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Sample records for coronary atherosclerosis illness

  1. Coronary Atherosclerosis and Interventional Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Peña-Duque, Marco Antonio; Romero-Ibarra, José Luis; Gaxiola-Macías, Manuel Ben Adoniram; Arias-Sánchez, Eduardo A

    2015-07-01

    The atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries begins with endothelial dysfunction and may provoke thrombotic total occlusion and myocardial infarction. In this state-of-the-art review, we discuss recent evidence of atheroslerosis, vulnerable plaque, and hemodynamic changes in the coronary tree, as well as the current techniques we implement in the catheterization lab to evaluate coronary stenosis. It is clear that atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition with several consequences in the coronary tree, however, we are able now to characterize the plaque and to select the appropriate treatment for many patients.

  2. Preventing and arresting coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C

    1995-09-01

    The good news about coronary atherosclerosis is that it takes an awful lot of plaque before symptoms of myocardial ischemia occur. The bad news is that despite the need for large quantities of plaque for symptoms to occur, nevertheless nearly half of us in the United States eventually have the necessary quantity. Atherosclerosis is infrequently hereditary in origin. Most of us get atherosclerosis because we consume too much fat, cholesterol, and calories. The consequence is an elevated ( > 150 mg/dl) serum total cholesterol level, and the higher the number is above 150, the greater is the quantity of plaque deposited in our arteries. If the serum total cholesterol level can be prevented from rising to more than 150 mg/dl, plaques are not laid down; if elevated levels are lowered to 150 mg/dl, further plaque does not form, and parts of those present may vanish. A fruit-vegetarian-starch diet is necessary as a rule to achieve the 150 mg/dl level in most adults. Lipid-lowering drugs are required in the patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and in most patients with atherosclerotic events. The best news about atherosclerosis is that it can be prevented in those without the hereditary form, and it can be arrested by lowering elevated serum total (and LDL) cholesterol to the 150 mg/dl level.

  3. Rapid Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bajaj, Sharad; Virk, Hartaj; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, the prevalence of which has increased steadily as the population ages. Vascular injury is believed to be critical initiating event in pathogenesis of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis has been classically described in patients undergoing heart transplantation, coronary artery bypass graft, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In contrast to spontaneous atherosclerosis, denuding endothelial injury followed by thrombus formation and initial predominant smooth muscle cell proliferation is believed to be playing a significant role in accelerated atherosclerosis. There is no universal definition of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. However most studies describing the phenomenon have used the following definition: (i) > or = 10% diameter reduction of at least one preexisting stenosis > or = 50%, (ii) > or = 30% diameter reduction of a preexisting stenosis <50%, and (iii) progression of a lesion to total occlusion within few months. Recent studies have described the role of coronary vasospasm, human immunodeficiency virus, various inflammatory markers, and some genetic mutations as predictors of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. As research in the field of vascular biology continues, more factors are likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26823982

  4. [Invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gamou, Tadatsugu; Kawashiri, Masaaki; Tada, Hayato; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Invasive diagnostic imaging technique of coronary atherosclerosis has rapidly developed. For example, intravascular ultrasound(IVUS) is recognized as an essential device for percutaneous coronary intervention to evaluate the vessel wall, vascular lumen and coronary plaque morphologies because of its accuracy for quantitative analysis capability. Recently new imaging modalities such as radio-frequency signal analysis, elastography and contrast harmonic echography have been developed for the evaluation of histological characteristics. Also, optical coherence tomography(OCT), which provides approximately ten-times higher-resolutional cross-section images of the coronary arterial wall in comparison with IVUS, became available in clinical setting. In this article, we review the latest progress of the invasive diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

  5. Cardiac CT: atherosclerosis to acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Munnur, Ravi Kiran; Cameron, James D.; Ko, Brian S.; Meredith, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is a robust non-invasive method to assess coronary artery disease (CAD). Qualitative and quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic coronary stenosis with CCTA has been favourably compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Importantly, it allows the study of preclinical stages of atherosclerotic disease, may help improve risk stratification and monitor the progressive course of the disease. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) is excellent and the constantly improving technology is making the evaluation of stents feasible. Novel techniques are being developed to assess the functional significance of coronary stenosis. The excellent negative predictive value of CCTA in ruling out disease enables early and safe discharge of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Emergency Department (ED). In addition, CCTA is useful in predicting clinical outcomes based on the extent of coronary atherosclerosis and also based on individual plaque characteristics such as low attenuation plaque (LAP), positive remodelling and spotty calcification. In this article, we review the role of CCTA in the detection of coronary atherosclerosis in native vessels, stented vessels, calcified arteries and grafts; the assessment of plaque progression, evaluation of chest pain in the ED, assessment of functional significance of stenosis and the prognostic significance of CCTA. PMID:25610801

  6. Proteomic Study of Blood Serum in Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stakhneva, E M; Meshcheryakova, I A; Demidov, E A; Starostin, K V; Ragino, Yu I; Peltek, S E; Voevoda, M I

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the blood serum proteins were assessed in men with coronary atherosclerosis and without coronary heart disease. Proteins were separated by 2D-electrophoresis, protein fractions were identified by their peptide fingerprint by MALDI method; fractions with more than twofold increase in protein level were determined. In blood serum of patients with coronary atherosclerosis, the content of C4 complement protein increased and ceruloplasmin level decreased, which is typical of heart failure and coronary heart disease.

  7. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance ... flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including Coronary artery ...

  8. Prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ottervanger, J.P.; Thomas, K.; Sie, T.H.; Haalebos, M.M.P.; Zijlstra, F.

    2002-01-01

    Background Because of a high prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve disease, coronary angiography is recommended before aortic valve replacement. However, during the last three decades, a decline in mortality due to coronary heart disease has been observed in the general population in both Western Europe and the United States. It is unknown whether preoperative angiography is still mandatory in all patients. Aim To assess the prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve replacement and trends during a ten-year period. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement between 1988 and 1998 in our institution. Patients with a history of coronary artery disease and patients younger than 25 years were excluded. Coronary atherosclerosis was defined as one or more coronary artery luminal stenosis of 50% or more on preoperative coronary angiography. Results During the study period 1339 patients had aortic valve replacement in our institution, data on 1322 (98%) were available for analysis. Previous coronary artery disease was documented in 124 patients (10%). After exclusion of 17 patients (no angiography), data on a total of 1181 patients were analysed. Coronary atherosclerosis was present in 472 patients (40%) on preoperative coronary angiography. Several well-known risk factors of ischaemic heart disease were associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary atherosclerosis varied between 30% and 50% per year. There was, however, no significant trend during the study period. Multivariate analyses, to adjust for potential differences in risk factors during the observation period, did not change this conclusion. Conclusions The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients scheduled for aortic valve replacement is still high. From 1988 to 1998, no significant change

  9. Subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and neighbourhood deprivation in an urban region.

    PubMed

    Dragano, Nico; Hoffmann, Barbara; Stang, Andreas; Moebus, Susanne; Verde, Pablo E; Weyers, Simone; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Mann, Klaus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Siegrist, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Inhabitants of deprived neighbourhoods are at higher risk of coronary heart disease. In this study we investigate the hypothesis that social inequalities at neighbourhood level become already manifest in subclinical coronary atherosclerosis, as defined by electron-beam computed tomography derived measures. Coronary artery calcification was assessed as a marker of atherosclerosis in a population based sample of 4301 men and women (45-75 years) without a history of coronary heart disease. Participants lived in three adjacent cities in Germany and were examined between 2000 and 2003 as part of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study. Individual level data was combined with neighbourhood level information about unemployment, welfare and living space per inhabitant. This dataset was analysed with descriptive and multilevel regression methods. An association between neighbourhood deprivation and subclinical coronary calcification was observed. After adjustment for age and individual socioeconomic status male inhabitants of high unemployment neighbourhoods had an odds ratio of 1.45 (1.11, 1.96) of exhibiting a high calcification score (>75th percentile) compared to men living in low unemployment areas. The respective odds for women was 1.29 (0.97, 1.70). Additional explorative analyses suggest that clustering of unhealthy lifestyles in deprived neighbourhoods contributes to the observed association. In conclusion, findings suggest that certain neighbourhood characteristics promote the emergence of coronary atherosclerosis. This might point to a pathway from neighbourhood deprivation to manifest coronary heart disease.

  10. Association of Serum Osteocalcin with Insulin Resistance and Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine the associations between serum osteocalcin level and insulin resistance, coronary atherosclerosis by using dual-source coronary computed tomography angiography. Methods A total of 98 subjects (24 men and 74 women) were selected for this retrospective cross-sectional study who voluntarily visited a health examination center for routine health check-up including the blood test for serum osteocalcin level and coronary computed tomography angiography. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine which variables were independently related to osteocalcin levels and coronary atherosclerosis. Results Stepwise multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, menopausal status, body mass index, serum alkaline phosphatase, serum calcium and phosphate showed that osteocalcin negatively correlated with serum glucose (β=-0.145, P=0.001) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index (β=-1.794, P=0.027) independently. The age, serum glucose, smoking status but not osteocalcin level were independent risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis by use of multiple logistic regression analysis after controlling for other variables. Conclusions Serum osteocalcin level was inversely associated with fasting glucose level and insulin resistance measured by HOMA-IR, suggesting that osteocalcin is important for glucose metabolism. However, in this study, no significant difference was observed in the serum osteocalcin level according to the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27965939

  11. Prediction of cardiovascular outcomes by imaging coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Faraz

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several invasive and non-invasive coronary atherosclerosis imaging modalities have emerged as predictors of cardiovascular outcomes in at-risk population. These modalities have demonstrated independent or incremental prognostic information over existing/standard risk stratification schemes, such as the Framingham risk score (FRS), by identifying characteristics of coronary artery diseases (CADs). In this review, we begin with discussing the importance of pre-test probability and quality of outcome measure, followed by specific findings of each modality in relation to prognosis. We focused on both short and long term prognostic aspects of coronary computed tomography (CT) (including coronary calcium score and coronary angiography) and magnetic resonance imaging as non-invasive tools, as well as invasive modalities including intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), optical coherence tomography (OCT), near infrared spectroscopy and Angioscopy. PMID:27500091

  12. Pathology of coronary atherosclerosis and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue

    2016-01-01

    The process of early atherosclerotic plaque progression is characterized by the development of pathologic intimal thickening (PIT) with lipid pool that may transform into the necrotic core to form fibroatheroma, where infiltration of foamy macrophages plays a crucial role. The expansion of the necrotic core is also attributable to intraplaque hemorrhage. Thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) is characterized by a relatively large necrotic core with an overlying thin fibrous cap measuring <65 µm typically containing numerous macrophages, and is considered to be the precursor lesion of plaque rupture which is the most common cause of coronary thrombosis. The second common cause of acute thrombosis is plaque erosion, while calcified nodules is known to be the least frequent cause of coronary thrombosis. Coronary thrombosis can occur without symptoms to form healed lesions, which contributes to an increase in plaque burden and luminal narrowing. The process of plaque progression is generally accompanied by the progression of calcification. An understanding of the histomorphological characteristics of coronary plaques should provide important insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of atherosclerotic coronary disease for both basic and clinical researchers as well as for clinicians. PMID:27500096

  13. Atherosclerosis and Liver Function Tests in Coronary Angiography Patients

    PubMed Central

    Doganer, YC; Rohrer, JE; Aydogan, U; Agerter, DC; Cayci, T; Barcin, C

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Elevated aminotransferase levels indicating liver function, even in the normal range, have attracted great concern as potential novel markers of cardiovascular risk assessment. We hypothesized the possibility that liver function test variations in the normal range might be meaningfully associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). Method: Eighty-eight patients were randomly selected from those who underwent coronary angiography from June 2010 to June 2011 after applying to the outpatient cardiology clinic in Gulhane Military Medical Academy. According to the results of angiographies, patients were classified into three groups as normal, non-critical (< 50% involvement in coronaries), and critical (≥ 50% involvement in coronaries). In addition to angiographic intervention, measurements of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations, albumin and the other serum parameters were performed in all patients. Results: The patient groups of CAD were balanced (28 critical cases, 30 non-critical cases and 30 normal cases). Mean age was 51.93 ± 9.3 (range 32–65) years and 19.3 per cent (n = 17) were females. Multiple linear regression analysis of all three liver function tests explained a significant portion of the variance, but adjusted r-squares were small (AST = 0.174, ALT = 0.242, albumin = 0.124). Albumin was significantly higher for patients with critical CAD than for patients with no CAD (beta = 3.205, p = 0.002). Non-critical CAD was not significantly different from no CAD for any of the dependent variables. Mean AST was significantly higher for patients taking aspirin (beta = 0.218, p = 0.049), as was mean ALT (beta = 0.264, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Alanine aminotransferase and AST may not be associated with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis. Albumin may be more sensitive to demonstrate the burden of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that the association between the liver

  14. Epicardial adipose excision slows the progression of porcine coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In humans there is a positive association between epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) volume and coronary atherosclerosis (CAD) burden. We tested the hypothesis that EAT contributes locally to CAD in a pig model. Methods Ossabaw miniature swine (n = 9) were fed an atherogenic diet for 6 months to produce CAD. A 15 mm length by 3–5 mm width coronary EAT (cEAT) resection was performed over the middle segment of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) 15 mm distal to the left main bifurcation. Pigs recovered for 3 months on atherogenic diet. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in the LAD to quantify atheroma immediately after adipectomy and was repeated after recovery before sacrifice. Coronary wall biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for atherosclerosis markers and cytokines and cEAT was assayed for atherosclerosis-related genes by RT-PCR. Total EAT volume was measured by non-contrast CT before each IVUS. Results Circumferential plaque length increased (p < 0.05) in the proximal and distal LAD segments from baseline until sacrifice whereas plaque length in the middle LAD segment underneath the adipectomy site did not increase. T-cadherin, scavenger receptor A and adiponectin were reduced in the intramural middle LAD. Relative to control pigs without CAD, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD-1), CCL19, CCL21, prostaglandin D2 synthase, gp91phox [NADPH oxidase], VEGF, VEGFGR1, and angiotensinogen mRNAs were up-regulated in cEAT. EAT volume increased over 3 months. Conclusion In pigs used as their own controls, resection of cEAT decreased the progression of CAD, suggesting that cEAT may exacerbate coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:24387639

  15. [Role of measurement of fractional flow reserve in coronary artery atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kopylovi, F Yu; Bykova, A A; Vasilevsky, Yu V; Simakov, S S

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers coronary flow in health and coronary flow autoregulation in health and disease. It gives basic methods used to estimate coronary flow reserve in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. The physiological bases for determining fractional flow reserve are presented. Clinical trials investigating the use of fractional flow reserve in patients with coronary heart disease are analyzed.

  16. Lasting monitoring of immune state in patients with coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Immune state monitoring is an expensive, invasive and sometimes difficult necessity in patients with different disorders. Immune reaction dynamics study in patients with coronary atherosclerosis provides one of the leading components to complication development, clinical course prognosis and treatment and rehabilitation tactics. We've chosen intravenous glucose injection as metabolic irritant in the following four groups of patients: men with proved coronary atherosclerosis (CA), non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), men hereditary burden by CA and NIDDM and practically healthy persons with longlivers in generation. Immune state parameters such as quantity of leukocytes and lymphocytes, circulating immune complexes levels, serum immunoglobulin levels, HLA antigen markers were studied at 0, 30 and 60 minutes during glucose loading. To obtain continues time function of studied parameters received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree with after going first derivatives. Time functions analyze elucidate principally different dynamics studied parameters in all chosen groups of patients, which couldn't be obtained from discontinuous data compare. Leukocyte and lymphocyte levels dynamics correlated HLA antigen markers in all studied groups. Analytical estimation of immune state in patients with coronary atherosclerosis shows the functional "margin of safety" of immune system state under glucose disturbance. Proposed method of analytical estimation also can be used in immune system monitoring in other groups of patients.

  17. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis in various susceptible groups

    PubMed Central

    Nerlekar, Nitesh; Wong, Dennis T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Atherosclerosis, which is the primary pathophysiologic mechanism for the development of plaque leading to CAD, is a multifactorial process resulting from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and various risk factors such as hypertension (HT), dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus (DM) and smoking. In addition, influences from other disease states such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity and the metabolic syndrome as well as gender and ethnic diversity also contribute to the disease process. Insights from pathological observations and advances in cellular and molecular biology have helped us understand the process of plaque formation, progression and rupture leading to events. Several intravascular imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allow in vivo assessment of plaque burden, plaque morphology and response to therapy. In addition, non invasive assessment using coronary artery calcium (CAC) score allows risk stratification and plaque burden assessment whilst computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) allows evaluation of luminal stenosis, plaque characterisation and quantification. This review aims to summarise the results of invasive and non-invasive imaging studies of coronary atherosclerosis seen in various high-risk populations including DM, metabolic syndrome, obesity, CKD and, gender differences and ethnicity. Understanding the phenotype of plaques in various susceptible groups may allow potential development of personalised therapies. PMID:27500095

  18. An evaluation of coronary atherosclerosis using coronary CT in subjects with asymptomatic carotid lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Vito; Piraino, Davide; Bracale, Umberto Marcello; Evola, Salvatore; Di Piazza, Mariaconcetta; Vicari, Claudia; Lupo, Ambra; Inga, Giuseppe; Andolina, Giuseppe; Assennato, Pasquale; Novo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of coronary lesions in patients with asymptomatic carotid plaque represents a very promising line of research to assess cardiovascular risk and the possible implementation of a more aggressive prevention therapy. Methods: In this study we enrolled 102 patients with intermediate to high cardiovascular risk but no history of coronary artery disease. The first group, consisting of 51 patients, underwent a Coronary CT scan (CCT-group) as well as carotid ultrasonography. The second group, also consisting of 51 patients, underwent coronary angiography (CA) and carotid ultrasonography. Results: The absence of a statistically significant difference between the involvement of both coronary and carotid sites, assessed by CCT and CA, confirms the role of coronary CT as a useful method in the preclinical evaluation of cardiovascular risk. In the CCT group, the correlation between atherosclerosis of carotid artery and coronary disease, as well as between the mean carotid intimal medial thickness and the number of involved coronary vessels, and between the maximum values of carotid plaque and the presence of coronary artery stenosis > 50%, were statistically significant. The Agatson calcium score was also statistically associated with carotid plaque size. Conclusion: The imaging biomarkers have a key role in the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. Moreover, carotid ultrasound examination and a CT-scan of coronary arteries, in a particular sub-group of patients with intermediate to high cardiovascular risk, can play a crucial role to assess the preventive therapeutic strategies. PMID:25147763

  19. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  20. [Genetic dimorphism in beta-aminoisobutyric acid excretion in patients with atherosclerosis of the coronary artery and in groups at risk for atherosclerosis in the Lithuanian population].

    PubMed

    Spitsyn, V A; Stakishaĭtis, D V; Preĭksha, R A

    1993-11-01

    Frequency of genetic variants of excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB) in the urea was examined in patients suffering from atherosclerosis of coronary arteries and in risk group for atherosclerosis: children frequently suffering from respiratory viral infection, children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and in adults suffering from IDDM and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. With the aim to determine whether excretion of BAIB could be related with CMV persistence of with proteolytic activity of blood serum the IgG class antibodies against CMV and level of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) in blood serum was tested also. Frequency of high excretors of BAIB was found significantly more often (P < 0.01) in children suffering from virus infection compared to that of population. Frequency distribution of BAIB excretion showed that "high excretors" were found significantly more often in children suffering from atherosclerosis. The difference of BAIB excretion among healthy and diabetics was not defined (P > 0.05). The changes of excretion of BAIB in urea were not related with quantity of alpha 1-PI in blood serum. Investigation reveal a possible relation between high BAIB excretor and latent CMV infection and that this may impact atherogenesis. This leads to a suggestion that children who are often ill with respiratory virus infection may constitute a risk group for coronary atherosclerosis.

  1. Coronary Atherosclerosis The Implications of Being a Woman.

    PubMed

    Morales-Villegas, E

    2014-07-01

    The profile of ischemic heart disease by coronary atherosclerosis has been developed based on clinical, paraclinical and angiographic grounds inherent to the male gender. A man in his 40s - 50s with "classical" cardiovascular risk factors, angina pectoris and hemodynamically significant myocardial ischemia associated with angiographic stenosis (≥ 50% endovascular diameter reduction equivalent to ≥ 75% endovascular area reduction and determining a trans-stenotic pressure gradient) is the prototype over which guidelines for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this disease are structured. However, this "male" pattern of coronary atherosclerosis is not the rule in female gender. Therefore, in women, the frequent lack of a clinical, paraclinical and angiographic profile, classically masculine, results in a suboptimal medical approach, characterized by low implementation of the guidelines for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of ischemic heart disease. The final consequence of this cycle, favored by other gender, social and environmental circumstances, is a high morbidity and mortality caused by this pathology in the female gender. In this chapter, which concludes with a review of the state-of-the-art knowledge of atheroma in females, the current concepts on the physiological level of c-LDL, oxidized c-LDL "a mimicked pathogen" and atherogenesis will be reviewed in sequence for didactic purposes.

  2. A novel biomarker of coronary atherosclerosis: serum DKK1 concentration correlates with coronary artery calcification and atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Park, Kyoung Un; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Sang Il; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Chae, In-Ho; Song, Junghan; Choi, Dong-Ju; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2011-09-01

    DKK1 modulates Wnt signaling, which is involved in the atherosclerosis. However, no data exist regarding the usefulness of measuring serum DKK1 concentration in predicting coronary atherosclerosis. A total of 270 consecutive patients (62.8 ± 11.2 yr; 70% male) were included. A contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary MDCT was performed to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques. Agatston calcium scores (CS) were calculated to quantify the coronary artery calcification (CAC). DKK1 concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For each subsequent DKK1 quartile, there was a significant increase in CAC (P = 0.004) and the number of segments with coronary atherosclerosis (P < 0.001). In addition, DKK1 concentration was significantly higher in patients with atherosclerotic plaques, regardless of plaque composition (P = 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified DKK1 as an independent risk factor for the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. The adjusted odds ratio for coronary atherosclerotic plaque was 4.88 (95% CI, 1.67 to 14.25) for highest versus lowest quartile of the DKK1 levels. Furthermore, patients with DKK1 concentrations ≥ 68.6 pg/mL demonstrated coronary atherosclerotic plaques even when they had low CS. Serum DKK1 concentrations correlate with the coronary atherosclerosis and play an independent role in predicting the presence of coronary atherosclerosis.

  3. Remarkable regression of coronary atherosclerosis: An interplay of pharmacotherapeutic and lifestyle factors

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Vinayagam, N. Sakthi; Chockalingam, V.; Chockalingam, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world today. Regression of coronary atherosclerosis using a combination of drugs and lifestyle interventions has been reported. This letter describes three patients with remarkable reduction in angiographic stenosis of coronary arteries that is generally not considered feasible. PMID:27133332

  4. Atrial fibrillation, progression of coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bayturan, Ozgur; Puri, Rishi; Tuzcu, E Murat; Shao, Mingyuan; Wolski, Kathy; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir; Nissen, Steven E; Sanders, Prashanthan; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Background Despite atrial fibrillation representing an established risk factor for stroke, the association between atrial fibrillation and both progression of coronary atherosclerosis and major adverse cardiovascular events is not well characterized. We assessed the serial measures of coronary atheroma burden and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with and without atrial fibrillation. Methods Data were analyzed from nine clinical trials involving 4966 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing serial intravascular ultrasonography at 18-24 month intervals to assess changes in percent atheroma volume (PAV). Using a propensity weighted analysis, and following adjustment for baseline variables, patients with ( n = 190) or without ( n = 4776) atrial fibrillation were compared with regard to coronary plaque volume and major adverse cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, and stroke). Results Atrial fibrillation patients demonstrated lower baseline PAV (36.0 ± 8.9 vs. 38.1 ± 8.9%, p = 0.002) and less PAV progression (-0.07 ± 0.34 vs. + 0.23 ± 0.34%, p = 0.001) compared with the non-atrial fibrillation group. Multivariable analysis revealed atrial fibrillation to independently predict both myocardial infarction [HR, 2.41 (1.74,3.35), p<0.001] 2.41 (1.74, 3.35), p < 0.00) and major adverse cardiovascular events [HR, 2.2, (1.66, 2.92), p<0.001] 2.20 (1.66, 2.92), p < 0.001]. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that atrial fibrillation compared with non-atrial fibrillation patients had a significantly higher two-year cumulative incidence of overall major adverse cardiovascular events (4.4 vs. 2.0%, log-rank p = 0.02) and myocardial infarction (3.3 vs. 1.5%, log-rank p = 0.05). Conclusions The presence of atrial fibrillation independently associates with a heightened risk of myocardial infarction despite a lower baseline burden and progression rate of coronary atheroma. Further studies are necessary to define

  5. Endothelium-mediated coronary blood flow modulation in humans. Effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Zeiher, A M; Drexler, H; Saurbier, B; Just, H

    1993-01-01

    The effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia on vascular function of the coronary circulation were studied by subselective intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine, which releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor, and papaverine, which directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle, in normal patients (n = 18; no risk factors for coronary artery disease), in patients with evidence of early atherosclerosis but normal cholesterol levels and normal blood pressure (n = 12), in patients with hypertension without left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 12), and in patients with hypercholesterolemia (n = 20). Papaverine-induced maximal increases in coronary blood flow were significantly greater in normals, but no differences were noted between the groups of patients with early atherosclerosis, with hypertension, and with hypercholesterolemia. The capacity of the coronary system to increase blood flow in response to acetylcholine was similar in normal and normocholesterolemic patients with epicardial atherosclerosis and/or hypertension but was significantly impaired in patients with hypercholesterolemia, irrespective of evidence of epicardial atherosclerotic lesions. Age (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001) and total serum cholesterol levels (r = -0.70; P < 0.0001) were the only significant independent predictors of a blunted coronary blood flow response to acetylcholine. Thus, hypercholesterolemia and advanced age selectively impair endothelium-mediated relaxation of the coronary microvasculature in response to acetylcholine, whereas endothelial dysfunction is restricted to epicardial arteries in age-matched normocholesterolemic patients with evidence of coronary atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Images PMID:8349804

  6. Relation between type A behavior pattern and the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Washio, Masakazu; Tokunaga, Shoji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Liu, Ying; Kodama, Hiroko; Arai, Hidekazu; Koyanagi, Samon; Hiyamuta, Koji; Doi, Yoshitaka; Kawano, Tomoki; Nakagaki, Osamu; Takada, Kazuyuki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Nii, Takanobu; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Ideishi, Munehito; Arakawa, Kikuo; Mohri, Masahiro; Takeshita, Akira

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relation of Type A behavior pattern and its components to angiographically documented coronary atherosclerosis in 198 Japanese women. A questionnaire-based interview elicited psychosocial and other factors. Type A behavior pattern was measured by 12 questions. Significant coronary stenosis was defined when a 75% or greater luminal narrowing occurred at one or more major coronary arteries or 50% or greater narrowing occurred at the left main artery. Gensini's score also was calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for traditional coronary risk factors and the presence of a job. Global Type A behavior pattern showed no material association with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis assessed by both Gensini's score and the presence of significant coronary stenosis. However, its subcomponents, enthusiasm and competitiveness, were positively related to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis, whereas self-confidence and perfectionism were negatively related. These findings suggest overall a null association between global Type A and coronary atherosclerosis as well as the presence of toxic or beneficial components of Type A behaviors in Japanese women.

  7. Treg/Th17 balance in stable CAD patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Alexandra V; Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Provatorov, Sergey; Ruleva, Natalya; Masenko, Valery; Noeva, Elena; Krasnikova, Tatiana; Arefieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Immune processes play a significant role in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Regulatory T cells and T helpers 17 were shown to possess anti- and pro-atherogenic activity, respectively. We aimed to investigate the balance of circulating Treg and Th17 in stable angina patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods. Treg, Th17 and Th1 cell frequencies were studied in 117 patients via direct immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Group 1 had intact coronary arteries. Group 2 and Group 3 had undergone previous coronary stenting; in Group 2 no coronary atherosclerosis progression was found, in Group 3 patients had disease progression in non-invaded coronary arteries. Group 4 had severe coronary atherosclerosis. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25highCD127low, CD4+foxp3+, and CD4+IL10 + T cells were decreased, and CD4+IL17 + T cells frequencies were increased in group 4 vs. 1. Treg/Th17 ratios were declined in groups 3 and 4 vs. groups 1 and 2. IL-10 level was lower while hsCRP and sCD25 levels were higher in group 4 vs. 1. Conclusion. We assume that the imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory/atherogenic lymphocyte subpopulations is associated with atherosclerosis progression.

  8. [Painless myocardial ischemia in patient with extensive constrictive atherosclerosis of coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Oshchepkova, E V; Lazareva, N V

    2012-01-01

    We describe in this article a clinical case of a patient with arterial hypertension, painless myocardial ischemia and extensive constrictive atherosclerosis of coronary arteries. Coronary heart disease (painless ischemia) was suspected basing on results of transesophageal electrostimulation coupled with stress echocardiography and was confirmed by coronary angiography. This description is followed by discussion of possibilities of different instrumental methods in diagnostics of painless ischemia, classification of painless ischemia, treatment, and prognosis.

  9. Influence of coronary artery disease and subclinical atherosclerosis related polymorphisms on the risk of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Huaranga, Marco A. Ramírez; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Ocejo-Vinyals, J. Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    A genetic component influences the development of atherosclerosis in the general population and also in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, genetic polymorphisms associated with atherosclerosis in the general population are not always involved in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA. Accordingly, a study in North-American RA patients did not show the association reported in the general population of coronary artery disease with a series of relevant polymorphisms (TCF21, LPA, HHIPL1, RASD1-PEMT, MRPS6, CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2, SMG6-SRR, PHACTR1, WDR12 and COL4A1-COL4A2). In the present study, we assessed the potential association of these polymorphisms with CVD in Southern European RA patients. We also assessed if polymorphisms implicated in the increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in non-rheumatic Caucasians (ZHX2, PINX1, SLC17A4, LRIG1 and LDLR) may influence the risk for CVD in RA. 2,609 Spanish patients were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,258 of them by carotid ultrasonography (assessment of carotid intima media thickness and presence/absence of carotid plaques). No statistically significant differences were found when each polymorphism was assessed according to the presence/absence of cardiovascular events and subclinical atherosclerosis, after adjustment for potential confounder factors. Our results do not show an association between these 15 polymorphisms and atherosclerosis in RA. PMID:28059143

  10. Influence of coronary artery disease and subclinical atherosclerosis related polymorphisms on the risk of atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Vicente, Esther; Robustillo-Villarino, Montserrat; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Genre, Fernanda; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Huaranga, Marco A Ramírez; Pina, Trinitario; Blanco, Ricardo; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Raya, Enrique; Mijares, Verónica; Ubilla, Begoña; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Balsa, Alejandro; López-Longo, Francisco J; Carreira, Patricia; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Ocejo-Vinyals, J Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Castañeda, Santos; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2017-01-06

    A genetic component influences the development of atherosclerosis in the general population and also in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, genetic polymorphisms associated with atherosclerosis in the general population are not always involved in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA. Accordingly, a study in North-American RA patients did not show the association reported in the general population of coronary artery disease with a series of relevant polymorphisms (TCF21, LPA, HHIPL1, RASD1-PEMT, MRPS6, CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2, SMG6-SRR, PHACTR1, WDR12 and COL4A1-COL4A2). In the present study, we assessed the potential association of these polymorphisms with CVD in Southern European RA patients. We also assessed if polymorphisms implicated in the increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in non-rheumatic Caucasians (ZHX2, PINX1, SLC17A4, LRIG1 and LDLR) may influence the risk for CVD in RA. 2,609 Spanish patients were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was determined in 1,258 of them by carotid ultrasonography (assessment of carotid intima media thickness and presence/absence of carotid plaques). No statistically significant differences were found when each polymorphism was assessed according to the presence/absence of cardiovascular events and subclinical atherosclerosis, after adjustment for potential confounder factors. Our results do not show an association between these 15 polymorphisms and atherosclerosis in RA.

  11. Decreased Renal Function Is a Risk Factor for Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Korean Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Cho, Si Hyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Decreased renal function is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Our study was planned to verify the association of decreased renal function and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 251 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center for a routine health checkup. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used to show renal function, which was estimated by calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formulas. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results Women with reduced eGFR (< 60 mL/minute/1.73 m2) had significantly higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) than women with normal eGFR (≥ 60 mL/minute/1.73 m2). The eGFR was negatively correlated with baPWV (r = -0.352, P < 0.001), significantly. The eGFR was lower in women with coronary atherosclerosis than in normal control women, markedly. Reduced eGFR was significantly associated with the presence of coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio [OR] = 7.528, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.728-20.772, P < 0.001). Conclusions Decreased eGFR was closely associated with increased arterial stiffness and coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Evaluating subclinical atherosclerosis by screening the renal function in postmenopausal women may be helpful screening high risk group and considering starting menopausal hormone therapy before atherosclerosis development. PMID:28119897

  12. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Atherosclerosis Updated:Apr 3,2017 Atherosclerosis, or hardening of ... the arteries as you get older. How does atherosclerosis start and progress? It's a complex process. Exactly ...

  13. [Infection and coronary atherosclerosis: the role Chlamydia pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Paz, M; de Otero, J; Codinach, P; Ferrer-Ruscalleda, F; Gayà, M; Ibernón, M

    1998-11-01

    The role of inflammatory reactions in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is widely accepted. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has linked infections to atherosclerosis. It is hypothesized that infections could interact with other risk factors of vascular disease, enhancing the endothelial damage and the production of atherosclerotic plaques. Several different infectious agents have been related to the atherosclerosis genesis: mainly herpesvirus, Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Several lines of evidence strongly link C. pneumoniae to atherosclerosis. Consequently, several studies evaluating the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment in the reduction of cardiac ischemic events in patients with C. pneumoniae seropositivity have been performed. These studies support a causative role for C. pneumoniae. This article reviews the recent evidence linking infections to atherosclerosis, with emphasis on the role of C. pneumoniae on the atherosclerotic plaque.

  14. A pan-coronary artery angiographic study of the association between diabetes mellitus and progression or regression of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Raisuke; Ndrepepa, Gjin; Kujath, Vivien; Harada, Yukinori; Kufner, Sebastian; Schunkert, Heribert; Nakamura, Masato; Kastrati, Adnan

    2017-04-01

    The frequency and pattern of progression or regression of coronary atherosclerosis in contemporary patients with diabetes remain unknown. This study included 605 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Two coronary angiographic examinations at baseline and after 2 years were performed. The analysis focused on non-stented segments with diameter stenosis ≥25 %. Atherosclerosis progression (or regression) was defined as a decrease (or increase) in the mean minimal lumen diameter (MLD) in the 2-year angiogram compared to mean MLD in the baseline angiogram of >0.2 mm. Statins were prescribed in 576 patients (95.2 %). The primary outcome was atherosclerosis progression or regression in the 2-year angiogram. One hundred sixty-nine patients (28 %) had diabetes. Diabetic patients had greater reduction of mean MLD in the 24 angiogram compared to baseline angiogram than nondiabetic patients (0.11 ± 0.18 vs. -0.08 ± 0.15 mm, P < 0.001). Atherosclerosis progression was observed in 37 patients with diabetes and 16 nondiabetic patients (21.9 vs. 3.7 %; P < 0.001). Atherosclerosis regression was observed in two diabetic patients and 78 nondiabetic patients (1.2 vs. 17.9 %; P < 0.001). A progression pattern across all coronary segments was observed in 70 patients (41.4 %) with diabetes and 60 patients (13.8 %) without diabetes (P < 0.001). Diabetic patients with a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥70 mg/dl showed more atherosclerosis progression than diabetic patients with LDL cholesterol <70 mg/dl (delta-MLD: 0.12 ± 0.19 vs. 0.08 ± 0.16 mm; P = 0.04). In conclusion, in contemporary patients with CAD treated with moderate-intensity statin therapy, diabetes is associated with the increased risk of progression and decreased probability of regression of coronary atherosclerosis.

  15. Significance of microalbuminuria in relation to subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic nonhypertensive, nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Eun; Heo, Nam Ju; Kim, Minkyung; Choi, Su-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the significance of microalbuminuria and its relationship with subclinical atherosclerosis in nonhypertensive and nondiabetic patients, by using coronary artery computed tomography (CT). A total of 1,318 nonhypertensive and nondiabetic subjects who had taken coronary artery CT and measured spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) were evaluated. The atherosclerotic changes of coronary arteries were greater in subjects with microalbuminuria, reflected by coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and significant coronary artery stenosis (CACS ≥ 100 in 15.3% vs 7.6% and stenosis ≥ 50% in 11.5% vs 4.9% of patients with vs without microalbuminuria, P = 0.008 and P = 0.011, respectively). Among various parameters that are known as a risk factor or possible biomarkers of coronary artery disease, presence of microalbuminuria, age and Framingham risk score were significantly related to coronary artery stenosis. Among them the presence of microalbuminuria showed stronger correlation than others to the coronary artery stenosis detected by CT, even after adjusting confounding factors (OR 3.397, 95% confidence interval 1.138 to 10.140, P = 0.028). The presence of microalbuminuria by UACR was significantly associated with presence of coronary artery stenosis ≥ 50% in asymptomatic, nonhypertensive and nondiabetic general population. Our study suggests that the presence of microalbuminuria may imply subclinical coronary artery disease, even in asymptomatic population.

  16. Associations Between Antiretroviral Use and Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Guajira P.; Li, Xiuhong; Post, Wendy S.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Brown, Todd T.; Kingsley, Lawrence; Phair, John P.; Palella, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives HIV infection is associated with increased prevalence of subclinical coronary plaque. The extent to which such plaque reflects effects of HIV infection or effects of long-term antiretroviral (ART) use remains unclear and was the goal of this analysis. Design and Methods We compared the prevalence and extent of coronary plaque and stenosis between users of specific ART drugs or drug classes using coronary computed tomography (CT) among HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. To account for time-dependent confounders, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and time-varying reasons for using specific treatments, we conducted fully adjusted logistic and linear models with inverse probability of treatment weighting. Results There were 618 men who underwent non-contrast coronary CT; 450 also underwent coronary CT angiography. At the time of scanning 81% had undetectable plasma HIV RNA. In fully adjusted models, cumulative use of zidovudine, abacavir, darunavir and protease inhibitors as a drug class were inconsistently associated with specific forms of plaque presence or extent. Conclusions Among virally suppressed HIV-infected men with extensive ART exposure, no consistent associations between use of specific ART drugs and both subclinical coronary plaque presence and extent were apparent. Our findings support the hypothesis that, among virally suppressed persons, type of ART used is not in general a major determinant of subclinical coronary plaque risk. PMID:27490639

  17. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ≤0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ≤0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma

  18. The atherosclerosis burden score (ABS): a convenient ultrasound-based score of peripheral atherosclerosis for coronary artery disease prediction.

    PubMed

    Yerly, Patrick; Marquès-Vidal, Pedro; Owlya, Reza; Eeckhout, Eric; Kappenberger, Lukas; Darioli, Roger; Depairon, Michèle

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonographic detection of subclinical atherosclerosis improves cardiovascular risk stratification, but uncertainty persists about the most discriminative method to apply. In this study, we found that the "atherosclerosis burden score (ABS)", a novel straightforward ultrasonographic score that sums the number of carotid and femoral arterial bifurcations with plaques, significantly outperformed common carotid intima-media thickness, carotid mean/maximal thickness, and carotid/femoral plaque scores for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area under the curve (AUC) = 0.79; P = 0.027 to <0.001 with the other five US endpoints) in 203 patients undergoing coronary angiography. ABS was also more correlated with CAD extension (R = 0.55; P < 0.001). Furthermore, in a second group of 1128 patients without cardiovascular disease, ABS was weakly correlated with the European Society of Cardiology chart risk categories (R(2) = 0.21), indicating that ABS provided information beyond usual cardiovascular risk factor-based risk stratification. Pending prospective studies on hard cardiovascular endpoints, ABS appears as a promising tool in primary prevention.

  19. Male-Specific Association between a γ-Secretase Polymorphism and Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Dejaegere, Tim; van Zweeden, Martine; van Schijndel, Jessica E.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trip, Mieke D.; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a common multifactorial disease resulting from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. The causative genes that contribute to atherosclerosis are elusive. Based on recent findings with a Wistar rat model, we speculated that the γ-secretase pathway may be associated with atherosclerosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We have tested for association of premature coronary atherosclerosis with a non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the γ-secretase component APH1B (Phe217Leu; rs1047552), a SNP previously linked to Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of a Dutch Caucasian cohort (780 cases; 1414 controls) showed a higher prevalence of the risk allele in the patients (odds ratio (OR) = 1.35), albeit not statistically different from the control population. Intriguingly, after gender stratification, the difference was significant in males (OR = 1.63; p = 0.033), but not in females (OR = 0.50; p = 0.20). Since Phe217Leu-mutated APH1B showed reduced γ-secretase activity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the genetic variation is likely functional. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that, in a male-specific manner, disturbed γ-secretase signalling may play a role in the susceptibility for premature coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:18987747

  20. Therapeutic modulation of the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis: lessons learned from serial imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jordan; Puri, Rishi; Kataoka, Yu; Nicholls, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in risk prediction, preventive and therapeutic strategies, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains a major public health challenge worldwide, carrying considerable morbidity, mortality and health economic burden. There continues to be a need to better understand the natural history of this disease to guide the development of more effective treatment, integral to which is the rapidly evolving field of coronary artery imaging. Various imaging modalities have been refined to enable detailed visualization of the pathological substrate of atherosclerosis, providing accurate and reproducible measures of coronary plaque burden and composition, including the presence of high-risk characteristics. The serial application of such techniques, including coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have uncovered important insights into the progression of coronary plaque over time in patients with stable and unstable coronary artery disease (CAD), and its responsiveness to therapeutic interventions. Here we review the use of different imaging modalities for the surveillance of coronary atherosclerosis and the lessons they have provided about the modulation of CAD by both traditional and experimental therapies. PMID:27500089

  1. Effect of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Regression of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Statin Treated Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Seo Kwang; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Yun, Eunyoung; Kim, Sang-Pil; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Statins remain the mainstay of secondary coronary artery disease (CAD) prevention, but n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) display biological effects that may also reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and CAD. However, data on the possible antiatherosclerotic benefits of adding ω-3 PUFA to statin therapy are limited. This study aimed to investigate the potential additive effects of ω-3 PUFA on regression of atherosclerosis in CAD patients receiving statin therapy and stent implantation. Subjects and Methods Seventy-four CAD patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation were enrolled, prescribed statins, and randomly assigned to two groups: n-3 group (ω-3 PUFA 3 g/day, n=38) or placebo group (placebo, n=36). All patients completed the study follow-up consisting of an intravascular ultrasound at baseline and at 12 months. Results There was no difference in the baseline characteristics and distribution of other medications. No significant differences were observed in primary endpoints, including changes in atheroma volume index (−12.65% vs. −8.51%, p=0.768) and percent atheroma volume (−4.36% vs. −9.98%, p=0.526), and in secondary endpoints including a change in neointimal volume index (7.84 vs. 4.94 mm3/mm, p=0.087). Conclusion ω-3 PUFA had no definite additional effect on the regression of coronary atherosclerosis when added to statin in CAD patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27482256

  2. Grading atherosclerosis in aorta and coronary arteries obtained at autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Kazuo; Sternby, Nils; Vaněček, Rudolf; Vihert, Anatoli; Kagan, Aubrey

    1964-01-01

    A method of assessing “atherosclerosis”, if used according to certain rules, was shown in an earlier study to be capable of discriminating between groups of aortas or coronary arteries according to the quantity of certain defined lesions. It would not measure absolute amounts, but would show whether one group of specimens had more or less of the factor assessed than another and would indicate the statistical significance of this finding according to the number of specimens in each group. The method has now been applied to a study of material from six communities in three countries. This paper outlines how the rules of procedure were applied. Intra-observer and inter-observer calibration tests carried out in a routine manner during four “grading sessions” and inter-sessional tests are described. The discriminatory power in comparing groups of specimens from nearly 3000 subjects is calculated and shown according to artery (thoracic aorta, descending aorta, right coronary, left anterior descending coronary, left circumflex coronary) and type of lesion (“total amount of atherosclerosis”, “fatty streak”, “fibrous plaque”, “complicated lesion” and “calcification”). Observations on “coronary stenosis” were also made. The discriminatory power of the method was calculated for this factor and, contrary to many expectations, was found to be of practical value. Definitions and general procedure are described in annexes. ImagesFIG. 13FIG. 14FIG. 15PLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:14267740

  3. Problems and prospects for laser treatment of coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, John R., Jr.; Feld, Michael S.

    1994-08-01

    An analysis of the technical problems involved indicates that the use of lasers in the vascular system remains a complex problem, but one that is eminently approachable with continued research. The emphasis should be on continued basic research rather than on the accumulation of large clinical experiences with less than adequate technology. There is great potential for the development of a percutaneous treatment for coronary artery disease that may reduce restenosis rates compared to those seen with percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty. Development of an effective percutaneous treatment of coronary artery disease with long term durability is critical to the advancement of interventional cardiology.

