PH Domains 4 (ACAP4) is an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) GTPase-activating protein essential for EGF-elicited cell migration. However, how ACAP4 regulates membrane dynamics and curvature in response to EGF stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that phosphorylation of the N-terminal region of ACAP4, named the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain, at Tyr34 is necessary for EGF-elicited membrane remodeling. Domain structure analysis demonstrates that the BAR domain regulates membrane curvature. EGF stimulation of cells causes phosphorylation of ACAP4 at Tyr34, which subsequently promotes ACAP4 homodimer curvature. The phospho-mimicking mutant of ACAP4 demonstrates lipid-binding activity and tubulation in vitro, and ARF6 enrichment at the membrane is associated with ruffles of EGF-stimulated cells. Expression of the phospho-mimicking ACAP4 mutant promotes ARF6-dependent cell migration. Thus, the results present a previously undefined mechanism by which EGF-elicited phosphorylation of the BAR domain controls ACAP4 molecular plasticity and plasma membrane dynamics during cell migration. PMID:23776207

  3. Proving lipid rafts exist: membrane domains in the prokaryote Borrelia burgdorferi have the same properties as eukaryotic lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    LaRocca, Timothy J; Pathak, Priyadarshini; Chiantia, Salvatore; Toledo, Alvaro; Silvius, John R; Benach, Jorge L; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts in eukaryotic cells are sphingolipid and cholesterol-rich, ordered membrane regions that have been postulated to play roles in many membrane functions, including infection. We previously demonstrated the existence of cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in membranes of the prokaryote, B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease [LaRocca et al. (2010) Cell Host & Microbe 8, 331-342]. Here, we show that these prokaryote membrane domains have the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts, despite lacking sphingolipids. Substitution experiments replacing cholesterol lipids with a set of sterols, ranging from strongly raft-promoting to raft-inhibiting when mixed with eukaryotic sphingolipids, showed that sterols that can support ordered domain formation are both necessary and sufficient for formation of B. burgdorferi membrane domains that can be detected by transmission electron microscopy or in living organisms by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Raft-supporting sterols were also necessary and sufficient for formation of high amounts of detergent resistant membranes from B. burgdorferi. Furthermore, having saturated acyl chains was required for a biotinylated lipid to associate with the cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in B. burgdorferi, another characteristic identical to that of eukaryotic lipid rafts. Sterols supporting ordered domain formation were also necessary and sufficient to maintain B. burgdorferi membrane integrity, and thus critical to the life of the organism. These findings provide compelling evidence for the existence of lipid rafts and show that the same principles of lipid raft formation apply to prokaryotes and eukaryotes despite marked differences in their lipid compositions.

  4. Amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains formed in intact lens membranes: Methodology development and its application to studies of porcine lens membranes.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-11-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling method has been developed that allows quantitative evaluation of the amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains of intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of eye lenses. The long term goal of this research is the assessment of organizational changes in human lens fiber cell membranes that occur with age and during cataract development. The measurements needed to be performed on lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. For these types of studies it is necessary to separate the age/cataract related changes from preparation/technique related changes. Human lenses differ not only because of age, but also because of the varying health histories of the donors. To solve these problems the sample-to-sample preparation/technique related changes were evaluated for cortical and nuclear lens membranes prepared from single porcine eyes. It was assumed that the differences due to the age (animals were two year old) and environmental conditions for raising these animals were minimal. Mean values and standard deviations from preparation/technique changes for measured amounts of lipids in membrane domains were calculated. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test) of the data also allowed determining the differences of mean values which were statistically significant with P ≤ 0.05. These differences defined for porcine lenses will be used for comparison of amounts of lipids in domains in human lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. Greater separations will indicate that differences were statistically significant with (P ≤ 0.05) and that they came from different than preparation/technique sources. Results confirmed that in nuclear porcine membranes the amounts of lipids in domains created due to the presence of membrane proteins were greater than those in cortical membranes and the differences were larger than

  5. Amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains formed in intact lens membranes: methodology development and its application to studies of porcine lens membranes

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2015-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling method has been developed that allows quantitative evaluation of the amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains of intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of eye lenses. The long term goal of this research is the assessment of organizational changes in human lens fiber cell membranes that occur with age and during cataract development. The measurements needed to be performed on lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. For these types of studies it is necessary to separate the age/cataract related changes from preparation/technique related changes. Human lenses differ not only because of age, but also because of the varying health histories of the donors. To solve these problems the sample-to-sample preparation/technique related changes were evaluated for cortical and nuclear lens membranes prepared from single porcine eyes. It was assumed that the differences due to the age (animals were two year old) and environmental conditions for raising these animals were minimal. Mean values and standard deviations from preparation/technique changes for measured amounts of lipids in membrane domains were calculated. Statistical analysis (Student's t test) of the data also allowed determining the differences of mean values which were statistically significant with P ≤ 0.05. These differences defined for porcine lenses will be used for comparison of amounts of lipids in domains in human lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. Greater separations will indicate that differences were statistically significant with (P ≤ 0.05) and that they came from different than preparation/technique sources. Results confirmed that in nuclear porcine membranes the amounts of lipids in domains created due to the presence of membrane proteins were greater than those in cortical membranes and the differences were larger than the

  6. New non-invasive method for evaluation of the stratum corneum structure in diseases with abnormal keratinization by immunofluorescence microscopy of desmoglein 1 distribution in tape-stripped samples.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Zuiei; Naoe, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Hiroko; Masunaga, Takuji; Seishima, Mariko; Aoyama, Yumi; Kitajima, Yasuo

    2010-10-01

    The corneodesmosomes in the stratum corneum are critical for the maintenance of stratum corneum integrity. To evaluate the normal and diseased keratinization states in the epidermis, we studied the distribution of desmoglein 1 (DSG1), a major component of corneodesmosomes, in samples of the stratum corneum obtained by tape stripping, a non-invasive method. Samples were collected from lesional skin of four patients with psoriasis and three with lichen planus, and from non-lesional skin of three volunteers. Upper stratum corneum cells were obtained by tape stripping and skin biopsies were obtained from adjacent sites. Tape-stripped samples were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-DSG1 monoclonal antibody, in combination with histopathology of skin biopsies. In normal human stratum corneum, which shows basket-woven orthokeratosis, DSG1-containing fluorescent dots were distributed on the lateral cell-cell contact areas of plasma membrane, but not on the dorsal/ventral plasma membrane, and formed a well-ordered hexagonal network structure. In psoriatic stratum corneum, fluorescent dots were distributed throughout the cell membrane at ventral aspects of corneocytes as well as at the lateral cell-cell contacts. In lichen planus, fluorescent dots were distributed homogeneously and/or heterogeneously on the ventral surface in some cells. Adjacent cells lacked DSG1 at the lateral cell-cell contacts, but were instead separated by distinctive black-gap lines. These results suggest that the intercellular adhesion by DSG1 may depend on the lateral plasma membrane in normal human stratum corneum, on the dorsal/ventral plasma membrane in lichen planus, and on both lateral and dorsal/ventral plasma membranes in psoriatic stratum corneum. Tape stripping and DSG1 immunofluorescence visualizes adhesion features of corneocytes and has considerable potential for evaluation of abnormal keratinization and the process of healing in response to treatment. © 2010 Japanese

  7. GRP1 PH Domain, Like AKT1 PH Domain, Possesses a Sentry Glutamate Residue Essential for Specific Targeting to Plasma Membrane PI(3,4,5)P3

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P3, an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P2 and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P3 target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al (1), revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P2, thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P3 targeting (2). The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P2 affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis the present study investigates the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of General Receptor for Phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P2 affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P2 releases E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm and the efficiency of this release increases when target Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K (1, 3). Analysis of available PH domain structures suggests that a lone glutamate residue (or, in some cases an aspartate) is a common, perhaps ubiquitous, feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific binding

  8. Secretion of endothelin converting enzyme-1a: the hydrophobic signal anchor domain alone is not sufficient to promote membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S C; Fernandez, L; Ergul, A

    2000-05-01

    Endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is a type II membrane protein that is important for the proteolytic activation of big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1. Although the highly conserved zinc-binding motif is known to be located in the extracellular domain, the role(s) of the N-terminal and membrane-spanning signal anchor domains in the biosynthesis and function of ECE-1 isoforms, ECE-1a, ECE-1b, and ECE-1c, remain undetermined. In this study, we provide evidence that the deletion of the cytoplasmic N-terminal tail (residues 1-55) of ECE-1a results in the cleavage of a potential signal peptide located in the signal anchor domain leading to the partial secretion of the recombinant enzyme into the media. However, the truncation of N-terminal and/or signal anchor domain does not affect the activity of ECE-1a. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the hydrophobic signal anchor domain alone is not sufficient for the membrane anchoring of ECE-1a and that the N-terminal domain of ECE-1a is important for membrane targeting as well as the intracellular localization of the enzyme.

  9. Protein sorting by lipid phase-like domains supports emergent signaling function in B lymphocyte plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Núñez, Marcos F; Wisser, Kathleen; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-01-01

    Diverse cellular signaling events, including B cell receptor (BCR) activation, are hypothesized to be facilitated by domains enriched in specific plasma membrane lipids and proteins that resemble liquid-ordered phase-separated domains in model membranes. This concept remains controversial and lacks direct experimental support in intact cells. Here, we visualize ordered and disordered domains in mouse B lymphoma cell membranes using super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy, demonstrate that clustered BCR resides within ordered phase-like domains capable of sorting key regulators of BCR activation, and present a minimal, predictive model where clustering receptors leads to their collective activation by stabilizing an extended ordered domain. These results provide evidence for the role of membrane domains in BCR signaling and a plausible mechanism of BCR activation via receptor clustering that could be generalized to other signaling pathways. Overall, these studies demonstrate that lipid mediated forces can bias biochemical networks in ways that broadly impact signal transduction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19891.001 PMID:28145867

  10. The membrane-extrinsic domain of cytochrome b(558/566) from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius performs pivoting movements with respect to the membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Schoepp-Cothenet, B; Schütz, M; Baymann, F; Brugna, M; Nitschke, W; Myllykallio, H; Schmidt, C

    2001-01-05

    The orientation of the membrane-attached cytochrome b(558/566)-haem with respect to the membrane was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy on two-dimensionally ordered oxidised membrane fragments from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Unlike the other redox centres in the membrane, the cytochrome b(558/566)-haem was found to cover a range of orientations between 25 degrees and 90 degrees. The described results are reminiscent of those obtained on the Rieske cluster of bc complexes and indicate that the membrane-extrinsic domain of cytochrome b(558/566) can perform pivoting motion between two extreme positions. Such a conformational flexibility is likely to play a role in electron transfer with its redox partners.

  11. Exclusion of CD45 inhibits activity of p56lck associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    p56lck (Lck) is a lymphoid-specific Src family tyrosine kinase that is critical for T-cell development and activation. Lck is also a membrane protein, and approximately half of the membrane-associated Lck is associated with a glycolipid-enriched membrane (GEM) fraction that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 (TX-100). To compare the membrane-associated Lck present in the GEM and TX-100-soluble fractions of Jurkat cells, Lck from each fraction was immunoblotted with antibody to phosphotyrosine. Lck in the GEM fraction was found to be hyperphosphorylated on tyrosine, and this correlated with a lower kinase specific activity relative to the TX-100-soluble Lck. Peptide mapping and phosphatase diagests showed that the hyperphosphorylation and lower kinase activity of GEM-associated Lck was due to phosphorylation of the regulatory COOH-terminal Tyr505. In addition, we determined that the membrane-bound tyrosine phosphatase CD45 was absent from the GEM fraction. Cells lacking CD45 showed identical phosphorylation of Lck in GEM and TX-100-soluble membranes. We propose that the GEM fraction represents a specific membrane domain present in T-cells, and that the hyperphosphorylation of tyrosine and lower kinase activity of GEM-associated Lck is due to exclusion of CD45 from these domains. Lck associated with the GEM domains may therefore consitute a reservoir of enzyme that can be readily activated. PMID:8978819

  12. Interactions between intersubunit transmembrane domains regulate the chaperone-dependent degradation of an oligomeric membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Buck, Teresa M; Jordahl, Alexa S; Yates, Megan E; Preston, G Michael; Cook, Emily; Kleyman, Thomas R; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    In the kidney, the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) regulates blood pressure through control of sodium and volume homeostasis, and in the lung, ENaC regulates the volume of airway and alveolar fluids. ENaC is a heterotrimer of homologous α-, β- and γ-subunits, and assembles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before it traffics to and functions at the plasma membrane. Improperly folded or orphaned ENaC subunits are subject to ER quality control and targeted for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). We previously established that a conserved, ER lumenal, molecular chaperone, Lhs1/GRP170, selects αENaC, but not β- or γ-ENaC, for degradation when the ENaC subunits were individually expressed. We now find that when all three subunits are co-expressed, Lhs1-facilitated ERAD was blocked. To determine which domain-domain interactions between the ENaC subunits are critical for chaperone-dependent quality control, we employed a yeast model and expressed chimeric α/βENaC constructs in the context of the ENaC heterotrimer. We discovered that the βENaC transmembrane domain was sufficient to prevent the Lhs1-dependent degradation of the α-subunit in the context of the ENaC heterotrimer. Our work also found that Lhs1 delivers αENaC for proteasome-mediated degradation after the protein has become polyubiquitinated. These data indicate that the Lhs1 chaperone selectively recognizes an immature form of αENaC, one which has failed to correctly assemble with the other channel subunits via its transmembrane domain. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Lateral organization and domain formation in a two-component lipid membrane system.