  4. Comparison of Non-Invasive Methods for the Detection of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bampi, Angela Bacelar Albuquerque; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Favarato, Desiderio; Lemos, Pedro Alves; da Luz, Protásio Lemos

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive detection of atherosclerosis is critical for its prevention. Objective: To correlate non-invasively detectable indicators of coronary atherosclerosis, or Coronary Artery Disease (i.e., classical risk factors, hs-CRP test results, carotid intima-media thickness, endothelial function, ankle-brachial index and calcium score by computed tomography) with the extent of coronary disease assessed by the Friesinger index from conventional coronary angiography. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 100 consecutive patients, mean age 55.1 ± 10.7 years, 55% men and 45% women. Patients with acute coronary syndrome, renal dialytic insufficiency, collagen disease and cancer were not included. All patients were subjected to clinical evaluation and laboratory tests. Endothelial function of the brachial artery and carotid artery were evaluated by high-resolution ultrasound; ankle-brachial index and computed tomography for coronary determination of calcium score were also performed, and non-HDL cholesterol and TG/HDL-c ratio were calculated. All patients were subjected to coronary angiography at the request of the assistant physician. We considered patients without an obstructive lesion (< 29% stenosis) demonstrated by coronary angiography to be normal. RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed that calcium score, HDL-c, TG/HDL ratio and IMT were significantly correlated with the Friesinger index. However, multivariate analysis indicated that only calcium score and low HDL-c levels correlated significantly with the extension of CAD. On the other hand, hs-CRP, LDL-c, flow-mediated dilation, and Framingham score did not correlate with the Friesinger index. ROC analysis showed that calcium score, HDL-c and TG-HDL ratio accurately predicted extensive CAD in a statistically significant manner. CONCLUSION: It is possible to approximately determine the presence and extent of CAD by non-invasive methods, especially by calcium score, HDL-c and TG/HDL-c ratio assays

  5. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  6. Coronary Artery Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Plasma Concentrations of Vitamin D: Their Association with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schnatz, Peter F.; Nudy, Matthew; O’Sullivan, David M.; Jiang, Xuezhi; Cline, J. Mark; Kaplan, Jay R.; Clarkson, Thomas B.; Appt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze coronary artery vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, plasma concentration of vitamin D3 [25OHD3], and their relationship with coronary artery atherosclerosis. Methods Premenopausal cynomolgus monkeys were fed atherogenic diets containing the equivalent of 1,000 IU/day of 25OHD3. Protein was derived from casein-lactalbumin (C/L, n=10), soy protein isolate (soy, n=10), or a combination (n=19). After 32 months consuming the diets, each monkey underwent surgical menopause. After 32 post-menopausal months, coronary atherosclerosis was measured in the left circumflex artery (LCX) and left anterior descending artery (LAD). VDR expression was determined for the LAD and 25OHD3 concentrations were assessed. Results Both the cross-sectional area of atherosclerotic plaques (mm2) and plaque thickness (mm) in the LCX as well as the LAD were analyzed in these monkeys. Those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR were compared to those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and lower VDR. Significantly smaller plaque sizes were noted with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR. For the LCX, there was also a significantly lower plaque size (both plaque thickness and cross sectional area) in those with higher VDR and lower 25OHD3 concentrations versus those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3, p=0.040 and p=0.009, respectively. Conclusions Cynomolgus monkeys with higher quantities of VDR have significantly less atherosclerosis than those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations. If these findings translate to human beings, it might explain why some individuals with higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3 have more coronary artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22617336

  7. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  8. Imaging Coronary Atherosclerosis and Vulnerable Plaques with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearney, Guillermo J.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Kashiwagi, Manubu; Bouma, Brett E.

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an invasive microscopic imaging technology that has been developed for the identification of vulnerable plaque. OCT acquires cross-sectional images of tissue reflectance and, since it may be implemented through an optical fiber probe, it is readily adaptable to coronary catheters for insertion into coronary arteries and circumferential imaging of arterial pathology. The first investigation of vascular optical coherence tomography ex vivo demonstrated the potential of this technique to identify arterial microstructure. Subsequent development of OCT technology enabled image acquisition at rates sufficient for intracoronary imaging in human patients. In this chapter, we review studies conducted with this technology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Results from these studies show that a wide variety of microscopic features, including those associated with TCFAs, can be identified by OCT imaging both ex vivo and in living human patients. These findings suggest that this technology will play an important role in improving our understanding of coronary artery disease, guiding local therapy, and decreasing themortality of AMI.

  9. Hypercortisolism Is Associated With Increased Coronary Arterial Atherosclerosis: Analysis of Noninvasive Coronary Angiography Using Multidetector Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Neary, Nicola M.; Booker, O. Julian; Abel, Brent S.; Matta, Jatin R.; Muldoon, Nancy; Sinaii, Ninet; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Observational studies show that glucocorticoid therapy and the endogenous hypercortisolism of Cushing's syndrome (CS) are associated with increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the causes of these findings remain largely unknown. Objective: To determine whether CS patients have increased coronary atherosclerosis. Design: A prospective case-control study was performed. Setting: Subjects were evaulated in a clinical research center. Subjects: Fifteen consecutive patients with ACTH-dependent CS, 14 due to an ectopic source and 1 due to pituitary Cushing's disease were recruited. Eleven patients were studied when hypercortisolemic; 4 patients were eucortisolemic due to medication (3) or cyclic hypercortisolism (1). Fifteen control subjects with at least one risk factor for cardiac disease were matched 1:1 for age, sex, and body mass index. Primary outcome variables: Agatston score a measure of calcified plaque and non-calcified coronary plaque volume were quantified using a multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiogram scan. Additional variables included fasting lipids, blood pressure, history of hypertension or diabetes, and 24-hour urine free cortisol excretion. Results: CS patients had significantly greater noncalcified plaque volume and Agatston score (noncalcified plaque volume [mm3] median [interquartile ranges]: CS 49.5 [31.4, 102.5], controls 17.9 [2.6, 25.3], P < .001; Agatston score: CS 70.6 [0, 253.1], controls 0 [0, 7.6]; P < .05). CS patients had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures than controls (systolic: CS 143 mm Hg [135, 173]; controls, 134 [123, 136], P < .02; diastolic CS: 86 [80, 99], controls, 76 [72, 84], P < .05). Conclusions: Increased coronary calcifications and noncalcified coronary plaque volumes are present in patients with active or previous hypercortisolism. Increased atherosclerosis may contribute to the increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with

  10. Effect of combination therapy of ezetimibe and rosuvastatin on regression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Jun; Tanigawa, Takashi; Yamada, Tomomi; Nishimura, Yuki; Sasou, Takashi; Nakata, Tomoyuki; Sawai, Toshiki; Fujimoto, Naoki; Dohi, Kaoru; Miyahara, Masatoshi; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Nakamura, Mashio; Ito, Masaaki

    2015-05-13

    Ezetimibe has been reported to provide significant incremental reduction in low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) when added to a statin; however, its effect on coronary atherosclerosis has not yet been evaluated in detail. The aim of this study was to investigate the add-on effect of ezetimibe to a statin on coronary atherosclerosis evaluated by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).In this prospective randomized open-label study, a total of 51 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) requiring percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were enrolled, and assigned to a combination group (n = 26, rosuvastatin 5 mg/day + ezetimibe 10 mg/day) or a monotherapy group (n = 25, rosuvastatin 5 mg/day). Volumetric IVUS analyses were performed at baseline and 6 months after the treatment for a non-PCI site. LDL-C level was significantly reduced in the combination group (-55.8%) versus that in the monotherapy group (-36.8%; P = 0.004). The percent change in plaque volume (PV), the primary endpoint, appeared to decrease more effectively in the combination group compared with the monotherapy group (-13.2% versus -3.1%, respectively, P = 0.050). Moreover, there was a significant group × time interaction in the effects of the two treatments on PV (P = 0.021), indicating the regressive effect of the combination therapy on PV was greater than that of monotherapy for subtly different values of baseline PV in the two treatment groups. Moreover, percent change in PV showed positive correlations with percent change of LDL-C (r = 0.384, P = 0.015).Intensive lipid-lowering therapy with ezetimibe added to usual-dose statin may provide significant incremental reduction in coronary plaques compared with usual-dose statin monotherapy.

  11. Atherosclerosis influences the vasomotor response of epicardial coronary arteries to exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J B; Ganz, P; Nabel, E G; Fish, R D; Zebede, J; Mudge, G H; Alexander, R W; Selwyn, A P

    1989-01-01

    We studied the vasomotion of epicardial coronary arteries during exercise and tested the hypotheses that abnormal vasoconstriction is related to the presence of atherosclerosis and may be related to endothelial dilator dysfunction. During cardiac catheterization quantitative coronary angiography was performed in 21 patients during supine bicycle exercise. 21 of 28 smooth, angiographically normal vessel segments dilated (14.0 +/- 1.8%) during exercise; four smooth segments did not change whereas only three constricted. In contrast, 15 of 16 vessel segments with irregularities constricted in response to exercise (17.0 +/- 0.1%) with only one segment dilating. All 10 stenotic segments constricted to exercise (23 +/- 4%). Six patients also received intracoronary acetylcholine before exercise to test endothelium-dependent dilator function. In five of six patients all nine vessel segments showed the same directional response to acetylcholine and exercise. Three irregular and two stenotic segments constricted with acetylcholine (51 +/- 21%) and exercise (9.0 +/- 0.6%). In contrast, four smooth segments dilated to acetylcholine (19 +/- 6%) and exercise (9 +/- 1%). Both exercise and acetylcholine generally dilated smooth but constricted irregular and stenosed coronary segments. It appears likely that atherosclerosis plays an important role in the abnormal vasomotion of diseased coronary arteries during exercise and the pattern of abnormality suggests impairment of vasodilator function. Images PMID:2723067

  12. Illness perception patterns in patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Kunschitz, E; Friedrich, O; Schöppl, Ch; Maitz, J; Sipötz, J

    2016-12-23

    The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of illness perception in patients with angiografically verified Coronary Artery Disease. A total of 166 patients (age: 64.4 ± 12.1, 80.7% male) were recruited after angiography. Cluster analysis on the items of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to identify patterns of illness perception. The resulting groups were characterized with regard to Quality of Life (MacNew), anxiety and depression (GAD-7 and PHQ-9) and resilience (RS-13). The analysis revealed 4 distinct groups differing with regard to the items covering the perception of the physical and emotional impact of disease. Stronger perceptions in these domains were associated with lower Health Related Quality of Life and higher levels of emotional distress. Group 1 (33.1%) reported the strongest perceptions of the physical and emotional impact of disease and expressed low treatment control, high chronic timeline and significantly higher levels of depression than the other groups. Group 2 (27.7%) was characterized by more moderate perceptions of the emotional and physical impact of disease together with low scores on illness coherence and chronic timeline. Groups 3 (25.3%) and 4 (13.9%) reported smaller physical and emotional impact of illness but differed in chronic timeline. Our results correspond largely to recent findings in patients with other chronic diseases. Further research is needed to explore if stratification of patients according patterns of illness perception can help to inform patient-physician communication strategies.

  13. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity is Associated with Composite Carotid and Coronary Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Asymptomatic Population

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Cho, Sang-A; Cho, Jae-Young; Lee, Seunghun; Park, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Sung Ho; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Although arterial stiffness has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis, the role of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) for diagnosing composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis has not been completely elucidated. Method: We enrolled 773 asymptomatic individuals who were referred from 25 public health centers in Seoul and who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary computed tomography. Noninvasive hemodynamic parameters, including baPWV, were also measured. Composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was defined as follows: 1) coronary artery calcium (CAC) score ≥ 100, 2) coronary artery stenosis (CAS) ≥ 50% of diameter stenosis, 3) carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) ≥ 0.9 mm, or 4) presence of carotid artery plaque (CAP). Results: The incidence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was 28.2%. Coronary atherosclerosis (CAC and CAS) was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis (CIMT and CAP). Subjects with higher baPWV (highest quartile) had a higher prevalence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis (p < .001). Although multivariate analysis failed to show baPWV as an independent predictor for composite atherosclerosis, baPWV had moderate diagnostic power to detect a subject with more than two positive subclinical atherosclerosis exams [area under the curve (AUC), 0.692]. Conclusion: baPWV was associated with the composite coronary and carotid atherosclerotic burden in a community-based asymptomatic population. PMID:27251176

  14. Atherosclerosis of coronary blood vessels - local or systemic inflamation?

    PubMed

    Pejkov, Hristo; Kedev, Sasko; Panov, Saso; Srbinovska-Kostovska, Elizabeta; Lang, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The presence of atherosclerotic lesions in the blood vessels is a predisposition for the development and occurrence of acute ischaemic attacks. Bigger atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary blood vessels cause lumen occlusion, which is a cause of acute myocardial infarction. Endothelial dysfunction is defined as an ability of the endothelium to produce vasorelaxing nitric oxide (NO), or deregulation of the other vasoactive substances, such as angiotensin II and endothelin [13]. This definition describes endothelial dysfunction as an improper vasomotor constriction of the vessel, that leads to lumen occlusion of the already existing atherosclerotic lesions. According to the modern model, the development of atherosclerotic plaque and inappropriate endothelial NO production have a synergistic role in patho-physiological and molecular processes in the blood vessels [14]. Lesions in the coronary arteries are deposits of huge quantities of foamy cells and fibrous plaques. The thin fibrous plaques are 10-20% of the total plaque population and are the cause of 80-90% of clinical cases due to their ability to rupture [48]. According to all the results from published studies by far, it has been pointed out that the plaque stability, not the absolute size influences the rupture potential. Elucidating the risk factors that may modify in the atherogenesis and the consequent atherothrombic effect is the first step to this goal.

  15. Hypercholesterolemia increases coronary endothelial dysfunction, lipid content, and accelerated atherosclerosis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, L P; Mahlberg, F; Breugnot, C; Bidouard, J P; Villeneuve, N; Vilaine, J P; Vanhoutte, P M

    2000-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia may increase endothelial damage and promote accelerated atherogenesis in graft coronary vasculopathy. To study the effects of hypercholesterolemia on coronary endothelial dysfunction, intimal hyperplasia, and lipid content, a porcine model of heterotopic heart transplantation, allowing nonacute rejection without immunosuppressive drugs, was used. A high cholesterol diet was fed to donor and recipient swine 1 month before and after transplantation. The endothelial function of coronary arteries of native and transplanted hearts from cholesterol-fed animals was studied in organ chambers 30 days after implantation and compared with endothelial function in arteries from animals fed a normal diet. The total serum cholesterol increased 3-fold in donors and recipients. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to serotonin, to the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist UK14,304, and to the direct G-protein activator sodium fluoride were decreased significantly in allografted hearts compared with native hearts from both groups. Relaxations to the calcium ionophore A23187 and bradykinin were decreased significantly in allografts from animals fed the high cholesterol diet. The prevalence of intimal hyperplasia was significantly increased in coronary arteries from hypercholesterolemic swine. There was a significant increase in the lipid content of allograft arteries of hypercholesterolemic recipients. Hypercholesterolemia causes a general coronary endothelial dysfunction, increases the prevalence of intimal hyperplasia, and augments the incorporation of lipids in the vascular wall after heart transplantation. Hyperlipidemia accelerates graft coronary atherosclerosis through its effects on the endothelium.

  16. Reduction of coronary atherosclerosis by moderate conditioning exercise in monkeys on an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Kramsch, D M; Aspen, A J; Abramowitz, B M; Kreimendahl, T; Hood, W B

    1981-12-17

    All available evidence that exercise may protect against coronary heart disease is circumstantial, and direct evidence is difficult to obtain in human beings. Therefore, we studied the effect of moderate conditioning with treadmill exercise on developing coronary-artery disease in monkeys on an atherogenic diet. Physical training was demonstrated by slow heart rates. Serum total cholesterol was the same (approximately 600 mg per deciliter or 15.5 mmol per liter) in exercising and non-exercising monkeys, with significantly higher high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and much lower triglyceride and low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) plus very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride in the exercise group. Ischemic electrocardiographic changes, angiographic signs of coronary-artery narrowing, and sudden death were observed only in non-conditioned monkeys, in which post-mortem examination revealed marked coronary atherosclerosis and stenoses. Exercise was associated with substantially reduced overall atherosclerotic involvement, lesion size, and collagen accumulation; it also produced much larger hearts and wider coronary arteries, further reducing the degree of luminal narrowing. Our data suggest that moderate exercise may prevent or retard coronary heart disease in primates.

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Retired National Football League Players

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alice Y.; FitzGerald, Shannon J.; Cannaday, John; Zhang, Song; Patel, Amit; Palmer, M. Dean; Reddy, Gautham P.; Ordovas, Karen G.; Stillman, Arthur E; Janowitz, Warren; Radford, Nina B.; Roberts, Arthur J.; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of obesity exists among National Football League (NFL) players as determined by body mass index (BMI). It is not established whether elevated BMI is associated with a greater prevalence of CV risk factors or coronary atherosclerosis in former NFL players as in non-athletes. This study compared cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and coronary atherosclerosis among retired NFL players and two groups of community controls, the population-based Dallas Heart Study and the preventive medicine cohort, the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Retired NFL players (n=201) were matched for ethnicity, age and BMI (Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, age only). CV risk factors were assessed by survey and screening visit. Coronary atherosclerosis was measured by computed tomography as coronary artery calcium (CAC). Compared to population-based controls, retired NFL players had a significantly lower prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, sedentary lifestyle and the metabolic syndrome, yet a higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and hyperlipidemia. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of detectable CAC (46 v 48.3%, p=0.69) or distribution of CAC (0-10, 10-100, 100-400, 400+, p=0.11). Comparing retired NFL players to the physically active preventive medicine controls, there was no difference in the amount of CAC. Among retired NFL players, age and hyperlipidemia, not body size, were the most significant predictors of CAC. In conclusion, despite their large body size, retired NFL players do not have a greater prevalence of CV risk factors or amount of CAC than community controls. PMID:19733715

  18. Effects of Long Term Sertraline Treatment and Depression on Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Premenopausal Female Primates

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Appt, Susan E.; Clarkson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) often co-occur in the same individuals. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for depression and other disorders, but their effects on CHD risk remain unclear. We determined the effects of a SSRI on coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) in an established nonhuman primate model used to clarify the association between depression and CAA. Methods 42 adult female cynomolgus macaques consuming a Western diet were characterized during an 18-month pretreatment phase, and assigned to SSRI (sertraline HCl 20 mg/kg, po, once/day) or Placebo balanced on pretreatment depression, body weight (BW), and iliac artery atherosclerosis extent measured via biopsy. After 18 months CAA extent was measured using histomorphometry. Results Before and during treatment depressed monkeys had lower BW, body mass index (BMI), and plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and higher heart rates during the pretreatment (p<0.01) but not the treatment phase (p=0.17). There were no pretreatment differences between the sertraline and placebo groups. Sertraline reduced anxious behavior but had no effect on BW, BMI, heart rate, plasma lipids, or depression. CAA, analyzed by a 2 (Depressed, Nondepressed) × 2 (Placebo, Sertraline) × 3 (coronary arteries) analysis of covariance adjusted for pretreatment iliac atherosclerosis, was greater in depressed than nondepressed monkeys (p<0.036), and in sertraline than placebo-treated monkeys (p=0.040). The observed CAA extent in depressed monkeys treated with sertraline was 4.9 times higher than in untreated depressed monkeys, and 6.5 times higher than in non-depressed monkeys, on average. Conclusions Depressed animals develop more CAA, and that longterm treatment with sertraline promotes CAA. PMID:25829239

  19. Non-invasive Detection of Aortic and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia by 64 Slice Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector-row ...

  20. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  1. [Prevalence of distress and coronary behaviour in patients with atherosclerosis of various localization].

    PubMed

    Sumin, A N; Raĭkh, O I; Karpovich, A V; Korok, E V; Bokhan, Ia E; Bezdenezhnykh, A V; Barbarash, O L

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of distressor personality traits and coronary behavioral type was studied in 943 patients (774 men and 169 women) with clinical forms of atherosclerosis of various localization. Intermediate behavioral type AB prevailed (69.9%), while types A (25.3%) and B (4.8%) were less frequent. Patients with type B more frequently had involvement of several vascular beds. They also had greater intima-media thickness, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Patients with type B behavior were characterized by higher level of distressor personality traits (<0.00001). Rate of type D personality in patients with type B behavior (44.4%) was higher than in patients with behavior types AB (21.7%) and A (8.3%). Reverse correlations were noted between pronouncedness of "coronary" behavior and number of involved vascular beds and the presence of distressor personality traits (personality type D, levels of depression and anxiety).

  2. Potential biomarkers of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Syed Ikmal, Sharifah Intan Qhadijah; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Wan Ahmad, Wan Azman

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  3. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification.

  4. Human coronary atherosclerosis studied in vitro by catheter-based transluminal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, Hendrik P. J.; Romer, Tjeerd J.; Wach, Michael L.; Marple, Eric; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Bruschke, Albert V.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    1999-04-01

    We used Raman spectroscopy to assess the chemical composition and pathological states of atherosclerosis in in vitro intact human coronary artery tissue. Human coronary artery samples expressing different stages of atherosclerosis were mounted in an in vitro set-up and perfused with a salt solution. NIR laser light was delivered to the tissue through the central fiber of an optical fiber catheter that was inserted transluminally into a buffer- perfused arterial segment. Tissue Raman signal was collected by seven fibers surrounding the central fiber. The collected Raman light was launched into a spectrometer and imaged onto a CCD. High signal to noise, low background tissue Raman spectra were obtained in 10-60 s form artery samples. The spectral information from each collection fiber was linearly modeled with a Raman spectral model that quantifies the chemical composition of the arterial wall. The model results showed excellent fits to all Raman spectra. A diagnostic algorithm, that has proven to have excellent correlation with historilogical classification by a pathologist, classified the examined tissue into one of three pathological states. From these experiments we conclude that intravascular optical fiber Raman spectroscopy can provide in situ histopathology, which may be used to study vascular disease in vivo.

  5. Study of Aortic Valve Sclerosis as A Marker of Atherosclerosis in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Picardo, Preeti Jane; Khariong, Peter Daniel S; Hajong, Debobratta; Naku, Narang; Anand, Madhur; Sharma, Girish; Singh, K Lenish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aortic valve sclerosis has been shown to be associated with increased incidence, chances of developing myocardial infarction and even death. The epidemiological risk factors causing calcification of aortic valves have also been found to cause atherosclerosis. Aim To analyse the epidemiological risk factors causing aortic valve sclerosis which have been studied in details and analysed to see whether they cause any significant increase in the incidence of cardiovascular events. Materials and Methods This prospective case-control study was conducted between 1st Jan 2015 to 31st Dec 2015 in NEIGRIHMS hospital and data for age, gender, socioeconomic status, hypertension, diabetes, tobacco use, Body Mass Iindex (BMI), cholesterol levels, Electrocardiography (ECG) changes and Ejection Fraction (EF) were collected and analysed by using SPSS software version 22. Results Hypertension, diabetes, weight, BMI, hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia were not found to be significantly associated with aortic valve sclerosis in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. The presence of aortic valve sclerosis was also not associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Conclusion The risk factors for atherosclerosis were found to be associated with the presence of aortic valve sclerosis more in the control group and hence finding of a sclerosed aortic valve in the apparent normal population might identify those persons at increased risk of developing coronary artery disease and appropriate preventive measures should be taken before the disease sets in. PMID:28208902

  6. [Association between IGF system and PAPP-A in coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fierro-Macías, Alfonso Eduardo; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Mena-Burciaga, Victoria Michelle; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Hugo; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Fierro-Almanzán, Alfonso Edmundo

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a condition that involves multiple pathophysiological mechanisms and whose knowledge has not been fully elucidated. Often, scientific advances on the atherogenic pathophysiology generate that molecules not previously considered in the scene of this disease, were attributed actions on the onset or progression of it. A representative example is the study of a new mechanism involved in the atherogenic process, consisting of the association between the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Insulin-like growth factor system is a family of peptides that include 3 peptide hormones, 4 transmembrane receptors and 6 binding proteins. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the main ligand of the IGF system involved in coronary atherosclerosis. IGF-1 exerts its effects via activation of the IGF-1R receptor on vascular smooth muscle cells or macrophages. In vascular smooth muscle cells promotes migration and prevents apoptosis which increases plaque stability while in macrophages reduces reverse cholesterol transport leading to the formation of foam cells. Regulation of IGF-1 endothelial bioavailability is carried out by IGFBP proteases, mainly by PAPP-A. In this review, we address the mechanisms between IGF system and PAPP-A in atherosclerosis with emphasis on molecular effects on vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages.

  7. An autopsy study of coronary atherosclerosis and its relation to anthropometric measurements/indices of overweight and obesity in men.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Prateek; Pinto, Denver S; Pai, Mukta R; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis accounts for a large proportion of cardiovascular system associated morbidity and mortality. The present autopsy based study is aimed to study the correlation between coronary atherosclerosis and anthropometric measurements/indices of overweight and obesity such as; Waist Circumference (WC), Hip Circumference (HC), Body Mass Index (BMI), and Waist Hip Ratio (WHR) in men from southern India. The present research also analyses the correlation between anthropometric measurements/indices of overweight and obesity in men with number of coronaries affected with atherosclerosis in individuals. The study included 50 autopsies conducted in the Government District Wenlock Hospital, Mangalore during March and September 2008. The heart was dissected following standard autopsy protocol and a 5 cm section of the right coronary artery (RCA) in the atrio-ventricular groove from its origin, a 5 cm segment of the left anterior descending artery (LADA) distal to the origin of the circumflex artery, but including the region of origin of the circumflex branch and left coronary artery (LCA) from its origin till the circumflex branch were excised, dissected out, fixed in 10% formalin, marked for identification and sent for histopathological analysis. The study shows a positive correlation of WC and WHR with atherosclerotic changes in the RCA. The number of arteries affected with atherosclerosis is found to be well correlated with WC, BMI and WHR. The study confirms an association between anthropometric measurements/indices of obesity, grade of atherosclerosis in the RCA and the number of arteries affected with atherosclerosis. Anthropometric measurements/indices of obesity can be an effective means to identify high risk cases of atherosclerosis at an early stage that can be effective in reducing the associated cardiac morbidity and mortality.

  8. NALP3-Inflammasome-Related Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Prehypertension and Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Gu, Chonghuai; Yan, Chenghui; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Yi; Wang, Li; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Junyin; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Prehypertension is an early stage of hypertension that is characterized by inflammatory factors. Inflammation also plays an essential role in the development of coronary atherosclerosis (CAS). The present study evaluated the NALP3-inflammasome and its related genes, NLRP3, NOD2, and CARD8, using SNP linkage and gene haplotypes in prehypertensive patients. Methods. A total of 576 patients with prehypertension and suspected coronary heart disease (CHD) were enrolled. According to coronary angiography, patients were divided into two groups: arterial stenosis <50% of the diameter (control) and arterial stenosis >50% of the diameter (case). Fifteen polymorphisms in the NOD2, NLRP3, and CARD8 genes were analyzed, and serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Results. When comparing allele frequencies, none of these 15 SNPs in NOD2, CARD8, and NLPR3 genes showed a significant difference using multiple logistic regression. However, the CTACATAA (p = 0.0064) and CCACATAG (p = 0.0126) haplotypes of the NOD2 gene SNPs were significantly different between cases and controls. Conclusions. Although our study excludes a significant association of selected SNPs in these genes with CHD in prehypertension patients, this work suggests that the CTACATAA and CCACATAG haplotypes were associated with CHD in the NOD2 locus. This work suggests that the CTACATAA and CCACATAG haplotypes were associated with CHD in prehypertension patients in the NOD2 locus. PMID:27446957

  9. Progression of coronary artery calcification at the crossroads: sign of progression or stabilization of coronary atherosclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Bruining, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) has been strongly established as an independent predictor of adverse events, with a significant incremental prognostic value over traditional risk stratification algorithms. CAC progression has been associated with a higher rate of events. In parallel, several randomized studies and meta-analysis have shown the effectiveness of statins to slow progression and even promote plaque regression. However, evidence regarding the effect of routine medical therapy on CAC has yielded conflicting results, with initial studies showing significant CAC regression, and contemporaneous data showing rather the opposite. Accordingly, there is currently a great controversy on whether progression of CAC is a sign of progression or stabilization of coronary artery disease (CAD). The finding of inexorable CAC progression despite the implementation of intensive contemporaneous medical therapy suggests that further understanding of this phenomenon should be undertaken before the implementation of CAC as a surrogate endpoint for longitudinal studies, or for prospective follow-up of patients under routine medical treatment. PMID:27280088

  10. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Electrocardiogram Heart Attack Send a link to NHLBI ... calcium, or calcifications, are a sign of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or coronary microvascular disease. A coronary calcium scan ...

  11. Development of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis Model Using Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Swine with Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Onishi, Akira; Tsuboi, Shuta; Wada, Hideki; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Kojima, Yuko; Schwartz, Robert S.; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Several animal models have facilitated the evaluation and pathological understanding of atherosclerosis, but a definitive animal model of coronary atherosclerosis is not available. We therefore developed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR-KO) pigs with hypercholesterolemia, a model which rapidly developed coronary atherosclerosis following balloon injury. Methods and Results We deleted LDLR exon regions from cultured porcine fetal fibroblasts and cloned LDLR knockout (LDLR-KO) embryos microinjecting fetal fibroblast nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Twelve LDLR-KO pigs were fed a 2.0% cholesterol and 20% fat diet. Baseline serum LDL cholesterol level was 510.0±86.1 mg/dL. Balloon injury was created in 46 coronary segments and necropsy were obtained 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks later. Coronary artery sections were reviewed to evaluate lesion progression. We found lipid accumulation with foam cells and inflammatory cells beginning four weeks after balloon injury. The mean ratio of macrophages to plaque area was significantly higher in the four- weeks and eight-week animals compared with those at 2-weeks (8.79% ± 5.98% and 17.00% ± 10.38% vs. 1.14% ± 1.88%, P < 0.0001). At 12 weeks the ratio decreased toward the level at 2 week level (4.00% ± 4.56%, P = 0.66 vs. baseline). Advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions contained lipid pools at eight-weeks with fibrous components beginning at 12 weeks. Conclusions We developed a model of rapid coronary atherosclerosis using LDLR KO pigs with balloon injury. This model may be useful for preclinical evaluation of medication or devices, and may also help investigate mechanisms of plaque progression. PMID:27631974

  12. Introducing the Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort: THC-PAC Study

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Abchouyeh, Maryam Amiri; Isfahani, Farah Ayatollahzade; Rosendaal, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Data on premature coronary artery disease (CAD) are scarce. The Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort Study (THC-PAC) is the first study of its kind in the Middle East to assess major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in young CAD patients. Methods: The cohort consists of CAD patients, males ≤ 45 years old and females ≤ 55 years old. The participants are residents of Tehran or its suburbs and underwent coronary angiography between June 2004 and July 2011. A 10-year follow-up, via either clinical visits or telephone calls at least once a year, was commenced in August 2012. The end point is considered MACE, encompassing death, myocardial infarction, stroke, new coronary involvement, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: The cohort comprises 1232 eligible patients (613 [49.8%] males) at a mean age of 45.1 years (SD = 5.8). High frequencies of conventional risk factors, including hyperlipidemia (884 [71.8%]), hypertension (575 [46.7%]), positive family history (539 [43.8%]), cigarette smoking (479 [38.8%]), and diabetes mellitus (390 [31.7%]), were seen in the participants. The mean body mass index (BMI) of the enrolled patients was high (29.2 ± 4.8 kg/m2), and 532 (43.3%) and 440 (35.8%) of them were overweight and obese, respectively. The females’ BMI was higher (30.4 ± 5.3 vs. 28.0 ± 3.9 kg/m2; P < 0.001) and they had a greater mean abdominal circumference (99.9 ± 13.5 vs. 98.1 ± 9.3 cm; P = 0.035). Between August 2012 and August 2013, follow-up was successful in 1173 (95.2%) patients (median follow-up duration = 55.3 months, 95%CI: 53.5–57.0 months). Conclusion: Our younger patients with CAD had a high frequency of risk factors compared to the same-age general population and all-age CAD patients, which may predispose them to higher incidence of recurrent MACE. PMID:26157461

  13. Serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels Are Associated with the Presence of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung Joo; Heo, Jin Young; Yun, Bo Hyon; Jung, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Menopause is a natural aging process causing estrogen deficiency, accelerating atherogenic processes including dyslipidemia. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is also high in postmenopausal women, and it is known to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we are to study on the associations in between serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and prevalence of CVD in postmenopausal women who have normal thyroid function. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 247 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center from January, 2007 to December, 2009. Postmenopausal women with normal serum TSH were included in the study. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results In multiple linear regression analysis, serum TSH was associated with serum triglyceride (TG) (β = 0.146, P = 0.023). In multiple logistic regression analysis, increasing age and serum TSH were associated with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.107 [1.024-1.197], P = 0.011 and OR = 1.303 [1.024-1.658], P = 0.031, respectively). Conclusions It revealed that significant predictor of serum TSH was serum TG, and increasing age and TSH were found to have associations with an increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in euthyroid postmenopausal women. Screening and assessing risks for CVD in healthy postmenopausal women would be helpful before atherosclerosis develops. PMID:28119894

  14. Coronary atherosclerosis in transplanted mouse hearts. I. Time course and immunogenetic and immunopathological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, P. S.; Chase, C. M.; Winn, H. J.; Colvin, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental system is described in which coronary arteries of mouse hearts transplanted heterotopically develop obstructive lesions by 4 weeks. Transient immunosuppression permits graft survival. Donor/recipient antigenic differences may be either class I or class II major histocompatibility antigens (H-2) or non-H-2 antigens. An infiltrate including CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages concentrates early in the intima and adventitia of larger coronary arteries, with little in the myocardium. Subsequently, the intima expands with cells of donor origin and the infiltrate invades the media. Endothelial and intimal cells express ICAM-1, leukocytes LFA-1: Endothelium expresses class I, but not class II, antigens. As class II disparity alone suffices, the endothelium can apparently be an indirect target of immune injury. We propose that graft atherosclerosis is T cell initiated and elicited by heterogeneous antigens in the endothelium or media. It is separable from rejection of the myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7906094

  15. A Genome-wide Trans-ethnic Interaction Study Links the PIGR-FCAMR Locus to Coronary Atherosclerosis Via Interactions Between Genetic Variants and Residential Exposure to Traffic

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution is a worldwide contributor to cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Traffic air pollution is a ubiquitous source of air pollution in developed nations, and is associated with multiple cardiovascular outcomes such as: coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral ar...

  16. Marked Acceleration of Atherosclerosis following Lactobacillus casei induced Coronary Arteritis in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Lee, Young Ho; Crother, Timothy R.; Fishbein, Michael; Zhang, Wenxuan; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Schulte, Danica J; Lehman, Thomas J.A.; Shah, Prediman K.; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate if Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced Kawasaki Disease (KD) accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Method and Resuslts Apoe−/− or Ldlr−/− mice were injected with LCWE (KD mice) or PBS, fed high fat diet for 8 weeks, and atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinuses (AS), arch (AC) and whole aorta were assessed. KD mice had larger, more complex aortic lesions with abundant collagen, and both extracellular and intracellular lipid and foam cells, compared to lesions in control mice despite similar cholesterol levels. Both Apoe−/− KD and Ldlr−/− KD mice showed dramatic acceleration in atherosclerosis vs. controls, with increases in en face aortic atherosclerosis and plaque size in both the AS and AC plaques. Accelerated atherosclerosis was associated with increased circulating IL-12p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased macrophage, DC, and T cell recruitment in lesions. Furthermore, daily injections of the IL-1Ra, which inhibits LCWE induced KD vasculitis, prevented the acceleration of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest an important pathophysiologic link between coronary arteritis/vasculitis in the KD mouse model and subsequent atherosclerotic acceleration, supporting the concept that a similar relation may also be present in KD patients. These results also suggest that KD in childhood may predispose to accelerated and early atherosclerosis as adults. PMID:22628430

  17. Epicardial Fat is Associated with Duration of Antiretroviral Therapy and Coronary Atherosclerosis: The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brener, Michael; Ketlogetswe, Kerunne; Budoff, Matthew; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Rezaeian, Panteha; Razipour, Aryabod; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence; Witt, Mallory D; George, Richard T; Post, Wendy S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cytokines released by epicardial fat are implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. HIV infection and anti-retroviral therapy have been associated with changes in body fat distribution and coronary artery disease. We sought to determine if HIV infection is associated with greater epicardial fat and if epicardial fat is associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Design We studied 579 HIV-infected and 353 HIV-uninfected men age 40 to 70 years with non-contrast computed tomography (CT) to measure epicardial adipose tissue volume (EAT) and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Total plaque score (TPS), and plaque subtypes (non-calcified, calcified and mixed) were measured by coronary CT angiography in 706 men. Methods We evaluated the association between EAT and HIV serostatus, and the association of EAT with subclinical atherosclerosis, adjusting for age, race and serostatus and with additional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and tested for modifying effects of HIV serostatus. Results HIV-infected men had greater EAT than HIV-uninfected men (p=0.001). EAT was positively associated with duration of antiretroviral therapy (p=0.02), specifically AZT (p<0.05). EAT was associated with presence of any coronary artery plaque (p=0.006) and non-calcified plaque (p=0.001), adjusting for age, race, serostatus and CV risk factors. Among men with CAC, EAT was associated with CAC extent (p=0.006). HIV serostatus did not modify associations between EAT and either CAC extent or presence of plaque. Conclusions Greater epicardial fat volume in HIV-infected men and its association with coronary plaque and antiretroviral therapy duration suggest potential mechanisms that might lead to increased risk for cardiovascular disease in HIV. PMID:24809732

  18. [Pathobiological determinants of atherosclerosis in youths: data from a macromorphometric and histomorphometric investigation of the aorta and coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Lesauskaite, Vaiva; Stalioraityte, Elena; Tanganelli, Piero; Epistolato, Maria Carmela

    2004-01-01

    We present a review of data from epidemiological and morphological studies carried out in Kaunas of atherosclerosis in youths. Since 1985, Kaunas has been a Collaborating Center involved with the World Health Organization and International Society and Federation of Cardiology studying the pathobiological determinants of atherosclerosis in youth. During the pilot study (1985-1987), we estimated the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta and coronary arteries correlated to various risk factors in Kaunas residents aged 5 to 44 years. Within the framework of this international study, we compared histomorphometric characteristics of arteries collected from trauma victims aged 5 to 34 years in Budapest (Hungary), Heidelberg (Germany), Kaunas (Lithuania), Yaounde (Cameroon), and Mexico City (Mexico). These data revealed that males from countries with a high mortality from ischemic heart disease (Hungary, Lithuania, Germany) tended to have thicker intima in the thoracic and abdominal aorta and left anterior descending coronary artery than did males from countries with low mortality from ischemic heart disease (Mexico, Cameroon). We detected an increased mean intimal thickness of the abdominal aorta in male smokers aged 25-34 years. Males with hypertension aged 15-24 and 25-34 years had a thicker intima in the aorta and left anterior descending coronary artery than normotensive males. The morphological and epidemiological studies of atherosclerosis in youths carried out in Kaunas demonstrated that aortic and coronary atherosclerotic lesions appeared as early as childhood and advanced until the lesions become clinically apparent in adulthood. Histomorphometric findings support the postulate that increased intimal thickness can be considered a structural determinant of atherogenesis. These data draw attention to the means for the primary prevention of atherosclerosis in youth.

  19. Coronary calcification in SLE: comparison with the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Adnan N.; Magder, Laurence S.; Post, Wendy S.; Szklo, Moyses; Bathon, Joan M.; Schreiner, Pam J.; O’Leary, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Accelerated atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and death in SLE. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the prevalence and extent of coronary artery calcium (CAC) is higher in female SLE patients compared with a non-SLE sample from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods. CAC was measured in 80 female SLE patients and 241 female MESA controls from the Baltimore Field Centre, ages 45–64 years, without evidence of clinical cardiovascular disease. Binary regression was used to estimate the ratio of CAC prevalence in SLE vs MESA controls, controlling for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. To compare the groups with respect to the quantity of CAC among those with non-zero Agatston scores, we used linear models in which the outcome was a log-transformed Agatston score. Results. The prevalence of CAC was substantially higher in SLE. The differences were most pronounced and statistically significant in those aged 45–54 years (58% vs 20%, P < 0.0001), but were still observed among those aged 55–65 years (57% vs 36%, P = 0.069). After controlling for age, ethnicity, education, income, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, high-density lipoprotein levels, smoking, education and BMI, SLE patients still had a significantly higher prevalence of CAC than controls. Among those with CAC, the mean log Agatston score did not differ significantly between SLE and MESA participants. Conclusion. Women with SLE have a higher prevalence of CAC than comparable women without SLE, even after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, especially among those aged 45–54 years. PMID:26106213

  20. Coronary Artery Calcium and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation (From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis)

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, Wesley T.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Dawood, Farah Z.; Yeboah, Joseph; Alonso, Alvaro; Heckbert, Susan R.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Calcified coronary arteries are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and stroke. It is currently unknown whether coronary artery calcium (CAC) is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). We addressed this question in 6,641 participants (mean age 62 ± 10; 53% women; 62% non-whites) from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) who were free of baseline clinical cardiovascular disease and AF. CAC measurements were assessed by cardiac computed tomography (CT) at study baseline. AF was ascertained by review of hospital discharge records and from Medicare claims data until December 31, 2010. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the association between CAC and AF. During a median follow up of 8.5 years, 308 (4.6%) participants developed AF. In a model adjusted for socio-demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and potential confounders, higher CAC scores were associated with an increased risk of AF (CAC=0: HR=1.0, referent; CAC=1–100: HR=1.4, 95%CI=1.01, 2.0; CAC=101–300: HR=1.6, 95%CI=1.1, 2.4; CAC>300: 2.1, 95%CI=1.4, 2.9). The addition of CAC to the Framingham Heart Study and the CHARGE AF risk scores yielded an integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) of 0.0033 (95%CI=0.0015, 0.0066) and 0.0028 (95%CI=0.0012, 0.0057) and with relative IDI of 0.10 (95%CI=0.061, 0.15) and 0.077 (95%CI=0.040, 0.11), respectively. In conclusion, CAC is independently associated with an increased risk of AF. PMID:25282316

  1. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at cardiovascular (CV) risk factor reduction in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria can diminish fatal and non-fatal CV. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the utility of P-NT-proBNP in screening for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. Methods and Results P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score ≥400, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) > 0.90 mm, ankle-brachial index < 0.90, and/or toe-brachial index < 0.64, respectively. Carotid artery compliance was also determined and the reactive hyperaemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral artery tonometry was used as a surrogate for endothelial function. P-NT-proBNP was associated with atherosclerosis in the unadjusted analysis, but not after adjustment for conventional risk factors. P-NT-proBNP was not associated with vascular dysfunction. The prevalence of atherosclerosis in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries was 35%, 10% and 21% of all patients, respectively. In total 49% had atherosclerosis in one territory and 15.6% and 1.0% in two and three territories. Low RHI was an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio [CI], 2.60 [1.15-5.88] and systolic blood pressure was the only independent determinant of CIMT (0.02 mm increase in CIMT per 10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure [p = 0.003]). Conclusions Half of asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria had significant

  2. Effects of an angry temperament on coronary heart disease risk : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, J E; Nieto, F J; Sanford, C P; Tyroler, H A

    2001-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine which component of an anger-prone personality more strongly predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Proneness to anger, as assessed by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale, is composed of two distinct subcomponents-anger-temperament and anger-reaction. Participants were 12,990 middle-aged Black men and women and White men and women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study who were followed for the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (MI)/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures (average = 53 months; maximum = 72 months) through December 31, 1995. Among normotensive persons, a strong, angry temperament (tendency toward quick, minimally provoked, or unprovoked anger) was associated with combined CHD (acute MI/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures) (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.34, 3.29) and with 'hard" events (acute MI/fatal CHD) (multivariate adjusted hazard ratio = 2.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.29, 4.02). CHD event-free survival among normotensives who had a strong, angry temperament was not significantly different from that of hypertensives at either level of anger. These data suggest that a strong, angry temperament rather than anger in reaction to criticism, frustration, or unfair treatment places normotensive, middle-aged persons at increased risk for cardiac events and may confer a CHD risk similar to that of hypertension.

  3. HDAC9 Variant Rs2107595 Modifies Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease and the Severity of Coronary Atherosclerosis in a Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Han, Ya-di; Sabina, Shrestha; Cui, Ning-Hua; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Ze-Jin; Li, Cong; Zheng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association study showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2107595 in histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) gene was associated with large artery stroke (LAS) in Caucasians. Based on the similar atherosclerotic pathogenesis between LAS and coronary artery disease (CAD), we aimed to evaluate the associations of SNP rs2107595 with CAD risk and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a Chinese Han population, and explore the potential gene-environment interactions among SNP rs2107595 and conventional CAD risk factors. In a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2317 CAD patients and 2404 controls, the AG + AA genotypes of SNP rs2107595 were significantly associated with increased CAD risk (Adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.23, Padj = 0.001) and higher modified Gensini scores (Adjusted OR = 1.38, Padj < 0.001). These associations remained significant in subtype analyses for unstable angina pectoris (UAP), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Subgroup and multifactor dimensionality reduction analyses (MDR) further found the gene-environment interactions among SNP rs2107595, body mass index, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia in CAD risk and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Moreover, patients with CAD had higher levels of HDAC9 mRNA expression and plasma HDAC9 than controls. Subsequent genotype-phenotype analyses observed the significant correlations of SNP rs2107595 with HDAC9 mRNA expression and plasma HDAC9 levels in controls and patients with NSTEMI and STEMI. Taken together, our data suggest that SNP rs2107595 may contribute to coronary atherosclerosis and CAD risk through a possible mechanism of regulating HDAC9 expression and gene-environment interactions.