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, C; Wolkers, W F; Jørgensen, K; Mouritsen, O G; Crowe, J H

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior and lateral lipid membrane organization of unilamellar vesicles made from mixtures of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a function of temperature and composition. This was done by incorporating a headgroup-labeled lipid donor (NBD-DPPE) and acceptor (N-Rh-DPPE) in low concentrations into the binary mixtures. Two instances of increased energy transfer efficiency were observed close to the phase lines in the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram. The increase in energy transfer efficiency was attributed to a differential preference of the probes for dynamic and fluctuating gel/fluid coexisting phases. This differential preference causes the probes to segregate (S. Pedersen, K. Jørgensen, T. R. Baekmark, and O. G. Mouritsen, 1996, Biophys. J. 71:554-560). The observed increases in energy transfer match with the boundaries of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, as measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We propose that the two instances of probe segregation are due to the presence of DMPC-rich and DSPC-rich domains, which form a dynamic structure of gel/fluid coexisting phases at two different temperatures. Monitoring the melting profile of each lipid component independently by FTIR shows that the domain structure is formed by DMPC-rich and DSPC-rich domains rather than by pure DMPC and DSPC domains. PMID:11259295

  14. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-03

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.

  15. Vaccinia virus A6 is a two-domain protein requiring a cognate N-terminal domain for full viral membrane assembly activity.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Rose, Lloyd; Han, Yue; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2017-03-08

    Poxvirus virion biogenesis is a complex, multistep process, starting with the formation of crescent-shaped viral membranes, followed by their enclosure of viral core to form the spherical immature virions. Crescent formation requires a group of proteins that are highly conserved among poxviruses, including A6 and A11 of vaccinia virus (VACV). To gain a better understanding of the molecular function of A6, we established a HeLa cell line that inducibly expressed VACV-A6, which allowed us to construct VACV mutants with A6 deletion or mutation. As expected, A6 deletion VACV mutant failed to replicate in non-complementing cell lines with defects in crescent formation and A11 localization. Surprisingly, a VACV mutant that had A6 substituted with a close ortholog from Yaba-like disease virus, YLDV-97, also failed to replicate. This mutant, however, developed crescents and had normal A11 localization despite failing to form immature virions. A limited proteolysis of the recombinant A6 protein identified an N- and a C-domain of approximately 121 and 251 residues, respectively. Various chimeras of VACV-A6 and YLDV-97 were constructed, but only one that precisely combined the N-domain of VACV-A6 and the C-domain of YLDV-97 supported VACV replication, albeit at reduced efficiency. Our results show that VACV A6 has a two-domain architecture and functions in both crescent formation and its enclosure to form immature virions. While a cognate N-domain is not required for crescent formation, it is required for virion formation, suggesting that interactions of N-domain with cognate viral proteins may be critical for virion assembly.IMPORTANCE Poxviruses are unique among enveloped viruses in that they acquire their primary envelope not through budding from cellular membranes but by forming and extending crescent membranes. The crescents are highly unusual, open-ended membranes, and their origin and biogenesis have perplexed virologists for decades. A group of five viral proteins

  16. Vesicle formation by self-assembly of membrane-bound matrix proteins into a fluidlike budding domain

    PubMed Central

    Shnyrova, Anna V.; Ayllon, Juan; Mikhalyov, Ilya I.; Villar, Enrique; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Frolov, Vadim A.

    2007-01-01

    The shape of enveloped viruses depends critically on an internal protein matrix, yet it remains unclear how the matrix proteins control the geometry of the envelope membrane. We found that matrix proteins purified from Newcastle disease virus adsorb on a phospholipid bilayer and condense into fluidlike domains that cause membrane deformation and budding of spherical vesicles, as seen by fluorescent and electron microscopy. Measurements of the electrical admittance of the membrane resolved the gradual growth and rapid closure of a bud followed by its separation to form a free vesicle. The vesicle size distribution, confined by intrinsic curvature of budding domains, but broadened by their merger, matched the virus size distribution. Thus, matrix proteins implement domain-driven mechanism of budding, which suffices to control the shape of these proteolipid vesicles. PMID:18025300

  17. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  18. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  19. Optical Signatures of Quantum Delocalization over Extended Domains in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christopher A; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-08-27

    The prospect of coherent dynamics and excitonic delocalization across several light-harvesting structures in photosynthetic membranes is of considerable interest, but challenging to explore experimentally. Here we demonstrate theoretically that the excitonic delocalization across extended domains involving several light-harvesting complexes can lead to unambiguous signatures in the optical response, specifically, linear absorption spectra. We characterize, under experimentally established conditions of molecular assembly and protein-induced inhomogeneities, the optical absorption in these arrays from polarized and unpolarized excitation, and demonstrate that it can be used as a diagnostic tool to determine the resonance coupling between iso-energetic light-harvesting structures. The knowledge of these couplings would then provide further insight into the dynamical properties of transfer, such as facilitating the accurate determination of Förster rates.

  20. Hydrophobic contributions to the membrane docking of synaptotagmin 7 C2A domain: mechanistic contrast between isoforms 1 and 7.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Devin S; Coffman, Matthew D; Falke, Joseph J; Knight, Jefferson D

    2012-10-02

    Synaptotagmin (Syt) triggers Ca(2+)-dependent membrane fusion via its tandem C2 domains, C2A and C2B. The 17 known human isoforms are active in different secretory cell types, including neurons (Syt1 and others) and pancreatic β cells (Syt7 and others). Here, quantitative fluorescence measurements reveal notable differences in the membrane docking mechanisms of Syt1 C2A and Syt7 C2A to vesicles comprised of physiological lipid mixtures. In agreement with previous studies, the Ca(2+) sensitivity of membrane binding is much higher for Syt7 C2A. We report here for the first time that this increased sensitivity is due to the slower target membrane dissociation of Syt7 C2A. Association and dissociation rate constants for Syt7 C2A are found to be ~2-fold and ~60-fold slower than Syt1 C2A, respectively. Furthermore, the membrane dissociation of Syt7 C2A but not Syt1 C2A is slowed by Na(2)SO(4) and trehalose, solutes that enhance the hydrophobic effect. Overall, the simplest model consistent with these findings proposes that Syt7 C2A first docks electrostatically to the target membrane surface and then inserts into the bilayer via a slow hydrophobic mechanism. In contrast, the membrane docking of Syt1 C2A is known to be predominantly electrostatic. Thus, these two highly homologous domains exhibit distinct mechanisms of membrane binding correlated with their known differences in function.

  1. Detergent/Nanodisc Screening for High-Resolution NMR Studies of an Integral Membrane Protein Containing a Cytoplasmic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Because membrane proteins need to be extracted from their natural environment and reconstituted in artificial milieus for the 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR, the search for membrane mimetic that conserve the native structure and functional activities remains challenging. We demonstrate here a detergent/nanodisc screening study by NMR of the bacterial α-helical membrane protein YgaP containing a cytoplasmic rhodanese domain. The analysis of 2D [15N,1H]-TROSY spectra shows that only a careful usage of low amounts of mixed detergents did not perturb the cytoplasmic domain while solubilizing in parallel the transmembrane segments with good spectral quality. In contrast, the incorporation of YgaP into nanodiscs appeared to be straightforward and yielded a surprisingly high quality [15N,1H]-TROSY spectrum opening an avenue for the structural studies of a helical membrane protein in a bilayer system by solution state NMR. PMID:23349867

  2. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  3. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  4. Nonlinear conductance and heterogeneity of voltage-gated ion channels allow defining electrical surface domains in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    The membrane potential of a cell measured by typical electrophysiological methods is only an average magnitude and experimental techniques allowing a more detailed mapping of the cell surface have shown the existence of spatial domains with locally different electric potentials and currents. Electrical potentials in non-neural cells are regulated by the nonlinear conductance of membrane ion channels. Voltage-gated potassium channels participate in cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes and control the electrical signals over the cell surface, constituting good candidates to study basic biological questions on a more simplified scale than the complex cell membrane. These channels show also a high heterogeneity, making it possible to analyze the effects of diversity in the electrical responses of channels localized on spatial domains. We use a phenomenological approach of voltage gating that reproduces the observed rectification characteristics of inward rectifying potassium channels and relate the threshold voltage heterogeneity of the channels to the establishment of spatial domains with different electrical sensitivities. Although our model is only a limited picture of the whole cell membrane, it shows that domains with different ion channels may permit or suppress steady state bioelectrical signals over the cell surface according to their particular voltage sensitivity. Also, the nonlinear electrical coupling of channels with different threshold potentials can lead to a rich variety of bioelectrical phenomena, including regions of membrane potential bi-stability.

  5. On the interactions between nucleotide binding domains and membrane spanning domains in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: A molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Luca; Moran, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) is a membrane protein whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disease. We performed a molecular dynamic (MD) study of the properties of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) whose conformational changes, upon ATP binding, are the direct responsible of the gating mechanisms of CFTR. This study was done for the wild type (WT) CFTR and for the two most common mutations, ΔF508, that produces a traffic defect of the protein, and the mutation G551D, that causes a gating defect on CFTR. Using an homology model of the open channel conformation of the CFTR we thus introduced the mutations to the structure. Although the overall structures of the G551D and ΔF508 are quite well conserved, the NBD1-NBD2 interactions are severely modified in both mutants. NBD1 and NBD2 are indeed destabilized with a higher internal energy (Ei) in the ΔF508-CFTR. Differently, Ei does not change in the NBDs of G551D but, while the number of close contacts between NBD1 and NBD2 in ΔF508 is increased, a significant reduction of close contacts is found in the G551D mutated form. Hydrogen bonds formation between NBDs of the two mutated forms is also altered and it is slightly increased for the ΔF508, while are severely reduced in G551D. A consequent modification of the NBDs-ICLs interactions between residues involved in the transduction of the ATP binding and the channel gating is also registered. Indeed, while a major interaction is noticed between NBDs interface and ICL2 and ICL4 in the WT, this interaction is somehow altered in both mutated forms plausibly with effect on channel gating. Thus, single point mutations of the CFTR protein can reasonably results in channel gating defects due to alteration of the interaction mechanisms between the NBDs and NBDs-ICLs interfaces upon ATP-binding process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  6. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-12-29

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins.

  7. Gramicidin Alters the Lipid Compositions of Liquid-Ordered and Liquid-Disordered Membrane Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Huang, Juyang

    2012-10-01

    The effects of adding 1 mol % of gramicidin A to the well-known DOPC/DSPC/cholesterol lipid mixtures were investigated. 4-component giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) were prepared using our recently developed Wet-Film method. The phase boundary of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered (Lo-Ld) coexisting region was determined using video fluorescence microscopy. We found that if cares were not taken, light-induced domain artifacts could significantly distort the measured phase boundary. After testing several fluorescence dyes, we found that the emission spectrum of Nile Red is quite sensitive to membrane composition. By fitting the Nile Red emission spectra at the phase boundary to the spectra in the Lo-Ld coexisting region, the thermodynamic tie-lines were determined. As an active component of lipid membranes, gramicidin not only partitions favorably into the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase, it also alters the phase boundary and thermodynamic tie-lines. Even at as low as 1 mol %, gramicidin decreases the cholesterol mole fraction of Ld phase and increases the area of Lo phase.

  8. Biochemical characterization of domain-specific glycoproteins of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bartles, J.R.; Braiterman, L.T.; Hubbard, A.L.

    1985-10-15

    Seven integral proteins (CE 9, HA 21, HA 116, HA 16, HA 4, HA 201, and HA 301) were isolated from rat hepatocyte plasma membranes by immunoaffinity chromatography on monoclonal antibody-Sepharose. Six of the proteins (all but HA 16) exhibit domain-specific localizations (either bile canalicular or sinusoidal/lateral) about the hepatocyte surface. The authors identified three of these protein antigens as leucine aminopeptidase (HA 201), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (HA 301), and the asialoglycoprotein receptor (HA 116). They also developed SVI-lectin blotting procedures that, when used in conjunction with chemical and glycosidase treatments, permitted a comparison of the types of oligosaccharides present on the seven proteins. All seven are sialoglycoproteins, based upon the effects of prior neuraminidase and periodate-aniline-cyanoborohydride treatments of blots on labeling by SVI-wheat germ agglutinin. Depending upon the protein, they estimated the presence of 2-26 N-linked oligosaccharides/polypeptide chain from the Mr reductions accompanying chemical or enzymatic deglycosylation. Three of these mature plasma membrane proteins (HA 21, HA 116, and HA 4) have both high mannose-type and complex-type oligosaccharides on every copy of their polypeptide chains.

  9. Altered membrane lipid domains limit pulmonary endothelial calcium entry following chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Paffett, Michael L; Naik, Jay S; Riddle, Melissa A; Menicucci, Steven D; Gonzales, Antonio J; Resta, Thomas C; Walker, Benjimen R

    2011-10-01

    Agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry into the pulmonary endothelium depends on activation of both store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry and receptor-operated Ca(2+) (ROC) entry. We previously reported that pulmonary endothelial cell SOC entry and ROC entry are reduced in chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that diminished endothelial Ca(2+) entry following CH is due to derangement of caveolin-1 (cav-1) containing cholesterol-enriched membrane domains important in agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry. To test this hypothesis, we measured Ca(2+) influx by fura-2 fluorescence following application of ATP (20 μM) in freshly isolated endothelial cells pretreated with the caveolar-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD; 10 mM). Cholesterol depletion with mβCD attenuated agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry in control endothelial cells to the level of that from CH rats. Interestingly, endothelial membrane cholesterol was lower in cells isolated from CH rats compared with controls although the density of caveolae did not differ between groups. Cholesterol repletion with a cholesterol:mβCD mixture or the introduction of the cav-1 scaffolding peptide (AP-cav; 10 μM) rescued ATP-induced Ca(2+) entry in endothelia from CH arteries. Agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry assessed by Mn(2+) quenching of fura-2 fluorescence was also significantly elevated by luminal AP-cav in pressurized intrapulmonary arteries from CH rats to levels of controls. Similarly, patch-clamp experiments revealed diminished inward current in response to ATP in cells from CH rats compared with controls that was restored by AP-cav. These data suggest that CH-induced pulmonary hypertension leads to reduced membrane cholesterol that limits the activity of ion channels necessary for agonist-activated Ca(2+) entry.

  10. Investigations into the Membrane Interactions of m-Calpain Domain V

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Sarah R.; Dante, Silvia; Hauß, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A.

    2005-01-01

    m-Calpain is a calcium-dependent heterodimeric protease implicated in a number of pathological conditions. The activation of m-calpain appears to be modulated by membrane interaction, which has been predicted to involve oblique-orientated α-helix formation by a GTAMRILGGVI segment located in domain V of the protein's small subunit. Here, we have investigated this prediction. Fourier transform infrared conformational analysis showed that VP1, a peptide homolog of this segment, exhibited α-helicity of ∼45% in the presence of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) vesicles. The level of helicity was unaffected over a 1- to 8-mM concentration range and did not alter when the anionic lipid composition of these vesicles was varied between 1% and 10% DMPS. Similar levels of α-helicity were observed in trifluoroethanol and the peptide appeared to adopt α-helical structure at an air/water interface with a molecular area of 164 Å2 at the monolayer collapse pressure. VP1 was found to penetrate dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/DMPS monolayers, and at an initial surface pressure of 30 mN m−1, the peptide induced surface pressure changes in these monolayers that correlated strongly with their anionic lipid content (maximal at 4 mN m−1 in the presence of 10% DMPS). Neutron diffraction studies showed VP1 to be localized at the hydrophobic core of model palmitoyloleylphosphatidylcholine/palmitoyloleylphosphatidylserine (10:1 molar ratio) bilayer structures and, in combination, these results are consistent with the oblique membrane penetration predicted for the peptide. It would also appear that although not needed for structural stabilization anionic lipid was required for membrane penetration. PMID:15653743

  11. The immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain exists as an integral part of phospholipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods were used to study the organization of cholesterol and phospholipids in membranes formed from Chol/POPS (cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine) mixtures, with mixing ratios from 0 to 3. It was confirmed using the discrimination by oxygen transport and polar relaxation agent accessibility methods that the immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD) was present in all of the suspensions when the mixing ratio exceeded the cholesterol solubility threshold (CST) in the POPS membrane. The behavior of phospholipid molecules was monitored with phospholipid analogue spin labels (n-PCs), and the behavior of cholesterol was monitored with the cholesterol analogue spin labels CSL and ASL. Results indicated that phospholipid and cholesterol mixtures can form a membrane suspension up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Additionally, EPR spectra for n-PC, ASL, and CSL indicated that both phospholipids and cholesterol exist in these suspensions in the lipid-bilayer-like structures. EPR spectral characteristics of n-PCs (spin labels located in the phospholipid cholesterol bilayer, outside the CBD) change with increase in the cholesterol content up to and beyond the CST. These results present strong evidence that the CBD forms an integral part of the phospholipid bilayer when formed from a Chol/POPS mixture up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Interestingly, CSL in cholesterol alone (without phospholipids) when suspended in buffer does not detect formation of bilayer-like structures. A broad, single-line EPR signal is given, similar to that obtained for the dry film of cholesterol before addition of the buffer. This broad, single-line signal is also observed in suspensions formed for Chol/POPS mixtures (as a background signal) when the Chol/POPS ratio is much greater than 3. It is suggested that the EPR spin-labeling approach can discriminate and characterize the fraction of cholesterol that forms the CBD within the

  12. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  13. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  14. The molecular size of the extra-membrane domain influences the diffusion of the GPI-anchored VSG on the trypanosome plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Andreas J W; Glogger, Marius; Guigas, Gernot; Jones, Nicola G; Fenz, Susanne F; Weiss, Matthias; Engstler, Markus

    2015-06-11

    A plethora of proteins undergo random and passive diffusion in biological membranes. While the contribution of the membrane-embedded domain to diffusion is well established, the potential impact of the extra-membrane protein part has been largely neglected. Here, we show that the molecular length influences the diffusion coefficient of GPI-anchored proteins: smaller proteins diffuse faster than larger ones. The distinct diffusion properties of differently sized membrane proteins are biologically relevant. The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of African trypanosomes, for example, is sized for an effective diffusion-driven randomization on the cell surface, a process that is essential for parasite virulence. We propose that the molecular sizes of proteins dominating the cell surfaces of other eukaryotic pathogens may also be related to diffusion-limited functions.

  15. Distinct domains of the limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) mediate discrete effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Kathie L; Pimenta, Aurea F; Burns, Mary M; Fairfull, Liane D; Cornuet, Pamela K; Zhang, Li; Levitt, Pat

    2003-11-01

    The limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein with three immunoglobulin (Ig) domains that can either enhance or inhibit neurite outgrowth depending upon the neuronal population examined. In the present study, we investigate the domains responsible for these activities. Domain deletion revealed that the N-terminal IgI domain is necessary and sufficient for the neurite-promoting activity observed in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in SCG neurons, which is mediated by heterophilic interactions, requires full-length LAMP, although selective inhibition of the second Ig domain, but not the first or third domains, prevented the inhibitory effect. This indicates that the IgII domain of LAMP harbors the neurite-inhibiting activity, but only in the context of the full-length configuration. Covasphere-binding analyses demonstrate IgI/IgI interactions, but no interaction between IgII and any other domain, consistent with the biological activities that each domain mediates. The data suggest that LAMP may serve as a bifunctional guidance molecule, with distinct structural domains contributing to the promotion and inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

  16. Synthesis of specific deuterated derivatives of the long chained stratum corneum lipids [EOS] and [EOP] and characterization using neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberger, Stefan; Eichner, Adina; Schmitt, Thomas; Hauß, Thomas; Lange, Stefan; Langner, Andreas; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Dobner, Bodo

    2017-06-15

    The synthesis of specific deuterated derivatives of the long chained ceramides [EOS] and [EOP] is described. The structural differences with respect to the natural compounds are founded in the substitution of the 2 double bonds containing linoleic acid by a palmitic acid branched with a methyl group in 10-position. The specific deuteration is introduced both in the branched and in the terminal methyl group, which was realized by common methods of successive deuteration of carboxylic groups in 3 steps. These modified fatty acids resp. the corresponding ceramides [EOS] and [EOP] were prepared for neutron scattering investigations. First results of these investigations were presented in this manuscript showing that the deuterated compounds could be detected in the stratum corneum lipid model membranes. The deuterated ceramides [EOS] and [EOP] are valuable tools to investigate the influence of these long chained ceramide species on the nanostructure of stratum corneum lipid model membranes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Deuterium NMR investigation of polymorphism in stratum corneum lipids.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W; Downing, D T

    1991-09-30

    The intercellular lipid lamellae of stratum corneum constitute the major barrier to percutaneous penetration. Deuterium magnetic resonance and freeze-fracture electron microscopic investigation of hydrated lipid mixtures consisting of ceramides, cholesterol, palmitic acid and cholesteryl sulfate and approximating the stratum corneum intercellular lipid composition, revealed thermally induced polymorphism. The transition temperature of bilayer to hexagonal transition decreased as the ratio of cholesterol to ceramides in these mixtures was lowered. Lipid mixtures in which the stratum corneum ceramides were replaced by synthetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine did not show any polymorphism throughout the temperature range used in the present study. The ability of the ceramide-containing samples to form hexagonal structures establishes a plausible mechanism for the assembly of the stratum corneum intercellular lamellae during the final stages of epidermal differentiation. Also, the bilayer to hexagonal phase transition of these nonpolar lipid mixtures could be used to enhance the penetration of drugs through skin.

  18. Contribution of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions to the membrane integration of the Shaker K+ channel voltage sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyan; Sato, Yoko; Hessa, Tara; von Heijne, Gunnar; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kodama, Itsuo; Sakaguchi, Masao; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2007-05-15

    Membrane-embedded voltage-sensor domains in voltage-dependent potassium channels (K(v) channels) contain an impressive number of charged residues. How can such highly charged protein domains be efficiently inserted into biological membranes? In the plant K(v) channel KAT1, the S2, S3, and S4 transmembrane helices insert cooperatively, because the S3, S4, and S3-S4 segments do not have any membrane insertion ability by themselves. Here we show that, in the Drosophila Shaker K(v) channel, which has a more hydrophobic S3 helix than KAT1, S3 can both insert into the membrane by itself and mediate the insertion of the S3-S4 segment in the absence of S2. An engineered KAT1 S3-S4 segment in which the hydrophobicity of S3 was increased or where S3 was replaced by Shaker S3 behaves as Shaker S3-S4. Electrostatic interactions among charged residues in S2, S3, and S4, including the salt bridges between E283 or E293 in S2 and R368 in S4, are required for fully efficient membrane insertion of the Shaker voltage-sensor domain. These results suggest that cooperative insertion of the voltage-sensor transmembrane helices is a property common to K(v) channels and that the degree of cooperativity depends on a balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic forces.

  19. Stratum corneum acidification in neonatal skin: secretory phospholipase A2 and the sodium/hydrogen antiporter-1 acidify neonatal rat stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Behne, Martin J; Brown, Barbara E; Moskowitz, David G; Selden, Clare; Mao-Qiang, Man; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2004-02-01

    At birth, human stratum corneum (SC) displays a near-neutral surface pH, which declines over several days to weeks to months to an acidic pH, comparable to that of adults. Recent studies suggest that an acidic pH is required for normal permeability barrier homeostasis and SC integrity/cohesion. We assessed here the basis for postnatal acidification in the neonatal rat, where SC pH, as measured with a flat surface electrode, declines progressively from near-neutral levels (pH 6.63) on postnatal days 0 to 1 to adult levels (pH 5.9) or even below over the subsequent 7 to 8 d. The postnatal decline in SC pH was paralleled by a progressive activation of a pH-dependent hydrolytic enzyme, beta-glucocerebrosidase. Because SC acidification could not be linked to commonly implicated exogenous factors, such as bacterial colonization, or the deposition of sebaceous gland products. We next assessed whether changes in one or more of three endogenous mechanisms demonstrate postnatal activity changes that contribute to the progressive development of an acidic SC pH. Although the histidine-to-urocanic acid pathway has been implicated in acidification of the adult SC, surface pH is completely normal in histidase-deficient (his/his, Peruvian) mice, ruling out a requirement for this mechanism. In contrast, when sodium/hydrogen antiporter-1 (NHE1), which predominantly acidifies membrane domains at the stratum granulosum-SC interface, is inhibited, postnatal acidification of the SC is partially blocked. Likewise, SC secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity, measured with a fluorometric assay, is low at birth, but increases progressively (by 66%) over the first 5 d after birth, and inhibition of sPLA2 between days 0 to 1 and days 5 to 6 delays postnatal SC acidification. Together, these results describe a neonatal model, in which the development of an acidic surface pH can be ascribed, in part, to progressive SC acidification by two endogenous mechanisms, namely, sPLA2 and NHE1, which

  20. Water modulation of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme activity and desquamation.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Harding, C; Moore, A; Coan, P

    2001-09-01

    Exposure to a dry environment leads to depletion of water from the peripheral stratum corneum layers in a process dependent on the relative humidity (RH) and the intrinsic properties of the tissue. We hypothesized that by modulating the water content of the stratum corneum in the surface layers, RH effects the rate of desquamation by modulating the activity of the desquamatory enzymes, and specifically stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (SCCE). Using a novel air interface in vitro desquamatory model, we demonstrated RH-dependent corneocyte release with desquamatory rates decreasing below 80% RH. Application of 10% glycerol or a glycerol-containing moisturizing lotion further increased desquamation, even in humid conditions, demonstrating that water was the rate-limiting factor in the final stages of desquamation. Furthermore, even in humid conditions desquamation was sub-maximal. In situ stratum corneum SCCE activity showed a dependence on RH: activity was significantly higher at 100% than at 44% RH. Further increases in SCCE activity were induced by applying a 10% glycerol solution. Since SCCE, a water-requiring enzyme, must function in the water-depleted outer stratum corneum, we sought to determine whether this enzyme has a tolerance to lowered water activity. Using concentrated sucrose solutions to lower water activity, we analysed the activity of recombinant SCCE and compared it to that of trypsin and chymotrypsin. SCCE activity demonstrated a tolerance to water restriction, and this may be an adaptation to maintain enzyme activity even within the water-depleted stratum corneum intercellular space. Overall these findings support the concept that in the upper stratum corneum, RH modulates desquamation by its effect upon SCCE activity, and possibly other desquamatory hydrolases. In addition, SCCE may be adapted to function in the water-restricted stratum corneum intercellular space.