  4. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Atherosclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease: Antioxidant Foods

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Emi; Kondo, Kazuo; Momiyama, Yukihiko

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in atherosclerotic diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), and much attention has been paid to antioxidant foods. The relationships between the consumption of vegetables and fruits and atherosclerotic diseases have been reported in many epidemiological studies showing a reduced risk of such diseases. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins C and E, green and yellow vegetables contain abundant quantities of carotenoids and polyphenols. The consumption of carotenoids and vitamins C and E has been shown to be inversely associated with CAD. However, supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamins C and E shows no beneficial effect, but rather mortality is increased with beta-carotene and vitamin E supplements. Therefore, it is recommended to consume vegetables and fruits, but vitamin supplementation is not recommended. Many epidemiological studies also report that higher consumption of fish, rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is associated with a lower risk of CAD and stroke. Antiatherosclerotic effects of n-3 PUFAs include reduced platelet aggregation, triglyceride-lowering effect, anti-inflammatory effect, and plaque stabilization, but the anti-inflammatory effect is principally responsible for preventing atherosclerosis. It is recommended to consume fish at least twice a week in patients without CAD and to consider n-3 PUFA supplements in patients with documented CAD. Regarding soy products, soy protein consumption reduces low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Isoflavone, a polyphenol contained in soybeans, has antiatherosclerotic property because it has a structure similar to that of estrogen and bonds with estrogen receptors. High consumption of isoflavone has been reported to be associated with a reduced risk of CAD and stroke only in women, but the preventative effect of soy products in the general population has not yet been clarified. Thus, many epidemiological studies report the

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Atherosclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease: Antioxidant Foods.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emi; Kondo, Kazuo; Momiyama, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in atherosclerotic diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), and much attention has been paid to antioxidant foods. The relationships between the consumption of vegetables and fruits and atherosclerotic diseases have been reported in many epidemiological studies showing a reduced risk of such diseases. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins C and E, green and yellow vegetables contain abundant quantities of carotenoids and polyphenols. The consumption of carotenoids and vitamins C and E has been shown to be inversely associated with CAD. However, supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamins C and E shows no beneficial effect, but rather mortality is increased with beta-carotene and vitamin E supplements. Therefore, it is recommended to consume vegetables and fruits, but vitamin supplementation is not recommended. Many epidemiological studies also report that higher consumption of fish, rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is associated with a lower risk of CAD and stroke. Antiatherosclerotic effects of n-3 PUFAs include reduced platelet aggregation, triglyceride-lowering effect, anti-inflammatory effect, and plaque stabilization, but the anti-inflammatory effect is principally responsible for preventing atherosclerosis. It is recommended to consume fish at least twice a week in patients without CAD and to consider n-3 PUFA supplements in patients with documented CAD. Regarding soy products, soy protein consumption reduces low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Isoflavone, a polyphenol contained in soybeans, has antiatherosclerotic property because it has a structure similar to that of estrogen and bonds with estrogen receptors. High consumption of isoflavone has been reported to be associated with a reduced risk of CAD and stroke only in women, but the preventative effect of soy products in the general population has not yet been clarified. Thus, many epidemiological studies report the

  7. Prevention of Coronary Atherosclerosis: The Role of a College Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manchester, Ralph A.; Greenland, Philip

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of behavioral risk factors for atherosclerosis which become entrenched in adolescence or young adulthood. Evidence favoring intervention in the adolescent years and a screening program at the University of Rochester Health Service are described. A preliminary strategy for prevention of atherosclerosis on campus is…

  8. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  9. Illness perception in patients with coronary artery disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala; Hweidi, Issa; Gharaibeh, Besher; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review that investigates the differences in illness perception with age and gender in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Previous studies show some discrepancies regarding the influence of age and gender on the specific dimensions of coronary artery disease patients' illness perception. A systematic review using a narrative synthesis process included preliminary synthesis, exploration of relationships and assessment of the robustness of the synthesis and findings was conducted. Search terms were used to identify research studies published between 1996 and December 2014 across four key databases: CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO and Web of Science. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. The review found that men had a stronger perception that their own behaviour had caused their illness than women. In addition, older patients had lower perceptions of the consequences and chronicity of their illness. This analysis concludes that some dimensions of illness perception vary according to age and gender of patients with coronary artery disease. These differences should be taken into consideration, particularly when providing health education and cardiac rehabilitation.

  10. Significance of a positive family history for coronary heart disease in patients with a zero coronary artery calcium score (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Randy; Budoff, Matthew; McClelland, Robyn L; Sillau, Stefan; Burke, Gregory; Blaha, Michael; Szklo, Moyses; Uretsky, Seth; Rozanski, Alan; Shea, Steven

    2014-10-15

    Although a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of 0 is associated with a very low 10-year risk for cardiac events, this risk is nonzero. Subjects with a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been associated with more subclinical atherosclerosis than subjects without a family history of CHD. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of a family history for CHD in subjects with a CAC score of 0. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort includes 6,814 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline. Positive family history was defined as reporting a parent, sibling, or child who had a heart attack. Time to incident CHD or CVD event was modeled using the multivariable Cox regression; 3,185 subjects were identified from the original Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort as having a baseline CAC score of 0 (mean age 58 years, 37% men). Over a median follow-up of 10 years, 101 participants (3.2%) had CVD events and 56 (1.8%) had CHD events. In age- and gender-adjusted analyses, a family history of CHD was associated with an ∼70% increase in CVD (hazard ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 2.56) and CHD (hazard ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.91) events. CVD events remained significant after further adjustment for ethnicity, risk factors, and baseline medication use. In conclusion, asymptomatic subjects with a 0 CAC score and a positive family history of CHD are at increased risk for CVD and CHD events compared with those without a family history of CHD, although absolute event rates remain low.

  11. Effects of the high-density lipoprotein mimetic agent CER-001 on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes: a randomized trial†

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Jean-Claude; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barter, Philip; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Fayad, Zahi A.; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Kastelein, John J. P.; Keyserling, Constance; Klepp, Heather; Koenig, Wolfgang; L'Allier, Philippe L.; Lespérance, Jacques; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Paolini, John F.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Waters, David D.; Pfeffer, M.; Brown, V.; Rouleau, J.; Watkins, P.; Wei, L.J.; Gosselin, G.; Chayer, C.; Lanthier, S.; Pelletier, G.B.; Racine, N.; Agarwal, H.; Brilakis, E.; Cannon, L.; Carrié, D.; Corbelli, J.; Coste, P.; de Winter, R.; Diaz, A.; Eisenberg, S.; Ennis, B.; Fajadet, J.; Fam, N.; Fortuin, D.; Gessler, C.; Grines, C.; Guerra, D.; Gum, H.; Haldis, T.; Heestermans, T.; Herrman, J.P.; Huynh, T.; Kedhi, E.; Koren, M.; Kouz, S.; Krolick, M.; Kumkumian, G.; Lavi, S.; Li, R.J.; Masud, ARZ; McAlhany, C.; McGrew, F.A.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Oude Ophuis, A.J.M.; Parr, K.; Penny, W.; Pesant, Y.; Post, H.; Robinson, S.; Rodes-Cabau, J.; Roy, A.; Schulman, S.; Spence, F.; Stouffer, G.; Stys, T.; Sussex, B.; Tahirkheli, N.; Tardif, J-C.; Grégoire, J.; ten Berg, J.; van Boven, A.J.; von Birgelen, C.; Weinstein, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have several potentially protective vascular effects. Most clinical studies of therapies targeting HDL have failed to show benefits vs. placebo. Objective To investigate the effects of an HDL-mimetic agent on atherosclerosis by intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Design and setting A prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial was conducted at 51 centres in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada, and France. Intravascular ultrasonography and QCA were performed to assess coronary atherosclerosis at baseline and 3 (2–5) weeks after the last study infusion. Patients Five hundred and seven patients were randomized; 417 and 461 had paired IVUS and QCA measurements, respectively. Intervention Patients were randomized to receive 6 weekly infusions of placebo, 3 mg/kg, 6 mg/kg, or 12 mg/kg CER-001. Main outcome measures The primary efficacy parameter was the nominal change in the total atheroma volume. Nominal changes in per cent atheroma volume on IVUS and coronary scores on QCA were also pre-specified endpoints. Results The nominal change in the total atheroma volume (adjusted means) was −2.71, −3.13, −1.50, and −3.05 mm3 with placebo, CER-001 3 mg/kg, 6 mg/kg, and 12 mg/kg, respectively (primary analysis of 12 mg/kg vs. placebo: P = 0.81). There was also no difference among groups for the nominal change in per cent atheroma volume (0.02, −0.02, 0.01, and 0.19%; nominal P = 0.53 for 12 mg/kg vs. placebo). Change in the coronary artery score was −0.022, −0.036, −0.022, and −0.015 mm (nominal P = 0.25, 0.99, 0.55), and change in the cumulative coronary stenosis score was −0.51, 2.65, 0.71, and −0.77% (compared with placebo, nominal P = 0.85 for 12 mg/kg and nominal P = 0.01 for 3 mg/kg). The number of patients with major cardiovascular events was 10 (8.3%), 16 (13.3%), 17 (13.7%), and 12 (9.8%) in the four groups. Conclusion CER-001 infusions did not reduce coronary

  12. Tortuosity of coronary bifurcation as a potential local risk factor for atherosclerosis: CFD steady state study based on in vivo dynamic CT measurements.

    PubMed

    Malvè, M; Gharib, A M; Yazdani, S K; Finet, G; Martínez, M A; Pettigrew, R; Ohayon, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether in vivo bifurcation geometric factors would permit prediction of the risk of atherosclerosis. It is worldwide accepted that low or oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is a robust hemodynamic factor in the development of atherosclerotic plaque and has a strong correlation with the local site of plaque deposition. However, it still remains unclear how coronary bifurcation geometries are correlated with such hemodynamic forces. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on left main (LM) coronary bifurcation geometries derived from CT of eight patients without significant atherosclerosis. WSS amplitudes were accurately quantified at two high risk zones of atherosclerosis, namely at proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD) and at proximal left circumflex artery (LCx), and also at three high WSS concentration sites near the bifurcation. Statistical analysis was used to highlight relationships between WSS amplitudes calculated at these five zones of interest and various geometric factors. The tortuosity index of the LM-LAD segment appears to be an emergent geometric factor in determining the low WSS amplitude at proximal LAD. Strong correlations were found between the high WSS amplitudes calculated at the endothelial regions close to the flow divider. This study not only demonstrated that CT imaging studies of local risk factor for atherosclerosis could be clinically performed, but also showed that tortuosity of LM-LAD coronary branch could be used as a surrogate marker for the onset of atherosclerosis.

  13. Association between circulating vitamin K1 and coronary calcium progression in community-dwelling adults: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While animal studies found vitamin K treatment reduced vascular calcification, human data are limited. Using a case-cohort design, we determined the association between vitamin K status and coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Serum phylloquinone (v...

  14. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis: toward coronary arterial visualization of biologically high-risk plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calfon, Marcella A.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2010-01-01

    New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.

  15. Impact of Atorvastatin Combined with Ezetimibe for the Treatment of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ping; Wang, Lixia; Zhu, Haohui; Du, Song; Wang, Guanggong; Ding, Shoukun

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the impact of atorvastatin (Ato) combined with ezetimibe (Eze) for the treatment of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods One hundred and forty-eight CHD patients with carotid atherosclerosis were divided into the control (Ato alone) and combination (Ato and Eze) groups. The treatment course was 12 months; patient blood lipids, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and carotid plaque area were measured before and after treatment. Results Twelve months after treatment, there was a decrease in the CIMT, and the horizontal and vertical axes of the carotid plaque areas in both groups, compared to pretreatment values. The serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the LDL-C (2.12 ± 0.58 mmol/L vs. 2.63 ± 0.56 mmol/L) and CIMT (1.06 ± 0.12 mm vs. 1.13 ± 0.11 mm) levels between the combination and the control groups after treatment. Compared to the control group, the horizontal (0.18 ± 0.06 cm2 vs. 0.19 ± 0.05 cm2) and vertical carotid arterial plaque areas (0.40 ± 0.15 cm2 vs. 0.41 ± 0.17 cm2) of the combination group were reduced after treatment. However, the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions The combination of Ato and Eze further reduces LDL-C levels and CIMT, and affect the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in CHD patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27713607

  16. Neovascularization of coronary tunica intima (DIT) is the cause of coronary atherosclerosis. Lipoproteins invade coronary intima via neovascularization from adventitial vasa vasorum, but not from the arterial lumen: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An accepted hypothesis states that coronary atherosclerosis (CA) is initiated by endothelial dysfunction due to inflammation and high levels of LDL-C, followed by deposition of lipids and macrophages from the luminal blood into the arterial intima, resulting in plaque formation. The success of statins in preventing CA promised much for extended protection and effective therapeutics. However, stalled progress in pharmaceutical treatment gives a good reason to review logical properties of the hypothesis underlining our efforts, and to reconsider whether our perception of CA is consistent with facts about the normal and diseased coronary artery. Analysis To begin with, it must be noted that the normal coronary intima is not a single-layer endothelium covering a thin acellular compartment, as claimed in most publications, but always appears as a multi-layer cellular compartment, or diffuse intimal thickening (DIT), in which cells are arranged in many layers. If low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) invades the DIT from the coronary lumen, the initial depositions ought to be most proximal to blood, i.e. in the inner DIT. The facts show that the opposite is true, and lipids are initially deposited in the outer DIT. This contradiction is resolved by observing that the normal DIT is always avascular, receiving nutrients by diffusion from the lumen, whereas in CA the outer DIT is always neovascularized from adventitial vasa vasorum. The proteoglycan biglycan, confined to the outer DIT in both normal and diseased coronary arteries, has high binding capacity for LDL-C. However, the normal DIT is avascular and biglycan-LDL-C interactions are prevented by diffusion distance and LDL-C size (20 nm), whereas in CA, biglycan in the outer DIT can extract lipoproteins by direct contact with the blood. These facts lead to the single simplest explanation of all observations: (1) lipid deposition is initially localized in the outer DIT; (2) CA often develops at high

  17. A genome-wide trans-ethnic interaction study links the PIGR-FCAMR locus to coronary atherosclerosis via interactions between genetic variants and residential exposure to traffic

    PubMed Central

    Neas, Lucas M.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Z. Elaine; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution is a worldwide contributor to cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Traffic-related air pollution is a widespread environmental exposure and is associated with multiple cardiovascular outcomes such as coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial infarction. Despite the recognition of the importance of both genetic and environmental exposures to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, studies of how these two contributors operate jointly are rare. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWIS) to examine gene-traffic exposure interactions associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Using race-stratified cohorts of 538 African-Americans (AA) and 1562 European-Americans (EA) from a cardiac catheterization cohort (CATHGEN), we identify gene-by-traffic exposure interactions associated with the number of significantly diseased coronary vessels as a measure of chronic atherosclerosis. We found five suggestive (P<1x10-5) interactions in the AA GWIS, of which two (rs1856746 and rs2791713) replicated in the EA cohort (P < 0.05). Both SNPs are in the PIGR-FCAMR locus and are eQTLs in lymphocytes. The protein products of both PIGR and FCAMR are implicated in inflammatory processes. In the EA GWIS, there were three suggestive interactions; none of these replicated in the AA GWIS. All three were intergenic; the most significant interaction was in a regulatory region associated with SAMSN1, a gene previously associated with atherosclerosis and B cell activation. In conclusion, we have uncovered several novel genes associated with coronary atherosclerosis in individuals chronically exposed to increased ambient concentrations of traffic air pollution. These genes point towards inflammatory pathways that may modify the effects of air pollution on cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28355232

  18. 2013 ACC/AHA versus 2004 NECP ATP III Guidelines in the Assignment of Statin Treatment in a Korean Population with Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu Mi; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Eun Hee; Park, Duk-Woo; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Woo Je

    2015-01-01

    Background The usefulness of the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for the management of blood cholesterol in the Asian population remains controversial. In this study, we investigated whether eligibility for statin therapy determined by the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines is better aligned with the presence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis detected by CCTA (coronary computed tomography angiography) compared to the previously recommended 2004 NCEP ATP III guidelines. Methods We collected the data from 5,837 asymptomatic subjects who underwent CCTA using MDCT during routine health examinations. Based on risk factor assessment and lipid data, we determined guideline-based eligibility for statin therapy according to the 2013 ACC/AHA and 2004 NCEP ATP III guidelines. We defined the presence and severity of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis detected in CCTA according to the presence of significant coronary artery stenosis (defined as >50% stenosis), plaques, and the degree of coronary calcification. Results As compared to the 2004 ATP III guidelines, a significantly higher proportion of subjects with significant coronary stenosis (61.8% vs. 33.8%), plaques (52.3% vs. 24.7%), and higher CACS (CACS >100, 63.6% vs. 26.5%) was assigned to statin therapy using the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines (P < .001 for all variables). The area under the curves of the pooled cohort equation of the new guidelines in detecting significant stenosis, plaques, and higher CACS were significantly higher than those of the Framingham risk calculator. Conclusions Compared to the previous ATP III guidelines, the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines were more sensitive in identifying subjects with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis detected by CCTA in an Asian population. PMID:26372638

  19. Is galectin-3 a biomarker, a player-or both-in the presence of coronary atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Aksan, Gökhan; Gedikli, Ömer; Keskin, Kudret; Nar, Gökay; İnci, Sinan; Yıldız, Süleyman Sezai; Kaplan, Özgür; Soylu, Korhan; Kılıçkesmez, Kadriye Orta; Şahin, Mahmut

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex process mediated by leukocytes, macrophages and various inflammatory markers. Galectin-3 is secreted by activated macrophages and is involved in cardiac fibrosis, cardiac remodeling, and inflammation. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and serum galectin-3 levels. The study included 82 patients with CAD confirmed via coronary angiography and 82 healthy participants as control group. Angiographic CAD was defined as ≥50% luminal diameter stenosis of at least one major epicardial coronary artery. The severity of CAD was determined by the Gensini score; and the serum galectin-3 levels were measured via ELISA. Serum galectin-3 levels were significantly higher in the patient group with CAD than in the control group (12.96±4.92 vs 5.52±1.9 ng/mL, p<0.001). In the correlation analysis, serum galectin-3 showed significant correlation with the Gensini score (r=0.715, p<0.001), number of diseased vessels (r=0.752, p<0.001) and serum hs-CRP level (r=0.607, p<0.001). In addition, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the serum galectin-3 levels were significant and independent predictors of the presence of angiographic CAD (OR=3.933, 95% CI 2.395 to 6.457; p<0.001). In the present study, the serum galectin-3 levels were higher in the patients with CAD than in healthy controls. Also, serum galectin-3 levels showed a significant positive correlation with the severity of CAD. An increased serum galectin-3 level may be considered an important activator and a marker of the atherosclerotic inflammatory process in CAD.

  20. Adverse Hospital Events for Mentally Ill Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Glance, Laurent G; Cai, Xueya; Mukamel, Dana B

    2008-01-01

    Context Patients with mental disorders show higher burden of coronary heart disease, and may face special safety issues during in-hospital cardiac care. Objectives To compare the postoperative complication rate between patients with and without mental disorders undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective analyses of New York state hospital claims between 1997 and 2004 (N=135,701). Complications were defined using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators (AHRQ PSI). Principal Findings Mental disorders were significantly associated with higher anesthesia complications (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=6.44, p<.001), decubitus ulcer (AOR=1.42, p=.006), postoperative hip fracture (AOR=3.29, p<.001), and overall complication rate representing nine PSIs (AOR=1.27, p<.001). Conclusions Mentally ill patients undergoing CABG surgery are more likely to experience potentially preventable complications and injuries. The mechanism underlying this observation warrants further study. PMID:18665856

  1. Sex Differences of the Natriuretic Peptide Polymorphism Associated With Angiographic Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Terry Y.; Tse, M. Yat; Pang, Stephen C.; McLellan, Catherine S.; King, Will D.; Johri, Amer M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms within natriuretic peptide (NP) genes have been associated with clinical outcomes for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but no previous study has compared the effect of these polymorphisms between men and women. This study aimed to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key genes of the NP system and coronary angiographic outcomes, with the focus on the sexual dimorphism in the effects of these SNPs. Methods Patients undergoing clinically indicated coronary angiography (n = 513, 328 men and 185 women) were consented and genotyped for NPPA rs5065, NPPB rs198389 and NPR2 rs10758325. Patients were stratified into having normal coronaries, non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) or obstructive CAD, based on the highest stenosis in any epicardial artery. Average luminal narrowing across all four arteries was derived to represent the overall atherosclerotic burden. Results The frequency of NPPB rs198389 AA genotype was significantly higher in women with obstructive CAD (P = 0.014). The same association was not observed in males. With respect to atherosclerotic burden, an association was found between the AA genotype and average luminal narrowing in women (P = 0.005), but not in men. Conclusions The current study identified an association between an SNP of the NPPB gene and coronary atherosclerotic burden through angiographic evidence in women but not in men. These results suggest that B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) may have more important involvement in the development of CAD in women compared to men, and as such, genotyping of the NPPB gene may serve as a potential biomarker to identify women with high risk for CAD. PMID:28275418

  2. Translational atherosclerosis research: From experimental models to coronary artery disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Christian A

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Research on the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherogenesis has made tremendous progress over the past two decades. However, despite great advances there is still a lack of therapies that reduce adverse cardiovascular events to an acceptable degree. This review addresses successes, but also questions, challenges, and chances regarding the translation of basic science results into clinical practice, i.e. the capability to apply the results of basic and/or clinical research in order to design therapies suitable to improve patient outcome. Specifically, it discusses problems in translating findings from the most broadly used murine models of atherosclerosis into clinically feasible therapies and strategies potentially improving the results of clinical trials. Most likely, the key to success will be a multimodal approach employing novel imaging methods as well as large scale screening tools-summarized as "omics" approach. Using individually tailored therapies, plaque stabilization and regression could prevent adverse cardiovascular events thereby improving outcome of a large number of patients.

  3. Postmortem Coronary Atherosclerosis Findings in General Aviation Accident Pilot Fatalities: 1975-1977

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    known about the contribution of cardio- vascular disease to aviation accidents. While the potential for accident outcome has been recognized for some...potential for interaction between existing cardio- vascular disease and aircraft accidents (1-7). Pettyjohn and McMeekin found coronary artery disease present...Cardiovascular disease through the National Technic-,l Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Clossif. (of this report) 20

  4. Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults with Coronary Artery Disease: Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Akhondzadh, Shahin; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Amiri Abchouyeh, Maryam; Ayatollahzade Isfahani, Farah; Rosendaal, Frits

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depressed coronary artery disease (CAD) patients may experience a poorer prognosis than non-depressed patients. The aim of this study was to find the associated factors for depressive symptoms in young adults with CAD. Method: This was a cross-sectional study within Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC) study. Young adult CAD patients (men ≤ 45 year-old and women ≤ 55 year-old) were visited from March 2013 to February 2014. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and all patients were asked to fill in the Beck Depression Inventory II. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. A logistic regression model was used to find multiple associated factors of depressive symptoms. Results: Seven hundred seventy patients (mean ±SD age: 45.34 ±5.75 y, men: 47.7%) were visited. The point prevalence of depressive symptoms was 46.9% in women and 30.2% in men (p < 0.001). Logistic regressions model revealed that the most important associated factors for depressive symptoms in the male premature CAD patients were opium usage (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.33-4.43), major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.17-3.93), initial coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) treatment (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.07-4.06), positive family history for CAD (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.11-3.01) and cigarette smoking (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.97-2.98). Hypertension showed a protective role in this group of patients (OR = 0.5, CI = 0.29-0.92). In the female patients, hypertension (OR = 1.5, CI = 0.96-2.22) and body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.1, CI = 1.02-1.10) were associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusion: In premature CAD male patients, opium usage, MACE, initial CABG treatment, positive family history for CAD and cigarette smoking were associated with depressive symptoms; and hypertension and BMI were associated with depressive symptoms in women. PMID:28050181

  5. Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults with Coronary Artery Disease: Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC) Study.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Akhondzadh, Shahin; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Amiri Abchouyeh, Maryam; Ayatollahzade Isfahani, Farah; Rosendaal, Frits

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Depressed coronary artery disease (CAD) patients may experience a poorer prognosis than non-depressed patients. The aim of this study was to find the associated factors for depressive symptoms in young adults with CAD. Method: This was a cross-sectional study within Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC) study. Young adult CAD patients (men ≤ 45 year-old and women ≤ 55 year-old) were visited from March 2013 to February 2014. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and all patients were asked to fill in the Beck Depression Inventory II. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. A logistic regression model was used to find multiple associated factors of depressive symptoms. Results: Seven hundred seventy patients (mean ±SD age: 45.34 ±5.75 y, men: 47.7%) were visited. The point prevalence of depressive symptoms was 46.9% in women and 30.2% in men (p < 0.001). Logistic regressions model revealed that the most important associated factors for depressive symptoms in the male premature CAD patients were opium usage (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.33-4.43), major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.17-3.93), initial coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) treatment (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.07-4.06), positive family history for CAD (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.11-3.01) and cigarette smoking (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.97-2.98). Hypertension showed a protective role in this group of patients (OR = 0.5, CI = 0.29-0.92). In the female patients, hypertension (OR = 1.5, CI = 0.96-2.22) and body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.1, CI = 1.02-1.10) were associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusion: In premature CAD male patients, opium usage, MACE, initial CABG treatment, positive family history for CAD and cigarette smoking were associated with depressive symptoms; and hypertension and BMI were associated with depressive symptoms in women.

  6. Acute coronary syndrome and decompression illness: a challenge for the diving physician.

    PubMed

    Brauzzi, Marco; Andreozzi, Fabio; De Fina, Laura; Tanasi, Paolo; Falini, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is a syndrome with diverse clinical manifestations but in which cardiac symptoms are rare. In the presence of cardiac symptoms, the necessity to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) which requires prompt treatment may result in delay to appropriate recompression treatment. We describe three cases with cardiologic symptoms referred to our centre by the Emergency Department (ED) of our facility. The first was a 48-year-old woman who lost consciousness during a dive and required cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The final diagnosis was acute myocardial infarction and the patient did not undergo recompression treatment. The second case was that of a 27-year-old man who complained of tachycardia, dyspnoea and vertigo soon after a dive. He was referred by helicopter ambulance and in the ED was diagnosed with new-onset atrial fibrillation. Recompression resulted in disappearance of his vertigo, and sinus rhythm was restored pharmacologically. The third case was a 43-year-old man, with a history of coronary artery disease, who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting three years previously. After a repetitive dive without adequate decompression, he complained of crushing retrosternal pain and numbness in the upper left arm. All cardiovascular examinations were negative and the patient was recompressed, with resolution of his symptoms. Features to consider in arriving at the correct differential diagnosis in divers presenting with cardiac symptoms are discussed in the light of these three illustrative cases.

  7. Coronary calcium scans and radiation exposure in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Bradley; Li, Dong; Nasir, Khurram; Carr, J Jeffrey; Blankstein, Ron; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing use of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring to risk stratify asymptomatic patients for future cardiovascular events, there have been concerns raised regarding the theoretical risk of radiation exposure to this potentially large patient population. Newer CT protocols have sought to reduce radiation exposure without compromising image quality, but the reported radiation exposures in the literature remains widely variable (0.7-10.5 mSv). In this study, we report the radiation exposure of calcium scoring from our MESA cohort across several modern CT scanners with the aim of clarifying the radiation exposure of this imaging modality. To evaluate the mean effective doses of radiation, using dose length product, utilized for coronary artery calcium scoring in the MESA cohort, in an effort to understand estimated population quantity effective dose using individual measurements of scanner radiation output using current CT scanners. We reviewed effective dose in milliSieverts (mSv) for 3442 participants from the MESA cohort undergoing coronary artery calcium scoring, divided over six sites with four different modern CT scanners (Siemens64, Siemens Somatom Definition, GE64, and Toshiba 320). For effective dose calculation (milliSieverts, mSv), we multiplied the dose length product by conversion factor k (0.014). The mean effective dose amongst all participants was 1.05 mSv, a median dose of 0.95 mSV. The mean effective dose ranged from 0.74 to 1.26 across the six centers involved with the MESA cohort. The Siemens Somatom Definition scanner had effective dose of 0.53 (n = 123), Siemens 64 with 0.97 (n = 1684), GE 64 with 1.16 (n = 1219), and Toshiba 320 with 1.26 mSv (n = 416). Subgroup analysis by BMI, age, and gender showed no variability between scanners, gender, ages 45-74 years old, or BMI less than 30 kg/m(2). Subjects over age 75 yo had a mean effective dose of 1.29 ± 0.31 mSv, while the <75 yo subgroup was 0.78 ± 0.09 mSv (p < 0.05). Effective

  8. Large animal models of atherosclerosis--new tools for persistent problems in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Shim, J; Al-Mashhadi, R H; Sørensen, C B; Bentzon, J F

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke caused by atherosclerosis are leading causes of illness and death worldwide. Small animal models have provided insight into the fundamental mechanisms driving early atherosclerosis, but it is increasingly clear that new strategies and research tools are needed to translate these discoveries into improved prevention and treatment of symptomatic atherosclerosis in humans. Key challenges include better understanding of processes in late atherosclerosis, factors affecting atherosclerosis in the coronary bed, and the development of reliable imaging biomarker tools for risk stratification and monitoring of drug effects in humans. Efficient large animal models of atherosclerosis may help tackle these problems. Recent years have seen tremendous advances in gene-editing tools for large animals. This has made it possible to create gene-modified minipigs that develop atherosclerosis with many similarities to humans in terms of predilection for lesion sites and histopathology. Together with existing porcine models of atherosclerosis that are based on spontaneous mutations or severe diabetes, such models open new avenues for translational research in atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the merits of different animal models of atherosclerosis and give examples of important research problems where porcine models could prove pivotal for progress.

  9. Characterization of CD4+CD28null T cells in patients with coronary artery disease and individuals with risk factors for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Téo, Fábio Haach; de Oliveira, Rômulo Tadeu Dias; Mamoni, Ronei Luciano; Ferreira, Maria Carolina Salmora; Nadruz, Wilson; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Fernandes, Juliano de Lara; Blotta, Maria Heloisa Souza Lima

    2013-01-01

    Risk factors for atherosclerosis may contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation. A highly cytotoxic and inflammatory CD4(+) cell subset (CD4(+)CD28(null) cells) has been associated with inflammatory diseases, including acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize CD4(+)CD28(null) cells in individuals with risk factors for atherosclerosis and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In order to achieve this goal, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from individuals with risk factors for atherosclerosis and patients with CAD were analyzed using flow cytometry to detect cytotoxic molecules and evaluate the expression of homing receptors and inflammatory cytokines in CD4(+) cell subsets. The cells were evaluated ex vivo and after stimulation in culture. We found no differences in the proportions of CD4(+)CD28(null) cells among the groups. Compared with the CD4(+)CD28(+) population, the ex vivo CD4(+)CD28(null) subset from all groups expressed higher levels of granzymes A and B, perforin, granulysin and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Individuals with risk factors and patients with ACS showed the highest levels of cytotoxic molecules. After stimulation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in the CD4(+)CD28(null) subset from these groups increased more than in the other groups. Stimulation with LPS decreased the expression of cytotoxic molecules by CD4(+)CD28(null) cells in all groups. In conclusion, our results show that risk factors for atherosclerosis may alter the CD4(+)CD28(null) cells phenotype, increasing their cytotoxic potential. Our findings also suggest that CD4(+)CD28(null) cells may participate in the early phases of atherosclerosis.

  10. Prevention and noninvasive management of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G; Berry, Colin

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a worldwide epidemic. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing in both developing and developed countries. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent and is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Individuals with prediabetes states, with or without known CHD, should undergo lifestyle modifications aimed at preventing DM. In patients with CHD and DM, routine use of aspirin and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, along with strict glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid control, is strongly recommended. Intense insulin therapy may be needed for glycemic control, and high-dose statin therapy may be needed for lipid control. For blood pressure control, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are considered first-line therapy. Noncompliance with medications and/or lifestyle measures and underprescription of evidence-based therapies remain important unsolved problems.

  11. Effect of mild atherosclerosis on flow resistance in a coronary artery casting of man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Cho, Y. I.; Crawford, D. W.; Cuffel, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An in-vitro flow study was conducted in a mildly atherosclerotic main coronary artery casting of man using sugar-water solutions simulating blood viscosity. Steady flow results indicated substantial increases in pressure drop, and thus flow resistance at the same Reynolds number, above those for Poiseuille flow by 30 to 100 percent in the physiological Reynolds number range from about 100 to 400. Time-averaged pulsatile flow data showed additional 5 percent increases in flow resistance above the steady flow results. Both pulsatile and steady flow data from the casting were found to be nearly equal to those from a straight, axisymmetric model of the casting up to a Reynolds number of about 200, above which the flow resistance of the casting became gradually larger than the corresponding values from the axisymmetric model.

  12. Opium consumption and coronary atherosclerosis in diabetic patients: a propensity score-matched study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Kianoosh; Masoudkabir, Farzad; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali; Alipour-Parsa, Saeed; Sheikh Fathollahi, Mahmood; Rahimi-Foroushani, Abbas; Hakki, Elham; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Eftekhar, Hassan

    2011-11-01

    There is a traditional belief among Eastern people that opium may have ameliorating effects on cardiovascular risk factors, especially diabetes; thus, it is widely used among diabetic patients. We attempted to investigate the association of opium consumption with coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on diabetic patients undergoing coronary angiography in our center. Out of 1925 diabetic patients included in the study, 228 were opium users, and the remaining 1697 non-opium users were used as a pool of potential comparators. Propensity scores were used to match the 228 opium consumers with 228 matched comparators for age, sex, and smoking status. The Gensini score and extent score were respectively used to assess the angiographic severity and extent of CAD. The mean Gensini score (86.9 ± 62.7 vs. 59.6 ± 43.4, p < 0.0001) and extent score (7.1 ± 2.9 vs. 5.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.0001) were significantly higher in opium user diabetic patients than in non-opium users. After adjustment for potential confounders, a dose-response relationship was observed between dose of opium and the Gensini score ( β = 0.27, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences between the routes of opium administration (inhalation vs. oral) regarding the severity and extent of CAD. In conclusion, exposure to opium in diabetic patients may be positively associated with the risk of CAD, and with the angiographically determined severity and extent of the disease. Furthermore, dosage of opium consumption may correlate with severity of CAD.

  13. Natural Progression of Atherosclerosis from Pathologic Intimal Thickening to Late Fibroatheroma in Human Coronary Arteries: A Pathology Study

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Kramer, Miranda C.A.; Woudstra, Pier; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Ladich, Elena; Finn, Aloke V.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Wight, Thomas N.; Davis, Harry R.; Joner, Michael; Virmani, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Smooth muscle cells, macrophage infiltration and accumulation of lipids, proteoglycans, collagen matrix and calcification play a central role in atherosclerosis. The early histologic changes of plaque progression from pathologic intimal thickenings (PIT) to late fibroatheroma lesions have not been fully characterized. Methods A total of 151 atherosclerotic coronary lesions were collected from 67 sudden death victims. Atherosclerotic plaques were classified as PIT without macrophage infiltration, PIT with macrophages, and early and late fibroatheromas. Presence of macrophages and proteoglycans (versican, decorin and biglycan) were recognized by specific antibodies while hyaluronan was detected by affinity histochemistry. Lipid deposition was identified by oil-red-O, and calcification was assessed following von Kossa and alizarin red staining. Results Lesion progression from PIT to late fibroatheroma was associated with increase in macrophage accumulation (p<0.001) and decreasing apoptotic body clearance by macrophages (ratio of engulfed-to-total apoptotic bodies) (p<0.001). Lipid deposition in lipid pool of PIT had a microvesicular appearance whereas those in the necrotic core were globular in nature. Overall, the accumulation of hyaluronan (p<0.001), and proteoglycan versican (p<0.001) and biglycan (p=0.013) declined along with lesion progression from PIT to fibroatheromas. Microcalcification was first observed only within areas of lipid pools and its presence and size increased in lesions with necrotic core. Conclusions PIT to fibroatheroma lesions are accompanied by early lipid accumulation, followed by macrophage infiltration with defective clearance of apoptotic bodies along with decrease in proteoglycan and hyaluronan in lipid pools that convert to necrotic cores. Calcification starts in PIT and increases with plaque progression. PMID:26058741

  14. Calcification of coronary arteries and abdominal aorta in relation to traditional and novel risk factors of atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Process of accelerated atherosclerosis specific for uremia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may be influenced by the different structure of arteries. The study assesses the influence of traditional and novel risk factors on calcification of coronary arteries (CAC) and abdominal aorta (AAC) in hemodialysis patients (HD). Methods CAC and AAC were assessed by CT in 104 prevalent adult HD and 14 apparently healthy subjects with normal kidney function (control group). Mineral metabolism parameters, plasma levels of FGF-23, MGP, osteoprotegerin, osteopontin, fetuin-A, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured. Results CAC and AAC (calcification score ≥ 1) were found in 76 (73.1%) and 83 (79.8%) HD respectively, more frequent than in the control group. In 7 HD with AAC no CAC were detected. The frequency and severity of calcifications increased with age. Both CAC and AAC were more frequently detected in diabetics (OR = 17.37 and 13.00, respectively). CAC score was significantly greater in males. CAC and AAC scores were correlated significantly with pack-years of smoking and plasma osteoprotegrin levels. However the independent contribution of plasma osteoprotegerin levels was not confirmed in multiple regression analysis. Age (OR = 1.13) and hemodialysis vintage (OR = 1.14) were the independent risk factor favoring the occurrence of CAC; while age (OR = 1.20) was the only predictor of AAC occurrence in HD. Conclusions 1. AAC precedes the occurrence of CAC in HD patients. 2. The exposition to uremic milieu and systemic chronic microinflammation has more deteriorative effect on the CAC than the AAC. PMID:23317172

  15. Comparing Arterial Function Parameters for the Prediction of Coronary Heart Disease Events: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Hom, Elizabeth K; Duprez, Daniel A; Jacobs, David R; Bluemke, David A; Brumback, Lyndia C; Polak, Joseph F; Peralta, Carmen A; Greenland, Philip; Magzamen, Sheryl L; Lima, João A C; Redheuil, Alban; Herrington, David M; Stein, James H; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Ouyang, Pamela; Kaufman, Joel D

    2016-12-15

    Arterial dysfunction has been linked to decline in cardiac function and increased risk of cardiovascular disease events. We calculated the value of arterial function, measured at baseline (2000-2002), in predicting time to first coronary heart disease (CHD) event (median follow-up, 10.2 years) among participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Measures included the following: C1 and C2, derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis from the radial artery blood pressure waveform obtained by tonometry (n = 6,336); carotid distensibility and Young's elastic modulus at the carotid artery, derived from carotid artery ultrasonography (n = 6,531 and 6,528); and aortic distensibility, measured using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (n = 3,677). After adjustment, the hazard ratio for a CHD event per standard-deviation increment in arterial function was 0.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86, 1.10) for C1, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.86) for C2, 0.98 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.11) for carotid distensibility, 0.99 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.09) for Young's modulus, and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.10) for aortic distensibility. We examined the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model with full adjustment plus the addition of each measure individually. C2 provided additional discrimination for the prediction of CHD (area under the curve = 0.736 vs. 0.743; P = 0.04). Lower C2 was associated with a higher risk of future CHD events.

  16. Postprandial lipemia and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kats, Dmitry; Sharrett, A Richey; Ginsberg, Henry N; Nambi, Vijay; Ballantyne, Christie M; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Heiss, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Objective Excessive levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins during postprandial lipemia (PPL) have been reported to be atherogenic. However, it is unclear whether the degree of PPL independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) given the scarcity of longitudinal data with standardised measures of postprandial change. We reexamined associations of PPL with incident CVD events in a population-based cohort using detailed measures of postprandial change from a standardised fat challenge. Research design and methods Postprandial triglycerides, TG-rich lipoprotein triglycerides, retinyl palmitate and apolipoprotein B48 to B100 ratio were measured before (following a 12-hour fasting period) and after a fat-tolerance test meal in a middle-aged, biracial subcohort without CVD (coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke) from the community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study in 1990–1993. Using these measures, we estimated associations of postprandial change with incident CVD (CHD, stroke) through 2012. Stratified analyses by race, obesity and carotid atherosclerotic severity were also conducted. Results Of 559 participants, 127 (23%) developed CHD and 27 (5%) experienced a stroke over more than 20 years of follow-up. None of the measures of postprandial change were associated with incident CVD events in the overall sample, or by subgroups of race, obesity or carotid atherosclerotic severity (all p>0.3). Conclusions The degree of PPL was not shown to predict excess CVD risk in extended follow-up of a population-based sample. While our study is the largest to examine the association between PPL and incident CVD using standardised postfat challenge measures, prospective investigation with similar assessment of PPL in more powered samples is warranted. PMID:28191321

  17. A prospective two-center study on the associations between microalbuminuria, coronary atherosclerosis and long-term clinical outcome in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: evaluation by coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Jin; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Choi, Ik Jun; Choo, Eun-Ho; Lim, Sungmin; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Pum-Joon; Seung, Ki-Bae; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Jung, Jung Im; Chang, Kiyuk

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the associations between microalbuminuria in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes and the presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and the long-term clinical outcomes. In total, the study enrolled 284 consecutive eligible asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes and without known coronary artery disease (CAD), who then underwent CCTA and 24 h urine albumin measurements. Microalbuminuria was defined as 30-300 mg/day urinary albumin excretion. Obstructive CAD, as measured by CCTA, was defined as maximum intra-luminal stenosis ≥50 %. Patients with and without microalbuminuria were compared in terms of obstructive CAD prevalence, and the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. They were evaluated using the following data: coronary artery calcium score (CACS), atheroma burden obstructive score (ABOS), segment involvement score (SIS) and segment stenosis score (SSS). All-cause mortality within a follow-up period of 5 years was also compared. Compared to patients without microalbuminuria, patients with microalbuminuria were more likely to have obstructive CAD (p = 0.004). Microalbuminuria was associated with higher ABOS (p = 0.010), SIS (p = 0.029), and SSS (p = 0.011), except for CACS (p = 0.058). Multivariable analyses adjusted for conventional cardiovascular risk factors revealed that microalbuminuria was an independent predictor of obstructive CAD [odds ratio 2.255, confidence intervals (CI) 1.121-4.538, p = 0.023] and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.469, CI 1.319-9.121, p = 0.012). In asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes, microalbuminuria was associated with increased risk of CAD and poorer clinical outcomes.

  18. A Cross-sectional Study of the Association Between Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis Among Participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Rebeccah A.; Haberlen, Sabina A.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.; Budoff, Matthew; Witt, Mallory D.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Palella, Frank J.; Thio, Chloe L.; Seaberg, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated the association of chronic HCV infection and coronary atherosclerosis among participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Methods. We assessed 994 men with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (87 of whom had chronic HCV infection) for coronary plaque, using noncontrast coronary computed tomography (CT); 755 also underwent CT angiography. We then evaluated the associations of chronic HCV infection and HIV infection with measures of plaque prevalence, extent, and stenosis. Results. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, HIV serostatus, behaviors, and CVD risk factors, chronic HCV infection was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of coronary artery calcium (prevalence ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.63), any plaque (prevalence ratio, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09–1.45), and noncalcified plaque (prevalence ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.16–1.75). Chronic HCV infection and HIV infection were independently associated with the prevalence of any plaque and of noncalcified plaque, but there was no evidence of a synergistic effect due to HIV/HCV coinfection. The prevalences of coronary artery calcium, any plaque, noncalcified plaque, a mixture of noncalcified and calcified plaque, and calcified plaque were significantly higher among men with an HCV RNA load of ≥2 × 106 IU/mL, compared with findings among men without chronic HCV infection. Conclusions. Chronic HCV infection is associated with subclinical CVD, suggesting that vigilant assessments of cardiovascular risk are warranted for HCV-infected individuals. Future research should determine whether HCV infection duration or HCV treatment influence coronary plaque development. PMID:26216904

  19. Regression or reduction in progression of atherosclerosis, and avoidance of coronary events, with lovastatin in patients with or at high risk of cardiovascular disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Frisinghelli, Anna; Mafrici, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are the drugs of first choice for treating hypercholesterolaemia in order to prevent or slow the progression of coronary heart disease (CHD). Statins generally reduce the risk of CHD morbidity or mortality by about 30%. Lovastatin is effective in lowering plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and is widely prescribed for both the primary and secondary prevention of CHD. In the major AFCAPS/TexCAPS primary prevention study of 6605 middle-aged or elderly men and women without symptomatic cardiovascular disease and with only moderately elevated serum lipids, treatment with lovastatin 20-40 mg once daily for a mean of 5.2 years significantly (p < 0.001) reduced the incidence of a first acute major cardiac event by 37% compared with placebo. In the smaller ACAPS study of 919 men and women who were asymptomatic for cardiovascular disease, but with evidence of early atherosclerosis, treatment with lovastatin for 3 years significantly (p = 0.001) slowed or reversed atherosclerosis compared with placebo, as measured by changes in the intimal-medial thickness of carotid arteries on B-mode ultrasound. Three randomised, controlled, secondary prevention trials have demonstrated that in patients with coronary artery disease, treatment with lovastatin 20-80 mg/day alone or in combination with colestipol for 2-2.5 years reduced the severity of stenosis and/or slowed or reversed the progression of atherosclerosis, as assessed by angiography. In the FATS study, the severity of stenosis after 2.5 years in recipients of lovastatin plus colestipol was reduced by 2.8% compared with placebo, while the frequency of lesion progression was halved and the frequency of lesion regression was tripled. Treatment with lovastatin for 2.2 years in the MARS study significantly reduced the mean percent diameter stenosis compared with placebo (p = 0.005) in patients with more severe stenosis, and also significantly (p = 0

  20. Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease in Symptomatic Subjects With Advanced Vascular Atherosclerosis of the Carotid Artery (Type III and IV b Findings Using Ultrasound)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ansgar; Bojara, Waldemar; Schunk, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background A study was conducted as to whether the early diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) in symptomatic patients with advanced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was more successful using ultrasound technology than exercise electrocardiography (ECG). Methods Within the scope of an occupational screening program using subjects from diverse employment sectors, people were given the opportunity to determine their risk of heart attack. During the study, the total plaque area (TPA), the maximum plaque thickness in the carotid artery and the PROCAM scores of 3,513 healthy men and 2,088 healthy women between the ages of 20 and 65 were determined. During the subsequent follow-up study, 36 subjects developed symptoms such as exertional dyspnea, atypical angina pectoris (AP) or typical AP. Four patients displayed no symptoms. The initial cardiac diagnostic testing was conducted on 31 patients using an exercise ECG, four patients were assessed using a coronary angiogram, and five further patients were assessed using a computed tomography (CT) coronary angiogram. An ultrasound examination of the carotid artery of 39 patients revealed a type IV b finding and in one patient, the examination revealed a type III finding. Results In 17 patients, the PROCAM score was < 10%, 13 patients had a score of 10-20% and 10 patients had a score of > 20%. In the final analysis, only two patients had entirely smooth coronary arteries, seven had coronary sclerosis, seven had a 30% stenosis, one had a 30-40% stenosis, one had a 40% stenosis, and 22 patients had a stenosis ≥ 50%, and in extreme cases, a left main coronary artery stenosis with three-vessel disease was shown. The exercise ECG only achieved a true positive result in four patients, and in 21 patients, the result was false negative. Conclusions Symptomatic patients with advanced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery (type III and type IV b findings) had a high risk for CHD. The diagnosis of CHD is better achieved by

  1. Effects of sitagliptin on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes-A serial integrated backscatter-intravascular ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Kazuki; Koyama, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Hikita, Hiroyuki; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Miyazawa, Akiyoshi; Michishita, Ichiro; Investigators, for the TRUST

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects in an animal model. However, the clinical usefulness of DPP-4 inhibitors, particularly its effects on coronary atherosclerosis, has not been evaluated thus far. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the effects of sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, on coronary atherosclerosis using integrated backscatter (IB)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with type 2 diabetes. This trial was a prospective, open-labeled, randomized, multicenter study. Twenty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to either the sitagliptin group (group S) or the control group (group C). Non-PCI lesions were evaluated using IB-IVUS at the time of PCI and at the 48-week follow-up. The primary endpoint was the percentage change in plaque volume measured using grayscale IVUS, and the secondary endpoint was changes in plaque composition evaluated using IB-IVUS. Grayscale IVUS analysis demonstrated that plaque volume tended to decrease in both groups (group S: -1.7±8.5%; group C: -3.2±12.2%), but a between-group difference was not observed. A decrease in the lipid plaque volume (group S: from 200.1±116.2 to 179.8±121.0 mm3, P = 0.02; group C: from 298.3±363.0 to 256.6±386.1 mm3, P = 0.1) and an increase in the calcified plaque volume (group S: from 2.1±0.9 to 3.2±1.8 mm3, P = 0.06; group C: from 2.3±1.7 to 4.8±3.5 mm3, P = 0.04) was observed on IB-IVUS analysis. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses showed that the percentage change in serum non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was an independent and significant predictor of a reduction in lipid plaque volume (β = 0.445, P = 0.04). In conclusions, sitagliptin did not significantly reduce coronary plaque volume in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, a decrease in the lipid plaque volume was observed in the sitagliptin

  2. Effect of serial infusions of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (CER-001) on coronary atherosclerosis: rationale and design of the CARAT study

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jordan; Janssan, Alex; Nguyen, Tracy; Pisaniello, Anthony D.; Scherer, Daniel J.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Merkely, Bela; Nissen, Steven E.; Ray, Kausik; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Worthley, Stephen G.; Keyserling, Connie; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Butters, Julie; Girardi, Jacinta; Miller, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    Background High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is believed to have atheroprotective properties, but an effective HDL-based therapy remains elusive. Early studies have suggested that infusion of reconstituted HDL promotes reverse cholesterol transport and vascular reactivity. The CER-001 Atherosclerosis Regression Acute Coronary Syndrome Trial (CARAT) is investigating the impact of infusing an engineered pre-beta HDL mimetic containing sphingomyelin (SM) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidlyglycerol (CER-001) on coronary atheroma volume in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods The CARAT is a phase 2, multicenter trial in which 292 patients with an ACS undergoing intracoronary ultrasonography and showing percent atheroma volume (PAV) greater than 30% are randomly assigned to treatment with ten infusions of CER-001 3 mg/kg or matching placebo, administered at weekly intervals. Intracoronary ultrasonography is repeated at the end of the treatment period. Results The primary endpoint is the nominal change in PAV. Safety and tolerability will also be evaluated. Conclusions CARAT will establish whether serial 3 mg/kg infusions of an engineered pre-beta HDL mimetic containing SM and dipalmitoyl phosphatidlyglycerol (CER-001) will regress atherosclerotic plaque in patients with a recent ACS. PMID:28164012

  3. Associations between Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Adults: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    VanWagner, Lisa B.; Ning, Hongyan; Lewis, Cora E.; Shay, Christina M.; Wilkins, John; Carr, J Jeffrey; Terry, James G.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Jacobs, David R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an obesity-related condition associated with cardiovascular mortality. Yet, whether or not NAFLD is independently related to atherosclerosis is unclear. In a population-based cross-sectional sample of middle-aged adults free from liver or heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that NAFLD is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC)) independent of obesity. Methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study with CT quantification of liver fat, CAC and AAC were included (n=2,424). NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation ≤ 40 Hounsfield Units after exclusion of other causes of liver fat. CAC and AAC presence was defined as Agatston score > 0. Results Mean participant age was 50.1±3.6 years, (42.7% men, 50.0% black) and BMI was 30.6±7.2 kg/m2. The prevalence of NAFLD, CAC, and AAC was 9.6%, 27.1%, and 51.4%. NAFLD participants had increased prevalence of CAC (37.9% vs. 26.0%, p<0.001) and AAC (65.1% vs. 49.9%, p<0.001). NAFLD remained associated with CAC (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.001–1.82) and AAC (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.29–2.35) after adjustment for demographics and health behaviors. However, these associations were attenuated after additional adjustment for visceral adipose tissue (CAC OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74–1.48, AAC OR=1.20; 95% CI, 0.86–1.67). There was no interaction by race or sex. Conclusion In contrast to prior research, these findings suggest that obesity attenuates the relationship between NAFLD and subclinical atherosclerosis. Further studies evaluating the role of NAFLD duration on atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular events are needed. PMID:24956534

  4. Associations of retrospective and concurrent lipid levels with subclinical atherosclerosis prediction after 20 years of follow-up: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, Lewis A.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Loria, Catherine M.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Pletcher, Mark J.; Shikany, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we sought to determine how well lipids measured at baseline and at 20 years predict the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods Complete risk factor, coronary artery calcification (CAC), and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) data were available for 2435 participants. Lipids were categorized into quartiles, CAC at Y20 was dichotomized as present/absent, and CIMT was dichotomized as ≥84 or <84th overall percentile. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the association between lipids and CAC/CIMT. C statistics were used to assess the discriminative value of each lipid measure in predicting the presence of CAC or CIMT at Y20. Results Lipid levels measured in young adulthood as well as middle age were both associated with subclinical disease in middle age. The discriminatory value of lipids was virtually identical at baseline, when participants were 18–30 years of age, and 20 years later. Neither baseline nor Y20 lipid data were strong predictors of Y20 subclinical disease despite statistically significant associations. Conclusions These results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that early-life exposure to nonoptimal lipids matters and lifestyle modifications administered earlier in the lifespan could slow the progress of the atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:23889858

  5. Coronary artery disease

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    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  6. Association of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities with Coronary Artery Calcium and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Individuals without Clinical Coronary Heart Disease (From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA])

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J.; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L.; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Isolated minor non-specific ST-segment and T-wave (NSSTA), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multi-ethnic sample of men and women aged 45–84 and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, resting 12-lead electrocardiograms, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having either minor abnormalities (e.g., minor non-specific STTA, first degree atrioventricular block, and QRS axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, significant dysrhythmias and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine the cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and common carotid-IMT. Among 6710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable-adjustment, isolated minor STTA, minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with the presence of CAC (>0) among men (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.81–1.33; 1.10, 0.91–1.32; and 1.03, 0.81–1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82–1.24; 1.04, 0.87–1.23; and 0.94, 0.73–1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using both log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multi-ethnic cohort. PMID:19801030

  7. Association of electrocardiographic abnormalities with coronary artery calcium and carotid artery intima-media thickness in individuals without clinical coronary heart disease (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2009-10-15

    Isolated minor nonspecific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities (NSSTAs), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multiethnic sample of men and women 45 to 84 years of age and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms at rest, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement, and common carotid intima-media thickness (CC-IMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having minor abnormalities (e.g., minor NSSTTAs, first-degree atrioventricular block, and QRS-axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major STTAs, significant dysrhythmias, and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and CC-IMT. Of 6,710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable adjustment, isolated minor STTAs and minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with presence of CAC (>0) in men (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.33; 1.10, 0.91 to 1.32; and 1.03, 0.81 to 1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82 to 1.24; 1.04, 0.87 to 1.23; and 0.94, 0.73 to 1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. In conclusion, ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multiethnic cohort.

  8. [Atherosclerosis. Old problem, new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Cortez, J

    2000-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of mortality in the population of the, so called, developed countries of western culture. Since the first half of this century, hypercholesterolemia was the hallmark for the investigation of atherosclerosis, improving the level of knowledge about the complex metabolism of lipoproteins. The occurrence of atherosclerosis in normolipidaemic subjects, and the relationship between this illness, other dysmetabolic features and certain infectious agents, led to the reformulation, in the last decade, of the pathophysiological archtypes, atherosclerosis was included in the group of the inflammatory processes. The inflammatory response to aggression of the arterial wall is the innovative issue of atherosclerosis investigation and laboratory follow-up in the new millennium.

  9. Influence of obesity and metabolic disease on carotid atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CordioPrev study)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Recent data suggest that the presence of associated metabolic abnormalities may be important modifiers of the association of obesity with a poorer prognosis in coronary heart disease. We determined the influence of isolated overweight and obesity on carotid intima media thickness (IMT-CC...

  10. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  11. Role of Micronutrients on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Micronutrients in Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Duygu; Gurses, Kadri Murat; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Tokgozoglu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) leading to coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Nutrition is one of the key factors in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Micronutrient supplements are widely used to prevent many chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. However, scientific evidence regarding this issue is still insufficient and current data on the association of dietary micronutrients and CVD risk is contradictory. Most of the randomized studies have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this review, role of each micronutrient on subclinical atherosclerosis will be evaluated thoroughly.

  12. Coronary atherosclerosis burden, but not transient troponin elevation, predicts long-term outcome in recreational marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Leineweber, Kirsten; Lehmann, Nils; Braun, Siegmund; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Perrey, Mareike; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Budde, Thomas; Halle, Martin; Mann, Klaus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Heusch, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We determined the prognostic value of transient increases in high-sensitive serum troponin I (hsTnI) during a marathon and its association with traditional cardiovascular risk factors and imaging-based risk markers for incident coronary events and all-cause mortality in recreational marathon runners. Baseline data of 108 marathon runners, 864 age-matched controls and 216 age- and risk factor-matched controls from the general population were recorded and their coronary event rates and all-cause mortality after 6 ± 1 years determined. hsTnI was measured in 74 marathon finishers before and after the race. Other potential predictors for coronary events, i.e., Framingham Risk Score (FRS), coronary artery calcium (CAC) and presence of myocardial fibrosis as measured by magnetic resonance imaging-based late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), were also assessed. An increase beyond the 99 % hsTnI-threshold, i.e., 0.04 μg/L, was observed in 36.5 % of runners. FRS, CAC, or prevalent LGE did not predict hsTnI values above or increases in hsTnI beyond the median after the race, nor did they predict future events. However, runners with versus without LGE had higher hsTnI values after the race (median (Q1/Q3), 0.08 μg/L (0.04/0.09) versus 0.03 μg/L (0.02/0.06), p = 0.039), and higher increases in hsTnI values during the race (median (Q1/Q3), 0.05 μg/L (0.03/0.08) versus 0.02 μg/L (0.01/0.05), p = 0.0496). Runners had a similar cumulative event rate as age-matched or age- and risk factor-matched controls, i.e., 6.5 versus 5.0 % or 4.6 %, respectively. Event rates in runners with CAC scores <100, 100-399, and ≥400 were 1.5, 12.0, and 21.4 % (p = 0.002 for trend) and not different from either control group. Runners with coronary events had a higher prevalence of LGE than runners without events (57 versus 8 %, p = 0.003). All-cause mortality was similar in marathon runners (3/108, 2.8 %) and controls (26/864, 3.0 % or 5/216, 2.4 %, respectively). Recreational marathon runners with

  13. Efficacy of statins on sirtuin 1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression: the role of sirtuin 1 gene variants in human coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ulkan; Gok, Ozlem; Elibol-Can, Birsen; Uysal, Omer; Bacaksiz, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and are used to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) due to their pleiotropic effects. Recently, greater focus has been placed on the role of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in cardiovascular disease research. However, insufficient data exist on the relationships between statins, SIRT1 protein levels, and SIRT1 gene variants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of statins, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, in CAD patients by analysing the associations between SIRT1 gene variants, rs7069102C>G and rs2273773C>T, and SIRT1/endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) expression, as well as total antioxidant and oxidant status, and the oxidative stress index. SIRT1 expression was significantly higher, and eNOS expression was significantly lower in CAD patients when compared with controls. Statin treatment reduced SIRT1 expression and increased eNOS expression, similar to the levels found in the control population, independent from the studied SIRT1 gene variants. Oxidative stress parameters were significantly increased in CAD patients, and were decreased by statin treatment, demonstrating the antioxidative effects of statins on atherosclerosis. These results indicate that statin treatment could produce its protective effect on cardiovascular disease through the inhibition of SIRT1 expression. This is the first study reporting on the effect of statins, specifically atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, on SIRT1 expression in CAD patients.

  14. Influence of Obesity and Metabolic Disease on Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CordioPrev Study)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Gomez-Luna, Purificacion; Gomez-Garduño, Angela; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F.; Yubero-Serrano, Elena; Marin, Carmen; Perez-Caballero, Ana I.; Fuentes-Jimenez, Francisco J.; Camargo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Perez- Jimenez, Francisco; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent data suggest that the presence of associated metabolic abnormalities may be important modifiers of the association of obesity with a poorer prognosis in coronary heart disease. We determined the influence of isolated overweight and obesity on carotid intima media thickness (IMT-CC), and also assessed whether this influence was determined by the presence of metabolic abnormalities. Methods 1002 participants from the CordioPrev study were studied at entry. We determined their metabolic phenotypes and performed carotid ultrasound assessment. We evaluated the influence of obesity, overweight and metabolic phenotypes on the IMT-CC. Results Metabolically sick participants (defined by the presence of two or more metabolic abnormalities) showed a greater IMT-CC than metabolically healthy individuals (p = 4 * 10−6). Overweight and normal weight patients who were metabolically healthy showed a lower IMT-CC than the metabolically abnormal groups (all p<0.05). When we evaluated only body weight (without considering metabolic phenotypes), overweight or obese patients did not differ significantly from normal-weight patients in their IMT-CC (p = 0.077). However, obesity was a determinant of IMT-CC when compared to the composite group of normal weight and overweight patients (all not obese). Conclusions In coronary patients, a metabolically abnormal phenotype is associated with a greater IMT-CC, and may be linked to a higher risk of suffering new cardiovascular events. The protection conferred in the IMT-CC by the absence of metabolic abnormality may be blunted by the presence of obesity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00924937 PMID:27064675

  15. Atherosclerosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arteries in which fatty material is deposited in the vessel wall, ... muscle leads to symptoms such as chest pain. Atherosclerosis shows no symptoms until a complication occurs.

  16. [Clinical and angiographical results of the use of the EPHESOS stent in patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Batyraliev, T A; Samko, A N; Pershukov, I V; Niyazova-Karben, Z A; Ozgul, S; Serchelik, A; Besnili, F; Aĭalp, M R; Pya, Yu; Dinler, G

    2002-01-01

    The Ephesos is a new balloon-expandable, stainless steel, tubular stent with multicellular design. This open nonrandomized study assesses the immediate and long-term clinical and angiographic outcomes after Ephesos implantation in patients with native coronary artery disease. The Ephesos was implanted in 168 patients with 198 de novo lesions. Most patients (56%) had unstable angina, and 38% of lesions were type B2-C. The mean lesion length was 12.5-/+7.2 mm, and 29% of lesions were >15 mm in length. No stent deployment failure occurred, as well as acute or subacute stent thrombosis. In-hospital non-Q-wave myocardial infarction occurred in 2 patients. The 6-month event-free survival was 83.9%. Two patients with no restenosis in the target vessel died of fatal infarction due to abrupt closure of a nontarget vessel. The 6-month angiographic follow-up was obtained in 164 patients (98%) (192 lesions). The loss index was 0.27-/+0.25. Angiographic restenosis rate was 12%. Twenty patients with restenosis had repeat target lesion revascularization. The results of this study indicate a potential benefit of EPHESOS for the prevention of stent thrombosis and restenosis in these relatively high-risk patients.

  17. Influence of exercise and perivascular adipose tissue on coronary artery vasomotor function in a familial hypercholesterolemic porcine atherosclerosis model

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Aaron K.

    2010-01-01

    Our lab has shown that left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) perivascular adipose tissue (PAT) blunts endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced maximal contractions in normal pigs on low- and high-fat diets. Other studies report that PAT exerts anticontractile effects on agonist-induced arterial contraction via release of a relaxing factor that acts on the underlying vasculature. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that PAT blunts LCX contraction in familial hypercholesterolemic pigs and that exercise training (Ex) augments this anticontractile effect. Male familial hypercholesterolemic pigs were divided into Ex (n = 13) and sedentary (Sed) (n = 15) groups. LCX reactivity to angiotensin II (ANG II), bradykinin (BK), ET-1, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was evaluated in vitro with intact or removed PAT in Sed and Ex familial hypercholesterolemic pigs. LCX relaxation induced by BK and SNP was not altered by Ex or PAT removal. LCX contractions stimulated by ANG II and ET-1 were not significantly altered by Ex or PAT removal across doses; however, Ex did act to significantly reduce ET-1 maximal contractions in familial hypercholesterolemic pig LCX compared with Sed familial hypercholesterolemic pig LCX, independent of PAT (P < 0.05). We conclude that LCX PAT in Sed and Ex familial hypercholesterolemic pigs exerts no substantial anticontractile influence over LCX vasomotor responses to endogenous constrictors such as ANG II and ET-1. Our results suggest that exercise training significantly reduces familial hypercholesterolemic pig LCX maximal contractile responses to the endogenous constrictor ET-1, independent of PAT. PMID:19959766

  18. Dietary Protein Intake and Coronary Heart Disease in a Large Community Based Cohort: Results from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Bernhard; Gronroos, Noelle; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Wyler von Ballmoos, Moritz C.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Prospective data examining the relationship between dietary protein intake and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) are inconclusive. Most evidence is derived from homogenous populations such as health professionals. Large community-based analyses in more diverse samples are lacking. Methods We studied the association of protein type and major dietary protein sources and risk for incident CHD in 12,066 middle-aged adults (aged 45–64 at baseline, 1987–1989) from four U.S. communities enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who were free of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Dietary protein intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years of follow-up by food frequency questionnaire. Our primary outcome was adjudicated coronary heart disease events or deaths with following up through December 31, 2010. Cox proportional hazard models with multivariable adjustment were used for statistical analyses. Results During a median follow-up of 22 years, there were 1,147 CHD events. In multivariable analyses total, animal and vegetable protein were not associated with an increased risk for CHD before or after adjustment. In food group analyses of major dietary protein sources, protein intake from red and processed meat, dairy products, fish, nuts, eggs, and legumes were not significantly associated with CHD risk. The hazard ratios [with 95% confidence intervals] for risk of CHD across quintiles of protein from poultry were 1.00 [ref], 0.83 [0.70–0.99], 0.93 [0.75–1.15], 0.88 [0.73–1.06], 0.79 [0.64–0.98], P for trend  = 0.16). Replacement analyses evaluating the association of substituting one source of dietary protein for another or of decreasing protein intake at the expense of carbohydrates or total fats did not show any statistically significant association with CHD risk. Conclusion Based on a large community cohort we found no overall relationship between protein type and major dietary protein

  19. Validated context-dependent associations of coronary heart disease risk with genotype variation in the chromosome 9p21 region: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, Christine M.; Dyson, Greg; Clark, Andrew G.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Markers of the chromosome 9p21 region are regarded as the strongest and most reliably significant genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals for Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; this was recently confirmed by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis. However, while these associations are significant at the population level, they may not be clinically relevant predictors of risk for all individuals. We describe here the results of a study designed to address the question: What is the contribution of context defined by traditional risk factors in determining the utility of DNA sequence variations marking the 9p21 region for explaining variation in CHD risk? We analyzed a sample of 7,589 (3,869 females and 3,720 males) European American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We confirmed CHD-SNP genotype associations for two 9p21 region marker SNPs previously identified by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium study, of which ARIC was a part. We then tested each marker SNP genotype effect on prediction of CHD within sub-groups of the ARIC sample defined by traditional CHD risk factors by applying a novel multi-model strategy, PRIM. We observed that the effects of SNP genotypes in the 9p21 region were strongest in a subgroup of hypertensives. We subsequently validated the effect of the region in an independent sample from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Our study suggests that marker SNPs identified as predictors of CHD risk in large population based GWAS may have their greatest utility in explaining risk of disease in particular sub-groups characterized by biological and environmental effects measured by the traditional CHD risk factors. PMID:24889828

  20. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bonanno, Elena; Arca, Marcello; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  1. [The treatment of atherosclerosis--drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Takahashi, Y

    1993-08-01

    Drug treatment against atherosclerosis has been evaluated recently in many epidemiological studies. Lipid Research Clinics Group convincingly reported in a large scale design that anion exchange resin effectively reduced blood cholesterol level and concomitantly decreased the events of coronary heart disease. Subsequently, anion exchange resin with or without combined administration of niacin or statin was found to inhibit the progression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in FATS, SCOR, CLAS and STARS. Fenofibrate also successfully reduced the coronary artery narrowings. Based on these intervention studies, several hypocholesterolemic agents are definitely effective in the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis.

  2. The non-thyroidal illness syndrome after coronary artery bypass grafting: a 6-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Cerillo, Alfredo Giuseppe; Storti, Simona; Mariani, Massimiliano; Kallushi, Enkel; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Parri, Maria Serena; Clerico, Aldo; Glauber, Mattia

    2005-01-01

    The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered a transient and completely reversible phenomenon, but it has been shown that it may last for several days postoperatively after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. This study was undertaken to assess thyroid function 6 months after uncomplicated CABG. The thyroid profile was evaluated in 40 consecutive patients undergoing CABG preoperatively, at 0, 12, 48, and 120 h postoperatively, and at 6-month follow-up. Triiodothyronine (T3), free T3 (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were assayed using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. T4 and total serum thyroid hormone-binding capacity (T-uptake) were measured on the same samples using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Patients with severe systemic illness and patients treated with amiodarone were excluded. All patients were euthyroid at admission. Mean age was 67.4+/-9.0 years. There were 31 (77.5%) men. Typical NTIS was observed in all patients, and the FT3 concentration was still reduced by postoperative day 5 (p<0.0001). At 6-month follow-up, all patients were free from cardiac symptoms, and no new cardiac events were recorded. The thyroid profile was normal in 35 patients (87.5%). One patient (4.5%) had developed overt hypothyroidism. Two patients had isolated low T3 and FT3 levels with normal TSH. Two patients had moderately increased FT3 levels with suppressed TSH. In most uncomplicated patients, thyroid function returns to normal 6 months after CABG. However, we observed significant alterations of the thyroid profile in 5 out of 40 patients. Further studies are needed to define the long-term consequences of postoperative NTIS.

  3. A genetic risk score based on direct associations with coronary heart disease improves coronary heart disease risk prediction in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), but not in the Rotterdam and Framingham Offspring, Studies

    PubMed Central

    Brautbar, Ariel; Pompeii, Lisa A.; Dehghan, Abbas; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nambi, Vijay; Virani, Salim S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Pencina, Michael J.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Objective Multiple studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined whether SNPs selected based on predefined criteria will improve CHD risk prediction when added to traditional risk factors (TRFs). Methods SNPs were selected from the literature based on association with CHD, lack of association with a known CHD risk factor, and successful replication. A genetic risk score (GRS) was constructed based on these SNPs. Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate CHD risk based on the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Framingham CHD risk scores with and without the GRS. Results The GRS was associated with risk for CHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07–1.13). Addition of the GRS to the ARIC risk score significantly improved discrimination, reclassification, and calibration beyond that afforded by TRFs alone in non-Hispanic whites in the ARIC study. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) increased from 0.742 to 0.749 (Δ= 0.007; 95% CI, 0.004–0.013), and the net reclassification index (NRI) was 6.3%. Although the risk estimates for CHD in the Framingham Offspring (HR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.10–1.14) and Rotterdam (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.02–1.14) Studies were significantly improved by adding the GRS to TRFs, improvements in AUC and NRI were modest. Conclusion Addition of a GRS based on direct associations with CHD to TRFs significantly improved discrimination and reclassification in white participants of the ARIC Study, with no significant improvement in the Rotterdam and Framingham Offspring Studies. PMID:22789513

  4. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  5. The Association Between Physical Activity and Both Incident Coronary Artery Calcification and Ankle Brachial Index Progression: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph A C; Jensky, Nicole E.; Criqui, Michael H.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Lima, João A. C.; Allison, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both coronary artery calcification (CAC) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) are measures of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. The influence of physical activity on the longitudinal change in these measures remains unclear. To assess this we examined the association between these measures and self-reported physical activity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods At baseline, the MESA participants were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. We included all participants with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40 (n=5656). Predictor variables were based on self-reported measures with physical activity being assessed using the Typical Week Physical Activity Survey from which metabolic equivalent-minutes/week of activity were calculated. We focused on physical activity intensity, intentional exercise, sedentary behavior, and conditioning. Incident peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as the progression of ABI to values below 0.90 (given the baseline range of 0.90 to 1.40). Incident CAC was defined as a CAC score >0 Agatston units upon follow up with a baseline score of 0 Agatston units. Results Mean age was 61 years, 53% were female, and mean body mass index was 28 kg/m2. After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, intentional exercise was protective for incident peripheral artery disease (Relative Risk (RR)= 0.85, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.98). After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, there was a significant association between vigorous PA and incident CAC (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.00). There was also a significant association between sedentary behavior and increased amount of CAC among participants with CAC at baseline (Δlog(Agatston Units +25)=0.027, 95% CI 0.002, 0.052). Conclusions These data suggest that there is an association between physical activity/sedentary behavior and the progression of two different measures

  6. Effects of niacin on glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression, and clinical events in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels (<100 mg/dl): a combined analysis of the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), and Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study.

    PubMed

    Phan, Binh An P; Muñoz, Luis; Shadzi, Pey; Isquith, Daniel; Triller, Michael; Brown, B Greg; Zhao, Xue-Qiao

    2013-02-01

    Although the effect of niacin on the glucose levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus has been investigated, niacin's effects on the glucose levels and atherosclerosis in subjects with normal glucose levels have not been well established. We examined the effect of niacin on the glucose levels, coronary stenosis progression using quantitative coronary angiography, and clinical events in 407 subjects who had a baseline glucose level <100 mg/dl and were enrolled in the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), HDL-Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (HATS), Armed Forces Regression Study (AFREGS), or Carotid Plaque Composition by MRI during lipid-lowering (CPC) study testing active niacin therapy. Although the fasting glucose levels increased significantly within 3 years in both subjects treated with niacin (from 85.6 ± 9.5 to 95.5 ± 19.7 mg/dl, p <0.001) and without niacin (from 85.2 ± 9.6 to 90 ± 17.9 mg/dl, p = 0.009), those treated with niacin had a significantly larger increase in glucose levels than those not taking niacin (9.88 vs 4.05 mg/dl, p = 0.002). Overall, 29% of subjects developed impaired fasting glucose within 3 years. Incident impaired fasting glucose was significantly more likely to be observed in subjects treated with niacin than in those who were not. However, the frequency of new-onset diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (5.6% vs 4.8%, p = 0.5). Niacin-treated subjects compared to untreated subjects had significantly less change in mean coronary stenosis (0.1 ± 0.3% vs 2 ± 12%, p <0.0001) and less major cardiovascular events (8% vs 21%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the use of niacin for 3 years in subjects with normal baseline glucose levels was associated with an increase in blood glucose levels and the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose, but not diabetes mellitus, and was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of coronary stenosis progression and major cardiovascular events.

  7. Polymorphisms in IL-10 and INF-γ genes are associated with early atherosclerosis in coronary but not in carotid arteries: A study of 122 autopsy cases of young adults.

    PubMed

    Esperança, José Carlos P; Miranda, William R R; Netto, José B; Lima, Fabiane S; Baumworcel, Leonardo; Chimelli, Leila; Silva, Rosane; Ürményi, Turán P; Cabello, Pedro H; Rondinelli, Edson; Faffe, Débora S

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease, involving both genetic and environmental factors. However, the influence of genetic variations on its early development remains unclear. This study examined the association of 12 different polymorphisms with atherosclerosis severity in anterior descending coronary (DA, n = 103) and carotid arteries (CA, n = 66) of autopsied young adults (< 30 years old). Histological sections (H-E) were classified according to the American Heart Association. Polymorphisms in ACE, TNF-α (- 308G/A and - 238 G/A), IFN-γ (+ 874 A/T), MMP-9 (- 1562 C/T), IL-10 (- 1082 A/G and - 819 C/T), NOS3 (894 G/T), ApoA1 (rs964184), ApoE (E2E3E4 isoforms), and TGF-β (codons 25 and 10) genes were genotyped by gel electrophoresis or automatic DNA sequencing. Firearm projectile or car accident was the main cause of death, and no information about classical risk factors was available. Histological analysis showed high prevalence of type III atherosclerotic lesions in both DA (69%) and CA (39%) arteries, while severe type IV and V lesions were observed in 14% (DA) and 33% (CA). Allele frequencies and genotype distributions were determined. Among the polymorphisms studied, IFN-γ and IL-10 (- 1082 A/G) were related to atherosclerosis severity in DA artery. No association between genotypes and lesion severity was found in CA. In conclusion, we observed that the high prevalence of early atherosclerosis in young adults is associated with IFN-γ (p < 0.001) and IL-10 (p = 0.013) genotypes. This association is blood vessel dependent. Our findings suggest that the vascular system presents site specialization, and specific genetic variations may provide future biomarkers for early disease identification.

  8. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart and other parts of your body. Atherosclerosis (ATH-er-oskler-O-sis) is a disease ... which plaque builds up inside your arteries. One atherosclerosis-related disease, coronary artery disease (CAD) is the ...

  9. Coronary collaterals.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, R

    1976-01-01

    Coronary collaterals are probably enlargements of pre-existing channels which respond to local vasodilators and which function whenever pressure differences exist across them. Thus, in human coronary atherosclerosis collaterals are only seen when there is a severe intervening arterial obstruction (in excess of 75%). Coronary collaterals follow epicardial and intramycardial pathways, and the intermediary connections may be at vessels of highly varying caliber. The flow potential of most collateral pathways in man is possibly adequate for segmental myocardial function at lower than normal demands but clearly is inadequate for most, if not all, stressful interventions. In the last analysis, coronary collaterals in man are more an indication of severe regional ischemia (present or potential) than a sign of biological "compensation'' for a perfusion deficit.

  10. Experimental coronary sclerosis induced by immobilization of rabbits: A new model of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyavokin, V. V.; Tjawokin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for producing arteriosclerosis with coronary insufficiency in rabbits by means of immobilization is described and discussed. The experimentally induced atherosclerosis develops due to hypodynamics imposed by the reduced muscular activity without overloading with exogenous cholesterol. The atherosclerosis and coronary insufficiency are associated. With variations in the duration and extent of immobilization, coronary insufficiency alone or with atherosclerosis can be produced.

  11. Polymorphisms in IL-10 and INF-γ genes are associated with early atherosclerosis in coronary but not in carotid arteries: A study of 122 autopsy cases of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Esperança, José Carlos P.; Miranda, William R.R.; Netto, José B.; Lima, Fabiane S.; Baumworcel, Leonardo; Chimelli, Leila; Silva, Rosane; Ürményi, Turán P.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Rondinelli, Edson; Faffe, Débora S.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease, involving both genetic and environmental factors. However, the influence of genetic variations on its early development remains unclear. This study examined the association of 12 different polymorphisms with atherosclerosis severity in anterior descending coronary (DA, n = 103) and carotid arteries (CA, n = 66) of autopsied young adults (< 30 years old). Histological sections (H-E) were classified according to the American Heart Association. Polymorphisms in ACE, TNF-α (− 308G/A and − 238 G/A), IFN-γ (+ 874 A/T), MMP-9 (− 1562 C/T), IL-10 (− 1082 A/G and − 819 C/T), NOS3 (894 G/T), ApoA1 (rs964184), ApoE (E2E3E4 isoforms), and TGF-β (codons 25 and 10) genes were genotyped by gel electrophoresis or automatic DNA sequencing. Firearm projectile or car accident was the main cause of death, and no information about classical risk factors was available. Histological analysis showed high prevalence of type III atherosclerotic lesions in both DA (69%) and CA (39%) arteries, while severe type IV and V lesions were observed in 14% (DA) and 33% (CA). Allele frequencies and genotype distributions were determined. Among the polymorphisms studied, IFN-γ and IL-10 (− 1082 A/G) were related to atherosclerosis severity in DA artery. No association between genotypes and lesion severity was found in CA. In conclusion, we observed that the high prevalence of early atherosclerosis in young adults is associated with IFN-γ (p < 0.001) and IL-10 (p = 0.013) genotypes. This association is blood vessel dependent. Our findings suggest that the vascular system presents site specialization, and specific genetic variations may provide future biomarkers for early disease identification. PMID:26674973

  12. Animal models of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiawei; Huang, Wei; Liu, George

    2015-08-20

    Cardiovascular disease, predominantly coronary heart disease and stroke, leads to high morbidity and mortality not only in developed worlds but also in underdeveloped regions. The dominant pathologic foundation for cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis and as to coronary heart disease, coronary atherosclerosis and resulting lumen stenosis, even total occlusions. In translational research, several animals, such as mice, rabbits and pigs, have been used as disease models of human atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular disorders. However, coronary lesions are either naturally rare or hard to be fast induced in these models, hence, coronary heart disease induction mostly relies on surgical or pharmaceutical interventions with no or limited primary coronary lesions, thus unrepresentative of human coronary heart disease progression and pathology. In this review, we will describe the progress of animal models of coronary heart disease following either spontaneous or diet-accelerated coronary lesions.

  13. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention.

  14. The burden of comorbidity and the C-reactive protein levels in nonthyroidal illness syndrome with metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Cola, Silvia; Frugoni, Patrizia; Indiano, Ilaria; D'Urso, Rosaria; Falaschi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Thyroid hormones undergo significant modifications during severe illnesses, and the low T3 levels are the hallmark of nonthyoidal illness syndrome (NTIS), due to a reduced extrathyroidal conversion from T4. We examined 41 patients with NTIS by a modified cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) and the measurement of FT3, FT4, TSH, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Fifty-seven control subjects were enrolled. We observed reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels in NTIS patients (P < 0.05). The CIRS scores (severity and comordity index) were inversely related to FT3 and positively related to FT4 levels (P < 0.05). The CRP and the FT4 concentrations were positively associated (P < 0.01). Our study showed that the reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels were significantly related to the comorbidity and severity of systemic illnesses, probably as a result of impairment in the peripheral hormonal conversion. The CIRS scale and the CRP are useful tools for a better evaluation of these patients.

  15. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  16. BIOLOGICAL IMAGING OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS: MOVING BEYOND ANATOMY

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Johan W.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological or molecular imaging is now providing exciting new strategies to study atherosclerosis in both animals and humans. These technologies hold the promise to provide disease-specific, molecular information within the context of a systemic or organ-specific disease beyond traditional anatomical-based imaging. By integration of biological, chemical and anatomical imaging knowledge into diagnostic strategies, a more comprehensive and predictive picture of atherosclerosis is likely to emerge. As such, biological imaging is well-positioned to study different stages of atherosclerosis and its treatment, including the sequence of atheroma initiation, progression, and plaque rupture. In this review we describe the evolving concepts in atherosclerosis imaging with a focus on coronary artery disease, and we provide an overview of recent exciting translational developments in biological imaging. The illuminated examples and discussions will highlight how biological imaging is providing new clinical approaches to identify high-risk plaques, and to streamline the development process of new atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:23733542

  17. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  18. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  19. Scavenger Receptor Class B Type 1 Deletion Led to Coronary Atherosclerosis and Ischemic Heart Disease in Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Knockout Mice on Modified Western-type Diet

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiawei; Guo, Xin; Wang, Mengyu; Dong, Chengyan; Gao, Mingming; Wang, Huan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Fan; Liu, George

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE) or low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) knockout (KO) mice are generally resistant to developing coronary atherosclerosis (CA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, studies have demonstrated the occurrence of spontaneous CA and IHD in scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI)/apoE double KO (dKO) mice, which suggests that SR-BI could be a potential target for the prevention and therapy of CA and IHD. This possibility was later investigated in SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice, but no signs of CA or IHD was identified when mice were fed a normal western-type diet. Here we explored whether SR-BI deletion could result in CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed a modified western-type diet containing higher (0.5%) cholesterol. Methods: Cardiac functions were detected by electrocardiography, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), echocardiography (Echo) and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. CA was visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: After 12 weeks on the modified diet, SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice developed cardiac ischemia/infarction, together with systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation. CA was most severe at the aortic sinus level to an extent that no dKO mice survived to 20 weeks on the modified diet. None of control mice, however, developed CA or IHD. Conclusions: SR-BI deletion led to CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed the modified western-type diet. We established SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice as a diet-induced murine model of human IHD and developed detection methods, using a combination of SPECT and Echo, for effective in vivo evaluation of cardiac functions. PMID:27373983

  20. Imaging Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarkin, Jason M.; Dweck, Marc R.; Evans, Nicholas R.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Brown, Adam J.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in atherosclerosis imaging technology and research have provided a range of diagnostic tools to characterize high-risk plaque in vivo; however, these important vascular imaging methods additionally promise great scientific and translational applications beyond this quest. When combined with conventional anatomic- and hemodynamic-based assessments of disease severity, cross-sectional multimodal imaging incorporating molecular probes and other novel noninvasive techniques can add detailed interrogation of plaque composition, activity, and overall disease burden. In the catheterization laboratory, intravascular imaging provides unparalleled access to the world beneath the plaque surface, allowing tissue characterization and measurement of cap thickness with micrometer spatial resolution. Atherosclerosis imaging captures key data that reveal snapshots into underlying biology, which can test our understanding of fundamental research questions and shape our approach toward patient management. Imaging can also be used to quantify response to therapeutic interventions and ultimately help predict cardiovascular risk. Although there are undeniable barriers to clinical translation, many of these hold-ups might soon be surpassed by rapidly evolving innovations to improve image acquisition, coregistration, motion correction, and reduce radiation exposure. This article provides a comprehensive review of current and experimental atherosclerosis imaging methods and their uses in research and potential for translation to the clinic. PMID:26892971

  1. Abnormal blood rheology and chronic low grade inflammation: possible risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease in Lewis negative subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alexy, Tamas; Pais, Eszter; Wenby, Rosalinda B.; Mack, Wendy J.; Hodis, Howard N.; Kono, Naoko; Wang, Jun; Baskurt, Oguz K.; Fisher, Timothy C.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that abnormal hemorheology and chronic low-grade inflammation are more prevalent in Lewis negative individuals, possibly contributing to premature atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We enrolled 223 healthy subjects (154 females, mean age: 64yrs). Conventional risk factors, markers of inflammation and hemorheological profiles were measured; Lewis blood group was determined by serology. Conventional risk factors (age, gender, BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking habit) did not differ among Lewis phenotypes. However, markers of inflammation (WBC, hs-CRP, ESR) were significantly elevated and rheological parameters (RBC aggregation, plasma viscosity) were abnormal in Lewis negative subjects, especially when compared to the Le(a−b+) group. Conclusions With a prevalence of 33% in select populations, our data support the hypothesis that Le(a−b−) represents a pro-inflammatory phenotype that may contribute to the elevated cardiovascular risk in this group. PMID:25626016

  2. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  3. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  4. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. What Is Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atherosclerosis? Español Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque ... problems, including heart attack , stroke , or even death. Atherosclerosis Figure A shows a normal artery with normal ...

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene And Recurrent Coronary Heart Disease or Mortality in Patients with Established Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Virani, Salim S.; Lee, Vei-Vei; Brautbar, Ariel; Grove, Megan L.; Nambi, Vijay; Alam, Mahboob; Elayda, MacArthur; Wilson, James M.; Willerson, James T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2013-01-01

    It is not known whether genetic variants in the cholesteryl-ester-transfer-protein (CETP) gene are associated with recurrent coronary heart disease events or mortality in secondary prevention patients. Among 3717 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients enrolled in a prospective genetic registry; we evaluated whether CETP gene variants previously shown to be associated with reduced CETP activity and high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol increase (“A” allele for both TaqIB [rs708272] and rs12149545) are associated with a reduction in recurrent myocardial infarction [MI], recurrent revascularization or death. At 4.5 years of follow-up; 439 recurrent MI, 698 recurrent revascularizations and 756 deaths occurred. Using an additive model of inheritance, the “A” allele for rs708272 was not associated with recurrent MI (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.78-1.17 for AG; HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.67-1.19 for AA; compared with GG genotype), recurrent revascularization (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.95-1.33 for AG; HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.84-1.32 for AA) or mortality (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.86-1.19 for AG; HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.91-1.37 for AA) in the overall cohort. Similar results were seen for the “A” allele for rs12149545. In the CABG subgroup, AG genotype for rs708272 was associated with an increased mortality (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.06-1.79) compared to GG genotype. Results remained consistent using dominant model of inheritance. In conclusion, genetic CETP variants were not associated with recurrent MI or recurrent revascularization in overall cohort with a possible mortality increase in CABG patients. PMID:23891427

  7. [Differences in allele frequency at the BAIB locus, determining the level of expression of beta-aminoisobutyric acid, in healthy donors and coronary artery atherosclerosis patients from Buryat and Lithuanian populations].

    PubMed

    Spitsyn, V A; Afanas'eva, I S

    2001-12-01

    Phenotype and allele frequencies of the genetically dimorphic system determining urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIB) were studied in population samples of Buryats from the Aginskii Buryat Autonomous District and Lithuanians from Vilnius and in patients with coronary atherosclerosis (CA) from both populations. Frequency of allele BAIB*b, which determines high BAIB excretion, proved to be more than twice higher in Buryats compared with the population sample of Lithuanians (0.620 versus 0.289, respectively). The proportion of individuals with high BAIB excretion in CA patients of either ethnic sample was twice higher than in the corresponding control sample. Frequency of allele BAIB*b in CA patients and healthy individuals was 0.348 and 0.242, respectively, in the Lithuanian population and 0.775 and 0.557, respectively, in the Buryat population. Thus, assessment of urinary excretion of BAIB proved to be prognostically valuable. The method used to detect a variation in BAIB excretion is relatively inexpensive, simple, and suitable for mass screening of patients and healthy individuals (population control). After additional testing with representative samples, the method can be used as an accessory diagnostic test in patients with cardiovascular disorders.

  8. Pathophysiology of Coronary Thrombus Formation and Adverse Consequences of Thrombus During PCI

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sundararajan; Ambrose, John A

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic vascular pathology that is preceded by endothelial dysfunction. Vascular inflammation “fuels” atherosclerosis and creates the milieu for episodes of intravascular thromboses. Thrombotic events in the coronary vasculature may lead to asymptomatic progression of atherosclerosis or could manifest as acute coronary syndromes or even sudden cardiac death. Thrombus encountered in the setting of acute coronary syndromes has been correlated with acute complications during percutaneous coronary interventions such as no-reflow, acute coronary occlusion and long term complications such as stent thrombus. This article reviews the pathophysiology of coronary thrombogenesis and explores the complications associated with thrombus during coronary interventions. PMID:22920487

  9. Association between type 2 diabetes mellitus, biochemical factors and UCSNP-43 polymorphisms of CALPIN-10 gene in patients with atherosclerosis of coronary artery disease in Southern Iran population

    PubMed Central

    Senemar, Sara; Edraki, Mohammad Reza; Toosi, Samane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic variations in the calpain 10 gene (CALPIN-10), single nucleotide polymorphisms-43 (SNP-43), have increased the risk of type 2 diabete mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: We studied the control and CAD groups for association of association of SNP-43 in the CALPIN-10 gene with T2DM and other risk factors of its complications. Overall, we examined 452 individuals, 224 patients with CAD and 228 healthy subjects for CAD in Iranian population. All the subjects were genotyped for the CALPIN-10, SNP-43 by polymorphism chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods, using biochemical methods to detect fasting glucose and other biochemical factors in the blood sample. We assessed frequencies of SNP-43 alleles between CAD and normal population groups. Results: In CAD patients, the GG allele was significantly associated with T2DM and GG allele was causing high level of glucose. But in control group, there was no relationship between them. Between clinical and biochemical risk factors with different genotypes there was no significant difference in the compared group. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest no significant association between SNP-43 and the risk of T2DM. In other words, CALPIN-10 did not show a major diabetes gene pool capacity in normal southern Iranian population. PMID:27069562

  10. Association of Isolated Minor Non-specific ST-Segment and T-Wave Abnormalities with Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged, Biracial Population: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Liu, Kiang; Ning, Hongyan; Daviglus, Martha L.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Isolated minor non-specific ST segment and T wave abnormalities (NSSTTA) are common and known to be independent electrocardiographic risk markers for future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The association of NSSTTA with subclinical atherosclerosis is not well defined, but has been postulated as a potential mechanism of association with future clinical events. Methods and Results We studied participants from the Year 20 examination of the middle-aged, biracial CARDIA cohort. This examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG), coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). ECGs were coded using both Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC) criteria. Isolated minor STTA was defined by MC as presence of MC 4-3, 4-4, 5-3, or 5-4, and by NC as presence of NC 5.8. ECGs with secondary causes of STTA (i.e. LVH) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the cross-sectional association of isolated minor NSSTTA with CAC and CC-IMT. The study sample consisted of 2175 participants with an average age of 45 years (57% women and 43% black). No association was observed between NSSTTA and CAC. After multivariable-adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors, the presence of isolated minor NSSTTA remained significantly associated with the extent of CCIMT (OR 1.25 (1.06 – 1.48), p < 0.01). This association remained significant after further adjustment for CAC. Conclusions Isolated minor NSSTTA were associated with the extent of CCIMT, but not with CAC, in this middle-aged biracial cohort. Further study is needed to elucidate potential mechanisms for these findings. PMID:22952292

  11. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  12. Polymorphisms in the IL6 gene in Asian Indian families with premature coronary artery disease--the Indian Atherosclerosis Research Study.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arindam; Shanker, Jayashree; Dash, Debabrata; John, Shibu; Sannappa, Prathima R; Rao, Veena S; Ramanna, Jayakumar K; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2008-05-01

    Inflammation plays a major role in coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the polymorphisms in the interleukin 6 (IL6) gene and their effect on the expression of acute-phase proteins in premature CAD in Asian Indian families. One hundred and ninety affected sibling pairs (ASPs) were genotyped for three tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 gene for linkage analysis. We observed suggestive logarithm of odds (LOD) score for one SNP (rs2066992) in a subset of 62 ASPs with the age at onset less than 45 years (LOD score=1.114, p=0.011 in linkage analysis; pi=0.55, p=0.008 in identity by descent; LOD score=1.06, p=0.014 in quantitative trait locus for plasma levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP). This was followed by sequencing of the promoter region and haplotype analysis in 46 probands and 40 controls. Five out of the eight previously reported promoter SNPs were found to be polymorphic (rs1800797, rs1800796, rs7802307, rs7802308, rs1800795). Two novel sequence variants were also found. One promoter haplotype (GGAAG) was detected with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.676 (p=0.0017, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.68-8.045) and population attributable risk of 21.1% (95%CI: 9.2%-31.5%). The plasma levels of both hsCRP and fibrinogen exhibited significant association with these promoter SNP genotypes (p<0.001). In conclusion, IL6 gene polymorphisms appear to be important genetic factors in premature CAD, and in the regulation of key atherogenic markers in Asian Indian families.