  1. Modular toxin from the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius: Structure of spiderine domains in solution and membrane-mimicking environment.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Romanovskaia, Daria D; Sachkova, Maria Y; Oparin, Peter B; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a common phenomenon in evolution of spider venom composition is the emergence of so-called modular toxins consisting of two domains, each corresponding to a "usual" single-domain toxin. In this article, we describe the structure of two domains that build up a modular toxin named spiderine or OtTx1a from the venom of Oxyopes takobius. Both domains were investigated by solution NMR in water and detergent micelles used to mimic membrane environment. The N-terminal spiderine domain OtTx1a-AMP (41 amino acid residues) contains no cysteines. It is disordered in aqueous solution but in micelles, it assumes a stable amphiphilic structure consisting of two α-helices separated by a flexible linker. On the contrary, the C-terminal domain OtTx1a-ICK (59 residues) is a disulfide-rich polypeptide reticulated by five S-S bridges. It presents a stable structure in water and its core is the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) or knottin motif that is common among single-domain neurotoxins. OtTx1a-ICK structure is the first knottin with five disulfide bridges and it represents a good reference for the whole oxytoxin family. The affinity of both domains to membranes was measured with NMR using titration by liposome suspensions. In agreement with biological tests, OtTx1a-AMP was found to show high membrane affinity explaining its potent antimicrobial properties. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  2. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  3. Niemann-Pick type C proteins promote microautophagy by expanding raft-like membrane domains in the yeast vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Takuma; Fujimoto, Megumi; Tatematsu, Tsuyako; Cheng, Jinglei; Orii, Minami; Takatori, Sho; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C is a storage disease caused by dysfunction of NPC proteins, which transport cholesterol from the lumen of lysosomes to the limiting membrane of that compartment. Using freeze fracture electron microscopy, we show here that the yeast NPC orthologs, Ncr1p and Npc2p, are essential for formation and expansion of raft-like domains in the vacuolar (lysosome) membrane, both in stationary phase and in acute nitrogen starvation. Moreover, the expanded raft-like domains engulf lipid droplets by a microautophagic mechanism. We also found that the multivesicular body pathway plays a crucial role in microautophagy in acute nitrogen starvation by delivering sterol to the vacuole. These data show that NPC proteins promote microautophagy in stationary phase and under nitrogen starvation conditions, likely by increasing sterol in the limiting membrane of the vacuole. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25960.001 PMID:28590904

  4. Lipid membrane domain formation and alamethicin aggregation studied by calorimetry, sound velocity measurements, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Jäger, Markus; Heimburg, Thomas; Buckin, Vitaly; Kaatze, Udo

    2008-05-01

    An experimental study of phosphocholine membranes made from one lipid, from mixtures of DPPC and DLPC, and also from lipids and small amounts of alamethicin is presented. We used atomic force microscopy to investigate the spatial organization and structure of lipid domains and also of the defects induced by the peptide. Alamethicin was found to alter the state of lipids in the gel state in a way that domains of fluid lipids are formed close to the defects. Differential calorimetry revealed phase characteristics of the lipid mixtures and the effect of small amounts of alamethicin on the phase behavior. It was also shown that the sound velocity profiles of the membranes suspensions can be well calculated from the heat capacity traces of the samples. This result confirms the correlation between the mechanical properties and the specific heat of membrane systems.

  5. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  6. The Sec7 N-terminal regulatory domains facilitate membrane-proximal activation of the Arf1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C; Halaby, Steve L; Gustafson, Margaret A; Fromme, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is the central sorting compartment of eukaryotic cells. Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Arf-GEFs) regulate virtually all traffic through the Golgi by activating Arf GTPase trafficking pathways. The Golgi Arf-GEFs contain multiple autoregulatory domains, but the precise mechanisms underlying their function remain largely undefined. We report a crystal structure revealing that the N-terminal DCB and HUS regulatory domains of the Arf-GEF Sec7 form a single structural unit. We demonstrate that the established role of the N-terminal region in dimerization is not conserved; instead, a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain is responsible for dimerization of Sec7. We find that the DCB/HUS domain amplifies the ability of Sec7 to activate Arf1 on the membrane surface by facilitating membrane insertion of the Arf1 amphipathic helix. This enhancing function of the Sec7 N-terminal domains is consistent with the high rate of Arf1-dependent trafficking to the plasma membrane necessary for maximal cell growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12411.001 PMID:26765562

  7. Optimization of Microdermabrasion for Controlled Removal of Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha N.; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Brian, Bondy; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Microdermabrasion has been shown to increase skin permeability for transdermal drug delivery by damaging or removing skin’s outer layer, stratum corneum. However, relationships between microdermabrasion parameters and effects on the stratum corneum barrier have not been developed. In this study, we determined the effect of microdermabrasion crystal flow rate, time, and suction pressure applied in both static and dynamic modes on the extent of stratum corneum removal from excised porcine skin. In addition to controlling the depth of tissue removal by microdermabrasion parameters, we also controlled the area of tissue removal by applying a metal mask patterned with 125- or 250-μm holes to selectively expose small spots of tissue to microdermabrasion. We found that the extent of stratum corneum removal depended strongly on the crystal flow rate and exposure time and only weakly on pressure or static/dynamic mode operation. Masking the skin was effective to localize stratum corneum removal to exposed sites. Overall, this study demonstrates that optimized microdermabrasion in combination with a mask can be used to selectively remove stratum corneum with three-dimensional control, which is important to translating this technique into a novel method of transdermal drug delivery. PMID:21272628

  8. Optimization of microdermabrasion for controlled removal of stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Samantha N; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Bondy, Brian; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2011-04-04

    Microdermabrasion has been shown to increase skin permeability for transdermal drug delivery by damaging or removing skin's outer layer, stratum corneum. However, relationships between microdermabrasion parameters and effects on the stratum corneum barrier have not been developed. In this study, we determined the effect of microdermabrasion crystal flow rate, time, and suction pressure applied in both static and dynamic modes on the extent of stratum corneum removal from excised porcine skin. In addition to controlling the depth of tissue removal by microdermabrasion parameters, we also controlled the area of tissue removal by applying a metal mask patterned with 125- or 250-μm holes to selectively expose small spots of tissue to microdermabrasion. We found that the extent of stratum corneum removal depended strongly on the crystal flow rate and exposure time and only weakly on pressure or static/dynamic mode operation. Masking the skin was effective to localize stratum corneum removal to exposed sites. Overall, this study demonstrates that optimized microdermabrasion in combination with a mask can be used to selectively remove stratum corneum with three-dimensional control, which is important to translating this technique into a novel method of transdermal drug delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The folded and disordered domains of human ribosomal protein SA have both idiosyncratic and shared functions as membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Zidane, Nora; Ould-Abeih, Mohamed B; Petit-Topin, Isabelle; Bedouelle, Hugues

    2012-12-20

    The human RPSA [ribosomal protein SA; also known as LamR1(laminin receptor 1)] belongs to the ribosome but is also a membrane receptor for laminin, growth factors, prion, pathogens and the anticarcinogen EGCG (epigallocatechin-gallate). It contributes to the crossing of the blood-brain barrier by neurotropic viruses and bacteria, and is a biomarker of metastasis. RPSA includes an N-terminal domain, which is folded and homologous to the prokaryotic RPS2, and a C-terminal extension, which is intrinsically disordered and conserved in vertebrates. We used recombinant derivatives of RPSA and its N- and C-domains to quantify its interactions with ligands by in-vitro immunochemical and spectrofluorimetric methods. Both N- and C-domains bound laminin with K(D) (dissociation constants) of 300 nM. Heparin bound only to the N-domain and competed for binding to laminin with the negatively charged C-domain, which therefore mimicked heparin. EGCG bound only to the N-domain with a K(D) of 100 nM. Domain 3 of the envelope protein from yellow fever virus and serotypes-1 and -2 of dengue virus bound preferentially to the C-domain whereas that from West Nile virus bound only to the N-domain. Our quantitative in-vitro approach should help clarify the mechanisms of action of RPSA, and ultimately fight against cancer and infectious agents.

  10. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen.

  11. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC, and tilted domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g., the acyl chain of glycerolipids) and their polar head (e.g., the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids). Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar α face and a rough β face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  12. The C-terminal Domains of Apoptotic BH3-only Proteins Mediate Their Insertion into Distinct Biological Membranes.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; García-Murria, María J; Bañó-Polo, Manuel; Martin, Juliette; Monticelli, Luca; Orzáez, Mar; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-11-25

    Changes in the equilibrium of pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) induce structural changes that commit cells to apoptosis. Bcl-2 homology-3 (BH3)-only proteins participate in this process by either activating pro-apoptotic effectors or inhibiting anti-apoptotic components and by promoting MOM permeabilization. The association of BH3-only proteins with MOMs is necessary for the activation and amplification of death signals; however, the nature of this association remains controversial, as these proteins lack a canonical transmembrane sequence. Here we used an in vitro expression system to study the insertion capacity of hydrophobic C-terminal regions of the BH3-only proteins Bik, Bim, Noxa, Bmf, and Puma into microsomal membranes. An Escherichia coli complementation assay was used to validate the results in a cellular context, and peptide insertions were modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. We also found that some of the C-terminal domains were sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein fusion proteins to specific membranes in human cells, but the domains did not activate apoptosis. Thus, the hydrophobic regions in the C termini of BH3-only members associated in distinct ways with various biological membranes, suggesting that a detailed investigation of the entire process of apoptosis should include studying the membranes as a setting for protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Identification of the Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase and of Its Autoinhibitory Domain.

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, F.; Carnelli, A.; De Michelis, M. I.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of controlled proteolysis on the plasma membrane (PM)Ca2+-ATPase was studied at the molecular level in PM purified from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. Two new methods for labeling the PM Ca2+-ATPase are described. The PM Ca2+-ATPase can be selectively labeled by treatment with micromolar fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a strong inhibitor of enzyme activity. Both inhibition of activity and FITC binding to the PM Ca2+-ATPase are suppressed by millimolar MgITP. The PM Ca2+-ATPase maintains the capability to bind calmodulin also after sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and blotting; therefore, it can be conveniently identified by 125l-calmodulin overlay in the presence of calcium. With both methods a molecular mass of 133 kD can be calculated for the PM Ca2+-ATPase. FITC-labeled PM Ca2+-ATPase co-migrates with the phosphorylated intermediate of the enzyme[mdash]labeled by incubation with [[gamma]-32P]GTP in the presence of calcium[mdash]on acidic sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Controlled trypsin treatment of purified PM determines a reduction of the molecular mass of the PM Ca2+-ATPase from 133 to 118 kD parallel to the increase of enzyme activity. Only the 133-kD but not the 118-kD PM Ca2+-ATPase binds calmodulin. These results indicate that trypsin removes from the PM Ca2+-ATPase an autoinhibitory domain that contains the calmodulin-binding domain of the enzyme. PMID:12228456

  14. Gramicidin Peptides Alter Global Lipid Compositions and Bilayer Thicknesses of Coexisting Liquid-Ordered and Liquid-Disordered Membrane Domains.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2017-04-04

    Effects of adding 1 mol % of gramicidin-A on the biochemical properties of coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered (Lo + Ld) membrane domains were investigated. Quaternary giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) of di18:1PC(DOPC)/di18:0PC(DSPC)/cholesterol/gramicidin-A were prepared using our recently developed damp-film method. The phase boundary of Lo + Ld coexisting region was determined using video fluorescence microscopy. Through fitting Nile Red fluorescence emission spectra, the thermodynamic tie-lines in the Lo + Ld two-phase region were determined. We found that at 1 mol % (i.e., ∼7% of membrane area), gramicidin peptides alter the phase boundary and thermodynamic tie-lines. Gramicidin abolishes the coexisting phases at some lipid compositions but induces phase separation at others. Previous studies of gramicidin emphasize the local perturbation of bilayer thickness adjacent to the protein through the interaction of "hydrophobic mismatch". For the first time, it becomes clear that adding gramicidin produces significant long-range and global effects on the structure of membrane domains: it alters the overall lipid compositions and bilayer thicknesses of coexisting Lo and Ld domains. We also found that gramicidin partitions favorably into the Ld phase. Adding gramicidin decreases cholesterol in the Ld phase and increases cholesterol in the Lo phase. Those compositional changes broaden the bilayer thickness difference between Lo and Ld domains and facilitate preferential partition of gramicidin into thinner Ld domains. Our results demonstrate that membrane proteins play significant roles in determining lipid compositions and bilayer thicknesses of biomembrane domains.