  13. Diagnosis & Treatment | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis Your healthcare provider diagnoses coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis) based on your medical and family histories, a ... may recommend one or more tests to diagnose atherosclerosis. These tests can help define the extent of ...

  14. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  15. Living with Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Atherosclerosis Improved treatments have reduced the number of deaths ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  16. Diffuse coronary artery ectasia in a patient with left main coronary artery trifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Desperak, Piotr; Bujak, Kamil; Głowacki, Jan; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The term coronary ectasia is reserved to describe a diffuse dilatation of coronary artery segments that have a diameter that exceeds the size of normal adjacent coronary segments by 1.5 times. The occurrence of coronary artery ectasia (CAE) ranges from 3% to 8% in the group of patients undergoing coronary computed tomography angiography. The CAE is associated with traditional risk factors and often co-exists with coronary atherosclerosis, which suggests that ectasia may represent an advanced form of atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus on the clinical implications and management of patients in whom the occurrence of CAE is observed, especially in patients without concomitant obstructive atherosclerosis. Here, we present a rare case of a 62-year-old patient with multiple CAEs and left main trifurcation. PMID:27785148

  17. Calcium antagonists and atherosclerosis protection in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rafael Hernández; Armas-Hernández, María José; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina

    2003-01-01

    Calcium antagonists are effective in hypertensive patients of all ethnic groups, irrespective of age, dietary salt intake, salt-sensitivity status or plasma renin activity profile. Some prospective studies show that the calcium antagonists, nifedipine GITS and nitrendipine, reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality at least to the same extent as the diuretics. Other prospective studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of calcium antagonists on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients. Calcium antagonists, especially the highly lipophilic amlodipine, lacidipine and nisoldipine, are shown to possess antioxidant properties. These drugs reduce the oxidation of LDL and its influx into the arterial wall, and reduce atherosclerotic lesions in animals. Platelet production of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxygen free radical formation, is suppressed by amlodipine, lacidipine or nifedipine in hypertensive patients. New evidence from long-term clinical trials of calcium antagonists indicates that these drugs can reduce the rate of progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive and coronary heart disease patients. In the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), co-administration of calcium antagonist, amlodipine or nifedipine with pravasatin caused a significant reduction in the appearance of new angiographic lesions. In the Verapamil in Hypertension and Atherosclerosis Study (VHAS), verapamil was more effective than chlorthalidone in promoting regression of thicker carotid lesions in parallel with a reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular events. In the Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Vascular Effects of Norvasc Trial (PREVENT), amlodipine slowed the progression of early coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. In a subprotocol of the Intervention as a Goal in the Hypertension Treatment (INSIGHT) study, nifedipine GITS significantly decreased intima

  18. Computer assessment of atherosclerosis from angiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Cashin, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A computer method for detection and quantification of atherosclerosis from angiograms has been developed and used to measure lesion change in human clinical trials. The technique involves tracking the vessel edges and measuring individual lesions as well as the overall irregularity of the arterial image. Application of the technique to conventional arterial-injection femoral and coronary angiograms is outlined and an experimental study to extend the technique to analysis of intravenous angiograms of the carotid and cornary arteries is described.

  19. Mammographically Detectable Breast Arterial Calcification and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj; Chainani, Vinod; Delafontaine, Patrice; Abdo, Abir; Lafferty, James; Rafeh, Nidal Abi

    2014-01-01

    Breast arterial calcification (BAC), observed as an incidental finding on screening mammograms, represents degenerative calcific changes occurring in the mammary arteries, with increasing age. The aim of this review is to discuss relevant literature examining relation between BAC and atherosclerosis. After a thorough literature search, in OVID and PubMed, 199 studies were identified, of which 25 were relevant to our review. Data were abstracted from each study and statistical analysis was done, including calculation of odds ratios and construction of forest plots. A total of 35,542 patients were enrolled across 25 studies looking at an association between BAC and coronary artery disease, cardiovascular disease, stroke, cerebral artery disease, carotid and peripheral artery diseases, and coronary artery calcification. A majority of the studies showed a statistically significant relation between BAC and presence of coronary artery disease cardiovascular disease and associated mortality. Sensitivity of BAC in predicting cardiovascular events was low, but specificity was high. BAC was predictive of incident and prevalent stroke but not mortality of stroke. Similarly, BAC was predictive of cerebral, carotid, and peripheral artery diseases. The role of BAC as a surrogate marker of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis is currently uncertain. Its role may be further elucidated by more large-scale prospective studies and clinical experience. PMID:23584424

  20. Taurine and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in most mammalian tissues and plays a role in many important physiological functions. Atherosclerosis is the underlying mechanism of cardiovascular disease including myocardial infarctions, strokes and peripheral artery disease and remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies conducted in laboratory animal models using both genetic and dietary models of hyperlipidemia have demonstrated that taurine supplementation retards the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Epidemiological studies have also suggested that taurine exerts preventive effects on cardiovascular diseases. The present review focuses on the effects of taurine on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which taurine suppress the development of atherosclerosis will be discussed.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND CARDIAC INFARCTS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Wilgram, George F.

    1959-01-01

    Marked obesity was induced in rats by feeding a high fat, egg yolk-rich diet. The obese rats were hyperlipemic and showed an increased incidence of lipomatous coronary lesions, but did not develop severe atheromatous lesions. Spontaneous vascular lesions of several kinds have been observed in aging rats. Among them, plaques containing a fibrin-like material seem to be conspicuous. However, these lesions differ from the experimentally induced changes, which were more fatty. Atherosclerosis, as it is defined in human pathology, has not been observed to develop spontaneously in rats. Experimental induction of marked hyperlipemia and hypercholesterolemia by feeding a high fat egg yolk-rich diet (supplemented with cholesterol, choleate, and thiouracil), and use of viosterol to cause vascular injury, led to severe atherosclerosis, coronary occlusion, and myocardial infarction. A consideration of all the findings reported here leads to renewed support of the concept that atherosclerosis has a combination of causes (Aschoff, Anitschkow, Page). Of all the etiological factors considered here, elevation of blood lipides and vascular injury are thought to be the most important ones. PMID:13620855

  2. Gamma interferon: a central mediator in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leon, M L Alfaro; Zuckerman, S H

    2005-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vasculature with lesions developing in the arterial wall, frequently in the coronary and carotid arteries. The interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes within the atherosclerotic lesion microenvironment exemplifies a site where both innate and adaptive immunity contribute towards disease progression. As gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), the classic macrophage activating factor, has been localized to atherosclerotic lesions, this review will focus on its contribution to plaque pathology and will finally consider how current therapies, as exemplified by HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or statins, may impact this process beyond lipid lowering, in part by inhibiting IFN-gamma dependent processes. IFN-gamma sources within the atheroma as well as receptors, signaling pathways and its effects on macrophages as well as on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells will be considered. Therapeutic interventions targeting molecular events associated with IFN-gamma signaling offer novel approaches to the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  3. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Jeremy D; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Goonewardena, Sascha N

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD.

  4. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Jeremy D.; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD. PMID:26809711

  5. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  6. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Daniele; Capodanno, Davide; Dangas, George; Tamburino, Corrado

    2014-07-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a relatively rare and unexplored type of coronary disease. Although atherosclerosis, hormonal changes during pregnancy and connective tissue disorders might represent a sufficiently convincing explanation for some patients with SCAD, the many remaining cases display only a weak relationship with these causes. While on one side the clinical heterogeneity of SCAD masks a full understanding of their underlying pathophysiologic process, on the other side paucity of data and misleading presentations hamper the quick diagnosis and optimal management of this condition. A definite diagnosis of SCAD can be significantly facilitated by endovascular imaging techniques. In fact, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) overcome the limitations of coronary angiography providing detailed endovascular morphologic information. In contrast, optimal treatment strategies for SCAD still represent a burning controversial question. Herein, we review the published data examining possible causes and investigating the best therapy for SCAD in different clinical scenarios.

  7. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  8. Computer Simulations of Coronary Blood Flow Through a Constriction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    and Prevention. This is generally caused by a constriction of a coronary artery through a process known as atherosclerosis , or an increased amount...surface for all stenoses. Shear rate is important in cardiovascular medicine because it affects atherosclerosis (Giddens, Zarins &Glagov, 1993...localization and detection of atherosclerosis . Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 115(4B):588–594. Koskinas, K.C., Chatzizisis, Y.S., Antoniadis

  9. Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against ApoB100, the core protein of LDL, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. Approach and Results To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against ApoB100 was studied with and without vaccination with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides. The immunological basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe−/− mice with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ~40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of IL-10. Conclusion Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans. PMID:26821946

  10. [Epigenetics in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Montse; Vallvé, Joan C; Zaina, Silvio; Ribalta, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The association studies based on candidate genes carried on for decades have helped in visualizing the influence of the genetic component in complex diseases such as atherosclerosis, also showing the interaction between different genes and environmental factors. Even with all the knowledge accumulated, there is still some way to go to decipher the individual predisposition to disease, and if we consider the great influence that environmental factors play in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, epigenetics is presented as a key element in trying to expand our knowledge on individual predisposition to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Epigenetics can be described as the discipline that studies the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, independent of changes in the sequence of DNA, and mostly induced by environmental factors. This review aims to describe what epigenetics is and how epigenetic mechanisms are involved in atherosclerosis.

  11. Nutrition and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a universal problem in modern society. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of CVD resulting in high rate of mortality in the population. Nutrition science has focused on the role of essential nutrients in preventing deficiencies, at the present time, the nutritional strategies are crucial to promote health and intervene with these global noncommunicable diseases. In many cases, diet is a major driving force, which is much easier to change and follow than other factors. It is important to establish that the first strategy to treat atherosclerosis is to modify lifestyle habits, focusing on the beneficial properties of specific nutrients. In the last decades, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that diet plays a central role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. In this review we will focus on the effect of specific foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds, including epidemiological facts, potential mechanisms of action and dietary recommendations to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. In particular, we include information about fiber, plant sterols and stanols, niacin, taurine, olive oil, omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants, minerals, methyl nutrients and soy. In addition, we also show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota associated with a consumption of certain animal food sources can generate some metabolites that are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and its consequences on CVD. According to the epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies we suggest a recommendation for some dietary foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds to support the complementary clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis.

  12. [Genomic instability in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaiozishvili, M N; Kakauridze, N G; Lezhava, T A

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study of the level of genomic instability, parameters of quantitative and structural mutations of chromosomes (aberration, aneuploidy, polyploidy) in lymphocyte cultures from patients with atherosclerosis of age 80 years and older (control group - 30-35 years old) was conducted. The possibility of correction of disturbed genomic indicators by peptide bioregulators - Livagen (Lys-Glu-Asp-Ala) and cobalt ions with separate application or in combination was also studied. Control was lymphocyte culture of two healthy respective age groups. It was also shown that patients with atherosclerosis exhibit high level of genomic instability in all studied parameters, regardless of age, which may suggest that there is marked increase in chromatin condensation in atherosclerosis. It was also shown that Livagen (characterized by modifying influence on chromatin) separately and in combination with cobalt ions, promotes normalization of altered genomic indicators of atherosclerosis in both age groups. The results show that Livagen separately and in combination with cobalt ions has impact on chromatin of patients with atherosclerosis. The identified protective action of Livagen proves its efficacy in prevention of atherosclerosis.

  13. Zebrafish Models for Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death. Elevated circulating concentrations of lipids are a central pathogenetic driver of atherosclerosis. While numerous effective therapies for this condition have been developed, there is substantial unmet need for this pandemic illness. Here, I will review nutritional, physiological, genetic, and pathological discoveries in the emerging zebrafish model for studying dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. The technical and physiological advantages and the pharmacological potential of this organism for discovery and validation of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis targets are stressed through summary of recent findings. An emerging literature shows that zebrafish, through retention of a cetp ortholog gene and high sensitivity to ingestion of excess cholesterol, rapidly develops hypercholesterolemia, with a pattern of distribution of lipid species in lipoprotein particles similar to humans. Furthermore, recent studies leveraging the optical transparency of zebrafish larvae to monitor the fate of these ingested lipids have provided exciting insights to the development of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Future directions for investigation are considered, with particular attention to the potential for in vivo cell biological study of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:28018294

  14. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  15. Transbrachial intraaortic balloon pumping in severe peripheral atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Francesco; Impiombato, Barbara; Ferraro, Alessandro; Comi, Maria Caterina; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Indolfi, Ciro; Renzulli, Attilio

    2007-07-01

    Preoperative intraaortic balloon pumping improves the results of complex coronary surgery; however, insertion may be harmful or contraindicated in severe and diffuse atherosclerosis of the descending aorta and peripheral arteries. We report our experience with 10 consecutive patients with severe peripheral atherosclerosis or distal abdominal aortic aneurysms, in whom a 7.5F intraaortic balloon catheter was inserted through the brachial artery. Intraaortic balloon pumping was maintained until hemodynamic stability was established; no complications or ischemia of the hand related to the intraaortic balloon pump occurred. Transbrachial intraaortic balloon pumping with a 7.5F catheter is as safe and effective as the transfemoral method in patients with unavailable femoral arteries.

  16. MicroRNA regulation of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Mark W.; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its attendant clinical complications such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in western societies. In response to biochemical and biomechanical stimuli, atherosclerotic lesion formation occurs from the participation of a range of cell types, inflammatory mediators, and shear stress. Over the past decade, microRNAs have emerged as evolutionarily conserved, non-coding small RNAs that serve as important regulators and “fine-tuners” of a range of pathophysiological cellular effects and molecular signaling pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulating studies reveal the importance of miRNAs in regulating key signaling and lipid homeostasis pathways that alter the balance of atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression. In this review, we highlight current paradigms of microRNA-mediated effects in atherosclerosis progression and regression. We provide an update on the potential use of miRNAs diagnostically for detecting increasing severity of coronary disease and clinical events. Finally, we provide a perspective on therapeutic opportunities and challenges for miRNA delivery in the field. PMID:26892968

  17. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... role in atherosclerosis risk. Other Factors That Affect Atherosclerosis Other factors also may raise your risk for ...

  18. The UPR in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Alex X.; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Multiple systemic factors and local stressors in the arterial wall can disturb the functions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing ER stress in endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and macrophages during the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. As a protective response to restore ER homeostasis, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated by three major ER sensors: protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). The activation of the various UPR signaling pathways displays a temporal pattern of activation at different stages of the disease. The ATF6 and IRE1α pathways that promote the expression of protein chaperones in ER are activated in ECs in athero-susceptible regions of prelesional arteries and before the appearance of foam cells. The PERK pathway that reduces ER protein client load by blocking protein translation is activated in SMCs and macrophages in early lesions. The activation of these UPR signaling pathways aims to cope with the ER stress and plays a pro-survival role in the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, with the progression of atherosclerosis, the extended duration and increased intensity of ER stress in lesions lead to prolonged and enhanced UPR signaling. Under this circumstance, the PERK pathway induces expression of death effectors, and possibly IRE1α activates apoptosis signaling pathways, leading to apoptosis of macrophages and SMCs in advanced lesions. Importantly, UPR-mediated cell death is associated with plaque instability and the clinical progression of atherosclerosis. Moreover, UPR signaling is linked to inflammation and possibly to macrophage differentiation in lesions. Therapeutic approaches targeting the UPR may have promise in the prevention and/or regression of atherosclerosis. However, more progress is needed to fully understand all of the roles of the UPR in atherosclerosis and to harness this information

  19. Subclinical atherosclerosis measures for cardiovascular prediction in CKD.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H; Shlipak, Michael; Katz, Ronit; Rosas, Sylvia E; Peralta, Carmen A; Woodward, Mark; Kramer, Holly J; Jacobs, David R; Sarnak, Mark J; Coresh, Josef

    2015-02-01

    Whether inclusion of the coronary artery calcium score improves cardiovascular risk prediction in individuals with CKD, a population with unique calcium-phosphate homeostasis, is unknown. Among 6553 participants ages 45-84 years without prior cardiovascular disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, coronary artery calcium score was assessed for cardiovascular risk prediction beyond the Framingham predictors in those with (n=1284) and without CKD and contrasted with carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index (two other measures of subclinical atherosclerosis). During a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 650 cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease) occurred (236 events in subjects with CKD). In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for Framingham predictors, each subclinical measure was independently associated with cardiovascular outcomes, with larger adjusted hazard ratios (HRs; per 1 SD) for coronary artery calcium score than carotid intima-media thickness or ankle-brachial index in subjects without and with CKD (HR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.45 to 1.97 versus HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.25 and HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.32, respectively). Compared with inclusion of carotid intima-media thickness or ankle-brachial index, inclusion of the coronary artery calcium score led to greater increases in C statistic for predicting cardiovascular disease and net reclassification improvement. Coronary artery calcium score performed best for the prediction of coronary heart disease and heart failure, regardless of CKD status. In conclusion, each measure improved cardiovascular risk prediction in subjects with CKD, with the greatest improvement observed with coronary artery calcium score.

  20. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  1. Coronary collateral circulation: its relevance.

    PubMed

    Karrowni, Wassef; El Accaoui, Ramzi N; Chatterjee, Kanu

    2013-11-15

    The interest in coronary collateral circulation (CCC) as "natural bypasses" is growing, especially in patients in whom the extent of coronary atherosclerosis is too severe to allow for conventional revascularization. The anatomic foundation of CCC has been recognized for long time. Recently, reliable methods have become available for the assessment of the adequacy of collateral flow. However, the debate regarding the importance of CCC in the different clinical settings continues. In this article, we present the recent progress in the understanding of anatomy and physiology of the CCC and focus on the studies addressing their functional significance in acute, subacute, and chronic coronary artery disease. In addition, we provide a focused update on the essential role of collateral circulation in the management of coronary chronic total occlusions.

  2. IL-17-dependent Autoimmunity to Collagen Type V in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Melanie L.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Huang, Guorui; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Keller, Melissa R.; Torrealba, Jose R.; Rhoads, Aaron; Kim, Byoungjae; Bobadilla, Joseph L.; Haynes, Lynn D.; Wilkes, David S.; Burlingham, William J.; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Considerable evidence shows atherosclerosis to be a chronic inflammatory disease in which immunity to self-antigens contributes to disease progression. We recently identified the collagen V [col(V)] α1(V) chain as a key autoantigen driving the Th17-dependent cellular immunity underlying another chronic inflammatory disease, obliterative bronchiolitis. Since specific induction of α1(V) chains has previously been reported in human atheromas, we postulated involvement of col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerosis. Objective To determine whether col(V) autoimmunity may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Here we demonstrate Th17-dependent anti-col(V) immunity to be characteristic of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and in apolipoprotein E null (ApoE−/−) atherosclerotic mice. Responses were α1(V)-specific in CAD with variable Th1 pathway involvement. In early atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice, anti-col(V) immunity was tempered by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. In support of a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, col(V)-sensitization of ApoE−/− mice on a regular chow diet overcame IL-10-mediated inhibition of col(V) autoimmunity, leading to increased atherosclerotic burden in these mice and local accumulation of IL-17 producing cells, particularly in the col(V)-rich adventitia subjacent to the atheromas. Conclusions These findings establish col(V) as an autoantigen in human CAD and show col(V) autoimmunity to be a consistent feature in atherosclerosis in humans and mice. Furthermore, data are consistent with a causative role for col(V) in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:20814021

  3. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Vadivelu, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Though a century old hypothesis, infection as a cause for atherosclerosis is still a debatable issue. Epidemiological and clinical studies had shown a possible association but inhomogeneity in the study population and study methods along with potential confounders have yielded conflicting results. Infection triggers a chronic inflammatory state which along with other mechanisms such as dyslipidemia, hyper-homocysteinemia, hypercoagulability, impaired glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction, contribute in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Studies have shown a positive relations between Cytotoxic associated gene-A positive strains of Helicobacter pylori and vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke. Infection mediated genetic modulation is a new emerging theory in this regard. Further large scale studies on infection and atherosclerosis focusing on multiple pathogenetic mechanisms may help in refining our knowledge in this aspect. PMID:25810813

  4. Guideline for minimizing radiation exposure during acquisition of coronary artery calcium scans with the use of multidetector computed tomography: a report by the Society for Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention Tomographic Imaging and Prevention Councils in collaboration with the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Voros, Szilard; Rivera, Juan J; Berman, Daniel S; Blankstein, Ron; Budoff, Matthew J; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Dey, Damini; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hecht, Harvey S; Nasir, Khurram; Santos, Raul D; Shapiro, Michael D; Taylor, Allen J; Valeti, Uma S; Young, Phillip M; Weissman, Gaby

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scanning is an important tool for risk stratification in intermediate-risk, asymptomatic subjects without previous coronary disease. However, the clinical benefit of improved risk prediction needs to be balanced against the risk of the use of ionizing radiation. Although there is increasing emphasis on the need to obtain CAC scans at low-radiation exposure to the patient, very few practical documents exist to aid laboratories and health care professionals on how to obtain such low-radiation scans. The Tomographic Imaging Council of the Society for Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention, in collaboration with the Prevention Council and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, created a task force and writing group to generate a practical document to address parameters that can be influenced by careful attention to image acquisition. Patient selection for CAC scanning should be based on national guidelines. It is recommended that laboratories performing CAC examinations monitor radiation exposure (dose-length-product [DLP]) and effective radiation dose (E) in all patients. DLP should be <200 mGy × cm; E should average 1.0-1.5 mSv and should be <3.0 mSv. On most scanner platforms, CAC imaging should be performed in an axial mode with prospective electrocardiographic triggering, using tube voltage of 120 kVp. Tube current should be carefully selected on the basis of patient size, potentially using chest lateral width measured on the topogram. Scan length should be limited for the coverage of the heart only. When patients and imaging parameters are selected appropriately, CAC scanning can be performed with low levels of radiation exposure.

  5. Noninvasive diagnosis of vulnerable coronary plaque

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Eduardo; Agudo-Quilez, Pilar; Rojas-González, Antonio; Alvarado, Teresa; Olivera, María José; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Alfonso, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are frequently the first manifestation of coronary artery disease. For this reason, screening of asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis has become an attractive field of research in cardiovascular medicine. Necropsy studies have described histopathological changes associated with the development of acute coronary events. In this regard, thin-cap fibroatheroma has been identified as the main vulnerable coronary plaque feature. Hence, many imaging techniques, such as coronary computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography, have tried to detect noninvasively these histomorphological characteristics with different approaches. In this article, we review the role of these diagnostic tools in the detection of vulnerable coronary plaque with particular interest in their advantages and limitations as well as the clinical implications of the derived findings. PMID:27721935

  6. A role of matrix metalloproteinase-8 in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laxton, Ross C.; Hu, Yanhua; Duchene, Johan; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zhongyi; Leung, Kit-Yi; Xiao, Qingzhong; Scotland, Ramona S.; Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Smith, Katherine; Willeit, Johann; López-Otín, Carlos; Simpson, Iain A.; Kiechl, Stefan; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Xu, Qingbo; Ye, Shu

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Atherosclerotic lesions express matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8) which possesses proteolytic activity on matrix proteins particularly fibrillar collagens and on non-matrix proteins such as angiotensin I (Ang I). Objective We studied whether MMP8 plays a role in atherogenesis. Methods and Results In atherosclerosis-prone apoE deficient mice, inactivating MMP8 resulted in a substantial reduction in atherosclerotic lesion formation. Immunohistochemical examinations showed that atherosclerotic lesions in MMP8 deficient mice had significantly fewer macrophages but increased collagen content. In line with results of in vitro assays showing Ang I cleavage by MMP8 generating angiotensin II (Ang II), MMP8 knockout mice had lower Ang II levels and lower blood pressure. In addition, we found that products of Ang I cleavage by MMP8 increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression and that MMP8 deficient mice had reduced VCAM-1 expression in atherosclerotic lesions. Intravital microscopy analysis showed that leukocyte rolling and adhesion on vascular endothelium was reduced in MMP8 knockout mice. Furthermore, we detected an association between MMP8 gene variation and extent of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. A relationship between MMP8 gene variation, plasma VCAM-1 level and atherosclerosis progression was also observed in a population-based, prospective study. Conclusion These results indicate that MMP8 is an important player in atherosclerosis. PMID:19745165

  7. Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: from autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Michalik, David E; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Lombardi, Guido P; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Valladolid, Clide M; Abd El-Maksoud, Gomaa; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Clarke, Emily M; Thomas, Ian G; Miyamoto, Michael I; Kaplan, Hillard S; Frohlich, Bruno; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Zink, Albert; Finch, Caleb E

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomographic findings of atherosclerosis in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and the Aleutian Islands challenge our understanding of the fundamental causes of atherosclerosis. Could these findings be true? Is so, what traditional risk factors might be present in these cultures that could explain this apparent paradox? The recent computed tomographic findings are consistent with multiple autopsy studies dating as far back as 1852 that demonstrate calcific atherosclerosis in ancient Egyptians and Peruvians. A nontraditional cause of atherosclerosis that could explain this burden of atherosclerosis is the microbial and parasitic inflammatory burden likely to be present in ancient cultures inherently lacking modern hygiene and antimicrobials. Patients with chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of today, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, experience premature atherosclerosis and coronary events. Might the chronic inflammatory load of ancient times secondary to infection have resulted in atherosclerosis? Smoke inhalation from the use of open fires for daily cooking and illumination represents another potential cause. Undiscovered risk factors could also have been present, potential causes that technologically cannot currently be measured in our serum or other tissue. A synthesis of these findings suggests that a gene-environmental interplay is causal for atherosclerosis. That is, humans have an inherent genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis, whereas the speed and severity of its development are secondary to known and potentially unknown environmental factors.

  8. Predictive value of the augmentation index derived vascular age in patients with newly diagnosed atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Betge, Stefan; Kretzschmar, Daniel; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Lichtenauer, Michael; Jung, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Early detection of atherosclerosis, i.e., in occupational health screening programs could reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in the working population. Changes of the augmentation index (AIX) correlate with changes of the arterial stiffness induced by aging, atherosclerosis, or arterial hypertension and have a prognostic value for cardiovascular events. Their diagnostic yield should be increased by normalizing the AIX to age, in terms of a calculating the vascular age (VA). In this pilot study, 30 patients (mean age 65.3 ± 8.8 years, 21 male) with suspected coronary heart disease underwent a duplex ultrasound of the carotid arteries and a measurement of the ankle brachial index in addition to the coronary angiography. The AIX was recorded with a portable device (Vascular Explorer), and the VA was calculated. Atherosclerosis was found in 24 patients. They were older than the patients without atherosclerosis, but there was no age dependency found for the distribution pattern or severity of atherosclerosis. In patients with findings of atherosclerosis, the calculated VA was higher than the chronological age, and these differences were significant in patients below 65 years of age. Comparing patients in higher blood pressure classes with patients in lower classes, significantly higher AIX, VA, and differences to the chronological age were found. The VA, deduced from the noninvasively obtained AIX, is a promising candidate for screening programs for atherosclerosis, i.e., in occupational health screening programs.

  9. Periodontal and coronary heart disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Berent, Robert; Auer, Johann; Schmid, Peter; Krennmair, Gerald; Crouse, Stephen F; Green, John S; Sinzinger, Helmut; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal inflammation has been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Coronary angiography (CA) is used in the assessment of CHD; only a few studies have evaluated periodontal disease (PD) and angiographic measures of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CHD and PD. In this prospective epidemiologic study, 466 patients underwent CA and were assessed for PD. All patients underwent physical, laboratory, cardiac, and dental examination including dental x-rays. Periodontal disease and coronary angiograms were evaluated blindly by a dentist and 2 cardiologists, respectively. A coronary stenosis greater than 50% was ruled as CHD. Periodontal disease was defined and measured with the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN); and if at least 2 sextants (segments dividing mandible and maxilla into 6) were recorded as having CPITN of at least 3 (signifying that sextant had periodontal pocket depth ≥ 3.5 mm), the patient was coded as having PD. Three-hundred forty-nine patients (74.9%) had CHD assessed by CA The CHD patients had PD in 55.6% vs 41.9% in the non-CHD patients (P < .01). The CPITN scores were significantly higher in patients with vs without CHD, 2.43 vs 2.16, respectively (P = .023). After adjusting for age, sex, and risk factors for atherosclerosis with additional inclusion of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, PD remained significantly related to CHD (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.1). Other predictors for CHD were male sex, age, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes. Our results demonstrate an increased odds ratio for angiographically determined CHD in patients with PD and that CHD and PD may cluster in particular groups of a population. Our data indicate that PD represents a potentially modifiable risk factor that is both preventable and treatable with predictable treatments that pose negligible risk.

  10. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor protects from atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Howard, Tamara A; Hu, Chelin; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R

    2014-12-23

    Coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women have been linked to inflammation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Natural estrogen exerts protective effects on both processes, yet also displays uterotrophic activity. Here, we used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to investigate the role of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in atherosclerosis. In ovary-intact mice, deletion of gper increased atherosclerosis progression, total and LDL cholesterol levels and inflammation while reducing vascular NO bioactivity, effects that were in some cases aggravated by surgical menopause. In human endothelial cells, GPER was expressed on intracellular membranes and mediated eNOS activation and NO formation, partially accounting for estrogen-mediated effects. Chronic treatment with G-1, a synthetic, highly selective small molecule agonist of GPER, reduced postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation without uterotrophic effects. In summary, this study reveals an atheroprotective function of GPER and introduces selective GPER activation as a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation in the absence of uterotrophic activity.

  11. G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Protects from Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthias R.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Howard, Tamara A.; Hu, Chelin; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women have been linked to inflammation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Natural estrogen exerts protective effects on both processes, yet also displays uterotrophic activity. Here, we used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to investigate the role of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in atherosclerosis. In ovary-intact mice, deletion of gper increased atherosclerosis progression, total and LDL cholesterol levels and inflammation while reducing vascular NO bioactivity, effects that were in some cases aggravated by surgical menopause. In human endothelial cells, GPER was expressed on intracellular membranes and mediated eNOS activation and NO formation, partially accounting for estrogen-mediated effects. Chronic treatment with G-1, a synthetic, highly selective small molecule agonist of GPER, reduced postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation without uterotrophic effects. In summary, this study reveals an atheroprotective function of GPER and introduces selective GPER activation as a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation in the absence of uterotrophic activity. PMID:25532911

  12. AdipoRon may be benefit for atherosclerosis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Maryam; Shabab, Nooshin; Saidijam, Massoud

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has serious role in coronary arteries disease, so it is important to establish effective strategies for prevention or even treatment of atherosclerosis. Adiponectin, as one of the most abundant adipokines, has insulin sensitivity, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties. Disturbed adiponectin actions through its receptor, (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) may be involved in atherosclerosis development. Some adiponectin effects are mediated by AMPK and PPAR-α signaling. AdipoRon is an orally active synthetic molecule which can bind to AdipoR1, Adipo R2 and activate them. AdipoRon can activate AdipoR1-AMPK- PGC-1α pathway and AdipoR2-PPAR-α pathway. Some studies indicated insulin sensitivity, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative effect of AdipoRon. We hypothesize that AdipoRon has anti atherosclerotic effect and may suppress atherosclerosis processes. With confirmation the benefit role of AdipoRon on atherosclerosis, it may be used in patients at risk of atherosclerotic development.

  13. Cutaneous markers of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is rapidly increasing in prevalence across the world and particularly in south Asians at a relatively younger age. As atherosclerosis starts in early childhood, the process of risk evaluation must start quite early. The present review addresses the issue of cutaneous markers associated with atherosclerosis, and the strengths and weaknesses of the markers in identifying early coronary atherosclerosis. A diligent search for such clinical markers, namely xanthelasma, xanthoma, arcus juvenilis, acanthosis nigricans, skin tags, ear lobe crease, nicotine stains, premature graying in smokers, hyperpigmented hands in betel quid sellers, central obesity, and signs of peripheral vascular disease may prove to be a rewarding exercise in identifying asymptomatic CAD in high risk individuals. PMID:21160602

  14. GSTM1 polymorphism in patients with clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, D A; Martins, J V M; E Silva, K S F; Costa, I R; Lagares, M H; Campedelli, F L; Barbosa, A M; de Morais, M P; Moura, K K V O

    2017-03-15

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by lesions, called atheroma or atheromatous plaques, in the inner layer of blood vessels, which block the vascular lumen and weaken the underlying tunica media. Several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis exist. The modifiable risk factors include hypertension, smoking, obesity, high LDL and low HDL cholesterol levels, sedentary lifestyle, and stress; the non-modifiable factors include diabetes mellitus, family history of hypertension and heart disease, thrombophilia, sex, age, and genetic factors. The association of polymorphisms in GST with coronary artery disease has been studied since the polymorphisms can affect enzyme activity and contribute to the onset of atherosclerosis. We analyzed polymorphisms in GSTM1 in individuals diagnosed with atherosclerosis as well as in healthy individuals (control group). The frequency of the GSTM1 present genotype in the atherosclerosis group was 1.2 times higher than that observed in the control group. We found no sex- or alcohol-consumption-dependent differences between the occurrences of the present and null genotypes. However, the GSTM1 present genotype occurred in 52.6% individuals with atherosclerosis who reported smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day and in 60% individuals who smoked 10 to 20 cigarettes per day (P = 0.0035). In addition, the GSTM1 present genotype was more frequent in individuals who reported being former smokers - 45.5% in individuals with atherosclerosis who smoked for more than 20 years and 50% each for individuals in the control group who smoked for less than 10 years or for 10 to 20 years, respectively (P = 0.0240).

  15. Nutraceutical therapies for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joe W.E.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease affecting large and medium arteries and is considered to be a major underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the development of pharmacotherapies to treat CVD has resulted in a decline in cardiac mortality in the past few decades, CVD is estimated to be the cause of one in three global deaths. Nutraceuticals are natural nutritional compounds that are beneficial for the prevention or treatment of disease and, therefore, represent a possible therapeutic avenue for the treatment of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight potential nutraceuticals for use as anti-atherogenic therapies, with evidence from in vitro, in vivo, clinical, and observational studies. PMID:27383080

  16. Assessment of coronary blood flow in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Ricciardi, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Coronary blood flow is tightly autoregulated but is subject to epicardial and microvascular obstruction, primarily owing to coronary atherosclerosis. Because coronary flow limitation underlies ischemic heart disease, an understanding of coronary physiology is paramount. Measurement of coronary blood flow, once relegated to the research laboratory is now easily performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. In particular, the measurement of fractional flow reserve has been extensively studied and is an important adjunct to clinical decision making. Measurement of coronary flow informs clinicians of prognosis, guides revascularization therapy, and forms the basis of ongoing research in treatment of complex myocardial disease processes. Newer methods of assessing coronary flow measurements are undergoing validation for clinical use and should further enhance our ability to assess the importance of coronary flow in clinical disease.

  17. Molecular biology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Elmo; Pirro, Matteo

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis as a pathological lipid deposition within the artery wall has been redefined by a more complex concept of an ongoing inflammatory disease. The atherosclerotic process is initiated when cardiovascular risk factors, through a chemical, mechanical or immunological insult, activate and/or injury the endothelium, thus contributing to endothelial dysfunction and fragmentation. This triggers a cascade of inflammatory reactions, in which monocytes, macrophages, T lymphocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells actively participate. Particularly, atherosclerotic lesions have been seen to have increased expression of T helper-1 cells together with increased levels of the T helper-1 related pro-inflammatory cytokines. Along with pro-inflammatory cytokines, other molecular factors involved in atherosclerosis appearance, progression and complication include chemokines, growth factors, vasoactive substances, enzymes, apoptosis signals and many others. Many of these molecular factors are both involved as possible markers of the atherosclerotic disease activity and burden, but may also play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In recent years, the discovery of progenitor cells of myeloid origin has offered the prospect of merging the most recent theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with the evolving concept of a role of these progenitor cells in the repair of the injured vessel wall and the neovascularisation of ischemic tissues. This review summarizes current knowledge about the biology of atherosclerosis with emphasis on the mechanisms of endothelial damage and repair and on the concept that the turnover and replacement of endothelial cells is a major determinant in the maintenance of vascular integrity. PMID:22460847

  18. Immunological aspects of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in several countries. The underlying process is atherosclerosis, a slowly progressing chronic disorder that can lead to intravascular thrombosis. There is overwhelming evidence for the underlying importance of our immune system in atherosclerosis. Monocytes, which comprise part of the innate immune system, can be recruited to inflamed endothelium and this recruitment has been shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerotic disease. Monocytes undergo migration into the vasculature, they differentiate into macrophage phenotypes, which are highly phagocytic and can scavenge modified lipids, leading to foam cell formation and development of the lipid-rich atheroma core. This increased influx leads to a highly inflammatory environment and along with other immune cells can increase the risk in the development of the unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. The present review provides an overview and description of the immunological aspect of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in atherosclerosis, by defining their interaction with the vascular environment, modified lipids and other cellular exchanges. There is a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages, but shorter descriptions of dendritic cells, lymphocyte populations, neutrophils, mast cells and platelets are also included.

  19. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  20. Impact of Combat Deployment and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Newly Reported Coronary Heart Disease Among US Active Duty and Reserve Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    activity, which may lead to the development of coronary atherosclerosis by invoking low-grade systemic proinflamma- tion, arterial intimal injury...veterans during the study period. Compared with a study of autopsy-based coro- nary atherosclerosis in US service members who died of com- bat or...Ebrahimi R. Post-traumatic stress disorder, coronary atherosclerosis , and mortality. Am J Cardiol. 2011;108:29–33. 6. Roger VL, Go AS, Lloyd-Jones DM

  1. Non-Invasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason; Rudd, James; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is therefore shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  2. Benefits of exercise training on coronary blood flow in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Rebecca S.; Sturek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Every 34 seconds an American experiences a myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Approximately 80% of these coronary artery disease (CAD)-related deaths are attributable to modifiable behaviors, such as a lack of physical exercise training (ET). Regular ET decreases CAD morbidity and mortality through systemic and cardiac-specific adaptations. ET increases myocardial oxygen demand acting as a stimulus to increase coronary blood flow and thus myocardial oxygen supply, which reduces myocardial infarction and angina. ET augments coronary blood flow through direct actions on the vasculature that improve endothelial and coronary smooth muscle function, enhancing coronary vasodilation. Additionally, ET promotes collateralization, thereby, increasing blood flow to ischemic myocardium and also treats macrovascular CAD by attenuating the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and restenosis, potentially through stabilization of atherosclerotic lesions. In summary, ET can be used as a relatively safe and inexpensive way to prevent and treat CAD. PMID:25446554

  3. [Control of atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Quiroz Martínez, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop atherosclerosis in an accelerated way as compared to non-diabetic patients. This is due to a generalized metabolic disorder that includes hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidosis, loss of the endothelial regulatory function, a tendency for vasoconstriction, and a prothrombotic state. The main complications are coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. In all these manifestations and at all severity levels, diabetic patients, in particular post-menopausal women, have the worst prognosis with any type of treatment as compared to non-diabetic patients. These findings lead to consider the sole presentation of diabetes mellitus to be equivalent to cardiovascular risk. The largest reduction in risk is achieved by controlling hypertension, followed by a control of glycemia, reduction of glycosylated hemoglobulin and control of dyslipidosis. Benefits in the cardiovascular realm have not extended to other vascular territories, such as the lower extremities or the brain.

  4. S100A12 and the S100/Calgranulins - Emerging Biomarkers for Atherosclerosis and Possibly Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Oesterle, Adam; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is mediated by local and systematic inflammation. The multi-ligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been studied in animals and humans, and is an important mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on S100/calgranulin proteins (S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12) and their receptor RAGE in mediating vascular inflammation. Mice lack the gene for S100A12, which in humans is located on chromosome 3 between S100A8 and S100A9. Transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell targeted expression of S100A12 demonstrate increased coronary and aortic calcification as well as increased plaque vulnerability. Serum S100A12 has recently been shown to predict future cardiovascular events in a longitudinal population study, underscoring a role for S100A12 as a potential biomarker for coronary artery disease. Genetic ablation of S100A9 or RAGE in atherosclerosis susceptible Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) null mice results in reduced atherosclerosis. Importantly, S100A12 and the RAGE axis can be modified pharmacologically. For example, soluble RAGE reduces murine atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. Additionally, a class of compounds currently in phase III clinical trials for multiple sclerosis and rheumatologic conditions, the Quinoline-3-carboxamides, reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and complexity in transgenic S100A12 ApoE null mice, but have not been tested with regards to human atherosclerosis. The RAGE axis is an important mediator for inflammation-induced atherosclerosis and S100A12 has emerged as biomarker for human atherosclerosis. Decreasing inflammation by inhibiting S100/calgranulin-mediated activation of RAGE attenuates murine atherosclerosis, and future studies in patients with coronary artery disease are warranted to confirm S100/RAGE as therapeutic target for atherosclerosis. PMID:26515415

  5. NPC1, intracellular cholesterol trafficking and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Hua; Jiang, Na; Yao, Ping-Bo; Zheng, Xi-Long; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-15

    Post-lysosomal cholesterol trafficking is an important, but poorly understood process that is essential to maintain lipid homeostasis. Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1), an integral membrane protein on the limiting membrane of late endosome/lysosome (LE/LY), is known to accept cholesterol from NPC2 and then mediate cholesterol transport from LE/LY to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane in a vesicle- or oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related protein 5 (ORP5)-dependent manner. Mutations in the NPC1 gene can be found in the majority of NPC patients, who accumulate massive amounts of cholesterol and other lipids in the LE/LY due to a defect in intracellular lipid trafficking. Liver X receptor (LXR) is the major positive regulator of NPC1 expression. Atherosclerosis is the pathological basis of coronary heart disease, one of the major causes of death worldwide. NPC1 has been shown to play a critical role in the atherosclerotic progression. In this review, we have summarized the role of NPC1 in regulating intracellular cholesterol trafficking and atherosclerosis.

  6. CYCLOOXYGENASE POLYMORPHISMS AND RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES (ARIC) STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins modulate cardiovascular disease risk. We genotyped 2212 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study participants (1,023 incident coronary heart disease (CHD) cases; 270 incident ischemic stroke cases; 919 non-cases) with available DNA for polymorphisms in PTGS1 an...

  7. Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors, Coronary Artery Calcification and Coronary Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Ipek, Emrah; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Gurler, Mehmet Yavuz; Gulbaran, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is an intimal disease which affects large and medium size arteries including aorta and carotid, coronary, cerebral and radial arteries. Calcium accumulated in the coronary arterial plaques have substantial contribution to the plaque volume. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary arterial calcification, and to delineate the importance of CACS in coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods The current study is retrospective and 410 patients admitted to our clinic with atypical chest pain and without known CAD were included. These individuals were evaluated by 16 slice electron beam computed tomography with suspicion of CAD and their calcium scores were calculated. Detailed demographic and medical history were obtained from all of the patients. Results In our study, we employed five different analyses using different coronary arterial calcification score (CACS) thresold levels reported in previous studies. All of the analyses, performed according to the previously defined thresold levels, showed that risk factors had strong positive relationship with CACS as mentioned in previous studies. Conclusion Coronary arterial calcification is part of the athero-sclerotic process and although it can be detected in atherosclerotic vessel, it is absent in a normal vessel. It can be concluded that the clinical scores, even they are helpful, have some limitations in a significant part of the population for cardiovascular risk determination. It is important for an anastomosis region to be noncalcified in coronary bypass surgery. In a coronary artery, it will be helpness for showing of calcific field and anostomosis spot. PMID:26155507

  8. Apolipoprotein A-I and its mimetics for the treatment of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-01-01

    Although statin treatment leads consistently to a reduction in major adverse coronary events and death in clinical trials, approximately 60 to 70% residual risk of these outcomes still remains. One frontier of investigational drug research is treatment to increase HDL, the ‘good cholesterol’ that is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. HDL and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI) are protective against atherosclerosis through several mechanisms, including the ability to mediate reverse cholesterol transport. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical findings for two types of therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis: apoAI-containing compounds and apoAI mimetic peptides. Both of these therapies have excellent potential to be useful clinically to promote atherosclerosis regression and stabilize existing plaques, but significant hurdles must be overcome in order to develop these approaches into safe and effective therapies. PMID:20730693

  9. Plasma IL-5 concentration and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Angela; McLeod, Olga; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Deleskog, Anna; Persson, Jonas; Leander, Karin; Gigante, Bruna; Kauhanen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Mannarino, Elmo; Giral, Philippe; Gustafsson, Sven; Söderberg, Stefan; Öhrvik, John; Humphries, Steve E.; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants robustly associated with coronary artery disease were reported in the vicinity of the interleukin (IL)-5 locus, and animal studies suggested a protective role for IL-5 in atherosclerosis. Therefore, we set this work to explore IL-5 as a plasma biomarker for early subclinical atherosclerosis, as determined by measures of baseline severity and change over time of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Methods We used biobank and databases of IMPROVE, a large European prospective cohort study of high-risk individuals (n = 3534) free of clinically overt cardiovascular disease at enrollment, in whom composite and segment-specific measures of cIMT were recorded at baseline and after 15 and 30 months. IL-5 was measured with an immunoassay in plasma samples taken at baseline. Results IL-5 levels were lower in women than in men, lower in the South than in North of Europe, and showed positive correlations with most established risk factors. IL-5 showed significant inverse relationships with cIMT change over time in the common carotid segment in women, but no significant relationships to baseline cIMT in either men or women. Conclusions Our results suggest that IL-5 may be part of protective mechanisms operating in early atherosclerosis, at least in women. However, the relationships are weak and whereas IL-5 has been proposed as a potential molecular target to treat allergies, it is difficult to envisage such a scenario in coronary artery disease. PMID:25587992

  10. Human Genetic Evidence for Involvement of CD137 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Leif Å; Gertow, Karl; Folkersen, Lasse; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sundman, Eva; Sheikine, Yuri; Goel, Anuj; Baldassarre, Damiano; Humphries, Steve E; de Faire, Ulf; Watkins, Hugh; Tremoli, Elena; Veglia, Fabrizio; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Göran K; Olofsson, Peder S

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Inflammation promotes plaque instability and clinical disease, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Subclinical atherosclerosis begins with thickening of the arterial intimal layer, and increased intima-media thickness (IMT) in the carotid artery is a widely used measurement of subclinical atherosclerosis. Activation of CD137 (tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 9) promotes inflammation and disease development in murine atherosclerosis. CD137 is expressed in human atherosclerosis, but its role is largely unknown. This study uses a genetic approach to investigate CD137 in human atherosclerotic disease. In publicly available data on genotype and gene expression from the HapMap project, the minor T allele of rs2453021, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CD137, was significantly associated with CD137 gene expression. In the PROCARDIS and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) cohorts of 13,029 cases and controls, no significant association was detected between the minor T allele of rs2453021 and risk for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. However, in the IMPROVE multicenter study of 3,418 individuals, the minor T allele of rs2453021 was associated with increased IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA), as measured by ultrasonography, with presence of plaque in CCA and with increased incidence of adverse noncardiac vascular events. Taken together, this study shows that the minor T allele of rs2453021 is associated with increased IMT in the CCA and increased risk of incident noncardiac vascular events, thus providing the first human genetic evidence for involvement of CD137 in atherosclerosis. PMID:25032953

  11. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  12. Evaluation of the biomechanics of atherosclerosis by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Schiott Jorgensen, Claus; Falk, Erling

    2001-07-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides not only the morphology, but also the biomechanical properties of the biological soft tissues. The biomechanics of atherosclerosis is important because the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is closely related with mechanical properties and mechanical stress. Rupture of the fibrous cap of atheromatous plaque is the initial event in acute coronary syndrome such as acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina. In addition to extrinsic physical stresses to the plaque, the intrinsic biomechanical property of the plaque is important for assessing the mechanism of the rupture. Two sets of SAMs operating in 100 to 200 MHz and in 800 MHz to 1.3 GHz were equipped to measure the acoustic properties of atherosclerosis of human or mouse arteries. The values of attenuation and sound speed in the tissue components of atherosclerosis were measured by analyzing the frequency dependent characteristics of the amplitude and phase signals. Both values were highest in calcification and lowest in lipid pool. Although attenuation and sound speed were relatively high in intimal fibrosis, the inhomogeneity of acoustic parameters was found within the fibrous cap. Polarized microscopy for the collagen stained with Picrosirius red showed that the attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type I collagen with orange polarized color compared to type III collagen with green color. SAM has shown the possibility to detect the plaque vulnerability and it might improve our understanding of the sudden rupture from micro-mechanical point of view.

  13. Potential infectious etiologies of atherosclerosis: a multifactorial perspective.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, S.; Taylor, C.; Campbell, L. A.; Epstein, S.; Libby, P.

    2001-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) contributes substantially to illness and death worldwide. Experimental studies demonstrate that infection can stimulate atherogenic processes. This review presents a spectrum of data regarding the link between CHD and infection. In addition, the need for improved diagnostic tools, the significance of multiple pathogens, and potential intervention strategies are discussed. PMID:11747688

  14. Lipoproteins and the progression/regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barth, J D

    1995-10-01

    Lipoproteins and the impact of lipid lowering on progression and regression of coronary artery disease are discussed. Angiographically assessed regression studies are reviewed (NHLBI, LIT, LHT, CLAS I and II, FATS, POSCH, Heidelberg, STARS, SCRIP, MAAS, PLAC I, HARP, UC-SF), as are B-mode ultrasound studies (ACAPS, PLAC II) and survival studies (Oslo diet-smoking study, SSSS, Pravastatin, Oxford). Although study populations and the interventions are different in the studies, I have come to the following conclusions. Regression of atherosclerosis correlates well with reduction in LDL cholesterol and an increase in HDL cholesterol. Although overall improvement in the severity and extent of the disease was modest, reduction of clinical events was impressive. Lipid modulation may stabilize existing lesions by improving the stability of the lesion cap and/or promoting loss of cholesterol content from within the plaque. Survival studies indicate that lipid lowering lowers morbidity and increases longevity in patients with established coronary heart disease. The B-mode ultrasound studies using the carotid artery as surrogate for the change in atherosclerosis in the coronary seems extremely promising. The atherosclerotic process as well as complications may be studied at an early stage using noninvasive methods.

  15. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  16. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc.

  17. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B.; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc. PMID:26594106

  18. Recent Highlights of ATVB Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic studies over the past decades using in vitro systems, animal models, and human tissues have highlighted the complexity of pathophysiological processes of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia, as one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, is still the focus of many mechanistic studies and the major therapeutic target of atherosclerosis. Although there is a dire need to validate many experimental findings in humans, there is a large number of approaches that have been showing promise for contributing to future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25717174

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  20. The Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on the Relationship Between Myocardial Adenosine Production and Coronary Vascular Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-13

    responsible for the vasodilation. 10 Coronary vasoconstriction has been observed with breathing 100% oxygen and with exposure to hypobaric oxygen...depending on the presence of diabetes related and non - diabetes related coronary artery disease risk factors (Fuller, 1980) The high levels of...circulating glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol observed in diabetics are risk factors in the development of atherosclerosis. Diabetes related

  1. Voodoo illness.

    PubMed

    Campinha-Bacote, J

    1992-01-01

    Healthcare providers must familiarize themselves with specific culture-bound syndromes and their manifestations in order to provide quality care to culturally diverse clients seeking healthcare services. Voodoo illness is one of several culture-bound syndromes that nurses need to be familiar with, for an inability to understand voodoo illness may result in the client's death (voodoo death).

  2. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Rotllan, Noemi; Aranda, Juan F.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22nucleotide) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. MiRNA/mRNA base pairing complementarity provokes mRNA decay and consequent gene silencing. These endogenous gene expression inhibitors were primarily described in cancer but recent exciting findings have also demonstrated a key role in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. MiRNAs controls endothelial cell (EC), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and macrophage functions, and thereby regulate the progression of atherosclerosis. MiRNAs expression is modulated by different stimuli involved in every stage of atherosclerosis and conversely miRNAs modulates several pathways implicated in plaque development such as cholesterol metabolism. In the present review, we focus on the importance of miRNAs in atherosclerosis and we further discuss their potential use as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:23512606

  3. A Case of Isolated Coronary Artery Ectasia in the Setting of Chronic Inflamation From human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Heckle, Mark R; Askari, Raza; Morsy, Mohamed; Ibebuogu, Uzoma N

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia also known as dilated coronopathy is a relatively rare finding that is most commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Several alternative reasons including congenital malformations and chronic inflammation have been identified as a cause of CAE. In this case, we discuss a 61-year-old male with postoperative chest pain who was found to have localized CAE in the absence of significant atherosclerosis. We also elucidate the recently proposed markers of chronic inflammation that might be associated with coronary artery ectasia.

  4. Plasma Cholesterol–Induced Lesion Networks Activated before Regression of Early, Mature, and Advanced Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L. M.; Hägg, Sara; Jain, Rajeev K.; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr−/−Apob 100/100 Mttp flox/floxMx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24586211

  5. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Björkegren, Johan L M; Hägg, Sara; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-02-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-)Apob (100/100) Mttp (flox/flox)Mx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. Foodborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people in the U.S. get sick from contaminated food. Common culprits include bacteria, parasites and viruses. Symptoms ... are the most common cause of foodborne illness. Foods may have some bacteria on them when you ...

  7. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  8. Targeting sortilin in immune cells reduces proinflammatory cytokines and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin B.; Kjolby, Mads; Gunnersen, Stine; Larsen, Jakob V.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Falk, Erling; Nykjaer, Anders; Bentzon, Jacob F.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a link between genetic variation at the human chromosomal locus 1p13.3 and coronary artery disease. The gene encoding sortilin (SORT1) has been implicated as the causative gene within the locus, as sortilin regulates hepatic lipoprotein metabolism. Here we demonstrated that sortilin also directly affects atherogenesis, independent of its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism. In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, deletion of Sort1 did not alter plasma cholesterol levels, but reduced the development of both early and late atherosclerotic lesions. We determined that sortilin is a high-affinity receptor for the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ. Moreover, macrophages and Th1 cells (both of which mediate atherosclerotic plaque formation) lacking sortilin had reduced secretion of IL-6 and IFN-γ, but not of other measured cytokines. Transfer of sortilin-deficient BM into irradiated atherosclerotic mice reduced atherosclerosis and systemic markers of inflammation. Together, these data demonstrate that sortilin influences cytokine secretion and that targeting sortilin in immune cells attenuates inflammation and reduces atherosclerosis. PMID:25401472

  9. Eating the Dead to Keep Atherosclerosis at Bay

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Megan L.; Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H. N. Ashiqur; Song, Kai; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite effective lipid-lowering therapies and prevention programs, atherosclerosis is still the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of CHD in developing countries worldwide is rapidly increasing at a rate expected to overtake those of cancer and diabetes. Prominent risk factors include the hardening of arteries and high levels of cholesterol, which lead to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, cell death and efferocytosis are critical components of both atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression, yet, few currently available therapies focus on these processes. Thus, understanding the causes of cell death within the atherosclerotic plaque, the consequences of cell death, and the mechanisms of apoptotic cell clearance may enable the development of new therapies to treat cardiovascular disease. Here, we review how endoplasmic reticulum stress and cholesterol metabolism lead to cell death and inflammation, how dying cells affect plaque progression, and how autophagy and the clearance of dead cells ameliorates the inflammatory environment of the plaque. In addition, we review current research aimed at alleviating these processes and specifically targeting therapeutics to the site of the plaque. PMID:28194400

  10. [Regression of coronary arteriosclerosis with hypolipidemic treatment, myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Lahoz, C; Monereo, A; Mostaza, J M; de Oya, M

    1992-11-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis regression with hypolipemiant treatment is a well known fact in the animal model since years ago. In humans, during these last years, several clinical trials have been performed to ellucidate the truth to this fact. All of these clinical trials have in common the evolutive study of the coronary lesions with angiographies, in patients following treatment with diet, surgery or drugs, to reduce plasmatic cholesterol. Clinical, analytical and angiographic results of said studies are reviewed. We conclude that the bigger the lowering in plasmatic cholesterol levels, smaller is the progression of these coronary lesions and more probable is finding patients with partial regression of the lesions.

  11. An isolated single L-II type coronary artery anomaly: A rare coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Emrah; Demirelli, Selami; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Sahin, Bingul Dilekci; Kantarci, Abdulmecit

    2015-01-01

    Summary The incidence of congenital artery anomalies is 0.2–1.4%, and most are benign. Single coronary artery (SCA) anomalies are very rare. The right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the left coronary system is one such SCA anomaly, and the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) increases if it courses between the pulmonary artery and aorta and coexists with other congenital heart diseases. Additionally, coursing of the RCA between the great vessels increases the risk of atherosclerosis. We herein present the case of a 57 year-old man who was admitted to our cardiology outpatient clinic and diagnosed with an SCA anomaly in which the RCA arose from the left main coronary artery (LMCA) and coursed between the pulmonary artery and aorta. However a critical stenosis was not detected in imaging techniques, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphic evidence of ischaemia was found in a small area. Therefore, he was managed with conservative medical therapy. PMID:26668781

  12. Chemokines in atherosclerosis: proceedings resumed.

    PubMed

    Zernecke, Alma; Weber, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines play important roles in atherosclerotic vascular disease. Expressed by not only cells of the vessel wall but also emigrated leukocytes, chemokines were initially discovered to direct leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, chemokines can also exert multiple functions beyond cell recruitment. Here, we discuss novel and recently emerging aspects of chemokines and their involvement in atherosclerosis. While reviewing newly identified roles of chemokines and their receptors in monocyte and neutrophil recruitment during atherogenesis and atheroregression, we also revisit homeostatic functions of chemokines, including their roles in cell homeostasis and foam cell formation. The functional diversity of chemokines in atherosclerosis warrants a clear-cut mechanistic dissection and stage-specific assessment to better appreciate the full scope of their actions in vascular inflammation and to identify pathways that harbor the potential for a therapeutic targeting of chemokines in atherosclerosis.

  13. The association between periodontal disease parameters and severity of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ketabi, Mohammad; Meybodi, Fatemeh Rashidi; Asgari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. The aim of this research was to determine the possible association between chronic periodontal disease and severity of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two subjects that were referred to Chamran Heart Hospital in Isfahan for angiography were involved in this study. Fifty-nine subjects had coronary artery obstruction (CAO) and 23 showed no obstruction after angiography. The severity of CAO was assessed. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), gingival recession (R), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) of all subjects were recorded. The decayed-missing-filled (DMF) index of all subjects was also measured. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square, and independent t-test were used. Results: There were significant positive correlation between variables R, PD, CAL, decayed (D), missing (M), DMF, BOP, and degree of CAO. However, there were no significant differences between filling variable degree of CAO (left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery). Independent t-test showed that the mean of variables R, PD, AL, D, M, and DMF in patients with obstructed arteries were significantly higher than subjects without CAO. But there were no significant differences between variable F in two groups. Conclusion: The results of this cross-section analytical study showed an association between periodontal disease and dental parameters with the severity of CAO measured by angiography. However, this association must not interpret as a cause and effect relationship. PMID:27274346

  14. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  15. A Histoenzymatic Study of Human Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Henry F.

    1972-01-01

    A light microscopy study on the localization of enzyme activity within atherosclerotic human intracranial arteries was performed on autopsy material obtained within 4 hours of death. The data suggests that the atherosclerotic process first goes through a proliferative phase and then a degenerative phase culminating in the formation of a plaque. In the proliferative phase, smooth muscle cell proliferation has formed a thickened intima. Tetrazolium reductase, adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and adenosine monophosphatase (AMPase) activities are present in these cells, while all dehydrogenases and acid phosphatase activities were weak or not present. As the degenerative phase commences, an area of necrosis, lipid and macrophage accumulation is formed on the lumen side of the elastica. This area increases in size until a plaque is formed. Unsaturated polar and nonpolar lipid, cholesterol, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and AMPase activities are associated with these areas and in foam cells, which are often found in the thickened intima of the proliferative phase. Tetrazolium reductase and ATPase activities decrease in the thickened intima as the area of necrosis increases in size, while dehydrogenase activity, except that for α-glycerophosphate, remains low or not present. Patterns of enzyme alterations for various stages of the disease process in intracranial arteries, the aorta and coronary arteries suggest a similar, if not identical, progression of the atherosclerotic process, irrespective of known differences in the prevalence of atherosclerosis. ImagesFig 2Fig 3Fig 5Fig 1Fig 4 PMID:4260721

  16. Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lankin, V Z; Lisina, M O; Arzamastseva, N E; Konovalova, G G; Nedosugova, L V; Kaminnyi, A I; Tikhaze, A K; Ageev, F T; Kukharchuk, V V; Belenkov, Yu N

    2005-07-01

    We measured the content of lipid peroxides in plasma LDL from patients with chronic CHD not accompanied by hypercholesterolemia; CHD and hypercholesterolemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus and decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism; and CHD, circulatory insufficiency, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (without hypercholesterolemia). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL isolated from blood plasma by differential ultracentrifugation in a density gradient was estimated by a highly specific method with modifications (reagent Fe(2+) xylene orange and triphenylphosphine as a reducing agent for organic peroxides). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL from patients was much higher than in controls (patients without coronary heart disease and diabetes). Hypercholesterolemia and diabetes can be considered as factors promoting LDL oxidation in vivo. Our results suggest that stimulation of lipid peroxidation in low-density lipoproteins during hypercholesterolemia and diabetes is associated with strong autooxidation of cholesterol and glucose during oxidative and carbonyl (aldehyde) stress, respectively. These data illustrate a possible mechanism of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. Detailed analysis of association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms and subclinical atherosclerosis: The Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose D; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Polak, Joseph F; Budoff, Matthew J; Bluemke, David A

    2016-06-01

    Previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome wide association studies (GWAS) of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in participants of mostly European descent were tested for association with subclinical cardiovascular disease (sCVD), coronary artery calcium score (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The data in this data in brief article correspond to the article Common Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [1]. This article includes the demographic information of the participants analyzed in the article as well as graphical displays and data tables of the association of the selected SNPs with CAC and of the meta-analysis across ethnicities of the association of CIMT-c (common carotid), CIMT-I (internal carotid), CAC-d (CAC as dichotomous variable with CAC>0) and CAC-c (CAC as continuous variable, the log of the raw CAC score plus one) and CVD. The data tables corresponding to the 9p21 fine mapping experiment as well as the power calculations referenced in the article are also included.

  18. Low ambient oxygen prevents atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Amar, Marcelo J; Pryor, Milton; Remaley, Alan T; Allen, Michele D; Noguchi, Audrey C; Springer, Danielle A; Kwon, Jaeyul; Chen, Jichun; Park, Ji-hoon; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Large population studies have shown that living at higher altitudes, which lowers ambient oxygen exposure, is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease mortality. However, hypoxia has also been reported to promote atherosclerosis by worsening lipid metabolism and inflammation. We sought to address these disparate reports by reducing the ambient oxygen exposure of ApoE-/- mice. We observed that long-term adaptation to 10% O2 (equivalent to oxygen content at ∼5000 m), compared to 21% O2 (room air at sea level), resulted in a marked decrease in aortic atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. This effect was associated with increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), known to be anti-atherogenic and regulated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α). Supporting these observations, ApoE-/- mice that were deficient in IL-10 (IL10-/- ApoE-/- double knockout) failed to show reduced atherosclerosis in 10% oxygen. Our study reveals a specific mechanism that can help explain the decreased prevalence of ischemic heart disease in populations living at high altitudes and identifies ambient oxygen exposure as a potential factor that could be modulated to alter pathogenesis. Key messages: Chronic low ambient oxygen exposure decreases atherosclerosis in mice. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels are increased by low ambient O2. This is consistent with the established role of HIF-1α in IL10 transactivation. Absence of IL-10 results in the loss of the anti-atherosclerosis effect of low O2. This mechanism may contribute to decreased atherosclerosis at high altitudes.

  19. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  20. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  1. Visceral adipose tissue as a source of inflammation and promoter of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Katritsis, Demosthenes; Raggi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity with the associated increasing incidence of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis affecting a large proportion of the North American and Western populations, has generated a strong interest in the potential role of visceral adipose tissue in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. The intra-abdominal and epicardial space are two compartments that contain visceral adipose tissue with a similar embryological origin. These visceral fats are highly inflamed in obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and in those with established coronary artery disease; additionally they are capable of secreting large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids. There is accumulating evidence to support a direct involvement of these regional adipose tissue deposits in the development of atherosclerosis and its complicating events, as will be reviewed in this article.

  2. Obesity and aging: determinants of endothelial cell dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. After the discovery of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by Robert F. Furchgott in 1980 it soon became clear that endothelial cells also release vasoactive factors distinct from nitric oxide (NO) namely, endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCF) as well as hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Vasoactive factors derived from endothelial cells include NO/EDRF, reactive oxygen species, endothelins and angiotensins which have either EDRF or EDCF functions, cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs and EDRFs, and EDHFs. Endothelial factors are formed by enzymes such as NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, converting enyzmes, NADPH oxidases, and epoxigenases, among others, and participate in the regulation of vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions; however, their abnormal regulation due to endothelial cell dysfunction contributes to disease processes such as atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, and renal disease. Because of recent changes in world demographics and the declining health status of the world's population, both aging and obesity as independent risk factors for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke, will continue to increase in the years to come. Obesity and associated conditions such as arterial hypertension and diabetes are now also some of the primary health concerns among children and adolescents. The similarities of pathomechanisms activated in obesity and aging suggest that obesity--at least in the vasculature--can be considered to have effects consistent with accelerated, "premature" aging. Pathomechanisms as well as the clinical issues of obesity- and aging-associated vascular changes important for atherosclerosis development and prevention are discussed.

  3. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis.

  4. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis. PMID:27826173

  5. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  7. Vitamin K Intake and Atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized that insufficient intake of vitamin K may increase soft tissue calcification due to impaired gamma-carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (MGP). The evidence to support this putative role of vitamin K intake in atherosclerosis is ...

  8. The Vascular Biology of Atherosclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, Europe, a vast majority of Asia, and is likely to be the greatest...threat to overall health worldwide. As a major cause of cardiovascular disease , the development of atherosclerosis starts early in childhood. Despite this

  9. Management of Coronary Artery Calcium and Coronary CTA Findings.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dustin M; Divakaran, Sanjay; Villines, Todd C; Nasir, Khurram; Shah, Nishant R; Slim, Ahmad M; Blankstein, Ron; Cheezum, Michael K

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) testing and coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) have significant data supporting their ability to identify coronary artery disease (CAD) and classify patient risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Evidence regarding CAC use for screening has established an excellent prognosis in patients with no detectable CAC, and the ability to risk re-classify the majority of asymptomatic patients considered intermediate risk by traditional risk scores. While data regarding the ideal management of CAC findings are limited, evidence supports statin consideration in patients with CAC > 0 and individualized aspirin therapy accounting for CAD risk factors, CAC severity, and factors which increase a patient's risk of bleeding. In patients with stable or acute symptoms undergoing coronary CTA, a normal CTA predicts excellent prognosis, allowing reassurance and disposition without further testing. When CTA identifies nonobstructive CAD (<50 % stenosis), observational data support consideration of statin use/intensification in patients with extensive plaque (at least four coronary segments involved) and patients with high-risk plaque features. In patients with both nonobstructive and obstructive CAD, multiple studies have now demonstrated an ability of CTA to guide management and improve CAD risk factor control. Still, significant under-treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and high-risk image findings remain, among concerns that CTA may increase invasive angiography and revascularization. To fully realize the impact of atherosclerosis imaging for ASCVD prevention, patient engagement in lifestyle changes and the modification of ASCVD risk factors remain the foundation of care. This review provides an overview of available data and recommendations in the management of CAC and CTA findings.

  10. Clinical potential of vorapaxar in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vorapaxar (ZONTIVITY™, formerly known as SCH 530348) is a specific, orally active antagonist of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) on platelets. It inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation by binding to the ectodomain of PAR-1. After animal studies and Phase II studies showed that vorapaxar sufficiently inhibits platelet activation without significantly increasing bleeding complications, safety and efficacy of vorapaxar were assessed in two large multicenter trials in patients with coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. The Thrombin-Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRACER) trial investigated safety and efficacy of vorapaxar in patients with an acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation. The Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) investigated atherothrombotic events in patients with stable atherosclerosis. Results of both studies suggested that vorapaxar given in addition to standard antiplatelet therapy can reduce atherothrombotic events, but increases the risk of mild and moderate bleeding complications. This review article summarizes the main results of TRACER and TRA 2°P-TIMI 50 and suggests patient cohorts that might benefit from treatment with vorapaxar in addition to standard antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26346960

  11. Common Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Jose D.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Post, Wendy S.; Polak, Joseph F.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Bluemke, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Subclinical atherosclerosis (sCVD), measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of CIMT and CVD have focused primarily on Caucasian populations. We hypothesized that these associations may differ in populations from distinct genetic backgrounds. Methods The associations between sCVD and 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published GWAS of sCVD and CVD were tested in 8224 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and MESA Family participants [2329 Caucasians (EUA), 691 Chinese (CHN), 2482 African Americans (AFA), and 2012 Hispanic (HIS)] using an additive model adjusting for CVD risk factors, with SNP significance defined by a Bonferroni-corrected p < 7.6 × 10−4 (0.05/66). Results In EUA there were significant associations for CAC with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P=2 × 10−9; rs4977574, P= 4 × 10−9), COL4A1 (rs9515203, P=9 × 10−6), and PHACTR1 (rs9349379, P= 4 × 10−4). In HIS, CAC was associated with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P=8 × 10−5; rs4977574, P=5 × 10−5), APOA5 (rs964184, P=2 × 10−4), and ADAMTS7 (rs7173743, P=4 × 10−4). There were no associations with the 9p21 region for AFA and CHN. Fine mapping of the 9p21 region revealed SNPs with robust associations with CAC in EUA and HIS but no significant associations in AFA and CHN. Conclusion Our results suggest some shared genetic architecture for sCVD across ethnic groups, while also underscoring the possibility of novel variants and/or pathways in risk of CVD in ethnically diverse populations. PMID:26789557

  12. Food intake patterns associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    PubMed

    Liese, Angela D; Nichols, Michele; Hodo, Denise; Mellen, Philip B; Schulz, Mandy; Goff, David C; D'Agostino, Ralph B

    2010-05-01

    We aimed to identify food intake patterns that operate via haemostatic and inflammatory pathways on progression of atherosclerosis among 802 middle-aged adults with baseline and 5-year follow-up ultrasound measurements of common (CCA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) intimal medial thickness (IMT). Food intake was ascertained with an FFQ. We derived food patterns using reduced rank regression (RRR) with plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and fibrinogen as response variables. We explored the impact of various food pattern simplification approaches. We identified a food pattern characterised by higher intakes of less healthful foods (low-fibre bread and cereal, red and processed meat, cottage cheese, tomato foods, regular soft drinks and sweetened beverages) and lower intakes of more healthful foods (wine, rice and pasta, meal replacements and poultry). The pattern was positively associated with mean CCA IMT at follow-up (P = 0.0032), a 1 sd increase corresponding to an increase of 13 mum higher CCA IMT at follow-up, adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. With increasing pattern quartile (Q), the percentage change in CCA IMT increased significantly: Q1 0.8 %; Q2 3.2 %; Q3 8.6 %; Q4 7.9 % (P = 0.0045). No clear association with ICA IMT was observed. All simplification methods yielded similar results. The present results support the contention that a pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic dietary pattern increases the rate of coronary artery atherosclerosis progression, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. RRR is a promising and robust tool for moving beyond the previous focus on nutrients or foods into research on the health effects of broader dietary patterns.

  13. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  14. High susceptibility of atherosclerotic coronary arteries to the onset of vasospasm and angina pectoris-like symptoms due to coronary spasm in WHHLMI rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Tomonari; Tamura, Shiori; Yu, Ying; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Shiomi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between atherosclerosis and the provocation of coronary spasm as well as the influence of coronary spasm on the onset of acute ischemic myocardial disease. Coronary spasm was provoked in anesthetized normal Japanese white (JW) rabbits and myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, by injecting ergonovine during the infusion of norepinephrine through a marginal ear vein. A decrease in contrast flow in the left circumflex artery was observed on coronary angiograms. Ischemic changes were observed on the electrocardiograms of 29% (2/7) of JW and 79% (27/34, P=0.007) of WHHLMI rabbits. The frequency of coronary spasm was significantly high in rabbits with severe coronary plaques showing diffuse lesions. Left ventricle motility in vasospasm-positive rabbits, which was evaluated with echocardiograms, was decreased by 29% following the ergonovine injection (P<0.001), and every serum ischemic marker markedly increased 4 h after the provocation of vasospasm. These results demonstrate that atherosclerotic coronary arteries are positively related to the provocation of vasospasm, and vasospasm in severe atherosclerotic coronary segments evokes angina pectoris-like findings and/or non-fatal myocardial infarction. WHHLMI rabbits may be a novel animal model for angina pectoris and acute ischemic heart disease. PMID:27301847

  15. Right coronary artery fistula to left ventricle treated by transcatheter coil embolization: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenni; Chen, Han; Wang, Jian'an

    2012-01-01

    A coronary artery fistula between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber is a rare condition. We reported a case of right coronary artery fistula to the left ventricle in a 57-year-old man who had 2-year history of chest pain and exercise dyspnea without significant coronary atherosclerosis with abnormal left ventricular size and function. It was important to recognize this anomaly and our experience showed that transcatheter occlusion of coronary artery fistula was a safe and effective procedure in the presence of symptoms of congestive heart failure, significant left-to-right shunt or refractory to medical treatment.

  16. Aortic Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Paola C; Ratliff, Michelle; Snider, Richard; Macias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Sibbitt, Wilmer; Roldan, Carlos A

    Aortic atherosclerosis (AoA) defined as intima-media thickening or plaques and aortic stiffness (AoS) also considered an atherosclerotic process and defined as decreased vessel distensibility (higher pulse pressure to achieve similar degree of vessel distension) are common in patients with SLE. Immune-mediated inflammation, thrombogenesis, traditional atherogenic factors, and therapy-related metabolic abnormalities are the main pathogenic factors of AoA and AoS. Pathology of AoA and AoS suggests an initial subclinical endothelialitis or vasculitis, which is exacerbated by thrombogenesis and atherogenic factors and ultimately resulting in AoA and AoS. Computed tomography (CT) for detection of arterial wall calcifications and arterial tonometry for detection of increased arterial pulse wave velocity are the most common diagnostic methods for detecting AoA and AoS, respectively. MRI may become a more applicable and accurate technique than CT. Although transesophageal echocardiography accurately detects earlier and advanced stages of AoA and AoS, it is semi-invasive and cannot be used as a screening method. Although imaging techniques demonstrate highly variable prevalence rates, on average about one third of adult SLE patients may have AoA or AoS. Age at SLE diagnosis; SLE duration; activity and damage; corticosteroid therapy; metabolic syndrome; chronic kidney disease; and mitral annular calcification are common independent predictors of AoA and AoS. Also, AoA and AoS are highly associated with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis. Earlier stages of AoA and AoS are usually subclinical. However, earlier stages of disease may be causally related or contribute to peripheral or cerebral embolism, pre-hypertension and hypertension, and increased left ventricular afterload resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Later stages of disease predisposes to visceral ischemia, aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. Even earlier stages of AoA and Ao

  17. Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Meyer, Craig; Engvall, Jan; Yang, Phillip; McConnell, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Background Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to nitroglycerine (NTG) of asymptomatic patients at high risk for CAD. Methods A total of 46 asymptomatic subjects were studied: 13 high-risk patients [8 with diabetes mellitus (DM), 5 with end stage renal disease (ESRD)] and 33 age-matched controls. Long-axis and cross-sectional coronary artery images were acquired pre- and 5 minutes post-sublingual NTG using a sub-mm-resolution multi-slice spiral coronary CMR sequence. Coronary cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on pre- and post-NTG images and % coronary vasodilation was calculated. Results Patients with DM and ESRD had impaired coronary vasodilation to NTG compared to age-matched controls (17.8 ± 7.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%, p = 0.002). This remained significant for ESRD patients alone (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.003) and for DM patients alone (19.8 ± 6.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.049), with a non-significant trend toward greater impairment in the ESRD vs. DM patients (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 19.8 ± 6.3%; p = 0.23). Conclusion Noninvasive coronary CMR demonstrates impairment of coronary vasodilation to NTG in high-risk patients with DM and ESRD. This may provide a functional indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis and warrants clinical follow up to determine prognostic significance. PMID:18513419

  18. The role of microRNAs in coronary artery disease: From pathophysiology to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Economou, Evangelos K; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Siasos, Gerasimos; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Tsalamandris, Sotiris; Mourouzis, Konsantinos; Papaioanou, Spyridon; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. Far from being simple intracellular regulators, miRNAs have recently been involved in intercellular communication and have been shown to circulate in the bloodstream in stable forms. In the past years specific miRNA expression patterns have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, two closely related conditions. The study of miRNAs has promoted our understanding of the processes involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches have emerged. In this review, we present the role of miRNAs in the development of atherosclerosis, on coronary artery disease progression and we assess their role as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally we evaluate the therapeutic and preventive opportunities that arise from the study of miRNAs in coronary artery disease and especially in myocardial infarction.

  19. Foodborne Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    ond time. Britain. A similar investigational drug, 3.4-dia- Therapy is nonspecific in patients poisoned minopyridine, is less toxic and shows dramatic...time of onset as well as in the type of Because neuromuscular paralysis may pro- toxicity . FOODBORNE ILLNESS-Continuod 19 The earliest manifestations of... toxicity result Favism from the peripheral anticholinergic effects of Some persons with an inherited deficiency of muscarine. Symptoms begin 10 to 120

  20. [Vitamin E, antioxidants and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Lecerf, J M; Luc, G; Fruchart, J C

    1994-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a process in which lipid and factors are mixed. When LDL are oxydized, they are catabolized by the macrophage's pathway, leading to foam cells which constitute the fatty streak, the earliest lesion in atherogenesis, and they have cytotoxic, chemotactic effects. Many protective devices against free radicals and oxydation mechanisms exist, particularly antioxydant vitamins and other natural dietary antioxydants. After a brief recall of their mechanisms, epidemiological, experimental and clinical data are reviewed. To day it seems necessary to take into consideration these factors in prevention and therapeutic of atherosclerosis and dylipidaemia. Many inquiries keep going, particularly about susceptible of LDL to oxydation. One is waiting for intervention surveys in order to conclude about nutritional and medical treatments.

  1. The Association between Circulating MicroRNA Levels and Coronary Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Chung, Woo-Young; Herrmann, Joerg; Jordan, Kyra L.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Human microRNAs (miRs) have been implicated in human diseases presumably through the downregulation and silencing of targeted genes via post-translational modifications. However, their role in the early stage of coronary atherosclerosis is not known. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with early atherosclerosis and coronary endothelial dysfunction (CED) have alterations in transcoronary miR gradients. Patients underwent coronary angiography and endothelial function testing in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Patients were divided into abnormal (n = 26) and normal (n = 22) microvascular coronary endothelial function based on intracoronary response to infused acetylcholine measured as a percent change in coronary blood flow (CBF) and arterial diameter. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the aorta and coronary sinus at the time of catheterization for RNA isolation, and miR subsequently assessed. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Patients with microvascular CED displayed transcoronary gradients significantly elevated in miR-92a and miR-133 normalized to C-elegans-39 miR. Percent change in CBF and the transcoronary gradient of miR-133 displayed a significant inverse correlation (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.03). Thus, we present novel data whereupon selected miRs demonstrate elevated transcoronary gradients in patients with microvascular CED. The current findings support further studies on the mechanistic role of miRs in coronary atherosclerosis and in humans. PMID:25310838

  2. Life Event, Stress and Illness

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Mohd. Razali

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between stress and illness is complex. The susceptibility to stress varies from person to person. Among the factors that influenced the susceptibility to stress are genetic vulnerability, coping style, type of personality and social support. Not all stress has negative effect. Studies have shown that short-term stress boosted the immune system, but chronic stress has a significant effect on the immune system that ultimately manifest an illness. It raises catecholamine and suppressor T cells levels, which suppress the immune system. This suppression, in turn raises the risk of viral infection. Stress also leads to the release of histamine, which can trigger severe broncho-constriction in asthmatics. Stress increases the risk for diabetes mellitus, especially in overweight individuals, since psychological stress alters insulin needs. Stress also alters the acid concentration in the stomach, which can lead to peptic ulcers, stress ulcers or ulcerative colitis. Chronic stress can also lead to plaque buildup in the arteries (atherosclerosis), especially if combined with a high-fat diet and sedentary living. The correlation between stressful life events and psychiatric illness is stronger than the correlation with medical or physical illness. The relationship of stress with psychiatric illness is strongest in neuroses, which is followed by depression and schizophrenia. There is no scientific evidence of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between the immune system changes and the development of cancer. However, recent studies found a link between stress, tumour development and suppression of natural killer (NK) cells, which is actively involved in preventing metastasis and destroying small metastases. PMID:22589633

  3. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  4. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  5. Early risk factors, job strain, and atherosclerosis among men in their 30s: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, Mika; Hintsanen, Mirka; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Elovainio, Marko; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Vahtera, Jussi; Viikari, Jorma S A; Raitakari, Olli T

    2007-03-01

    We examined whether preemployment influences confounded the association between job strain and atherosclerosis. We assessed biological, familial, and socioeconomic risk factors of coronary heart disease at 12 to 18 years of age and job strain and carotid artery intima-media thickness at 33 to 39 years of age for a cohort of 358 men. Adolescent risk factors predicted adult intima-media thickness but had little effect on the dose-response relation between greater job strain and greater intima-media thickness. Pre-employment influences did not confound the association between job strain and atherosclerosis.

  6. Monotherapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and secondary prevention in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rackley, C E

    1996-09-01

    Although thrombolytic drugs, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting have provided major advances in the treatment of coronary artery disease, the use of lipid-lowering drugs for secondary prevention has significantly reduced cardiovascular events in the population with coronary artery disease. Secondary prevention trials using HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors include the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study (MARS), the Canadian Coronary Atherosclerosis Intervention Trial (CCAIT), the Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Progression Study (ACAPS), the Multi Anti-Atheroma Study (MAAS), the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S), the Pravastatin Limitation of Atherosclerosis in Coronary Arteries (PLAC I), the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), the Pravastatin Multinational Study, and the Pravastatin, Lipids, and Atherosclerosis in Carotids (PLAC II). Mean changes from baseline of lipid fractions in these trials included: total cholesterol 18 to 35% reduction; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 26 to 46% reduction; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol 5 to 15% increase; and triglyceride 7 to 22% reduction. Angiographic regression or lack of progression was statistically demonstrated in the FATS, MARS, CCAIT, MAAS, PLAC I, and REGRESS trials. Cardiovascular events decreased 25 to 92% in all trials, and there was a significant reduction in both cardiovascular and total mortality in the 4S. The greater reduction in cardiovascular events than in anatomic changes suggests that the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors stabilized the surface of plaques. Monotherapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors provides the clinical opportunity to modify the natural history of coronary artery disease.

  7. Sex Differences in Inflammation During Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide, yet more men die from atherosclerosis than women, and at a younger age. Women, on the other hand, mainly develop atherosclerosis following menopause, and particularly if they have one or more autoimmune diseases, suggesting that the immune mechanisms that increase disease in men are different from those in women. The key processes in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are vascular inflammation, lipid accumulation, intimal thickening and fibrosis, remodeling, and plaque rupture or erosion leading to myocardial infarction and ischemia. Evidence indicates that sex hormones alter the immune response during atherosclerosis, resulting in different disease phenotypes according to sex. Women, for example, respond to infection and damage with increased antibody and autoantibody responses, while men have elevated innate immune activation. This review describes current knowledge regarding sex differences in the inflammatory immune response during atherosclerosis. Understanding sex differences is critical for improving individualized medicine. PMID:25983559

  8. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  9. Emerging roles of GPER in diabetes and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R

    2015-04-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 7-transmembrane receptor implicated in rapid estrogen signaling. Originally cloned from vascular endothelial cells, GPER plays a central role in the regulation of vascular tone and cell growth as well as lipid and glucose homeostasis. This review highlights our knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of GPER in the pancreas, peripheral and immune tissues, and the arterial vasculature. Recent findings on its roles in obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, including GPER-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation, are presented. The therapeutic potential of targeting GPER-dependent pathways in chronic diseases such as coronary artery disease and diabetes and in the context of menopause is also discussed.

  10. Coronary artery disease and plasma apolipoprotein E4 in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Barekatain, Majid; Zahedian, Faezeh; Askarpour, Hedyeh; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hashemi-Jazi, Mohammad; Aghaye-Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerosis and apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) are known risks for Dementia. We sought to evaluate the relationship between coronary atherosclerosis and APOE4 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS In a case-control study, subjects with age more than 60 years and recent coronary angiography were evaluated by mini-mental state examination and neuropsychiatry unit cognitive assessment tool (NUCOG) to find the patients with MCI (n = 40) and the controls with normal cognition (n = 40). Coronary angiography records were re-assessed to find the severity of coronary artery disease by the Gensini scores. Plasma levels of APOE4 were measured. RESULTS There were no-significant difference between the 2 groups regarding the plasma APOE4 levels (P = 0.706) and the Gensini scores (P = 0.236). Associations between the Gensini scores and the NUCOG scores in the MCI group (r = −0.196, P = 0.225) and the control group (r = 0.189, P = 0.243) were not significant. However, the interaction effect between the Gensini and the NUCOG scores based on allocation to the control or the patient groups showed statistically significant difference (F(1,67) = 4.84, P = 0.031). CONCLUSION Although atherosclerosis has been considered as known risk factor for dementia and MCI, this study could not reveal that coronary atherosclerosis-related to declining in cognitive functioning. There was no significant association between plasma APOE4 levels and MCI. PMID:25477981

  11. Coronary arteriography and angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.B.; Douglas, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book explores biomedical radiography of the heart. Topics considered include six bench marks in the history of cardiac catheterization; normal coronary anatomy; anomalies of the coronary arteries; pathoanotomy of the coronary arteries and complications; indications, limitations, and risks of coronary arteriography and left ventriculography; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography: the Sones technique; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography: the Judkins technique; modification of Judkins catheters; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography multipurpose technique; new views in coronary arteriography; quantitative evaluation of left ventricular function; complications of coronary arteriography: management during and following the procedure; interpretation of coronary arteriograms and left ventriculograms; prevalence and distribution of disease in patients catheterized for suspected coronary disease at Emory University Hospital; the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory; selection for surgery or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; intracoronary thrombolysis; and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

  12. Microorganisms in the aetiology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morre, S; Stooker, W; Lagrand, W; van den Brule, A J C; Niessen, H

    2000-01-01

    Recent publications have suggested that infective pathogens might play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on these microorganisms in the process of atherosclerosis. The results of in vitro studies, animal studies, tissue studies, and serological studies will be summarised, followed by an overall conclusion concerning the strength of the association of the microorganism with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role of the bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae and Helicobacter pylori, and the viruses human immunodeficiency virus, coxsackie B virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, and measles virus will be discussed. Key Words: atherosclerosis • Chlamydia pneumoniae • Helicobacter pylori PMID:11041053

  13. Smooth muscle FGF/TGFβ cross talk regulates atherosclerosis progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative phenotype is thought to play an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the contribution of this process to plaque growth has never been fully defined. In this study, we show that activation of SMC TGFβ signaling, achieved by suppression of SMC fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling input, induces their conversion to a contractile phenotype and dramatically reduces atherosclerotic plaque size. The FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk was observed in vitro and in vivo In vitro, inhibition of FGF signaling increased TGFβ activity, thereby promoting smooth muscle differentiation and decreasing proliferation. In vivo, smooth muscle-specific knockout of an FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α led to a profound inhibition of atherosclerotic plaque growth when these animals were crossed on Apoe(-/-) background and subjected to a high-fat diet. In particular, there was a significant reduction in plaque cellularity, increase in fibrous cap area, and decrease in necrotic core size. In agreement with these findings, examination of human coronary arteries with various degrees of atherosclerosis revealed a strong correlation between the activation of FGF signaling, loss of TGFβ activity, and increased disease severity. These results identify SMC FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk as an important regulator of SMC phenotype switch and document a major contribution of medial SMC proliferation to atherosclerotic plaque growth.

  14. Scaling laws of coronary circulation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-08-16

    The heterogeneity and complexity of coronary vasculature (structure) and myocardial flow (function) have fractal-like characteristics and can be described by scaling laws with remarkable simplicity. In contrast with allometric (interspecific) scaling law, intraspecific scaling laws describe the design rules of vascular trees within a species. This paper provides an overview of intraspecific scaling laws of vascular trees and the physiological and clinical implications thereof. The significance and shortcomings of these scaling laws are discussed in relation to diffuse coronary artery disease, Glagov's positive remodeling in early stages of coronary atherosclerosis, treatment guidelines of complex bifurcation lesions, and for estimation of outlet resistance values for computation of blood flow in epicardial coronary arteries. Finally, we summarize the highlights of scaling relations and suggest some future directions.

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  16. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  17. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the ...

  18. Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joe; Middaugh, John; Boudreau, Donald; Malcom, Gray; Parry, Steve; Tracy, Richard; Newman, William

    2005-08-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.

  19. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of microwave technology for treating Atherosclerosis while preserving the endothelium. The system uses catheter antennas as part of the system that is intended to treat atherosclerosis. The concept is to use a microwave catheter for heating the atherosclerotic lesions, and reduce constriction in the artery.

  20. Extension of the mitochondria dysfunction hypothesis of metabolic syndrome to atherosclerosis with emphasis on the endocrine-disrupting chemicals and biophysical laws.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyu; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-01-29

    Metabolic syndrome and its component phenotypes, hyperglycemia, hypertension, (abdominal) obesity and hypertriglyceridemia, are major risk factors for atherosclerosis. Recently, associations between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis have been established, suggesting a possible common mechanism underlying these phenomena. Extending a previously proposed mitochondria dysfunction theory of metabolic syndrome and using biophysical laws, such as metabolic scaling, Murray's law and fractal geometry of the vascular branching system, we propose that atherosclerosis could be explained as an ill-adaptive change occurring in nutrient-supplying arteries in response to the decreasing tissue energy demand caused by tissue mitochondrial dysfunction. Various aspects of this new hypothesis are discussed.

  1. Quantification of carotid vessel atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. D.; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of plaques in the arterial wall, which ultimately leads to heart attacks and stroke. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to screen patients' carotid arteries. Plaque measurements obtained from these images may aid in the management and monitoring of patients, and in evaluating the effect of new treatment options. Different types of measures for ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been proposed. Here, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3D US images obtained at two different time points. We evaluated our technique using manual segmentations of the wall and lumen of the carotid artery from images acquired in two US scanning sessions. To incorporate the effect of intraobserver variability in our evaluation, manual segmentation was performed five times each for the arterial wall and lumen. From this set of five segmentations, the mean wall and lumen surfaces were reconstructed, with the standard deviation at each point mapped onto the surfaces. A correspondence map between the mean wall and lumen surfaces was then established, and the thickness of the atherosclerotic plaque at each point in the vessel was estimated to be the distance between each correspondence pairs. The two-sample Student's t-test was used to judge whether the difference between the thickness values at each pair corresponding points of the arteries in the two 3D US images was statistically significant.

  2. Platelets: cell proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, R

    1979-04-01

    Intimal smooth muscle proliferation is the hallmark of the lesions of atherosclerosis. Endothelial injury is postulated to precede this intimal smooth muscle proliferative response, which is mediated by a potent mitogenic factor derived from adherence, aggregation, and release by platelets at sites of endothelial injury. Smooth muscle proliferation is accompanied by varying amounts of connective tissue formation and intracellular and extracellular lipid deposition, dependent upon the risk factors encountered in each patient. The platelet-derived mitogen (PF) is a stable, cationic, relatively low molecular weight (10,000-30,000) protein that has been partially purified by ion exchange chromotography and gel filtration. Less than 100 ng of PF/ml culture medium can stimulate sparse 3T3 cells or smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, to undergo multiple cell divisions in the presence of 5% cell-free, plasma-derived serum. The latter contains no mitogenic activity. The interaction of the platelet mitogen and plasma-derived components, including lipoproteins, plays a critical role in smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and in vivo in the induction of the lesions of atherosclerosis.