  15. The immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain exists as an integral part of phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods were used to study the organization of cholesterol and phospholipids in membranes formed from Chol/POPS (cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine) mixtures, with mixing ratios from 0 to 3. It was confirmed using the discrimination by oxygen transport and polar relaxation agent accessibility methods that the immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD) was present in all of the suspensions when the mixing ratio exceeded the cholesterol solubility threshold (CST) in the POPS membrane. The behavior of phospholipid molecules was monitored with phospholipid analogue spin labels (n-PCs), and the behavior of cholesterol was monitored with the cholesterol analogue spin labels CSL and ASL. Results indicated that phospholipid and cholesterol mixtures can form a membrane suspension up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Additionally, EPR spectra for n-PC, ASL, and CSL indicated that both phospholipids and cholesterol exist in these suspensions in the lipid-bilayer-like structures. EPR spectral characteristics of n-PCs (spin labels located in the phospholipid cholesterol bilayer, outside the CBD) change with increase in the cholesterol content up to and beyond the CST. These results present strong evidence that the CBD forms an integral part of the phospholipid bilayer when formed from a Chol/POPS mixture up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Interestingly, CSL in cholesterol alone (without phospholipids) when suspended in buffer does not detect formation of bilayer-like structures. A broad, single-line EPR signal is given, similar to that obtained for the dry film of cholesterol before addition of the buffer. This broad, single-line signal is also observed in suspensions formed for Chol/POPS mixtures (as a background signal) when the Chol/POPS ratio is much greater than 3. It is suggested that the EPR spin-labeling approach can discriminate and characterize the fraction of cholesterol that forms the CBD within the

  16. EXO70I Is Required for Development of a Sub-domain of the Periarbuscular Membrane during Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchun; Pumplin, Nathan; Ivanov, Sergey; Harrison, Maria J

    2015-08-17

    In eukaryotic cells, polarized secretion mediated by exocytotic fusion of membrane vesicles with the plasma membrane is essential for spatially restricted expansion of the plasma membrane and for the delivery of molecules to specific locations at the membrane and/or cell surface. The EXOCYST complex is central to this process, and in yeast, regulation of the EXO70 subunit influences exocytosis and cargo specificity. In contrast to yeast and mammalian cells, plants have upwards of 23 EXO70 genes with largely unknown roles. During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, deposition of the plant periarbuscular membrane (PAM) around the fungal arbuscule creates an intracellular membrane interface between the symbionts. The PAM has two major membrane sub-domains, and symbiosis-specific transporter proteins are localized in the branch domain. Currently, the mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in biogenesis of the PAM are largely unknown. Here, we identify an EXO70I protein present exclusively in plants forming AM symbiosis. Medicago truncatula exo70i mutants are unable to support normal arbuscule development, and incorporation of two PAM-resident ABC transporters, STR and STR2, is limited. During arbuscule branching, EXO70I is located in spatially restricted zones adjacent to the PAM around the arbuscule hyphal tips where it interacts with Vapyrin, a plant-specific protein required for arbuscule development. We conclude that EXO70I provides a specific exocytotic capacity necessary for development of the main functional sub-domain of the PAM. Furthermore, in contrast to other eukaryotes, plant EXO70s have evolved distinct specificities and interaction partners to fulfill their specialized secretory requirements.

  17. Insight into the adsorption profiles of the Saprolegnia monoica chitin synthase MIT domain on POPA and POPC membranes by molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Liang, Lijun; Brown, Christian; Wang, Qi; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-21

    The critical role of chitin synthases in oomycete hyphal tip growth has been established. A microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain was discovered in the chitin synthases of the oomycete model organism, Saprolegnia monoica. MIT domains have been identified in diverse proteins and may play a role in intracellular trafficking. The structure of the Saprolegnia monoica chitin synthase 1 (SmChs1) MIT domain has been recently determined by our group. However, although our in vitro assay identified increased strength in interactions between the MIT domain and phosphatidic acid (PA) relative to other phospholipids including phosphatidylcholine (PC), the mechanism used by the MIT domain remains unknown. In this work, the adsorption behavior of the SmChs1 MIT domain on POPA and POPC membranes was systematically investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that the MIT domain can adsorb onto the tested membranes in varying orientations. Interestingly, due to the specific interactions between MIT residues and lipid molecules, the binding affinity to the POPA membrane is much higher than that to the POPC membrane. A binding hotspot, which is critical for the adsorption of the MIT domain onto the POPA membrane, was also identified. The lower binding affinity to the POPC membrane can be attributed to the self-saturated membrane surface, which is unfavorable for hydrogen-bond and electrostatic interactions. The present study provides insight into the adsorption profile of SmChs1 and additionally has the potential to improve our understanding of other proteins containing MIT domains.

  18. Structure of the Membrane Proximal Oxioreductase Domain of Human Steap3, the Dominant Ferrireductase of the Erythroid Transferrin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sendamarai, A.K.; Ohgami, R.S.; Fleming, M.D.; Lawrence, C.M.

    2009-05-27

    The daily production of 200 billion erythrocytes requires 20 mg of iron, accounting for nearly 80% of the iron demand in humans. Thus, erythroid precursor cells possess an efficient mechanism for iron uptake in which iron loaded transferrin (Tf) binds to the transferrin receptor (TfR) at the cell surface. The Tf:TfR complex then enters the endosome via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Upon endosomal acidification, iron is released from Tf, reduced to Fe{sup 2+} by Steap3, and transported across the endosomal membrane by divalent metal iron transporter 1. Steap3, the major ferrireductase in erythrocyte endosomes, is a member of a unique family of reductases. Steap3 is comprised of an N-terminal cytosolic oxidoreductase domain and a C-terminal heme-containing transmembrane domain. Cytosolic NADPH and a flavin are predicted cofactors, but the NADPH/flavin binding domain differs significantly from those in other eukaryotic reductases. Instead, Steap3 shows remarkable, although limited homology to FNO, an archaeal oxidoreductase. We have determined the crystal structure of the human Steap3 oxidoreductase domain in the absence and presence of NADPH. The structure reveals an FNO-like domain with an unexpected dimer interface and substrate binding sites that are well positioned to direct electron transfer from the cytosol to a heme moiety predicted to be fixed within the transmembrane domain. Here, we discuss possible gating mechanisms for electron transfer across the endosomal membrane.

  19. Structure of the integral membrane domain of the GLP1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Frimurer, T M; Bywater, R P

    1999-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the integral membrane domain of the GLP1 receptor, a member of the secretin receptor family of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily is proposed. The probable arrangement of the seven helices in this receptor was deduced from a detailed analysis of all the sequences in the secretin receptor family. The analysis includes: 1) identifying the transmembrane helices, 2) charge distribution analysis to estimate to which extent the transmembrane helices are buried, 3) Fourier transform analysis of different property profiles within the transmembrane helices to determine the orientation of exposed and buried faces of the helices, 4) alignment of sequences with those of the rhodopsin-like family using the novel "cold spot" method reported herein, 5) determination of lengths of transmembrane helices and their connecting loops and the constraints these impose on packing, tilting and organization, 6) incorporation of mutagenesis and ligand specificity data. We find that there is a close similarity between the structural properties of receptors of the secretin family and those of the rhodopsin-like family as typified by the frog rhodopsin structure recently solved by electron cryomicroscopy.

  20. Role of a Putative gp41 Dimerization Domain in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Li, Q; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2010-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into a target cell entails a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. A trimer-of-hairpins structure formed by the association of two heptad repeat (HR) regions of the gp41 ectodomain has been implicated in a late step of the fusion pathway. Earlier native and intermediate states of the protein are postulated to mediate the antiviral activity of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs), but the details of these structures remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and crystal structure of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal ectodomain of gp41 (residues 630 to 683, or C54). Two C54 monomers associate to form an asymmetric, antiparallel coiled coil with two distinct C-terminal {alpha}-helical overhangs. This dimer structure is conferred largely by interactions within a central core that corresponds to the sequence of enfuvirtide. The mutagenic alteration of the dimer interface severely impairs the infectivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. Moreover, the C54 structure binds tightly to both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs and likely represents a potential intermediate conformation of gp41. These results should enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of the gp41 fusogenic structural transitions and thereby guide rational, structure-based efforts to design new fusion inhibitors and vaccine candidates intended to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  1. Topical Delivery of Interferon Alpha by Biphasic Vesicles: Evidence for a Novel Nanopathway across the Stratum Corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Foldvari, M.; Badea, B; Wettig, S; Baboolal, D; Kumar, P; Creagh, A; Haynes, C

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive delivery of macromolecules across intact skin is challenging but would allow for needle-free administration of many pharmaceuticals. Biphasic vesicles, a novel lipid-based topical delivery system, have been shown to deliver macromolecules into the skin. Investigation of the delivery mechanism of interferon alpha (IFN {alpha}), as a model protein, by biphasic vesicles could improve understanding of molecular transport through the stratum corneum and allow for the design of more effective delivery systems. The interaction of biphasic vesicles with human skin and isolated stratum corneum membrane was investigated by confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS). Confocal microscopy revealed that biphasic vesicles delivered IFN {alpha} intercellularly, to a depth of 70 {micro}m, well below the stratum corneum and into the viable epidermis. DSC and SAXS/WAXS data suggest that the interaction of biphasic vesicles with SC lipids resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional cubic Pn3m polymorphic phase by the molecular rearrangement of intercellular lipids. This cubic phase could be an intercellular permeation nanopathway that may explain the increased delivery of IFN {alpha} by biphasic vesicles. Liposomes and submicrometer emulsion (the individual building blocks of biphasic vesicles) separately and methylcellulose gel, an alternative topical vehicle, did not induce a cubic phase and delivered low amounts of IFN {alpha} below the stratum corneum. Molecular modeling of the cubic Pn3m phase and lamellar-to-cubic phase transitions provides a plausible mechanism for transport of IFN {alpha}. It is hypothesized that induction of a Pn3m cubic phase in stratum corneum lipids could make dermal and transdermal delivery of other macromolecules also possible.

  2. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  3. Lipophilic oligonucleotides spontaneously insert into lipid membranes, bind complementary DNA strands, and sequester into lipid-disordered domains.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Andreas; Kurz, Anke; Windeck, Anne-Kathrin; Korte, Thomas; Flasche, Wolfgang; Liebscher, Jürgen; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2007-04-10

    For the development of surface functionalized bilayers, we have synthesized lipophilic oligonucleotides to combine the molecular recognition mechanism of nucleic acids and the self-assembly characteristics of lipids in planar membranes. A lipophilic oligonucleotide consisting of 21 thymidine units and two lipophilic nucleotides with an alpha-tocopherol moiety as a lipophilic anchor was synthesized using solid-phase methods with a phosphoramadite strategy. The interaction of the water soluble lipophilic oligonucleotide with vesicular lipid membranes and its capability to bind complementary DNA strands was studied using complementary methods such as NMR, EPR, DSC, fluorescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. This oligonucleotide inserted stably into preformed membranes from the aqueous phase. Thereby, no significant perturbation of the lipid bilayer and its stability was observed. However, the non-lipidated end of the oligonucleotide is exposed to the aqueous environment, is relatively mobile, and is free to interact with complementary DNA strands. Binding of the complementary single-stranded DNA molecules is fast and accomplished by the formation of Watson-Crick base pairs, which was confirmed by 1H NMR chemical shift analysis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The molecular structure of the membrane bound DNA double helix is very similar to the free double-stranded DNA. Further, the membrane bound DNA double strands also undergo regular melting. Finally, in raft-like membrane mixtures, the lipophilic oligonucleotide was shown to preferentially sequester into liquid-disordered membrane domains.

  4. Three-dimensional dynamic structure of the liquid-ordered domain in lipid membranes as examined by pulse-EPR oxygen probing.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, Witold K; Wisniewska, Anna; Hyde, James S; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2007-03-01

    Membranes made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, one of the simplest paradigms for the study of liquid ordered-disordered phase separation, were investigated using a pulse-EPR spin-labeling method in which bimolecular collision of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label is measured. This method allowed discrimination of liquid-ordered, liquid-disordered, and solid-ordered domains because the collision rates (OTP) differ in these domains. Furthermore, the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) profile across the bilayer provides unique information about the three-dimensional dynamic organization of the membrane domains. First, the OTP in the bilayer center in the liquid-ordered domain was comparable to that in the liquid-disordered domain without cholesterol, but the OTP near the membrane surface (up to carbon 9) was substantially smaller in the ordered domain, i.e., the cholesterol-based liquid-ordered domain is ordered only near the membrane surface, still retaining high levels of disorder in the bilayer center. This property may facilitate lateral mobility in ordered domains. Second, in the liquid-disordered domain, the domains with approximately 5 mol % cholesterol exhibited higher OTP than those without cholesterol, everywhere across the membrane. Third, the transmembrane OTP profile in the liquid-ordered domain that contained 50 mol % cholesterol dramatically differed from that which contained 27 mol % cholesterol.

  5. Lipid organization in human and porcine stratum corneum differs widely, while lipid mixtures with porcine ceramides model human stratum corneum lipid organization very closely.

    PubMed

    Caussin, Julia; Gooris, Gert S; Janssens, Michelle; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-06-01

    The conformational disordering and lateral packing of lipids in porcine and human isolated stratum corneum (SC) was compared using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was shown that SC of both species differ markedly, porcine SC lipids being arranged predominantly in a hexagonal lattice while lipids in human SC are predominantly packed in the denser orthorhombic lattice. However, the lipid organization of equimolar ceramide:cholesterol:free fatty acid (CER:CHOL:FFA) mixtures prepared with isolated porcine CER or human CER is very similar, only the transition temperatures differed being slightly lower in mixtures with porcine CER. Therefore, the difference in lateral packing between human and porcine stratum corneum is not due to the difference in CER composition. Furthermore, it is possible to use more readily available porcine CER in model lipid mixtures to mimic lipid organization in human SC. As the equimolar porcine CER:CHOL:FFA mixtures closely mimic the lipid organization in human SC, both human SC and this mixture were selected to examine the effect of glycerol on the lipid phase behaviour. It was found that high concentrations of glycerol change the lamellar organization slightly, while domains with an orthorhombic lateral packing are still observed.

  6. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. PMID:28082718

  7. Mechanochemistry of the alternatively spliced spectrin-actin binding domain in membrane skeletal protein 4.1.

    PubMed

    Discher, D; Parra, M; Conboy, J G; Mohandas, N

    1993-04-05

    Protein 4.1's interaction with the erythroid skeletal proteins spectrin and actin and its essential role in regulating membrane strength are both attributable to expression of an alternatively spliced 63-nucleotide exon. The corresponding 21-amino acid (21-aa) cassette is within the previously identified spectrin-actin binding domain (10 kDa molecular mass) of erythroid protein 4.1. This cassette is absent, however, in several isoforms that are generated by tissue- and development-specific RNA splicing. Four isoforms of the 10-kDa domain were constructed for comparative assessment of functions particularly relevant to red cells. In vitro translated isoforms containing the 21-aa cassette, denoted 10k21 and 10k19,21, were able to bind spectrin, stabilize spectrin-actin complexes, and associate with red cell membrane. Isoforms replacing or lacking the 21-aa cassette, 10k19 and 10k0, did not function in these assays. A bacterially expressed fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase, designated GST-10k21, congealed spectrin-actin into a network in vitro as found with purified protein 4.1. Additionally, incorporation of GST-10k21 into mechanically weak, 4.1-deficient membranes increased mechanical strength of these membranes to normal. GST-10k19 did not function in these assays. These results show that the 21-aa sequence in protein 4.1 is critical to mechanical integrity of the red cell membrane. These results also allow the role of protein 4.1 in membrane mechanics to be interpreted primarily in terms of its spectrin-actin binding function. Alternatively expressed sequences within the 10-kDa domain of nonerythroid protein 4.1 are suggested to have different, yet to be defined functions.

  8. Permeability and lipid organization of a novel psoriasis stratum corneum substitute.

    PubMed

    Basse, Line Hollesen; Groen, Daniël; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2013-11-30

    Lipids in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play an important role in the skin barrier properties. The main lipid classes are ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids. In previous studies a stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was developed, solely prepared from the SC lipids. The SCS mimics the lipid barrier properties of SC very closely. The present study aimed to design a psoriasis SCS (PS-SCS) mimicking several aspects of the lipid composition in SC from psoriasis patients. This PS-SCS showed a different lipid organization than SCS. The main differences were a reduced presence of an orthorhombic packing and an increased level of crystalline cholesterol. These changes resulted in lower flux of hydrocortisone across PS-SCS than across SCS and SC, which was most likely attributed to the higher level of phase separated crystalline cholesterol in PS-SCS. As propylene glycol (PG) is often used in dermatological formulations, in subsequent studies the interaction of PG with SC and SCS membranes was also investigated. These studies revealed that PG increased the permeability of hydrocortisone, mainly by selectively extracting cholesterol from SCS membranes and SC. This may play an important role in the penetration enhancing effect of PG. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. PDZ domain protein GIPC interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of melanosomal membrane protein gp75 (tyrosinase-related protein-1).

    PubMed

    Liu, T F; Kandala, G; Setaluri, V

    2001-09-21

    Tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related proteins (TRPs) are a family of melanosomal membrane proteins involved in mammalian pigmentation. Whereas the melanogenic functions of TRPs are localized in their amino-terminal domains that reside within the lumen of melanosomes, the sorting and targeting of these proteins to melanosomes is mediated by signals in their cytoplasmic domains. To identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic tail of gp75 (TRP-1), the most abundant melanosomal membrane protein, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening of a melanocyte cDNA library. Here, we show that the cytoplasmic domain of gp75 interacts with a PDZ domain-containing protein. The gp75-interacting protein is identical to GIPC, an RGS (regulator of G protein signaling)/GAIP-interacting protein, and to SEMCAP-1, a transmembrane semaphorin-binding protein. Carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues, Ser-Val-Val, of gp75 are necessary and sufficient for interaction of gp75 with the single PDZ domain in GIPC. Although endogenous and transfected GIPCs bind efficiently to transiently expressed gp75, only a small amount of GIPC is found associated with gp75 at steady state. Using a strategy to selectively synchronize the biosynthesis of endogenous gp75, we demonstrate that only newly synthesized gp75 associates with GIPC, primarily in the juxtanuclear Golgi region. Our data suggest that GIPC/SEMCAP-1 plays a role in biosynthetic sorting of proteins, specifically gp75, to melanosomes.

  10. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  11. Rice C2-domain proteins are induced and translocated to the plasma membrane in response to a fungal elicitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cha Young; Koo, Yoon Duck; Jin, Jing Bo; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Sun Tae; Park, Byung Ouk; Lee, So Young; Kim, Man Lyang; Hwang, Inhwan; Kang, Kyu Young; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Moo Je

    2003-10-14

    Hundreds of proteins involved in signaling pathways contain a Ca(2+)-dependent membrane-binding motif called the C2-domain. However, no small C2-domain proteins consisting of a single C2-domain have been reported in animal cells. We have isolated two cDNA clones, OsERG1a and OsERG1b, that encode two small C2-domain proteins of 156 and 159 amino acids, respectively, from a fungal elicitor-treated rice cDNA library. The clones are believed to have originated from a single gene by alternative splicing. Transcript levels of the OsERG1 gene are dramatically elevated by a fungal elicitor prepared from Magnaporthe grisea or by Ca(2+) ions. The OsERG1 protein produced in Escherichia coli binds to phospholipid vesicles in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and is translocated to the plasma membrane of plant cells by treatment with either a fungal elicitor or a Ca(2+) ionophore. These results suggest that OsERG1 proteins containing a single C2-domain are involved in plant defense signaling systems.

  12. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains

    PubMed Central

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via “inverse piezoelectric effect”. Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s−1) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E. Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump. PMID:28809333

  13. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-02-22

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via "inverse piezoelectric effect". Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s(-1)) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E.Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump.

  14. Stratum corneum molecular mobility in the presence of natural moisturizers.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Sebastian; Andersson, Jenny Marie; Pham, Quoc Dat; Nowacka, Agnieszka; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2014-07-07

    The outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is a lipid-protein membrane that experiences considerable osmotic stress from a dry and cold climate. The natural moisturizing factor (NMF) comprises small and polar substances, which like osmolytes can protect living systems from osmotic stress. NMF is commonly claimed to increase the water content in the SC and thereby protect the skin from dryness. In this work we challenge this proposed mechanism, and explore the influence of NMF on the lipid and protein components in the SC. We employ natural-abundance (13)C solid-state NMR methods to investigate how the SC molecular components are influenced by urea, glycerol, pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), and urocanic acid (UCA), all of which are naturally present in the SC as NMF compounds. Experiments are performed with intact SC, isolated corneocytes and model lipids. The combination of NMR experiments provides molecularly resolved qualitative information on the dynamics of different SC lipid and protein components. We obtain completely novel molecular information on the interaction of these NMF compounds with the SC lipids and proteins. We show that urea and glycerol, which are also common ingredients in skin care products, increase the molecular mobility of both SC lipids and proteins at moderate relative humidity where the SC components are considerably more rigid in the absence of these compounds. This effect cannot be attributed to increased SC water content. PCA has no detectable effect on SC molecular mobility under the conditions investigated. It is finally shown that the more apolar compound, UCA, specifically influences the mobility of the SC lipid regions. The present results show that the NMF components act to retain the fluidity of the SC molecular components under dehydrating conditions in such a way that the SC properties remain largely unchanged as compared to more hydrated SC. These findings provide a new molecular insight into how small

  15. Effects of microemulsions on the stratum corneum and hydrocortisone penetration.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, L; Keipert, S; Gloor, M

    2001-09-01

    We tested a high-water-content hydrophilic microemulsion (ME 1) and a low-water-content lipophilic microemulsion (ME 2) for their suitability for use in dermatology, in general, and as alternative hydrocortisone (HC) vehicles, in particular. The lipophilic component of both study products was isopropyl myristate. The surfactant/cosurfactant system of ME 1 consisted of two sucrose esters and that of ME 2 was a mixture of Tagat S and Plurololeat. Both MEs showed no in vitro irritability in the hen's egg test on chorioallantoic membranes. In 14 subjects, stratum corneum water content was determined by corneometry and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) by the Tewameter before and after 3 days use of ME 1 or ME 2 as well as on two untreated control sites. ME 1 produced dehydration and increased TEWL as evidence of barrier compromise. ME 2 also produced an increase in TEWL but had no dehydrating effect. Subjects then underwent standardized washing with a surfactant solution. Under these conditions, pretreatment with ME 2 also produced dehydration, but to a lesser extent than did pretreatment with ME 1. In the same subjects, the impact of the two MEs on HC penetration (0.5%, 24h occlusion) was evaluated in terms of the chromameter-determined blanching effect compared with that on a site treated only with an occlusive film dressing. The comparator was an ambiphilic cream (Basiscreme (BC) Deutscher Arzneimittel Codex (German Formulary)). Irritative skin redness produced by ME 1 was significant and that produced by ME 2 was slight but visible, compared with BC. HC penetration was demonstrable from all the study products via the blanching effect and was significantly greater from ME 1 and slightly greater from ME 2 than from BC. However, neither ME would improve HC therapy because the irritative effects were so great that the blanching effect of HC formulated in ME 1 was significantly smaller and that of HC in ME 2 slightly smaller than that of HC formulated in BC.

  16. Fusion activity of HIV gp41 fusion domain is related to its secondary structure and depth of membrane insertion in a cholesterol-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Alex L; Moorthy, Anna Eswara; Li, Yinling; Tamm, Lukas K

    2012-04-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp41 fusion domain plays a critical role in membrane fusion during viral entry. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the structure and the activity of the fusion domain in different lipid environments helps to formulate mechanistic models on how it might function in mediating membrane fusion. The secondary structure of the fusion domain in small liposomes composed of different lipid mixtures was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy.  The fusion domain formed an α-helix in membranes containing less than 30 mol% cholesterol and  formed β-sheet secondary structure in membranes containing ≥30 mol% cholesterol. EPR spectra of spin-labeled fusion domains also indicated different conformations in membranes with and without cholesterol. Power saturation EPR data were further used to determine the orientation and depth of α-helical fusion domains in lipid bilayers. Fusion and membrane perturbation activities of the gp41 fusion domain were measured by lipid mixing and contents leakage. The fusion domain fused membranes in both its helical form and its β-sheet form. High cholesterol, which induced β-sheets, promoted fusion; however, acidic lipids, which promoted relatively deep membrane insertion as an α-helix, also induced fusion. The results indicate that the structure of the HIV gp41 fusion domain is plastic and depends critically on the lipid environment. Provided that their membrane insertion is deep, α-helical and β-sheet conformations contribute to membrane fusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G.; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W.; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Hartwig, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. PMID:25838348

  18. Characterization of caveolin-rich membrane domains isolated from an endothelial-rich source: implications for human disease

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Caveolae are 50-100-nm membrane microdomains that represent a subcompartment of the plasma membrane. Previous morphological studies have implicated caveolae in (a) the transcytosis of macromolecules (including LDL and modified LDLs) across capillary endothelial cells, (b) the uptake of small molecules via a process termed potocytosis involving GPI-linked receptor molecules and an unknown anion transport protein, (c) interactions with the actin-based cytoskeleton, and (d) the compartmentalization of certain signaling molecules, including G- protein coupled receptors. Caveolin, a 22-kD integral membrane protein, is an important structural component of caveolae that was first identified as a major v-Src substrate in Rous sarcoma virus transformed cells. This finding initially suggested a relationship between caveolin, transmembrane signaling, and cellular transformation. We have recently developed a procedure for isolating caveolin-rich membrane domains from cultured cells. To facilitate biochemical manipulations, we have applied this procedure to lung tissue--an endothelial and caveolin-rich source-allowing large scale preparation of these complexes. These membrane domains retain approximately 85% of caveolin and approximately 55% of a GPI-linked marker protein, while they exclude > or = 98% of integral plasma membrane protein markers and > or = 99.6% of other organelle-specific membrane markers tested. Characterization of these complexes by micro-sequencing and immuno- blotting reveals known receptors for modified forms of LDL (scavenger receptors: CD 36 and RAGE), multiple GPI-linked proteins, an anion transporter (plasma membrane porin), cytoskeletal elements, and cytoplasmic signaling molecules--including Src-like kinases, hetero- trimeric G-proteins, and three members of the Rap family of small GTPases (Rap 1--the Ras tumor suppressor protein, Rap 2, and TC21). At least a fraction of the actin in these complexes appeared monomeric (G- actin), suggesting that

  19. Graded delamination behavior of human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth S; Stefik, Morgan M; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2006-12-01

    An in vitro adhesion test method has been adapted to quantify the through-thickness intercellular delamination energy of isolated human stratum corneum (SC). Both untreated and delipidized tissues were tested. Measured delamination energies were found to increase from approximately 3 J/m(2) near the surface to approximately 15 J/m(2) for the inner layers of the tissue. For delipidized SC, the location of the initial debond was located closer to the center of the tissue. Delamination energy values were elevated compared to untreated specimens, increasing from approximately 7 J/m(2) near the surface to approximately 18 J/m(2) for the inner layers of the SC. Further tests were run to measure delamination energies of SC as a function of hydration (15-100% relative humidity (RH)) at approximately 25 degrees C and as a function of temperature (10-90 degrees C) at several hydrations (15, 45, 100% RH). Delamination energies were observed to decrease with increasing hydration and increasing temperature with the most significant changes occurring for 100% RH conditioned SC. Additional SC was treated with pH-buffered solutions (pH 4.2, 6.7, 9.9) and selected surfactant solutions (1%, 10% wt/wt sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) for comparison to untreated controls. While statistically significant differences were observed, the SC was found to be resistant to large changes in delamination energy with pH and 1% wt/wt SDS treatments with values in the range 4.2-5.1J/m(2) compared to control values of 4.4 J/m(2). More substantially elevated values were observed for SC treated with a 10%wt/wt SDS solution (6.6J/m(2)) and a chloroform-methanol extraction (11.2J/m(2)).