  3. Lower coronary plaque burden in patients with HIV presenting with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, E J; Bhamra-Ariza, P; Rao, S; Emmanuel, S; Carr, A; Holloway, C J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treated HIV infection is associated with a higher incidence of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, although the mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to characterise the burden of coronary artery disease in men with HIV using retrospective data from invasive coronary angiograms in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods Demographic and coronary angiographic data were obtained from 160 men with ST elevation myocardial infarction, non-STEMI or high-risk chest pain; 73 HIV-infected cases and 87 age-matched controls. The burden of coronary disease was calculated using the Gensini Angiographic Scoring System by 2 independent cardiologists blinded to HIV status. Results The 2 groups were matched for age, sex and cardiac event subtype and there was no difference in rates of smoking or cholesterol levels. Compared with control participants, patients with HIV had higher usage of antihypertensives (46 (63%) vs 30 (35%), p<0.001) and statins (47 (64%) vs 29 (33%), p<0.001). There was no difference in plaque distribution between both groups; however, the Gensini score was 42% lower in cases with HIV than in controls (p<0.03). C reactive protein was higher in cases with HIV (13.4±15.4 vs 3.7±3.6). Conclusions Men with HIV presenting with ACS paradoxically had a lower burden of coronary plaque than matched controls, despite more aggressive risk factor management, suggesting that plaque vulnerability, rather than total burden of atherosclerosis, may be important in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease in men with HIV. PMID:28123757

  4. Vasa Vasorum in Atherosclerosis and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Lu, Xiaotong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to several acute cardiovascular complications with poor prognosis. For decades, the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has received broad attention. The presence of VV neovascularization precedes the apparent symptoms of clinical atherosclerosis. VV also mediates inflammatory cell infiltration, intimal thickening, intraplaque hemorrhage, and subsequent atherothrombosis that results in stroke or myocardial infarction. Intraplaque neovessels originating from VV can be immature and hence susceptible to leakage, and are thus regarded as the leading cause of intraplaque hemorrhage. Evidence supports VV as a new surrogate target of atherosclerosis evaluation and treatment. This review provides an overview into the relationship between VV and atherosclerosis, including the anatomy and function of VV, the stimuli of VV neovascularization, and the available underlying mechanisms that lead to poor prognosis. We also summarize translational researches on VV imaging modalities and potential therapies that target VV neovascularization or its stimuli. PMID:26006236

  5. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Seecheran, Valmiki K.; Giddings, Stanley L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has considerably increased the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of mortality in patients infected with HIV. This is primarily attributed to their increased survival, HAART-induced metabolic derangements, and to HIV itself. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in HIV is both multifactorial and complex – involving direct endothelial injury and dysfunction, hypercoagulability, and a significant contribution from traditional cardiac risk factors. The advent of HAART has since heralded a remarkable improvement in outcomes, but at the expense of other unforeseen issues. It is thus of paramount importance to swiftly recognize and manage acute coronary syndromes in HIV-infected patients to attenuate adverse complications, which should translate into improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27845996

  6. Paraoxonase-3 is depleted from the high density lipoproteins of autoimmune disease patients with subclinical atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marsillach, Judit; Becker, Jessica O.; Vaisar, Tomas; Hahn, Bevra H.; Brunzell, John D.; Furlong, Clement E.; deBoer, Ian H.; McMahon, Maureen A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases have a significantly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In disease, high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles lose their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, becoming dysfunctional. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that alterations in the HDL proteomic profile are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and HDL dysfunction in patients with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes. Targeted proteomics was used to quantify the relative abundance of 18 proteins in HDL from SLE patients with and without atherosclerotic plaque detectable by carotid ultrasound. Changes in the proteomic profile were compared against the in vitro ability of HDL to protect against lipid oxidation. The same proteins were quantified in HDL from patients with type 1 diabetes with or without coronary artery calcification as determined by computed tomography. In each population, paraoxonase-3 (PON3), a potent antioxidant protein, was depleted from the HDL of patients with subclinical atherosclerosis. PON3 expression in HDL was positively correlated with HDL antioxidant function. These results suggest that PON3 may be an important protein in preventing atherosclerosis and highlights the importance of antioxidant proteins in the prevention of atherosclerosis in vivo. PMID:25723336

  7. Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses The Basics Would ...

  8. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  9. The identification of the variation of atherosclerosis plaques by invasive and non-invasive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Computer-enhanced visualization of coronary arteries and lesions within them is discussed, comparing invasive and noninvasive methods. Trial design factors in computer lesions assessment are briefly discussed, and the use of the computer edge-tracking technique in that assessment is described. The results of a small pilot study conducted on serial cineangiograms of men with premature atherosclerosis are presented. A canine study to determine the feasibility of quantifying atherosclerosis from intravenous carotid angiograms is discussed. Comparative error for arterial and venous injection in the canines is determined, and the mode of processing the films to achieve better visualization is described. The application of the computer edge-tracking technique to an ultrasound image of the human carotid artery is also shown and briefly discussed.

  10. Non-invasive imaging in coronary artery disease including anatomical and functional evaluation of ischaemia and viability assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pakkal, M; Raj, V; Mccann, G P

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease has an important impact on the morbidity and mortality statistics and health economics worldwide. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease is important in risk stratification and guides further management. Invasive coronary angiography is the traditional method of imaging the coronary arteries and remains the gold standard. It detects luminal stenosis but provides little information about the vessel wall or plaques. Besides, not all anatomical lesions are functionally significant. This has lent itself to a wide variety of imaging techniques to identify and assess a flow-limiting stenosis. The approach to diagnosis of coronary artery disease is broadly based on anatomical and functional imaging. Coronary CT and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis. Coronary calcium score and coronary CT assess subclinical atherosclerosis by assessing the atherosclerotic plaque burden. The haemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress radioisotope studies, stress echocardiography and stress MRI. The more recent literature also focuses on plaque assessment and identification of plaques that are likely to give rise to an acute coronary syndrome. There is an explosion of literature on the merits and limitations of the different imaging modalities. This review article will provide an overview of all the imaging modalities in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. PMID:22723535

  11. Prediction of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing operations for mitral valve degeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. S.; Lauer, M. S.; Asher, C. R.; Cosgrove, D. M.; Blackstone, E.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to develop and validate a model that estimates the risk of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients undergoing operations for mitral valve degeneration and to demonstrate its potential clinical utility. METHODS: A total of 722 patients (67% men; age, 61 +/- 12 years) without a history of myocardial infarction, ischemic electrocardiographic changes, or angina who underwent routine coronary angiography before mitral valve prolapse operations between 1989 and 1996 were analyzed. A bootstrap-validated logistic regression model on the basis of clinical risk factors was developed to identify low-risk (< or =5%) patients. Obstructive coronary atherosclerosis was defined as 50% or more luminal narrowing in one or more major epicardial vessels, as determined by means of coronary angiography. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-nine (19%) patients had obstructive coronary atherosclerosis. Independent predictors of coronary artery disease include age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus,and hyperlipidemia. Two hundred twenty patients were designated as low risk according to the logistic model. Of these patients, only 3 (1.3%) had single-vessel disease, and none had multivessel disease. The model showed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.84. Cost analysis indicated that application of this model could safely eliminate 30% of coronary angiograms, corresponding to cost savings of $430,000 per 1000 patients without missing any case of high-risk coronary artery disease. CONCLUSION: A model with standard clinical predictors can reliably estimate the prevalence of obstructive coronary atherosclerosis in patients undergoing mitral valve prolapse operations. This model can identify low-risk patients in whom routine preoperative angiography may be safely avoided.

  12. Anxiety, Depression, and General Psychological Distress in Patients with Coronary Slow Flow

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Mehmet Baran; Şahan, Ebru; Özcan, Kazım Serhan; Çanga, Yiğit; Güngör, Barış; Onuk, Tolga; İpek, Göktürk; Çakıllı, Yasin; Arugaslan, Emre; Bolca, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between psychiatric illness and heart disease has been frequently discussed in the literature. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety, depression and overall psychological distress, and coronary slow flow (CSF). Methods In total, 44 patients with CSF and a control group of 50 patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA) were prospectively recruited. Clinical data, admission laboratory parameters, and echocardiographic and angiographic characteristics were recorded. Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scales were administered to each patient. Results The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and atherosclerotic risk factors. In the CSF group, BAI score, BDI score, and general symptom index were significantly higher than controls (13 [18.7] vs. 7.5 [7], p = 0.01; 11 [14.7] vs. 6.5 [7], p = 0.01; 1.76 [0.81] vs. 1.1[0.24], p = 0.01; respectively). Patients with CSF in more than one vessel had the highest test scores. In univariate correlation analysis, mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame counts were positively correlated with BAI (r = 0.56, p = 0.01), BDI (r = 0.47, p = 0.01), and general symptom index (r = 0.65, p = 0.01). The psychiatric tests were not correlated with risk factors for atherosclerosis. Conclusion Our study revealed higher rates of depression, anxiety, and overall psychological distress in patients with CSF. This conclusion warrants further studies. PMID:26559983

  13. Coronary artery calcification in obese youth: What are the phenotypic and metabolic determinants?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity in adolescence has been associated with increased risk for coronary heart disease in adulthood. This study evaluated subclinical atherosclerosis in obese youth and the underlying risk factors. Ninety obese adolescents (37 normal glucose tolerant, 27 prediabetes, and 26 type 2 diabetes) under...

  14. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Altman, Raul

    2003-06-20

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events.Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease.

  15. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul

    2003-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events. Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease. PMID:12904261

  16. [Is coronary artery disease different in women?].

    PubMed

    Schiele, François; Chopard, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the primary cause of death in women. Although acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is relatively infrequent in young women, failure to recognize ACS in this population can incur a major risk and registry data show that there is still plenty of room for improvement in this area. Women may suffer from "classical" CAD with development of atherosclerosis with a delay of about 10 years as compared to men, reflecting hormonal protection in women. Besides this classical presentation, angina in women often corresponds to impaired microcirculation, a syndrome known to associate typical angina, demonstrable myocardial ischemia, but no lesions on the coronary angiography. Finally, spasm, spontaneous dissection or coronary thrombosis through endothelial rupture are more frequent in women. The influence of risk factors on the development of CAD is comparable in both women and men. Recent registry studies show that in France, in particular, diabetes, obesity, and smoking are all risk factors that are on the rise in women. In addition, certain other risk factors are more specific to women, namely psycho-social stress. The methods to evaluate risk and detect CAD were mainly developed in male study populations, and these tools thus perform less well in female patients. In case of ACS, women benefit just as much from invasive management, but are at greater risk of iatrogenic complications, particularly with anti-thrombotic therapy or during revascularization procedures.

  17. Coronary involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Piraino, Davide; Arrotti, Salvatore; Assennato, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are themselves a relevant and independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary ectasia. We describe a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted to our department for unstable angina. History of asthma, paranasal sinus abnormality, and peripheral eosinophilia given a high suspicion of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS). Diagnosis was performed with 5 of the 6 American College of Rheumatology criteria. The knowledge that CSS is often associated with significant coronary artery involvement and the persistence of chest pain led us to performing immediately a coronary angiography. Coronary angiography showed diffuse ectasic lesions, chronic occlusion of left anterior descending artery with homocoronary collateral circulation from left circumflex artery and subocclusive stenosis in the proximal tract of posterior descending artery. The early recognition of CSS, an aggressive invasive diagnostic approach, and an early appropriate therapy are important to prevent the progressive and permanent cardiac damage in these patients. In the setting of a multidisciplinary approach, careful cardiac assessment is an essential step in CSS, even in mildly symptomatic patients. PMID:26702692

  18. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  19. Abdominal Aortic Diameter and Vascular Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Gail A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Jensky, Nicole; Aboyans, Victor; Wong, Nathan D.; Detrano, Robert; Criqui, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To gain insight into early mechanisms of aortic widening, we examined associations between the diameter of the abdominal aorta (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and biomarkers, as well as measures of subclinical atherosclerosis, in a multi-ethnic population. Design Cross-sectional cohort Methods A total of 1926 participants (mean age 62, 50% women) underwent chest and abdomen scanning by computed tomography, ultrasound of the carotid arteries, and CVD risk factor assessment. AD was measured 5 cm above and at the bifurcation. Results In a model containing traditional CVD risk factors, biomarkers and ethnicity, only age (standardized β=0.97), male sex (β=1.88), body surface area (standardized β=0.92), current smoking (β=0.42), D-dimer levels (β=0.19) and hypertension (β=0.53) were independently and significantly associated with increasing AD (in mm) at the bifurcation; use of cholesterol-lowering medications predicted smaller AD (β=-0.70) (P<.01 for all). These findings were similar for AD 5 cm above the bifurcation with one exception: compared to Caucasian-Americans, Americans of Chinese, African and Hispanic descent had significantly smaller AD 5 cm above the bifurcation (β's= -0.59, -0.49, and -0.52, respectively, all P<.01), whereas AD at the bifurcation did not differ by ethnicity. Physical activity, alcohol consumption, diabetes and levels of IL-6, CRP and homocysteine were not independently associated with AD. Higher aortic and coronary artery calcium burden, but not common carotid artery intima-media thickness, were independently, but modestly (β=0.11 to 0.19), associated with larger AD. Conclusions Incremental widening of the aortic diameter shared some, but not all, risk factors for occlusive vascular disease. PMID:21236707

  20. Effects of calcium, magnesium, lead, or cadmium on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in the pigeon

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; Major, T.C.; Horton, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological and clincal studies suggest that the incidence of atherosclerosis is higher in soft-water areas than in hard-water areas. In an attempt to discern the factor(s) in drinking water that may be associated with these observations, the current studies were performed to determine the effects of several elements associated with hard (i.e., calcium and magnesium) or soft (i.e., calcium and magnesium) or soft (i.e., cadmium and lead) water in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis in the white carneau pigeon. The effect of these elements on lipoprotein metabolism was also assessed because it has been suggested that changes in the metabolism of lipoprotein may play a role in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Results show that the number and size of atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta were increased in pigeons given drinking water containing lead and/or cadmium. The effects of these elements were antagonized by the addition of calcium to drinking water containing lead and/or cadmium. Although lead and cadmium altered the profile of lipoproteins, this change did not appear to be related to an increase in the number and size of atherosclerotic plaques of the aorta. However, in pigeons treated with calcium alone the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increased fourfold, and arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries was observed. This result suggests that marked increases in the LDL protein may be related to arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries. Based on these preliminary results, we suggest that lead, cadmium, and the LDL protein may be important factors in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis in the pigeon.

  1. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  2. Association between adiposity and systemic atherosclerosis: a protocol of a cross-sectional autopsy study

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Aline; Suemoto, Claudia Kimie; Farias, Daniela Souza; Campos, Fernanda Marinho; da Silva, Karen Cristina Souza; Cuelho, Anderson; Leite, Renata Elaine Paraízo; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Farfel, José Marcelo; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adiposity has been associated with atherosclerosis in clinical studies. However, few autopsy studies have investigated this association, and they had only examined the coronary artery disease. Moreover, most studies had small sample sizes and were limited to middle-aged or young adults. Our aim is to investigate the association between adiposity and systemic atherosclerosis in an autopsy study. Methods and analysis A sample of 240 deceased with 30 years or more will be evaluated. The sample size was calculated using the lowest correlation coefficient found in previous studies (r=0.109), assuming a power of 90% and α=0.05. We will collect information about sociodemographics, frequency of previous contact of the deceased's next of kin and cardiovascular risk factors. We will measure neck, waist and hip circumferences, weight, height and abdominal subcutaneous tissue thickness, and then we will calculate the body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body shape index. We will also weigh the pericardial and abdominal visceral fat, the heart, and we will measure the left ventricular wall thickness. We will evaluate the presence of myocardial infarction, the degree of atherosclerosis in the aorta, carotid, coronary and cerebral arteries and plaque composition in carotid, coronary and cerebral arteries. For each individual, we will fix arterial and adipose tissue samples in 10% formalin and freeze another adipose tissue sample at −80°C for future studies. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted by the Ethics Committee of University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Brazil. Results will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:27621828

  3. Coronary magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza; Appelbaum, Evan; Danias, Peter G; Hauser, Thomas H; Yeon, Susan B

    2007-02-01

    This article highlights the technical challenges and general imaging strategies for coronary MRI. This is followed by a review of the clinical results for the assessment of anomalous CAD, coronary artery aneurysms, native vessel integrity, and coronary artery bypass graft disease using the more commonly applied MRI methods. It concludes with a brief discussion of the advantages/disadvantages and clinical results comparing coronary MRI with multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiography.

  4. Vasostatin-2 inhibits cell proliferation and adhesion in vascular smooth muscle cells, which are associated with the progression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghong; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Junnong

    2016-01-22

    Recently, the serum expression level of vasostatin-2 was found to be reduced and is being studied as an important indicator to assess the presence and severity of coronary artery disease; the functional properties of vasostatin-2 and its relationship with the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to detect the expression of vasostatin-2 and its impact on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot were used to assess the expression level of vasostatin-2 in VSMCs between those from atherosclerosis and disease-free donors; we found that vasostatin-2 was significantly down-regulated in atherosclerosis patient tissues and cell lines. In addition, the over-expression of vasostatin-2 apparently inhibits cell proliferation and migration in VSMCs. Gain-of-function in vitro experiments further show that vasostatin-2 over-expression significantly inhibits inflammatory cytokines release in VSMCs. In addition, cell adhesion experimental analysis showed that soluble adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1) had decreased expression when vasostatin-2 was over-expressed in VSMCs. Therefore, our results indicate that vasostatin-2 is an atherosclerosis-related factor that can inhibit cell proliferation, inflammatory response and cell adhesion in VSMCs. Taken together, our results indicate that vasostatin-2 could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic option for human atherosclerosis in the near future.

  5. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis—from molecular biology to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Fabian; Domschke, Gabriele; Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Katus, Hugo A.; Gleissner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over 3 years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecular inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis. PMID:25484870

  6. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  7. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Feig, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression. PMID:22934038

  8. [Atherosclerosis, oxidative stress and physical activity. Review].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan Camilo; Fernández, Ana Zita; María de Jesús, Alina Isabel

    2008-09-01

    Atherosclerosis and related diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and, therefore, as a problem of public health. Free radicals and reactive oxygen species have been suggested to be part of the pathophysiology of these diseases. It is well known that physical activity plays an important role as a public health measure by reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events in the general population. It is also known that physical activity increases in some tissues, the reactive oxygen species production. In this review the atherosclerosis-oxidative stress-physical activity relationship is focused on the apparent paradox by which physical activity reduces atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in parallel with the activation of an apparently damaging mechanism which is an increased oxidative stress. A hypothesis including the experimental and clinical evidence is presented to explain the aforementioned paradox.

  9. Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Packard, René R. S.; Lichtman, Andrew H.; Libby, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder, involves both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response that mediate the initiation, progression, and ultimate thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Most fatal thromboses, which may manifest as acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, result from frank rupture or superficial erosion of the fibrous cap overlying the atheroma, processes that occur in inflammatorily active, rupture-prone plaques. Appreciation of the inflammatory character of atherosclerosis has led to the application of C-reactive protein as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk, and the characterization of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions of the statin class of drugs. An improved understanding of the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and further studies of its immune mechanisms provide avenues for the development of future strategies directed toward better risk stratification of patients as well as the identification of novel anti-inflammatory therapies. This review retraces leukocyte subsets involved in innate and adaptive immunity and their contributions to atherogenesis. PMID:19449008

  10. Traditional risk factors are predictive on segmental localization of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tacoy, Gulten; Balcioglu, Akif Serhat; Akinci, Sinan; Erdem, Güliz; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Timurkaynak, Timur; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between established risk factors and segmental localization of coronary artery disease. A total of 2760 patients who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled into the study. Coronary angiographic segmental evaluation was performed according to the scheme of American Heart Association. Patients were classified into 2 groups (group 1: normal coronary artery segments, group 2: coronary artery segments with coronary artery disease). Smoking was highly related with left main coronary artery disease (odds ratio = 7.5; P = .005). Diabetes mellitus and male sex increased the risk of atherosclerosis in all coronary vasculature (odds ratio = 2.7-2.2; P < .001-P < .001). Hypertension was correlated with distal coronary artery (odds ratio = 1.4; P < .001) and family history with distal circumflex lesions (odds ratio = 4.5; P = .005) High triglyceride levels were associated with right coronary artery lesions (odds ratio = 1.00; P =.03). The effect of advanced age was small (odds ratio = 1.08; P < .001). Risk factors may be predictive for segmental localization.

  11. Inflammation in Atherosclerosis: From Pathophysiology to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Ridker, Paul M; Hansson, Göran K.

    2010-01-01

    Just three decades ago the prevailing viewpoint envisaged atherosclerosis as a bland proliferative process. (1) According to that concept, endothelial denuding injury led to platelet aggregation and release of platelet-derived growth factor which would trigger the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the arterial intima, and form the nidus of the atherosclerotic plaque. This cellular model of atherosclerosis updated Virchow's concepts of atherosclerosis as a response to injury formulated in the mid-nineteenth century. The advent of the cell biological era of atherosclerosis supplanted the simplistic concept of the atheroma as a passive deposition of lipid debris on the artery wall. Beyond the vascular smooth muscle cells long recognized in atherosclerotic lesions, subsequent work identified immune cells and mediators at work in atheromata, implicating inflammatory mechanisms in disease development. (2) The advent of gene-targeting technology enabled the testing of the roles of specific molecules in the development of experimental atherosclerosis in mice. Such data demonstrated a critical role for hypercholesterolemia and also supported the participation of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. (3) Multiple independent pathways of evidence now pinpoint inflammation as a key regulatory process that links multiple risk factors for atherosclerosis and its complications with altered arterial biology. This revolution in our thinking about the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis has begun to provide clinical insight and practical tools that may aid patient management. This review provides an update of the role of inflammation in atherogenesis and highlights how translation of these advances in basic science promises to change clinical practice. PMID:19942084

  12. Increased atherosclerosis and glomerulonephritis in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) given injections of BSA over an extended period of time.

    PubMed Central

    Stills, H. F.; Bullock, B. C.; Clarkson, T. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effects of experimental immune complex disease on the development of glomerulonephritis and aortic and coronary artery atherosclerosis. Fourteen adult male macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were fed a mildly atherogenic diet. Ten of these animals were given repeated intravenous injections of bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the remaining 4 were given similar injections of saline. Three of the monkeys given BSA responded with a high antibody titer, 4 with a moderate titer, and 3 with a low level titer to BSA. In all 4 monkeys with the moderate antibody response glomerulonephritis developed, characterized by increased glomerular cellularity, electron-dense deposits in the glomerular capillary basal lamina, and deposits of IgG, IgM, C3, C4, and BSA. Glomerulonephritis was not seen in the other 6 monkeys given BSA or the 4 control monkeys. Aortic lesions seen at necropsy consisted of a few fatty intimal streaks with no differences between test monkeys (given BSA) and control monkeys (given saline). There was no correlation between total serum cholesterol concentration, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, or BSA antibody levels and the degree of aortic atherosclerosis. Immunochemical stains for immunoglobulins and complement components revealed increased intimal staining when intimal thickness increased. Medial staining for immunoglobulin and complement components appeared to be slightly increased in monkeys with moderately high-level titers of BSA. The extent of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries of monkeys given BSA was greater than in the control animals. Differences in the extent and severity of the atherosclerotic lesions were most pronounced in the proximal portions of the main coronary arteries, suggesting an increased susceptibility of this site to immune-complex-exacerbated atherosclerosis. In addition to the increased lesion severity in monkeys given BSA, there were numerous granulocytes seen within

  13. Infection and atherosclerosis: emerging mechanistic paradigms.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S E; Zhou, Y F; Zhu, J

    1999-07-27

    Although definitive proof of a causal role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Moreover, both Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus exacerbate lesion development in animal models of atherosclerosis and restenosis. The fact that multiple pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis implies that many "atherogenic" pathogens exist, and recent data suggest that the risk of atherosclerosis conveyed by infection relates to the number of atherogenic pathogens with which an individual is infected. It also is evident that variability in host susceptibility to the atherogenic effects of pathogens exists; this variability appears to be related at least in part to whether the host can generate an immune response that successfully controls pathogen inflammatory activity and in part to the specific pattern of immune response--humoral or cellular. The latter may relate to host capacity to control pathogen activity and to a pathogen-induced autoimmune component of the atherogenic process. Additional animal and human studies are necessary to further test the validity of the infection/atherosclerosis link and to provide more insight into the mechanisms by which infection may contribute to atherosclerosis, information critical for devising strategies to reduce or eliminate any contribution to atherosclerosis caused by infection.

  14. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yujun; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  16. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  17. Associations of atherosclerosis in the descending thoracic aorta on CTA with arterial stiffness and chronic kidney disease in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Roos, Cornelis J; Delgado, V; de Koning, Eelco J; Rabelink, Ton J; Jukema, J Wouter; Bax, Jeroen J; Scholte, Arthur J

    2014-08-01

    The relation between atherosclerosis in the descending thoracic aortic (DTA), arterial stiffness and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) remains unclear. The current aim was to evaluate associations of DTA atherosclerosis with arterial stiffness and parameters of CKD in asymptomatic patients with DM. A total of 213 asymptomatic patients with diabetes (mean age 52 years, 56% men) underwent cardiovascular risk assessment including multi-slice computed tomography (for non-invasive coronary angiography, from which DTA atherosclerosis can be derived), non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness with applanation tonometry and assessment of renal function. Measurements of DTA atherosclerosis included assessment of DTA thickening and calcium score. Arterial stiffness was determined by the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), parameters of CKD included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR). DTA atherosclerosis was present in 180 (84%) patients. Patients with DTA atherosclerosis had increased arterial stiffness, lower eGFR and higher UACR values. After multivariate correction, DTA calcium score was independently associated with PWV (β = 0.18, p = 0.04). Furthermore, both DTA maximal wall thickness and DTA calcium score were independently associated with eGFR (β = -7.37, p < 0.001 and β = -1.99, p < 0.003, respectively), but not with UACR. The increase in arterial stiffness by atherosclerosis seemed to be mediated by arterial calcification, while the DTA calcium score was independently associated with arterial stiffness, but not DTA maximal wall thickness. Furthermore, parameters of CKD in patients with DM had a distinct relationship with DTA atherosclerosis: DTA atherosclerosis was associated with eGFR but not with UACR.

  18. Patient-Specific Computational Models of Coronary Arteries Using Monoplane X-Ray Angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease in western countries. Early detection and diagnosis of CAD is quintessential to preventing mortality and subsequent complications. We believe hemodynamic data derived from patient-specific computational models could facilitate more accurate prediction of the risk of atherosclerosis. We introduce a semiautomated method to build 3D patient-specific coronary vessel models from 2D monoplane angiogram images. The main contribution of the method is a robust segmentation approach using dynamic programming combined with iterative 3D reconstruction to build 3D mesh models of the coronary vessels. Results indicate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed pipeline. In conclusion, patient-specific modelling of coronary vessels is of vital importance for developing accurate computational flow models and studying the hemodynamic effects of the presence of plaques on the arterial walls, resulting in lumen stenoses, as well as variations in the angulations of the coronary arteries. PMID:27403203

  19. Dual-energy computed tomography for detection of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Min, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have fulfilled the prerequisites for the cardiac application of dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. By exploiting the unique characteristics of materials when exposed to two different x-ray energies, DECT holds great promise for the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease. It allows for the assessment of myocardial perfusion to discern the hemodynamic significance of coronary disease and possesses high accuracy for the detection and characterization of coronary plaques, while facilitating reductions in radiation dose. As such, DECT enabled cardiac CT to advance beyond the mere detection of coronary stenosis expanding its role in the evaluation and management of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:26549789

  20. Diet and the role of lipoproteins, lipases, and thyroid hormones in coronary lesion growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Jacques D.; Jansen, Hans; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Birkenhager, Jan C.; Kromhout, Daan

    1987-01-01

    The relationships between the coronary lesion growth and the blood contents of lipoprotein fractions, thyroic hormones, and the lipoprotein lipase activity were investigated in male patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis, who participated in a lipid-lowering dietary intervention program. A quantitative computer-assisted image-processing technique was used to assess the severity of coronary obstructions at the beginning of the program and at its termination two years later. Based on absolute coronary scores, patients were divided into a no-lesion growth group (14 patients) and a progression group (21 paients). At the end of the trial, the very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were found to be significantly higher, while the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hepatic lipase (HL) were lower in the progression group. Multivariate regression analysis showed HL to be the most important determinant of changes in coronary atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. Cytomegalovirus in Plasma of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskaya, E. A.; Grivel, J.C.; Maryukhnich, E. V.; Lebedeva, A. M.; Ivanova, O. I.; Savvinova, P. P.; Shpektor, A. V.; Margolis, L. B.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and local and systemic inflammation, including accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and upregulation of blood cytokines (e.g., C-reactive protein (CRP)), has been known for more than 100 years. The atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory response has been traditionally considered as an immune system reaction to low-density lipoproteins. At the same time, some data have indicated a potential involvement of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the activation and progression of atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, leading to ACS. However, these data have been tangential and mainly concerned the relationship between a coronary artery disease (CAD) prognosis and the anti-CMV antibody titer. We assumed that ACS might be associated with CMV reactivation and virus release into the bloodstream. The study’s aim was to test this assumption through a comparison of the plasma CMV DNA level in patients with various CAD forms and in healthy subjects. To our knowledge, no similar research has been undertaken yet. A total of 150 subjects (97 CAD patients and 53 healthy subjects) were examined. Real- time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the number of plasma CMV DNA copies. We demonstrated that the number of plasma CMV genome copies in ACS patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (p = 0.01). The CMV genome copy number was correlated with the plasma CRP level (p = 0.002). These findings indicate a potential relationship between CMV activation and atherosclerosis exacerbation that, in turn, leads to the development of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction. Monitoring of the CMV plasma level in CAD patients may be helpful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to coronary atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27437144

  2. Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Rodolfo; Bolego, Chiara; Poli, Andrea; Cignarella, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches. PMID:17319458

  3. The Association between Platelet/Lymphocyte Ratio and Coronary Artery Disease Severity in Asymptomatic Low Ejection Fraction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Açar, Burak; Gul, Murat; Özeke, Özcan; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Coronary angiography (CAG) is generally needed in the setting of systolic heart failure (HF) with an unidentified etiology as a part of diagnostic strategy. On the other hand, the clinical value of this invasive strategy is largely unknown. Platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has recently emerged as a novel inflammatory index that may serve as an important predictor of inflammatory state and overall mortality. The present study aimed to search the predictive value of PLR in determining the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic low ejection fraction (EF) patients. Subjects and Methods 156 asymptomatic heart failure (HF) subjects (without angina or HF symptoms, mean age: 58 years; to male: 71.2%) were enrolled, and thereafter a CAG was performed. Gensini Score was used to determine the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) on CAG. According to this scoring system, the overall study group was categorized into three distinct subgroups: control group with the score 0, mild atherosclerosis group with the score 0 to 20 and severe atherosclerosis group with the score of >20. Thereafter, a comparison was made among groups with regard to mean values of PLR. Results The severe atherosclerosis group had a substantially higher level of mean PLR in comparison to other groups (p<0.001). Pre-CAG PLR levels as well as a variety of clinical variables including age, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol demonstrated an independent correlation with Gensini score through a multivariate analysis. Conclusion These findings suggest the potential association of high PLR levels with severe atherosclerosis in the setting of asymptomatic systolic HF. A simple measurement of PLR helps to identify the severity of coronary atherosclerosis prior to conducting coronary angiography. PMID:27826341

  4. Effect of atherosclerosis on thermo-mechanical properties of arterial wall and its repercussion on plaque instability.

    PubMed

    Guinea, G V; Atienza, J M; Fantidis, P; Rojo, F J; Ortega, A; Torres, M; Gonzalez, P; Elices, M L; Hayashi, K; Elices, M

    2009-03-06

    Data from the literature report febrile reactions prior to myocardial infarction in patients with normal coronary arteries and that coronary syndromes seem to be triggered by bacterial and viral infections, being fever the common symptom. The thermo-mechanical behavior of thoracic aortas of New Zealand White rabbits with different degrees of atherosclerosis was measured by means of pressure-diameter tests at different temperatures. Specific measurements of the thermal dilatation coefficient of atheroma plaques were performed by means of tensile tests. Results show a different thermo-mechanical behavior, the dilatation coefficient of atheroma plaque being at least twice that of the arterial wall. Temperature-induced mechanical stress at the plaque-vessel interface could be enough to promote plaque rupture. Therefore, increases of corporal temperature, either local or systemic, can play a role in increasing the risk of acute coronary syndromes and deserve a more comprehensive study.

  5. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian J.; Davis, Richard C.; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R. Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  6. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian J; Davis, Richard C; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C; Hazen, Stanley L; Gargalovic, Peter S; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-12-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  7. [Health campaign for atherosclerosis prevention].

    PubMed

    Schoberberger, Rudolf; Modes, Michaela

    2005-07-01

    The goal of the campaign "plus leben", a project designed to run for at least 5 years, is to heighten the awareness of patients at risk of heart disease and to provide them with an appropriate prevention program. During the first two years of the campaign 20,000 visitors were registered on the homepage, 400,000 tests for risk of heart disease were distributed, and more than 3,000 health information brochures were requested. Thus, a survey of patients was designed to provide information on the extent to which preventive measures are effective. The survey, which was carried out by mail, had a response rate of 28%, or 230 participants. In the random sample, consisting of about 60% men and 40% women, only 16% are younger than 50 years of age. Thus the survey provides a representative picture of the affected target group. The test for risk of cardiac disease provided by "plus leben" led to an increase in awareness of preventive measures in more than two thirds of the respondents, and 60% also completed the test. Although only a fourth of the patients are regularly informed by their physician about preventive measures, the campaign has led about 90% of the respondents to make fundamental or at least partial changes in their lifestyle. In connection with the study it was shown that the media play an important role in providing information on preventive measures. Communication in the doctor's office as an important building block in raising consciousness about atherosclerosis prevention could be further improved.

  8. Systemic antiphospholipid syndrome and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga

    2007-04-01

    Atherosclerosis (AT) is a metabolic, systemic inflammatory/immune disease characterized by lipoproteins metabolism alteration that leads to immune/inflammatory system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth-muscle cells, narrowing arteries and atheroma formation. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by thrombophilic state and circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) including anti beta2-GPI. Experimental studies and human observations suggest that APS is associated with AT. In fact, innate and adaptive immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of both diseases. Anti-oxLDL, anti-aPL, anti beta2GPI, anti-HSP antibodies, among others, has been found in patients with APS and AT. Endothelial dysfunctions, oxidative stress, increase of cell adhesion molecules, active platelets, are common findings in both diseases. Macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cell activation, CD40-CD40 ligand interaction, are considered as pathogenic mechanism of AT and APS. Premature AT may be the first symptom of APS. Thrombophilia, aPL antibodies, and APS may be present in patients with premature AT. An association between AT and venous thrombosis (a clinical hallmark of APS) has been proposed in unselected patients with deep venous thrombosis of the legs without symptomatic AT. Asymptomatic AT, defined in terms of carotid intima media thickness and lumen diameter decrease, was observed in patients with APS. Premenopausal female patients with PAPS have a higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in comparison with male patients. Accelerated AT and hormones could be the explanation of these findings. High levels of aCLs, significantly predict the risk of future ischemic stroke in women but not in men. AT is one of the main features of systemic APS and offer opportunities for new treatment strategies.

  9. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  10. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  11. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  12. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-06

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis.

  13. Assessment of coronary vasomotion by intracoronary ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupouy, Patrick J.; Dubois-Rande, Jean Luc; Pelle, Gabriel; Gallot, Dominique; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, new intravascular ultrasound devices for intracoronary use became available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound for the assessment of coronary artery vasomotion and endothelial function in patients with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients with luminal irregularities on coronary angiogram and a high cholesterol level (287 +/- 19 mg/dl) (group 1) and 6 patients with angiographically smooth arteries and a minimally elevated cholesterol level (197 +/- 12 mg/dl) (group 2) were studied. A mechanical intravascular ultrasound probe (4.3 French, 30 MHz, Cardiovascular Imaging Systems) was placed into the proximal segment of the coronary artery. Off-line measurements of the lumen area and calculation of mean intimal thickness indice was performed using digitized ultrasound images. Endothelial function was studied during a sympathetic stimulation by a cold pressor test and after intracoronary administration of papaverine and linsidomine. Mean intimal thickness was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (1.52 +/- 0.64 mm vs. 0.18 +/- 0.08 mm, p < 0.001). Linsidomine infusion induced a significant vasodilating effect in both groups (p < 0.001).

  14. The Role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions including coronary arterial disease (CAD). They are expressed by a variety of immune cells where they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs recruit adaptor molecules, including myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MYD88) and TIRF-related adaptor protein (TRAM), to mediate activation of MAPKs and NF-kappa B pathways. They are associated with the development of CAD through various mechanisms. TLR4 is expressed in lipid-rich and atherosclerotic plaques. In TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice, atherosclerosis-associated inflammation was diminished. Moreover, TLR2 and TLR4 may induce expression of Wnt5a in advanced staged atheromatous plaque leading to activation of the inflammatory processes. TLR9 is activated by CpG motifs in nucleic acids and have been implicated in macrophage activation and the uptake of oxLDL from the circulation. Furthermore, TLR9 also stimulates interferon-α (INF-α) secretion and increases cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T-cells towards coronary artery tunica media smooth muscle cells. This review outlines the pathophysiological role of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in atherosclerosis, focusing on evidence from animal models of the disease. PMID:27795867

  15. Polymer-Based Therapeutics: Nanoassemblies and Nanoparticles for Management of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Kamisoglu, Kubra; York, Adam; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary arterial disease, one of the leading causes of adult mortality, is triggered by atherosclerosis. A disease with complex etiology, atherosclerosis results from the progressive long-term combination of atherogenesis, the accumulation of modified lipoproteins within blood vessel walls, along with vascular and systemic inflammatory processes. The management of atherosclerosis is challenged by the localized flare-up of several multipronged signaling interactions between activated monocytes, atherogenic macrophages and inflamed or dysfunctional endothelial cells. A new generation of approaches is now emerging founded on multifocal, targeted therapies that seek to reverse or ameliorate the athero-inflammatory cascade within the vascular intima. This article reviews the various classes and primary examples of bioactive configurations of nanoscale assemblies. Of specific interest are polymer-based or polymer-lipid micellar assemblies designed as multimodal receptor-targeted blockers or drug carriers whose activity can be tuned by variations in polymer hydrophobicity, charge, and architecture. Also reviewed are emerging reports on multifunctional nanoassemblies and nanoparticles for improved circulation and enhanced targeting to athero-inflammatory lesions and atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:21523920

  16. A pathological study of the epidemiology of atherosclerosis in Mexico city.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Saldaña, Joel; Rodriguez-Flores, Marcela; Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Aguirre-Garcia, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the frequency and patterns of association of cardiovascular risk factors with atherosclerosis in five different arterial territories at post-mortem in Mexico City. Methods. We obtained five arterial territories arteries (circle of Willis, coronary, carotid, renal, and aorta) of 185 men and women 0 to 90 years of age who underwent autopsy at the Medical Forensic Service of Mexico City. We determined the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions by histopathology according to the classification of the American Heart Association as early (types I-III) and advanced (types IV-VI), and according to the degree of stenosis and correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Atherosclerotic lesions were identified in at least one arterial territory in 181 subjects (97.8%), with involvement of two ore more territories in 178 subjects (92.2%). Advanced lesions were observed in 36% and 67% of subjects under 15 and between 16 and 35 years, respectively. Any degree of atherosclerosis was associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, obesity, and smoking, and to a greater extent with the presence of two or more risk factors (P < 0.001). However, emerging and advanced athersoclerosis was observed in 53% and 20% people with no risk factors. Conclusions. The study shows a high prevalence of atherosclerosis in all age groups and both sexes. There is considerable development of atherosclerotic disease in subjects without known risk factors.

  17. A Pathological Study of the Epidemiology of Atherosclerosis in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Saldaña, Joel; Rodriguez-Flores, Marcela; Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Aguirre-Garcia, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the frequency and patterns of association of cardiovascular risk factors with atherosclerosis in five different arterial territories at post-mortem in Mexico City. Methods. We obtained five arterial territories arteries (circle of Willis, coronary, carotid, renal, and aorta) of 185 men and women 0 to 90 years of age who underwent autopsy at the Medical Forensic Service of Mexico City. We determined the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions by histopathology according to the classification of the American Heart Association as early (types I–III) and advanced (types IV–VI), and according to the degree of stenosis and correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Atherosclerotic lesions were identified in at least one arterial territory in 181 subjects (97.8%), with involvement of two ore more territories in 178 subjects (92.2%). Advanced lesions were observed in 36% and 67% of subjects under 15 and between 16 and 35 years, respectively. Any degree of atherosclerosis was associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, obesity, and smoking, and to a greater extent with the presence of two or more risk factors (P < 0.001). However, emerging and advanced athersoclerosis was observed in 53% and 20% people with no risk factors. Conclusions. The study shows a high prevalence of atherosclerosis in all age groups and both sexes. There is considerable development of atherosclerotic disease in subjects without known risk factors. PMID:24719773

  18. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... high-altitude illness:Acute mountain sicknessHigh-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungsHigh-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brainThese illnesses ...

  19. Illness anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001236.htm Illness anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) is a preoccupation that physical symptoms ...

  20. Blood count parameters can predict the severity of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Hilal Bektas; Dağlı, Bekir; Akgüllü, Cağdaş; Avcil, Mücahit; Zencir, Cemil; Ayhan, Mediha; Sönmez, Hulki Meltem

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Because of the inflammatory nature of coronary artery disease (CAD), both platelets and white blood cells have been investigated for years. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between some prominently hematologic blood count parameters (mean platelet volume [MPV], neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio [NLR]) and the severity of CAD by using Gensini scores. Methods A total of 194 patients, who had undergone coronary angiography, enrolled in this study. The control group consisted of 42 patients who had normal coronary arteries. Remaining CAD patients were divided into two groups according to their Gensini scores. Results NLR and MPV were higher in the severe atherosclerosis group compared with the mild atherosclerosis group (p = 0.007, p = 0.005, respectively). The Gensini score showed significant correlations with NLR (r = 0.20, p = 0.011), MPV (r = 0.23, p = 0.004) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = –0.161, p = 0.047). Using a cut-off level of 2.54, NLR predicted severe atherosclerosis with a sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 53% (area under curve [AUC], 0.627; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.545 to 0.704; p = 0.004). MPV values above 10.4 predicted severe atherosclerosis with a sensitivity of 39% and specificity of 90% (AUC, 0.631; 95% CI, 0.549 to 0.708; p = 0.003). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, high levels of NLR (odds ratio [OR], 1.450; 95% CI, 1.080 to 1.945; p = 0.013) and MPV (OR, 1.622; 95% CI, 1.147 to 2.295; p = 0.006) were found to be independent predictors of severe atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study suggests that both NLR and MPV are predictors of severe atherosclerosis and may be used for the prediction and identification of cardiac risks in CAD patients. PMID:27052265

  1. Atherosclerosis: Process, Indicators, Risk Factors and New Hopes

    PubMed Central

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Doudi, Monir; Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidities and mortalities worldwide. In this study we aimed to review the mechanism of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, focusing on new findings in atherosclerosis markers and its risk factors. Furthermore, the role of antioxidants and medicinal herbs in atherosclerosis and endothelial damage has been discussed and a list of important medicinal plants effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis is presented. Methods: The recently published papers about atherosclerosis pathogenesis and herbal medicines effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis were searched. Results: Inflammation has a crucial role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The disease is accompanied by excessive fibrosis of the intima, fatty plaques formation, proliferation of smooth muscle cells, and migration of a group of cells such as monocytes, T cells, and platelets which are formed in response to inflammation. The oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to Ox-LDL indicates the first step of atherosclerosis in cardiovascular diseases. Malondialdehyde factor shows the level of lipoperoxidation and is a sign of increased oxidative pressure and cardiovascular diseases. In special pathological conditions such as severe hypercholesterolemia, peroxynitrite concentration increases and atherosclerosis and vascular damage are intensified. Medicinal plants have shown to be capable of interacting these or other pathogenesis factors to prevent atherosclerosis. Conclusions: The pathogenesis factors involved in atherosclerosis have recently been cleared and the discovery of these factors has brought about new hopes for better prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25489440

  2. Scanning protocol optimization and dose evaluation in coronary stenosis using multi-slices computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-hui; Chen, Chia-lin; Sheu, Chin-yin; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common incidence for premature death in developed countries. A major fraction is attributable to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, which may result in sudden cardiac failure. A reduction of mortality caused by myocardial infarction may be achieved if coronary atherosclerosis can be detected and treated at an early stage before symptoms occur. Therefore, there is need for an effective tool that allows identification of patients at increased risk for future cardiac events. The current multi-detector CT has been widely used for detection and quantification of coronary calcifications as a sign of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to optimize the diagnostic values and radiation exposure in coronary artery calcium-screening examination using multi-slice CT (MSCT) with different image scan protocols. The radiation exposure for all protocols is evaluated by using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom measurements. We chose an optimal scanning protocol and evaluated patient radiation dose in the MSCT coronary artery screenings and preserved its expecting diagnostic accuracy. These changes make the MSCT have more operation flexibility and provide more diagnostic values in current practice.

  3. A Proteomic Focus on the Alterations Occurring at the Human Atherosclerotic Coronary Intima*

    PubMed Central

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S.; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R.; Pinto, Angel G.; Barderas, Maria G.; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  4. Coping with Chronic Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Having a long-term, or chronic, illness can disrupt your life in many ways. You may often be tired and in pain. Your illness might affect your ... able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not ...

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerosis: current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Economou, Evangelos K; Crea, Filippo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-07

    The notion of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory disease has intensified research on the role of cytokines and the way these molecules act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are expressed by all types of cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects, and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leucocytes, and other vascular residing cells. It is now understood that widely used drugs such as statins, aspirin, methotrexate, and colchicine act in an immunomodulatory way that may beneficially affect atherogenesis and/or cardiovascular disease progression. Moreover, advancement in pharmaceutical design has enabled the production of highly specific antibodies against key molecules involved in the perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade, raising hope for advances in the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review describes the actions and effects of these agents, their potential clinical significance, and future prospects.

  6. PCSK9 and Atherosclerosis - Lipids and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio

    2017-03-09

    Even though it is only a little over a decade from the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a plasma protein that associates with both high and low cholesterol syndromes, a rich body of knowledge has developed, and drugs inhibiting this target have been approved in many markets. While the majority of research in recent years has focused on the impact of therapeutic antagonism of this molecule, important lines of investigation have emerged characterizing its unique physiology as it relates to cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. The PCSK9 story is unfolding rapidly but is far from complete. One chapter that is of particular interest is the possible direct link between PCSK9 and atherosclerosis. This review specifically examines this relationship drawing from data produced from experimental models of plaque biology and inflammation, atherosclerosis imaging studies, and observational epidemiology.