  20. Co-autodisplay of Z-domains and bovine caseins on the outer membrane of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gu; Saenger, Thorsten; Bong, Ji-Hong; Jose, Joachim; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-12-01

    In this work, two proteins, Z-domains and bovine casein, were auto-displayed on the outer membrane of the same Escherichia coli cells by co-transformation of two different auto-display vectors. On the basis of SDS-PAGE densitometry, Z-domains and bovine casein were expressed at 3.12 × 10⁵ and 1.55 × 10⁵ proteins/E. coli cell, respectively. The co-auto-displayed Z-domains had antibody-binding activity and the bovine casein had adhesive properties. E. coli with co-auto-displayed proteins were analyzed by fluorescence assisted cell sorting (FACS). E. coli with co-auto-displayed Z-domains and bovine casein aggregated due to hydrophobic interaction. For application to immunoassays, the Z-domain activity was estimated after (1) immobilizing the E. coli and (2) forming an OM layer. E. coli with co-auto-displayed two proteins that were immobilized on a polystyrene microplate had the same antibody-binding activity as did E. coli with auto-displayed Z-domains only. The OM layer from the co-transformed E. coli had Z-domains and bovine casein expressed at a 1:2 ratio from antibody-binding activity measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of membrane lipid composition on the structure and stability of the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Laura; Foster, Leigh; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2016-09-06

    Cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase is a crucial first step in the evolution of Alzheimer's disease. To discover the cleavage mechanism, it is urgent to predict the structures of APP monomers and dimers in varying membrane environments. We determined the structures of the C9923-55 monomer and homodimer as a function of membrane lipid composition using a multiscale simulation approach that blends atomistic and coarse-grained models. We demonstrate that the C9923-55 homodimer structures form a heterogeneous ensemble with multiple conformational states, each stabilized by characteristic interpeptide interactions. The relative probabilities of each conformational state are sensitive to the membrane environment, leading to substantial variation in homodimer peptide structure as a function of membrane lipid composition or the presence of an anionic lipid environment. In contrast, the helicity of the transmembrane domain of monomeric C991-55 is relatively insensitive to the membrane lipid composition, in agreement with experimental observations. The dimer structures of human EphA2 receptor depend on the lipid environment, which we show is linked to the location of the structural motifs in the dimer interface, thereby establishing that both sequence and membrane composition modulate the complete energy landscape of membrane-bound proteins. As a by-product of our work, we explain the discrepancy in structures predicted for C99 congener homodimers in membrane and micelle environments. Our study provides insight into the observed dependence of C99 protein cleavage by γ-secretase, critical to the formation of amyloid-β protein, on membrane thickness and lipid composition.

  2. Role of a Putative gp41 Dimerization Domain in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Membrane Fusion▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Deng, Yiqun; Li, Qunnu; Dey, Antu K.; Moore, John P.; Lu, Min

    2010-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into a target cell entails a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. A trimer-of-hairpins structure formed by the association of two heptad repeat (HR) regions of the gp41 ectodomain has been implicated in a late step of the fusion pathway. Earlier native and intermediate states of the protein are postulated to mediate the antiviral activity of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs), but the details of these structures remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and crystal structure of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal ectodomain of gp41 (residues 630 to 683, or C54). Two C54 monomers associate to form an asymmetric, antiparallel coiled coil with two distinct C-terminal α-helical overhangs. This dimer structure is conferred largely by interactions within a central core that corresponds to the sequence of enfuvirtide. The mutagenic alteration of the dimer interface severely impairs the infectivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. Moreover, the C54 structure binds tightly to both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs and likely represents a potential intermediate conformation of gp41. These results should enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of the gp41 fusogenic structural transitions and thereby guide rational, structure-based efforts to design new fusion inhibitors and vaccine candidates intended to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies. PMID:19846514

  3. Analysis of the membrane-interacting domain of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein bindin

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, L.; DeAngelis, P.L.; Glabe, C.G. )

    1989-11-14

    The authors have investigated the domain of the bindin polypeptide the selectively associates with gel-phase phospholipid vesicles. They found that small trypsin fragments of bindin retain the ability to selectively associate with gel-phase vesicles. The primary amino acid sequence of bindin suggests that these peptides are derived from the central portion of the polypeptide between residues 77 and 126, which is the most hydrophobic region of bindin. They have also employed 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (TID) and novel, radioiodinated, photoactivatable derivatives of the polar head group of phosphatidylethanolamine (ASD-PE and ASA-PE) to identify membrane-associated polypeptide segments after the transfer of radiolabel from the probe to the bindin polypeptide. After photolysis, bindin was selectively labeled only from probes incorporated in gel-phase vesicles. The labeling of bindin was much more efficient from the head group probes ASA-PE and ASD-PE (8 and 2% of the total label, respectively) in comparison to the hydrophobic probe TID (less than 0.02% of the total label), suggesting that bindin is localized within the polar part of the bilayer. Protease mapping experiments with V8 protease, trypsin, and endoprotease Lys-C suggest that some of the probe label is distributed along the amino-terminal portion of bindin between residues 1 and 76 and the rest of the label is restricted to the segments between residues 77 and 126 which also selectively bind to gel-phase vesicles. The carboxyl-terminal portion of bindin residues 127 and 236 is not labeled.

  4. Vehicle effects on human stratum corneum absorption and skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alissa; Jung, Eui-Chang; Zhu, Hanjiang; Zou, Ying; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-07-19

    This study evaluated the effects of three vehicles-ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM)-on stratum corneum (SC) absorption and diffusion of the [(14)C]-model compounds benzoic acid and butenafine hydrochloride to better understand the transport pathways of chemicals passing through and resident in SC. Following application of topical formulations to human dermatomed skin for 30 min, penetration flux was observed for 24 h post dosing, using an in vitro flow-through skin diffusion system. Skin absorption and penetration was compared to the chemical-SC (intact, delipidized, or SC lipid film) binding levels. A significant vehicle effect was observed for chemical skin penetration and SC absorption. IPA resulted in the greatest levels of intact SC/SC lipid absorption, skin penetration, and total skin absorption/penetration of benzoic acid, followed by IPM and EtOH, respectively. For intact SC absorption and total skin absorption/penetration of butenafine, the vehicle that demonstrated the highest level of sorption/penetration was EtOH, followed by IPA and IPM, respectively. The percent doses of butenafine that were absorbed in SC lipid film and penetrated through skin in 24 h were greatest for IPA, followed by EtOH and IPM, respectively. The vehicle effect was consistent between intact SC absorption and total chemical skin absorption and penetration, as well as SC lipid absorption and chemical penetration through skin, suggesting intercellular transport as a main pathway of skin penetration for model chemicals. These results suggest the potential to predict vehicle effects on skin permeability with simple SC absorption assays. As decontamination was applied 30 min after chemical exposure, significant vehicle effects on chemical SC partitioning and percutaneous penetration also suggest that skin decontamination efficiency is vehicle dependent, and an effective decontamination method should act on chemical solutes in the lipid domain.

  5. PD-L1 Antibodies to Its Cytoplasmic Domain Most Clearly Delineate Cell Membranes in Immunohistochemical Staining of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Kathleen M; Sun, Heather; Liao, Xiaoyun; Hua, Ping; Callea, Marcella; Greenfield, Edward A; Hodi, F Stephen; Sharpe, Arlene H; Signoretti, Sabina; Rodig, Scott J; Freeman, Gordon J

    2015-12-01

    Blocking the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway has clinical benefit in metastatic cancer and has led to the approval of the mAbs pembrolizumab and nivolumab to treat melanoma and nivolumab for non-small cell lung cancer. Expression of PD-L1 on the cell surface of either tumor cells or infiltrating immune cells is associated with a higher likelihood of response to PD-1 blockade in multiple studies. Most mAbs to PD-L1 in use are directed to its extracellular domain and immunohistochemically stain tumor tissue with a mixture of cytoplasmic and membrane staining. Cytoplasmic staining obscures the interpretation of a positive reaction on the tumor cell membrane, and thus affects the accuracy of PD-L1 scoring systems. We developed a mAb to the cytoplasmic domain of PD-L1, 405.9A11 (9A11), which is both more selective for membranous PD-L1 and more sensitive in IHC and Western blotting, compared with previous mAbs specific for the PD-L1 extracellular domain. Here, we compare immunohistochemical staining patterns of PD-L1 expression in five types of tumors, using five PD-L1 mAbs: 9A11, 7G11, and three commercially available mAbs. We demonstrate that 9A11, as well as two other cytoplasmic domain-specific mAbs, E1L3N and SP142, can clearly delineate the membrane of PD-L1-positive cells in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and facilitate interpretation of staining results. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Antibodies to the cytoplasmic domain of PD-L1 most clearly delineate cell membranes in immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Kathleen M.; Sun, Heather; Liao, Xiaoyun; Hua, Ping; Callea, Marcella; Greenfield, Edward A.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Signoretti, Sabina; Rodig, Scott J.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the PD-1 pathway has clinical benefit in metastatic cancer and has led to the approval of the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) pembrolizumab and nivolumab to treat melanoma and nivolumab for non-small cell lung cancer. Expression of PD-L1 on the cell surface of either tumor cells or infiltrating immune cells is associated with a higher likelihood of response to PD-1 blockade in multiple studies. Most mAbs to PD-L1 in use are directed to its extracellular domain and immunohistochemically stain tumor tissue with a mixture of cytoplasmic and membrane staining. Cytoplasmic staining obscures the interpretation of a positive reaction on the tumor cell membrane, and thus affects the accuracy of PD-L1 scoring systems. We developed a mAb to the cytoplasmic domain of PD-L1, 405.9A11 (9A11), which is both more selective for membranous PD-L1 and more sensitive in immunohistochemistry and western blotting, compared to previous mAbs specific for the PD-L1 extracellular domain. Here we compare immunohistochemical staining patterns of PD-L1 expression in five types of tumors, using five PD-L1 mAbs: 9A11, 7G11 and three commercially available mAbs. We demonstrate that 9A11, as well as two other cytoplasmic domain-specific mAbs, E1L3N and SP142, can clearly delineate the membrane of PD-L1 positive cells in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and facilitates interpretation of staining results. PMID:26546452

  7. Properties of ceramides and their impact on the stratum corneum structure. Part 2: stratum corneum lipid model systems.

    PubMed

    Kessner, D; Ruettinger, A; Kiselev, M A; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R H H

    2008-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) represents the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, exhibits the main skin barrier and plays an important role in the water penetration pathway through the SC. Knowing the structure and properties of the SC at the molecular level is essential for studying drug penetration through the SC and for the development of new dermal drug delivery systems. Therefore, research interest is focused on the SC lipid matrix and on water diffusion through it. Thus, the ultimate aim is to design a lipid mixture that mimics the barrier properties of the human SC to a high extent and that can substitute the SC in drug delivery systems. This review summarizes various studies performed on either isolated animal or human ceramide based SC model systems, coming to the result that using synthetic lipids with a well-defined architecture allows good extrapolation to the in vivo situation. This review is the continuation of part 1 that is focused on a detailed description of the thermotropic and/or lyotropic phase behaviour of single ceramide types obtained by various experimental techniques. The objective of part 2 is to reflect the numerous studies on SC lipid model systems, namely binary, ternary and multicomponent systems, during the last decade. In this context, neutron diffraction as a prospective tool for analyzing the internal membrane structure is addressed in particular. Based on these new insights, current SC models are presented, whose validations are still under discussion. A profound knowledge about SC lipid organization at the molecular level is still missing.

  8. An investigation of the effect of membrane curvature on transmembrane-domain dependent protein sorting in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Matteo; Goud, Bruno; Borgese, Nica; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins within the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells is a complex process involving discrete sorting signals as well as physico-chemical properties of the transmembrane domain (TMD). Previous work demonstrated that tail-anchored (TA) protein sorting at the interface between the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex is exquisitely dependent on the length and hydrophobicity of the transmembrane domain, and suggested that an imbalance between TMD length and bilayer thickness (hydrophobic mismatch) could drive long TMD-containing proteins into curved membrane domains, including ER exit sites, with consequent export of the mismatched protein out of the ER. Here, we tested a possible role of curvature in TMD-dependent sorting in a model system consisting of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) from which narrow membrane tubes were pulled by micromanipulation. Fluorescent TA proteins differing in TMD length were incorporated into GUVs of uniform lipid composition or made of total ER lipids, and TMD-dependent sorting and diffusion, as well as the bending rigidity of bilayers made of microsomal lipids, were investigated. Long and short TMD-containing constructs were inserted with similar orientation, diffused equally rapidly in GUVs and in tubes pulled from GUVs, and no difference in their final distribution between planar and curved regions was detected. These results indicate that curvature alone is not sufficient to drive TMD-dependent sorting at the ER-Golgi interface, and set the basis for the investigation of the additional factors that must be required. PMID:25210649

  9. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, R W; Blobel, G

    1992-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components.

  10. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  11. Rab14 specifies the apical membrane through Arf6-mediated regulation of lipid domains and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ruifeng; Wilson, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cell polarity is essential for the development of multi-cellular organisms as well as for the function of epithelial organs in the mature animal. Small GTPases regulate the establishment and maintenance of polarity through effects on cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and signaling. Using short-term 3-dimensional culture of MDCK cells, we find that the small GTPase Rab14 is required for apical membrane specification. Rab14 knockdown results in disruption of polarized lipid domains and failure of the Par/aPKC/Cdc42 polarity complex to localize to the apical membrane. These effects are mediated through tight control of lipid localization, as overexpression of the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase α [PtdIns(4)P5K] activator Arf6 or PtdIns(4)P5K alone, or treatment with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdInsI3K) inhibitor wortmannin, rescued the multiple-apical domain phenotype observed after Rab14 knockdown. Rab14 also co-immunoprecipitates and colocalizes with the small GTPase Cdc42, and Rab14 knockdown results in increased Cdc42 activity. Furthermore, Rab14 regulates trafficking of vesicles to the apical domain, mitotic spindle orientation, and midbody position, consistent with Rab14’s reported localization to the midbody as well as its effects upon Cdc42. These results position Rab14 at the top of a molecular cascade that regulates the establishment of cell polarity. PMID:27901125

  12. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  13. An investigation of the effect of membrane curvature on transmembrane-domain dependent protein sorting in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Matteo; Goud, Bruno; Borgese, Nica; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins within the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells is a complex process involving discrete sorting signals as well as physico-chemical properties of the transmembrane domain (TMD). Previous work demonstrated that tail-anchored (TA) protein sorting at the interface between the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex is exquisitely dependent on the length and hydrophobicity of the transmembrane domain, and suggested that an imbalance between TMD length and bilayer thickness (hydrophobic mismatch) could drive long TMD-containing proteins into curved membrane domains, including ER exit sites, with consequent export of the mismatched protein out of the ER. Here, we tested a possible role of curvature in TMD-dependent sorting in a model system consisting of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) from which narrow membrane tubes were pulled by micromanipulation. Fluorescent TA proteins differing in TMD length were incorporated into GUVs of uniform lipid composition or made of total ER lipids, and TMD-dependent sorting and diffusion, as well as the bending rigidity of bilayers made of microsomal lipids, were investigated. Long and short TMD-containing constructs were inserted with similar orientation, diffused equally rapidly in GUVs and in tubes pulled from GUVs, and no difference in their final distribution between planar and curved regions was detected. These results indicate that curvature alone is not sufficient to drive TMD-dependent sorting at the ER-Golgi interface, and set the basis for the investigation of the additional factors that must be required.

  14. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components. PMID:1281815

  15. Characterisation of the membrane-extrinsic domain of the TatB component of the twin arginine protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Barbara; Kneuper, Holger; Buchanan, Grant; Hatzixanthis, Kostas; Sargent, Frank; Berks, Ben C; Palmer, Tracy

    2011-02-04

    The twin arginine protein transport (Tat) system transports folded proteins across cytoplasmic membranes of bacteria and thylakoid membranes of plants, and in Escherichia coli it comprises TatA, TatB and TatC components. In this study we show that the membrane extrinsic domain of TatB forms parallel contacts with at least one other TatB protein. Truncation of the C-terminal two thirds of TatB still allows complex formation with TatC, although protein transport is severely compromised. We were unable to isolate transport-inactive single codon substitution mutations in tatB suggesting that the precise amino acid sequence of TatB is not critical to its function. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Essential regions in the membrane domain of bacterial complex I (NDH-1): the machinery for proton translocation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Motoaki; Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2014-08-01

    The proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I/NDH-1) is the first and largest enzyme of the respiratory chain which has a central role in cellular energy production and is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases and aging. It is believed that the peripheral domain of complex I/NDH-1 transfers the electron from NADH to Quinone (Q) and the redox energy couples the proton translocation in the membrane domain. To investigate the mechanism of the proton translocation, in a series of works we have systematically studied all membrane subunits in the Escherichia coli NDH-1 by site-directed mutagenesis. In this mini-review, we have summarized our strategy and results of the mutagenesis by depicting residues essential for proton translocation, along with those for subunit connection. It is suggested that clues to understanding the driving forces of proton translocation lie in the similarities and differences of the membrane subunits, highlighting the communication of essential charged residues among the subunits. A possible proton translocation mechanism with all membrane subunits operating in unison is described.

  17. Influence of lysophospholipid hydrolysis by the catalytic domain of neuropathy target esterase on the fluidity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Aaron J; Richardson, Rudy J; Worden, R Mark; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2010-08-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. Irreversible inhibition of NTE by certain organophosphorus compounds produces a paralysis known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neuropathy. In vitro, NTE has phospholipase/lysophospholipase activity that hydrolyses exogenously added single-chain lysophospholipids in preference to dual-chain phospholipids, and NTE mutations have been associated with motor neuron disease. NTE's physiological role is not well understood, although recent studies suggest that it may control the cytotoxic accumulation of lysophospholipids in membranes. We used the NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to hydrolyze palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (p-lysoPC) to palmitic acid in bilayer membranes comprising 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the fluorophore 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC). Translational diffusion coefficients (D(L)) in supported bilayer membranes were measured by fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching (FRAPP). The average D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes without NEST was 2.44 microm(2)s(-1)+/-0.09; the D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes containing NEST and diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, an inhibitor, was nearly identical at 2.45+/-0.08. By contrast, the D(L) for membranes comprising NEST, DOPC, and p-lysoPC was 2.28+/-0.07, significantly different from the system with inhibited NEST, due to NEST hydrolysis. Likewise, a system without NEST containing the amount of palmitic acid that would have been produced by NEST hydrolysis of p-lysoPC was identical at 2.26+/-0.06. These results indicate that NTE's catalytic activity can alter membrane fluidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11897.001 PMID:26714107

  19. Deletion analysis of AGD1 reveals domains crucial for plasma membrane recruitment and function in root hair polarity.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Cheol-Min; Naramoto, Satoshi; Sparks, J Alan; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Nakashima, Jin; Fukuda, Hiroo; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2017-06-23

    AGD1, a plant ACAP-type ADP-ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein (ARF-GAP), functions in specifying root hair polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana To better understand how AGD1 modulates root hair growth, we generated full-length and domain-deleted AGD1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) constructs, and followed their localization during root hair development. AGD1-GFP localized to the cytoplasm and was recruited to specific regions of the root hair plasma membrane (PM). Distinct PM AGD1-GFP signal was first detected along the site of root hair bulge formation. The construct continued to mark the PM at the root hair apical dome, but only during periods of reduced growth. During rapid tip growth, AGD1-GFP labeled the PM of the lateral flanks and dissipated from the apical-most PM. Deletion analysis and a single domain GFP fusion revealed that the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is the minimal unit required for recruitment of AGD1 to the PM. Our results indicate that differential recruitment of AGD1 to specific PM domains is an essential component of the membrane trafficking machinery that facilitates root hair developmental phase transitions and responses to changes in the root microenvironment. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The membrane localization domains of two distinct bacterial toxins form a 4-helix-bundle in solution.

    PubMed

    Hisao, Grant S; Brothers, Michael C; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Membrane localization domain (MLD) was first proposed for a 4-helix-bundle motif in the crystal structure of the C1 domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT). This structure motif is also found in the crystal structures of several clostridial glycosylating toxins (TcdA, TcdB, TcsL, and TcnA). The Ras/Rap1-specific endopeptidase (RRSP) module of the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin produced by Vibrio vulnificus has sequence homology to the C1-C2 domains of PMT, including a putative MLD. We have determined the solution structure for the MLDs in PMT and in RRSP using solution state NMR. We conclude that the MLDs in these two toxins assume a 4-helix-bundle structure in solution. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  1. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far.

  2. Highly conserved residues in the helical domain of dengue virus type 1 precursor membrane protein are involved in assembly, precursor membrane (prM) protein cleavage, and entry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Zou, Gang; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2014-11-28

    The envelope and precursor membrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are present on the surface of immature virions. During maturation, prM protein is cleaved by furin protease into pr peptide and membrane (M) protein. Although previous studies mainly focusing on the pr region have identified several residues important for DENV replication, the functional role of M protein, particularly the α-helical domain (MH), which is predicted to undergo a large conformational change during maturation, remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nine highly conserved MH domain residues in the replication cycle of DENV by site-directed mutagenesis in a DENV1 prME expression construct and found that alanine substitutions introduced to four highly conserved residues at the C terminus and one at the N terminus of the MH domain greatly affect the production of both virus-like particles and replicon particles. Eight of the nine alanine mutants affected the entry of replicon particles, which correlated with the impairment in prM cleavage. Moreover, seven mutants were found to have reduced prM-E interaction at low pH, which may inhibit the formation of smooth immature particles and exposure of prM cleavage site during maturation, thus contributing to inefficient prM cleavage. Taken together, these results are the first report showing that highly conserved MH domain residues, located at 20-38 amino acids downstream from the prM cleavage site, can modulate the prM cleavage, maturation of particles, and virus entry. The highly conserved nature of these residues suggests potential targets of antiviral strategy.

  3. Determination of the dissociation constants for Ca2+ and calmodulin from the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump by a lipid probe that senses membrane domain changes.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Irene; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Pignataro, María F; Strehler, Emanuel E; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain information about conformational changes of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-pump (PMCA) in the membrane region upon interaction with Ca(2+), calmodulin (CaM) and acidic phospholipids. To this end, we have quantified labeling of PMCA with the photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine analog [(125)I]TID-PC/16, measuring the shift of conformation E(2) to the auto-inhibited conformation E(1)I and to the activated E(1)A state, titrating the effect of Ca(2+) under different conditions. Using a similar approach, we also determined the CaM-PMCA dissociation constant. The results indicate that the PMCA possesses a high affinity site for Ca(2+) regardless of the presence or absence of activators. Modulation of pump activity is exerted through the C-terminal domain, which induces an apparent auto-inhibited conformation for Ca(2+) transport but does not modify the affinity for Ca(2+) at the transmembrane domain. The C-terminal domain is affected by CaM and CaM-like treatments driving the auto-inhibited conformation E(1)I to the activated E(1)A conformation and thus modulating the transport of Ca(2+). This is reflected in the different apparent constants for Ca(2+) in the absence of CaM (calculated by Ca(2+)-ATPase activity) that sharply contrast with the lack of variation of the affinity for the Ca(2+) site at equilibrium. This is the first time that equilibrium constants for the dissociation of Ca(2+) and CaM ligands from PMCA complexes are measured through the change of transmembrane conformations of the pump. The data further suggest that the transmembrane domain of the PMCA undergoes major rearrangements resulting in altered lipid accessibility upon Ca(2+) binding and activation.

  4. All-atom models of the membrane-spanning domain of HIV-1 gp41 from metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Abrams, Cameron F

    2010-11-17

    The 27-residue membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 bears conserved sequence elements crucial to the biological function of the virus, in particular a conserved GXXXG motif and a midspan arginine. However, structure-based explanations for the roles of these and other MSD features remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics and metadynamics calculations of an all-atom, explicit solvent, and membrane-anchored model, we study the conformational variability of the HIV-1 gp41 MSD. We find that the MSD peptide assumes a stable tilted α-helical conformation in the membrane. However, when the side chain of the midspan Arg (694) "snorkels" to the outer leaflet of the viral membrane, the MSD assumes a metastable conformation where the highly-conserved N-terminal core (between Lys(681) and Arg(694) and containing the GXXXG motif) unfolds. In contrast, when the Arg(694) side chain snorkels to the inner leaflet, the MSD peptide assumes a metastable conformation consistent with experimental observations where the peptide kinks at Phe(697) to facilitate Arg(694) snorkeling. Both of these models suggest specific ways that gp41 may destabilize viral membrane, priming the virus for fusion with a target cell.

  5. Crucial Role of Perfringolysin O D1 Domain in Orchestrating Structural Transitions Leading to Membrane-perforating Pores

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzyk-Stokowiec, Aleksandra; Kulma, Magdalena; Traczyk, Gabriela; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej; Dadlez, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a toxic protein that binds to cholesterol-containing membranes, oligomerizes, and forms a β-barrel transmembrane pore, leading to cell lysis. Previous studies have uncovered the sequence of events in this multistage structural transition to a considerable detail, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. By measuring hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns of peptide bond amide protons monitored by mass spectrometry (MS), we have mapped structural changes in PFO and its variant bearing a point mutation during incorporation to the lipid environment. We have defined all regions that undergo structural changes caused by the interaction with the lipid environment both in wild-type PFO, thus providing new experimental constraints for molecular modeling of the pore formation process, and in a point mutant, W165T, for which the pore formation process is known to be inefficient. We have demonstrated that point mutation W165T causes destabilization of protein solution structure, strongest for domain D1, which interrupts the pathway of structural transitions in other domains necessary for proper oligomerization in the membrane. In PFO, the strongest changes accompanying binding to the membrane focus in D1; the C-terminal part of D4; and strands β1, β4, and β5 of D3. These changes were much weaker for PFOW165Tlipo where substantial stabilization was observed only in D4 domain. In this study, the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis monitored by MS provided new insight into conformational changes of PFO associated with the membrane binding, oligomerization, and lytic pore formation. PMID:25164812

  6. The in vivo structure of biological membranes and evidence for lipid domains

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher B.; Qian, Shuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Myles, Dean A. A.; Standaert, Robert F.; Elkins, James G.

    2017-01-01

    Examining the fundamental structure and processes of living cells at the nanoscale poses a unique analytical challenge, as cells are dynamic, chemically diverse, and fragile. A case in point is the cell membrane, which is too small to be seen directly with optical microscopy and provides little observational contrast for other methods. As a consequence, nanoscale characterizati