  7. Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Atherosclerosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Fernando; Salinas, Beatriz; Groult, Hugo; Pellico, Juan; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V.; Bhavesh, Riju; Ruiz-Cabello, J.

    2014-01-01

    The production of magnetic nanoparticles of utmost quality for biomedical imaging requires several steps, from the synthesis of highly crystalline magnetic cores to the attachment of the different molecules on the surface. This last step probably plays the key role in the production of clinically useful nanomaterials. The attachment of the different biomolecules should be performed in a defined and controlled fashion, avoiding the random adsorption of the components that could lead to undesirable byproducts and ill-characterized surface composition. In this work, we review the process of creating new magnetic nanomaterials for imaging, particularly for the detection of atherosclerotic plaque, in vivo. Our focus will be in the different biofunctionalization techniques that we and several other groups have recently developed. Magnetic nanomaterial functionalization should be performed by chemoselective techniques. This approach will facilitate the application of these nanomaterials in the clinic, not as an exception, but as any other pharmacological compound.

  8. Brazilian adult individuals with untreated isolated GH deficiency do not have accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ursula M M; Oliveira, Carla R P; Salvatori, Roberto; Barreto-Filho, José A S; Campos, Viviane C; Oliveira, Francielle T; Rocha, Ivina E S; Oliveira, Joselina L M; Silva, Wersley A; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2016-01-01

    GH and its principal mediator IGF1 have important effects on metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) status. While acquired GH deficiency (GHD) is often associated with increased CV risk, the consequences of congenital GHD are not known. We have described a large group of patients with isolated GHD (IGHD) due to a homozygous mutation (c.57+1G>A) in the GH releasing hormone receptor gene, and shown that adult GH-naïve individuals have no evidence of clinically evident premature atherosclerosis. To test whether subclinical atherosclerosis is anticipated in untreated IGHD, we performed a cross-sectional study of 25 IGHD and 27 adult controls matched for age and gender. A comprehensive clinical and biochemical panel and coronary artery calcium scores were evaluated by multi-detector tomography. Height, weight, IGF1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, creatinine and creatininekinase were lower in the IGHD group. Median and interquartile range of calcium scores distribution was similar in the two groups: IGHD 0(0) and control 0(4.9). The vast majority of the calcium scores (20 of 25 IGHD (80%) and 18 of 27 controls (66.6%)) were equal to zero (difference not significant). There was no difference in the calcium scores classification. None of IGHD subjects had minimal calcification, which were present in four controls. Three IGHD and four controls had mild calcification. There were two IGHD individuals with moderate calcification and one control with severe calcification. Our study provides evidence that subjects with congenital isolated lifetime and untreated severe IGHD do not have accelerated subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:26811426

  9. Adipose Tissue in Metabolic Syndrome: Onset and Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luna-Luna, María; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Coss-Rovirosa, Fernanda; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Pérez-Méndez, Óscar

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) should be considered a clinical entity when its different symptoms share a common etiology: obesity/insulin resistance as a result of a multi-organ dysfunction. The main interest in treating MetS as a clinical entity is that the addition of its components drastically increases the risk of atherosclerosis. In MetS, the adipose tissue plays a central role along with an unbalanced gut microbiome, which has become relevant in recent years. Once visceral adipose tissue (VAT) increases, dyslipidemia and endothelial dysfunction follow as additive risk factors. However, when the nonalcoholic fatty liver is present, risk of a cardiovascular event is highly augmented. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) seems to increase simultaneously with the VAT. In this context, the former may play a more important role in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque than the latter. Hence, EAT may act as a paracrine tissue vis-à-vis the coronary arteries favoring the local inflammation and the atheroma calcification.

  10. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  11. Circulating humanin levels are associated with preserved coronary endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. J.; Flammer, A. J.; Herrmann, J.; Rodriguez-Porcel, M.; Wan, J.; Cohen, P.; Lerman, L. O.

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a small endogenous antiapoptotic peptide, originally identified as protective against Alzheimer's disease, but subsequently also found on human endothelium as well as carotid artery plaques. Endothelial dysfunction is a precursor to the development of atherosclerotic plaques, which are characterized by a highly proinflammatory, reactive oxygen species, and apoptotic milieu. Previous animal studies demonstrated that humanin administration may improve endothelial function. Thus the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with coronary endothelial dysfunction have reduced systemic levels of humanin. Forty patients undergoing coronary angiography and endothelial function testing were included and subsequently divided into two groups based on coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intracoronary acetylcholine (normal ≥ 50% increase from baseline, n = 20 each). Aortic plasma samples were obtained at the time of catheterization for the analysis of humanin levels and traditional biomarkers of atherosclerosis including C-reactive protein, Lp-Pla2, and homocysteine. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Patients with coronary endothelial dysfunction (change in CBF = −33 ± 25%) had significantly lower humanin levels (1.3 ± 1.1 vs. 2.2 ± 1.5 ng/ml, P = 0.03) compared with those with normal coronary endothelial function (change in CBF = 194 ± 157%). There was a significant and positive correlation between improved CBF and humanin levels (P = 0.0091) not seen with changes in coronary flow reserve (P = 0.76). C-reactive protein, Lp-Pla2, and homocysteine were not associated with humanin levels. Thus we observed that preserved human coronary endothelial function is uniquely associated with higher systemic humanin levels, introducing a potential diagnostic and/or therapeutic target for patients with coronary endothelial function. PMID:23220334

  12. The modification of serum lipids after acute coronary syndrome and importance in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Balci, Bahattin

    2011-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a pathology characterized by low-grade vascular inflammation rather than a mere accumulation of lipids. Inflammation is central at all stages of atherosclerosis. Acute coronary syndrome significantly affects the concentration and composition of the lipids and lipoproteins in plasma. Plasma triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein levels increase, while high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and total cholesterol levels decrease. Early treatment of hyperlipidemia provides potential benefits. However, post-event changes in lipid and lipoproteins lead to delays in the choice of the treatment. This review focuses on the mechanism and the clinical importance of the relevant changes.

  13. Global transcriptomic study of atherosclerosis development in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yao, Hong; Hui, Ji-Yuan; Ding, Sheng-Hao; Fan, Yi-Ling; Pan, Yao-Hua; Chen, Kai-Hong; Wan, Jie-Qing; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2016-10-30

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease of the arterial wall and a leading cause of death worldwide. Though the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic lesion formation has been studied, we still lack evidence of the global changes in the artery during atherosclerosis. In this report, we induced atherosclerosis in rats and conducted GeneChip analysis on carotid arteries with or without plaque formation. We found that molecular pathways underlying plaque formation in atherosclerosis were related to immune response, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis and hypoxic microenvironments, suggesting that the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is varied. In addition, we showed that three lncRNAs, GAS5, SNHG6 and Zfas1, were significantly increased in the plaque of atherosclerosis patients compared to normal people. A complex interaction of mRNA and lncRNA was identified in atherosclerosis. Our results provide a global transcriptomic network of atherosclerosis development in rats and possible targets that could lead to new clinical applications in the future.

  14. Macrophages in atherosclerosis: a dynamic balance

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn; Sheedy, Frederick; Fisher, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Preface Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease arising from an imbalance in lipid metabolism and a maladaptive immune response driven by the accumulation of cholesterol-laden macrophages in the artery wall. Through the analysis of animal models of atherosclerosis progression and regression, there is a growing understanding that the balance of macrophages in the plaque is dynamic, with both macrophage numbers and an inflammatory phenotype influencing plaque fate. Here we summarize recently identified pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways linking lipid and inflammation biology with the retention of macrophages in plaques, as well as factors with the potential to promote their egress from these sites. PMID:23995626

  15. Adipokines, diabetes and atherosclerosis: an inflammatory association

    PubMed Central

    Freitas Lima, Leandro C.; Braga, Valdir de Andrade; do Socorro de França Silva, Maria; Cruz, Josiane de Campos; Sousa Santos, Sérgio H.; de Oliveira Monteiro, Matheus M.; Balarini, Camille de Moura

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases can be considered the most important cause of death in diabetic population and diabetes can in turn increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Inflammation process is currently recognized as responsible for the development and maintenance of diverse chronic diseases, including diabetes and atherosclerosis. Considering that adipose tissue is an important source of adipokines, which may present anti and proinflammatory effects, the aim of this review is to explore the role of the main adipokines in the pathophysiology of diabetes and atherosclerosis, highlighting the therapeutic options that could arise from the manipulation of these signaling pathways both in humans and in translational models. PMID:26578976

  16. Possible roles of platelet-derived microparticles in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ting; Wang, Zi; Hu, Yan-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) play important roles in cardiovascular diseases, especially atherosclerosis. Continued research has revealed that PMPs have numerous functions in atherosclerosis, not only in thrombosis formation, but also by induction of inflammation. PMPs also induce formation of foam cells. Recent evidence strongly indicates a significant role of PMPs in atherosclerosis. Here, current research on the function of PMPs in atherosclerosis is reviewed.

  17. Morphology of atherosclerotic coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Hieber, Simone Elke; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of vessel diameter and build-up of plaques in coronary arteries, leads to an increase in the shear stresses present, which can be used as a physics-based trigger for targeted drug delivery. In order to develop appropriate nanometer-size containers, one has to know the morphology of the critical stenoses with isotropic micrometer resolution. Micro computed tomography in absorption and phase contrast mode provides the necessary spatial resolution and contrast. The present communication describes the pros and cons of the conventional and synchrotron radiation-based approaches in the visualization of diseased human and murine arteries. Using registered datasets, it also demonstrates that multi-modal imaging, including established histology, is even more powerful. The tomography data were evaluated with respect to cross-section, vessel radius and maximal constriction. The average cross-section of the diseased human artery (2.31 mm2) was almost an order of magnitude larger than the murine one (0.27 mm2), whereas the minimal radius differs only by a factor of two (0.51 mm versus 0.24 mm). The maximal constriction, however, was much larger for the human specimen (85% versus 49%). We could also show that a plastic model used for recent experiments in targeted drug delivery represents a very similar morphology, which is, for example, characterized by a maximal constriction of 82%. The tomography data build a sound basis for flow simulations, which allows for conclusions on shear stress distributions in stenosed blood vessels.

  18. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  19. Neutrophil-derived microparticles are released into the coronary circulation following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J.; Barraclough, Jennifer Y.; Nakhla, Shirley; Kienzle, Vivian; Robertson, Stacy; Mallat, Ziad; Celermajer, David S.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate (i) local coronary and systemic levels of microparticles (MP) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients and (ii) their release after plaque disruption with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). MP are small vesicles originating from plasma membranes of cells after activation or apoptosis and are implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Neutrophils play a role in plaque destabilization and shed neutrophil-derived MP that have the potential to drive significant proinflammatory and thrombotic downstream effects. Eight ACS and eight SAP patients were included. Coronary sinus (CS) samples pre-intervention (CS1), 45 s following balloon angioplasty (CS2) and at 45 s intervals following stent deployment (CS3, CS4 and CS5), together with peripheral vein samples, pre- and post-PCI were analysed for neutrophil-derived (CD66b+), endothelial-derived (CD144+), platelet-derived (CD41a+), monocyte-derived (CD14+) and apoptotic (Annexin V+) MP. ELISA for interleukin (IL)-6, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and P-selectin was also performed. CD66b+ MP levels were similar in both groups pre-intervention. Post-PCI, CS levels rose significantly in ACS but not SAP patients (ACS area under the curve (AUC): 549 ± 83, SAP AUC: 24 ± 29, P<0.01). CS CD41a+, CD144+, CD14+ and Annexin V+ MP levels did not differ between groups. Acute neutrophil-derived MP release post-PCI occurs in ACS compared with stable patients, likely to be reflective of plaque MP content in vulnerable lesions. PMID:27913753

  20. Low Cytochrome Oxidase 1 Links Mitochondrial Dysfunction to Atherosclerosis in Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Geeraert, Benjamine; De Keyzer, Dieuwke; Hulsmans, Maarten; Janssens, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Cytochrome oxidase IV complex regulates energy production in mitochondria. Therefore, we determined the relation of COX genes with atherosclerosis in mice and pigs. Methods and results First, we compared atherosclerosis in the aortic arch of age-matched (24 weeks) C57BL/6J control (n = 10), LDL-receptor deficient (n = 8), leptin-deficient ob/ob (n = 10), and double knock-out (lacking LDL-receptor and leptin) mice (n = 12). Low aortic mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 in obese diabetic double knock-out mice was associated with a larger plaque area and higher propensity of M1 macrophages and oxidized LDL. Caloric restriction increased mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 and reduced plaque area and oxidized LDL. This was associated with a reduction of titer of anti-oxidized LDL antibodies, a proxy of systemic oxidative stress. Low of mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 was related to low expression of peroxisome proliferative activated receptors α, δ, and γ and of peroxisome proliferative activated receptor, gamma, co-activator 1 alpha reflecting mitochondrial dysfunction. Caloric restriction increased them. To investigate if there was a diabetic/obesity requirement for mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 to be down-regulated, we then studied atherosclerosis in LAD of hypercholesterolemic pigs (n = 37). Pigs at the end of the study were divided in three groups based on increasing LAD plaque complexity according to Stary (Stary I: n = 12; Stary II: n = 13; Stary III: n = 12). Low mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase 1 in isolated plaque macrophages was associated with more complex coronary plaques and oxidized LDL. Nucleus-encoded cytochrome oxidase 4I1 and cytochrome oxidase 10 did not correlate with plaque complexity and oxidative stress. In mice and pigs, MT-COI was inversely related to insulin resistance. Conclusions Low MT-COI is related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and atherosclerosis and plaque

  1. Baldness and myocardial infarction in men: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo; Rosamond, Wayne D; Szklo, Moyses

    2008-03-15

    Because hair loss may be a surrogate measure of androgenic activity-possibly a determinant of coronary atherosclerosis-several studies have explored the presence and magnitude of an association between male pattern baldness and myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, vertex baldness, but not frontal baldness alone, was strongly associated with incident MI in a large, hospital-based, case-control study. The authors examined these associations in a cross-sectional sample of 5,056 men aged 52-75 years, of whom 767 had a history of MI. The sample was derived from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987-1998). As compared with a baldness-free reference group, the estimated odds ratios for prevalent MI from a multivariable model were 1.28 (frontal baldness), 1.02 (mild vertex baldness), 1.40 (moderate vertex baldness), and 1.18 (severe vertex baldness). Other regression models have yielded similar results, including the absence of a monotonic "dose-response relation" between the extent of vertex baldness and prevalent MI. The authors also examined the relation of baldness pattern to carotid intimal-medial thickness, a measure of atherosclerosis, among those who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The estimated mean differences in carotid intimal-medial thickness between groups of men with various types of baldness and their baldness-free counterparts were all close to zero. The results of this study suggest that male pattern baldness is not a surrogate measure of an important risk factor for myocardial infarction or asymptomatic atherosclerosis.

  2. Dietary micronutrient intakes are associated with markers of inflammation but not with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C C; Alonso, Alvaro; Lee, Duk-Hee; Delclos, George L; Jenny, Nancy S; Jiang, Rui; Lima, Joao A; Symanski, Elaine; Jacobs, David R; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2011-08-01

    Few studies have examined associations of dietary micronutrients with markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. The present study investigated associations of heme iron, nonheme iron, zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), β-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E with C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, total homocysteine (tHcy), fibrinogen, coronary artery calcium, and common and internal carotid artery intima media thickness. Micronutrient intakes and markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis were studied in 5,181 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were aged 45-84 y and free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Models were adjusted for energy intake, demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and BMI. Dietary nonheme iron and Mg intakes were inversely associated with tHcy concentrations (mean tHcy: 9.11, 8.86, 8.74, 8.71, and 8.50 μmol/L, and 9.20, 9.00, 8.65, 8.76, and 8.33 μmol/L across increasing quintiles of nonheme iron and Mg, respectively; P-trend < 0.001 for both). However, dietary Zn and heme iron were positively associated with CRP [mean: 1.73, 1.75, 1.78, 1.88, and 1.96 mg/L across increasing quintiles of Zn and 1.72, 1.76, 1.83, 1.86, and 1.94 mg/L across increasing quintiles of heme iron (P-trend = 0.002 and 0.01, respectively). Other tested micronutrient-marker associations were not significant. In conclusion, of the 49 tested associations, only 7 were significant. Although this study does not provide strong support for associations between the micronutrients and markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis, the results are consistent with dietary guidelines that advocate for a balanced diet that includes a variety of plant foods containing Mg, Zn, and nonheme iron.

  3. Generalized anxiety disorder and medical illness.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often have multiple medical comorbidities. The adrenal system and genetic and environmental factors are intermediaries between anxiety and medical illnesses such as chronic pain conditions and gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, and respiratory disorders. Medical disorders associated with anxiety include migraine, rheumatoid arthritis, peptic ulcer disease, irritable bowel syndrome, coronary heart disease, hyperthyroidism, diabetes, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. Compared to people with pain conditions without GAD, individuals with pain conditions and GAD experience and register pain differently; they also have increased awareness of symptoms. Comorbid medical illnesses may influence treatment choice for GAD. Treatment of anxiety in young patients with GAD needs to be long-term to decrease vulnerability to medical conditions.

  4. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with coronary aneurysm and stenosis due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Drossner, David M; Chappell, Clay; Rab, Tanveer; Kim, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of an acutely ill 3-year-old female, with a previous medical history of Kawasaki disease, who presented to care with an acute myocardial infarction. We describe the coordinated therapies employed by pediatric and adult cardiologists aimed to establish coronary revascularization.

  5. [Noninvasive diagnostic of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Zuber, Michel; Zellweger, Michael; Bremerich, Jens; Auf der Mauer, Christoph; Buser, Peter T

    2009-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging of coronary artery disease has extensively evolved during the last decade. Today, at least four imaging techniques with excellent image quality such as echocardiography, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and PET, cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac CT are widely available in order to estimate the risk for future ischemic events, to corroborate the suspected diagnosis of coronary artery disease, to demonstrate the extent and localisation of myocardial ischemia, to diagnose myocardial infarction and measure it's size, to identify the myocardium at risk during acute ischemia, to differentiate between viable and nonviable myocardium and thereby provide the basis for indications of revascularisations, to follow revascularized patients over long time, to assess the risk for sudden cardiac death and the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction and to depict atheromatosis and atherosclerosis of the coronary artery tree. Echocardiography is the most widely used imaging method in cardiology. It provides excellent information on morphology and function of nearly all cardiac structures. Stress echocardiography has been proven to be a reliable tool for the demonstration of myocardial ischemia and for the acquisition of prognostic data. Newer ultrasound techniques may further improve investigator dependence and thereby reproducibility. The completeness of echocardiography will always depend on acoustic windows, which are given in a specific patient. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy provides the largest database especially on prognosis in coronary artery disease. It has been the for the depictions of ischemic and infarcted myocardium. Radiation exposure will always be an issue. Newer hybrid techniques combining nuclear methods with cardiac CT may add arguments, which will be needed for clinical decision-making. Cardiac magnetic resonance has evolved as an important tool in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. It is

  6. Role of gut microbiota in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Annika Lindskog; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2017-02-01

    Infections have been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Findings from the past decade have identified microbial ecosystems residing in different habitats of the human body that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular-related disorders. In this Review, we describe three pathways by which microbiota might affect atherogenesis. First, local or distant infections might cause a harmful inflammatory response that aggravates plaque development or triggers plaque rupture. Second, metabolism of cholesterol and lipids by gut microbiota can affect the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Third, diet and specific components that are metabolized by gut microbiota can have various effects on atherosclerosis; for example, dietary fibre is beneficial, whereas the bacterial metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide is considered harmful. Although specific bacterial taxa have been associated with atherosclerosis, which is supported by increasing mechanistic evidence, several questions remain to be answered to understand fully how the microbiota contributes to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Such knowledge might pave the way for novel diagnostics and therapeutics based on microbiota.

  7. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  8. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  9. Metabolomic analyses for atherosclerosis, diabetes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and atherosclerosis is a global health problem. A portfolio of abnormalities of metabolic and vascular homeostasis accompanies T2DM and obesity, which are believed to conspire to lead to accelerated atherosclerosis and premature death. The complexity of metabolic changes in the diseases presents challenges for a full understanding of the molecular pathways contributing to the development of these diseases. The recent advent of new technologies in this area termed “Metabolomics” may aid in comprehensive metabolic analysis of these diseases. Therefore, metabolomics has been extensively applied to the metabolites of T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis not only for the assessment of disease development and prognosis, but also for the biomarker discovery of disease diagnosis. Herein, we summarize the recent applications of metabolomics technology and the generated datasets in the metabolic profiling of these diseases, in particular, the applications of these technologies to these diseases at the cellular, animal models, and human disease levels. In addition, we also extensively discuss the mechanisms linking the metabolic profiling in insulin resistance, T2DM, obesity, and atherosclerosis, with a particular emphasis on potential roles of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria dysfunctions. PMID:24252331

  10. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Misra, A

    2000-06-01

    Atherosclerosis starts in childhood, and is accelerated in some individuals. A cluster of clinical and biochemical factors constitute the risk profile for many of them, perhaps most important being metabolic insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance and its components for children and adolescents, especially obesity and dyslipidemia, are generators of hypertension, glucose intolerance and complications of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Some individuals are genetically predisposed, particularly those with the family history of such disorders. For many subjects, there is 'tracking' of metabolic and lifestyle factors from early age to adulthood. Several new risk factors of atherosclerosis (e.g. level of lipoprotein (a), procoagulant state, hyperhomocysteinemia, low birth weight and adverse in-utero environment, and possibly inflammatory markers) are current and potentially future areas of research concerning children and young individuals. Definition of and research on new and hitherto not investigated factors and formulation of strategies to neutralize the known factors are of paramount importance for primary prevention of atherosclerosis. Simple and effective measures for prevention include increasing awareness of the diseases, maintenance of ideal body weight, regular physical exercise, avoidance of smoking and chewing of tobacco, eating a balanced diet, and early periodic monitoring of blood pressure and metabolic status. These measures, starting from childhood, should be applied to all and in particular to the susceptible offspring, predisposed individuals, and populations.

  11. Meta-analysis of the effect of percutaneous coronary intervention on chronic total coronary occlusions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) is the last stage of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a therapeutic procedure used to recanalize vessels with total occlusion. However, successful recanalization of CTO is still not optimal, and the key influence factors are still uncertainty. Therefore, a scientific evaluation on the effective of PCI for CTO treatment is necessary. Methods Relevant studies of PCI treatment for CTO were examined. Data were extracted and assessed by two independent clinical experts. Embase, PubMed and Medline et al. were used as database. The main research key words include “CTO”, “PCI”, “Stent”, “Reopen”, “long-term”, “follow-up” and “outcome”. Quality assessment was carried out according to the Cochrane Handbook. The selected data were pooled and analyzed using fixed-effect model and random-effect model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 test, Q test, L’abbe and Galbraith. Comprehensive Meta -Analysis 2.0 and Metanalysis 1.0 were used for statistics analysis in this research. Results A total of 16 articles involving 6695 cases in successful CTO recanalization (CTO success group) and 2370 cases in failed CTO recanalization(CTO failure group) were included in this research. Low CTO success was associated with elder age, previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) history, multi-vessel diseases and right coronary artery disease lesion. Six follow-up variables including major adverse cardiac events (MACE), recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), all-cause death, incidence of angina, subsequent CABG and cumulative survival rate were found significantly reduced associated with CTO success. Conclusions Clinical baseline characteristics such as age, previous CABG history and lesion baseline characteristics such as lesion length, multi-vessel diseases might be important factors influencing the successful rate of CTO recanalization. Compared to

  12. Does vasectomy increase the risk of atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T B; Alexander, N J

    1980-11-15

    The work that stimulated a series of experiments, conducted to determine the relationship between vasectomy and atherosclerosis in nonhuman primates, is summarized along with results in 2 nonhuman primate species. Attention is directed to the following: immunologic injury and atherosclerosis; immunologic responses to vasectomy; effects of atherogenic diet and vasectomy; and the effects of vasectomy alone. Using rabbits as the animal model, early workers found that inducing both immunologic serum sickness and hyperlipoproteinemia caused more extensive atherosclerosis than did hyperlipoproteinemia alone and that the resulting lesions more closely resembled those of human beings in both morphologic characteristics and anatomic location. The mechanism by which immunologic injury exacerbates atherosclerosis still remains unclear, but studies focusing on injury to the vascular endothelium as an important mechanism in atherogenesis are currently of considerable interest. Sperm agglutination, sperm immobilization, and immunofluorescence have all been used to demonstrate circulating free antisperm antibodies after vasectomy. Such antibodies occur in about 50% of vasectomized men and in vasectomized males of several animal species. It is unclear why circulating free antisperm antibodies have not been found in all vasectomized men and male animals. The development of an antibody response to sperm antigen in vasectomized rhesus monkeys has been shown to correlate with high sperm counts before vasectomy and similar observations have been made in studies of men. Results in nonhuman primate species showed that vasectomized monkeys developed more extensive and severe atherosclerosis than did nonvasectomized monkeys of the same age and dietary history. In 2 species of monkeys, the effect of vasectomy on atherogenesis seemed to be present whether the animals were hyperlipoproteinemic or had plasma lipid concentrations in the normal range. The presumed mechanism of atherosclerosis

  13. Coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pieris, Rajeeva R; Fernando, Ravindra

    2015-08-30

    A 43-year-old male, with no previous history of mental illness, was diagnosed with coronary heart disease, after which he became acutely depressed and attempted suicide by ingesting an organophosphate pesticide. He was admitted to an intensive care unit and treated with pralidoxime, atropine, and oxygen. His coronary occlusion pattern required early coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. His family, apprehensive of a repeat suicidal attempt, requested surgery be performed as soon as possible. He recovered well from the OP poisoning and was mentally fit to express informed consent 2 weeks after admission. Seventeen days after poisoning, he underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and recovered uneventfully. Six years later, he remains in excellent health. We report this case because to the best of our knowledge there is no literature regarding CABG performed soon after organophosphate poisoning.

  14. Detection and treatment of atherosclerosis using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zu, Yujiao; Dhanasekara, Chathurika S; Li, Jun; Wu, Dayong; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the key pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, which is a silent killer and a leading cause of death in the United States. Atherosclerosis starts with the adhesion of inflammatory monocytes on the activated endothelial cells in response to inflammatory stimuli. These monocytes can further migrate into the intimal layer of the blood vessel where they differentiate into macrophages, which take up oxidized low-density lipoproteins and release inflammatory factors to amplify the local inflammatory response. After accumulation of cholesterol, the lipid-laden macrophages are transformed into foam cells, the hallmark of the early stage of atherosclerosis. Foam cells can die from apoptosis or necrosis, and the intracellular lipid is deposed in the artery wall forming lesions. The angiogenesis for nurturing cells is enhanced during lesion development. Proteases released from macrophages, foam cells, and other cells degrade the fibrous cap of the lesion, resulting in rupture of the lesion and subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombi can block blood circulation, which represents a major cause of acute heart events and stroke. There are generally no symptoms in the early stages of atherosclerosis. Current detection techniques cannot easily, safely, and effectively detect the lesions in the early stages, nor can they characterize the lesion features such as the vulnerability. While the available therapeutic modalities cannot target specific molecules, cells, and processes in the lesions, nanoparticles appear to have a promising potential in improving atherosclerosis detection and treatment via targeting the intimal macrophages, foam cells, endothelial cells, angiogenesis, proteolysis, apoptosis, and thrombosis. Indeed, many nanoparticles have been developed in improving blood lipid profile and decreasing inflammatory response for enhancing therapeutic efficacy of drugs and decreasing their side effects. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1412. doi: 10

  15. In Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Type 2 Diabetes, SIRT1 Expression in Circulating Mononuclear Cells Is Associated with Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines but Not with Coronary Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanmin; Ni, Jing; Guo, Rong; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    While SIRT1 is significantly associated with atherosclerosis and diabetic complications, its relevance to coronary lesions in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes has not been specifically investigated. Thus, we assessed SIRT1 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these patients. We found that SIRT1 expression did not significantly correlate with syntax scores from coronary angiography (p > 0.05). Notably, plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were markedly higher in diabetic patients (p < 0.05). In addition, SIRT1 expression was negatively correlated with levels of these cytokines, as well as that of interleukin-6 (p < 0.05). In summary, the data indicate that SIRT1 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is significantly correlated with inflammatory cytokines levels in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes but not with the severity of coronary lesions.

  16. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for lowering coronary artery disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system when activated exerts proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions and thereby contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, including that occurring in the coronary arteries. It thus contributes as well to coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have examined effects of renin-angiotensin system inhibition for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. These include important trials such as HOPE, EUROPA and PEACE using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, VALIANT, OPTIMAAL and TRANSCEND using angiotensin receptor blockers, and the ongoing TOPCAT study in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, many of who also have coronary artery disease. Data are unavailable as yet of effects of either direct renin inhibitors or the new angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor agents. Today, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is standard-of-care therapy for lowering cardiovascular risk in secondary prevention in high cardiovascular risk subjects.

  17. The Association of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Obesity, and Metabolic Syndrome, with Systemic Inflammation and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Silverman, Michael G.; Nasir, Khurram; Budoff, Matthew J.; Blankstein, Ron; Szklo, Moyses; Katz, Ronit; Blumentha, Roger S.; Blaha, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We characterized the association of 3 metabolic conditions – obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) – with increased inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 3,976 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) with adequate CT imaging to diagnose NAFLD. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥30 kg/m2, metabolic syndrome by AHA/NHLBI criteria, and NAFLD using non-contrast cardiac CT and a liver/spleen attenuation ratio (L/S) <1. Increased inflammation was defined as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ≥2 mg/L and subclinical atherosclerosis as coronary artery calcium (CAC) >0. We studied the association of a stepwise increase in number of these metabolic conditions (0–3) with increased inflammation and CAC, stratifying results by gender and ethnicity. Results Mean age of participants was 63 (±10) years, 45% were male, 37% white, 10% Chinese, 30% African American, and 23% Hispanic. Adjusting for obesity, metabolic syndrome and traditional risk factors, NAFLD was associated with a prevalence odds ratio for hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0 of 1.47 (1.20–1.79) and 1.37 (1.11–1.68) respectively. There was a positive interaction between female gender and NAFLD in the association with hsCRP ≥2 mg/L (p= 0.006), with no interaction by race. With increasing number of metabolic conditions, there was a graded increase in prevalence odds ratios of hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0. Conclusion NAFLD is associated with increased inflammation and CAC independent of traditional risk factors, obesity and metabolic syndrome. There is a graded association between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD with inflammation and CAC. PMID:25683387

  18. High blood pressure in pregnancy and coronary calcification.

    PubMed

    Sabour, Siamak; Franx, Arie; Rutten, Annemarieke; Grobbee, Diederick E; Prokop, Mathias; Bartelink, Marie-Louise; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bots, Michiel L

    2007-04-01

    A considerable proportion of pregnant women develop high blood pressure in pregnancy. Although it is assumed that this condition subsides after pregnancy, many of these women develop the metabolic syndrome later in life and are at increased risk to develop coronary heart disease. Atherosclerosis development is considered in between risk factors and occurrence of vascular symptoms. We set out to cross-sectionally study the relation of high blood pressure during pregnancy with risk of coronary calcification. The study population was composed 491 healthy postmenopausal women selected from a population-based cohort study. Information on high blood pressure during pregnancy was obtained using a questionnaire. Between 2004 and 2005, the women underwent a multidetector computed tomography (Philips Mx 8000 IDT 16) to assess coronary calcium. The Agatston score, volume, and mass measurements were used to quantify coronary calcium. A total of 30.7% of the women reported to have had high blood pressure in pregnancy. Body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.09) and diastolic blood pressure (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.05) were significantly related to a history of high blood pressure in pregnancy. Age was significantly related to increased coronary calcification. Women with a history of high blood pressure during pregnancy had a 57% increased risk of having coronary calcification compared with those women without this condition (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.37). After adjusting for age, the relation did not change (OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.53). We concluded that high blood pressure during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of coronary calcification later in life.

  19. Antibody Phage Display Assisted Identification of Junction Plakoglobin as a Potential Biomarker for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Reiser, Hans; Thommen, Daniela S.; Biedermann, Barbara; Neidhart, Michel; Gawinecka, Joanna; Cathomas, Gieri; Franzeck, Fabian C.; Wyss, Christophe; Klingenberg, Roland; Nanni, Paolo; Roschitzki, Bernd; Matter, Christian; Wolint, Petra; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Husmann, Marc; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Maier, Wilibald; Gay, Steffen; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no plaque-derived blood biomarker is available to allow diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this study, specimens of thrombendarterectomy material from carotid and iliac arteries were incubated in protein-free medium to obtain plaque and control secretomes for subsequent subtractive phage display. The selection of nine plaque secretome-specific antibodies and the analysis of their immunopurified antigens by mass spectrometry led to the identification of 22 proteins. One of them, junction plakoglobin (JUP-81) and its smaller isoforms (referred to as JUP-63, JUP-55 and JUP-30 by molecular weight) were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with independent antibodies to be present in atherosclerotic plaques and their secretomes, coronary thrombi of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and macrophages differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes as well as macrophage-like cells differentiated from THP1 cells. Plasma of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) (n = 15) and ACS (n = 11) contained JUP-81 at more than 2- and 14-fold higher median concentrations, respectively, than plasma of CAD-free individuals (n = 13). In conclusion, this proof of principle study identified and verified JUP isoforms as potential plasma biomarkers for atherosclerosis. Clinical validation studies are needed to determine its diagnostic efficacy and clinical utility as a biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. PMID:23110151

  20. Coronary revascularisation in women

    PubMed Central

    Mikhail, G W

    2006-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women worldwide. It is still considered a disease of men and there has been little recognition of its importance in women. Gender differences exist in acute and chronic ischaemia in terms of clinical manifestations, investigations and treatment. There are clear gender differences in coronary revascularisation with a higher mortality seen in women. At the time a woman presents with coronary artery disease she is older and has more co‐morbid factors. Furthermore, women have smaller coronary arteries making them more difficult to revascularise. In recent years there has been a general trend towards improved outcomes in women undergoing both surgical and percutaneous coronary intervention. The increasing use of drug eluting stents and adjunctive medical treatment as well as the use of off‐pump bypass surgery needs further evaluation in terms of gender differences. This article reviews the current literature on coronary revascularisation in women. PMID:16614263

  1. Assessment of coronary thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.; Abendschein, D.R.; Devries, S.R.

    1987-02-01

    The efficacy of coronary thrombolysis may be assessed by several invasive and noninvasive means, including coronary angiography, contrast and radionuclide angiography, thallium 201 or /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, cardiac ultrasonography, electrocardiography, and analysis of plasma creatine kinase activity. Each technique has its own strengths and limitations, but when used in concert these methods may provide insight into the physiology of coronary reperfusion and the efficacy of reperfusion in individual patients and populations. 104 references.

  2. Serum Urate Is Not Associated with Coronary Artery Calcification: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; ZHANG, YUQING

    2011-01-01

    Objective Urate may have effects on vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis. We had shown an association between serum uric acid (SUA) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Inflammation and vascular remodeling in atherosclerosis promote coronary artery calcification (CAC), a preclinical marker for atherosclerosis. Here, we examined whether SUA is associated with CAC, using the same study sample and methods as for our previous carotid atherosclerosis study. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. Participants were recruited from population-based cohorts in the US states of Massachusetts, North Carolina, Minnesota, Utah, and Alabama. CAC was assessed with helical computed tomography (CT). We conducted sex-specific and family-cluster analyses, as well as additional analyses among persons without risk factors related to both cardiovascular disease and hyperuricemia, adjusting for potential confounders as we had in the previous study of carotid atherosclerosis. Results For the CAC study, 2412 subjects had both SUA and helical CT results available (55% women, age 58 ± 13 yrs, body mass index 27.6 ± 5.3). We found no association of SUA with CAC in men or women [OR in men: 1.0, 1.11, 0.86, 0.90; women: 1.0, 0.83, 1.00, 0.87 for increasing categories of SUA: < 5 (referent group), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively], nor in subgroup analyses. Conclusion Replicating the methods used to demonstrate an association of SUA with carotid atherosclerosis did not reveal any association between SUA and CAC, suggesting that SUA likely does not contribute to atherosclerosis through effects on arterial calcification. The possibility that urate has divergent pathophysiologic effects on atherosclerosis and artery calcification merits further study. PMID:20889594

  3. Liver-specific deletion of the Plpp3 gene alters plasma lipid composition and worsens atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Busnelli, Marco; Manzini, Stefano; Hilvo, Mika; Parolini, Cinzia; Ganzetti, Giulia S; Dellera, Federica; Ekroos, Kim; Jänis, Minna; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Sirtori, Cesare R; Laaksonen, Reijo; Chiesa, Giulia

    2017-03-14

    The PLPP3 gene encodes for a ubiquitous enzyme that dephosphorylates several lipid substrates. Genome-wide association studies identified PLPP3 as a gene that plays a role in coronary artery disease susceptibility. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of Plpp3 deletion on atherosclerosis development in mice. Because the constitutive deletion of Plpp3 in mice is lethal, conditional Plpp3 hepatocyte-specific null mice were generated by crossing floxed Plpp3 mice with animals expressing Cre recombinase under control of the albumin promoter. The mice were crossed onto the athero-prone apoE(-/-) background to obtain Plpp3(f/f)apoE(-/-)Alb-Cre(+) and Plpp3(f/f)apoE(-/-)Alb-Cre(-) offspring, the latter of which were used as controls. The mice were fed chow or a Western diet for 32 or 12 weeks, respectively. On the Western diet, Alb-Cre(+) mice developed more atherosclerosis than Alb-Cre(-) mice, both at the aortic sinus and aorta. Lipidomic analysis showed that hepatic Plpp3 deletion significantly modified the levels of several plasma lipids involved in atherosclerosis, including lactosylceramides, lysophosphatidic acids, and lysophosphatidylinositols. In conclusion, Plpp3 ablation in mice worsened atherosclerosis development. Lipidomic analysis suggested that the hepatic Plpp3 deletion may promote atherosclerosis by increasing plasma levels of several low-abundant pro-atherogenic lipids, thus providing a molecular basis for the observed results.

  4. Liver-specific deletion of the Plpp3 gene alters plasma lipid composition and worsens atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Busnelli, Marco; Manzini, Stefano; Hilvo, Mika; Parolini, Cinzia; Ganzetti, Giulia S.; Dellera, Federica; Ekroos, Kim; Jänis, Minna; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Sirtori, Cesare R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Chiesa, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The PLPP3 gene encodes for a ubiquitous enzyme that dephosphorylates several lipid substrates. Genome-wide association studies identified PLPP3 as a gene that plays a role in coronary artery disease susceptibility. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of Plpp3 deletion on atherosclerosis development in mice. Because the constitutive deletion of Plpp3 in mice is lethal, conditional Plpp3 hepatocyte-specific null mice were generated by crossing floxed Plpp3 mice with animals expressing Cre recombinase under control of the albumin promoter. The mice were crossed onto the athero-prone apoE−/− background to obtain Plpp3f/fapoE−/−Alb-Cre+ and Plpp3f/fapoE−/−Alb-Cre− offspring, the latter of which were used as controls. The mice were fed chow or a Western diet for 32 or 12 weeks, respectively. On the Western diet, Alb-Cre+ mice developed more atherosclerosis than Alb-Cre− mice, both at the aortic sinus and aorta. Lipidomic analysis showed that hepatic Plpp3 deletion significantly modified the levels of several plasma lipids involved in atherosclerosis, including lactosylceramides, lysophosphatidic acids, and lysophosphatidylinositols. In conclusion, Plpp3 ablation in mice worsened atherosclerosis development. Lipidomic analysis suggested that the hepatic Plpp3 deletion may promote atherosclerosis by increasing plasma levels of several low-abundant pro-atherogenic lipids, thus providing a molecular basis for the observed results. PMID:28291223

  5. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  6. The role of mast cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wezel, A; Quax, P H A; Kuiper, J; Bot, I

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is the major underlying cause of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed towards inhibiting growth of atherosclerotic lesions as well as towards prevention of lesion destabilization. Interestingly, the presence of mast cells has been demonstrated in both murine and human plaques, and multiple interventional murine studies have pointed out a direct role for mast cells in early and late stages of atherosclerosis. Moreover, it has recently been described that activated lesional mast cells correlate with major cardiovascular events in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on the effect of different mast cell derived mediators in atherogenesis and in late stage plaque destabilization. Also, possible ligands for mast cell activation in the context of atherosclerosis are discussed. Finally, we will elaborate on the predictive value of mast cells, together with therapeutic implications, in cardiovascular disease.

  7. Heat-shock proteins and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M Branco; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-06-01

    In this review the authors focus on the possible role of heat-shock proteins (hsp) in the immune pathogenesis of the atherosclerotic process. The authors discuss evidence showing increased expression of these proteins in the vascular wall of stressed and atherosclerotic vessels and the immune mechanisms which could justify some of the inflammatory aspects that are now currently recognized in atherosclerosis, namely some of the possible hsp immune activating properties and also the possibility of hsp representing an innocent auto-antigen which could be the unwanted target of an immune response, initially directed against microbial heat-shock proteins. Epidemiological evidence linking atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases to soluble hsp levels as well as the intensity of anti-hsp immune response is also reviewed.

  8. Atherosclerosis risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Elliott, Jennifer R; Manzi, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Growing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from initial endothelial dysfunction to rupture of atheromatous plaques. The increased frequency of atherosclerosis in SLE is likely due to a complex interplay among traditional risk factors, disease-related factors such as medications and disease activity, and inflammatory and immunogenic factors. Identification of these novel risk factors will lead to a better understanding of CVD pathogenesis and may also provide targets for potential treatment strategies. When caring for SLE patients, clinicians should be aware of the increased CVD risk and treat the known modifiable risk factors in addition to controlling disease activity and inflammation.

  9. Leukotriene signaling in atherosclerosis and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The inflammatory process of atherosclerosis is associated with several pathophysiological reactions within the vascular wall. The arachidonic acid released by phospholipase A2 serves as substrate for the production of a group of lipid mediators known as the leukotrienes, which induce pro-inflammatory signaling through activation of specific BLT and CysLT receptors. Discussion Leukotriene signaling has been implicated in early lipid retention and foam cell accumulation, as well as in the development of intimal hyperplasia and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, the association of leukotrienes with degradation of extracellular matrix has suggested a role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Finally, studies of either myocardial or cerebral ischemia and reperfusion indicate that leukotriene signaling in addition may be involved in the development of ischemic injury. Conclusion Both leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and leukotriene receptor antagonists have been suggested to induce beneficial effects at different stages of the atherosclerosis process. PMID:18949546

  10. Current status of carotid ultrasound in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily caused by atherosclerosis is a major cause of death and disability in developed countries. Sonographic carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is widely studied as a surrogate marker for detecting subclinical atherosclerosis for risk prediction and disease progress to guide medical intervention. However, there is no standardized CIMT measurement methodology in clinical studies resulting in inconsistent findings, thereby undermining the clinical value of CIMT. Increasing evidences show that CIMT alone has weak predictive value for CVD while CIMT including plaque presence consistently improves the predictive power. Quantification of plaque burden further enhances the predictive power beyond plaque presence. Sonographic carotid plaque characteristics have been found to be predictive of cerebral ischaemic events. With advances in ultrasound technology, enhanced assessment of carotid plaques is feasible to detect high-risk/vulnerable plaques, and provide risk assessment for ischemic stroke beyond measurement of luminal stenosis. PMID:27429912

  11. Vascular risk factors, endothelial function, and carotid thickness in patients with migraine: relationship to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Hamed, Enas A; Ezz Eldin, Azza M; Mahmoud, Nagia M

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that migraine is associated with specific vascular risk profile. However, the functional and structural vascular abnormalities in migraine are rarely addressed. We evaluated the vascular risk factors, endothelial function, and carotid artery (CA)-intima-media thickness (IMT), segregators of preclinical atherosclerosis, in migraineurs. This preliminary study included 63 adults with headache (migraine with aura [n=14], migraine without aura [n=24], transformed migraine [n=6], and tension headache [n=19]) and 35 matched healthy subjects. The following vascular risks were assessed: body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), serum levels of C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Plasma endothelin (ET)-1, a vasoactive peptide produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and marker for endothelial injury and atherosclerosis, was measured. Endothelial-dependent vasoreactivity was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in response to hyperemia. CA-IMT, structural marker of early atherosclerosis, was measured. Compared with control subjects, SBP, DBP, glucose, insulin, ET-1, and CA-IMT were elevated with migraine. FMD% was inversely correlated with SBP (P < .001), DBP (P < .01), glucose (P < .001), and insulin levels (P < .01). CA-IMT was correlated with BMI (P < .05), SBP (P < .01), total cholesterol (P < .01), triglycerides (P < .001), glucose (P < .001), insulin (P < .01), and FMD% (P < .05). In multivariate analysis, ET-1 was correlated with duration of illness, SBP, DBP, glucose, insulin, IMT, and FMD%. We conclude that endothelial injury, impaired endothelial vasoreactivity, and increased CA-IMT occur with migraine and are associated with vascular risk factors that strongly suggest that migraine could be a risk for atherosclerosis.

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  13. The role of dysfunctional HDL in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on HDL function in modulating LDL oxidation and LDL-induced inflammation. Dysfunctional HDL has been identified in animal models and humans with chronic inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The loss of antiinflammatory function correlated with a loss of function in reverse cholesterol transport. In animal models and perhaps in humans, dysfunctional HDL can be improved by apoA-I mimetic peptides that bind oxidized lipids with high affinity. PMID:18955731

  14. Genetic markers in atherosclerosis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, N E

    1976-01-01

    There is a growing number of lipoprotein markers recognized by immunological, electrophoretic, and other biochemical methods, and a beginning has been made on studying their modes of inheritance and linkage relations. Suggestive but inconclusive evidence of a relation between the cerumen polymorphism and arteriosclerosis has been published. Associations of the ABO blood groups with cardiovascular disease and serum lipid levels have been established, but the exact relation to lipoproteins and atherosclerosis remains to be determined. PMID:180292

  15. Relationship Between Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation, Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness and Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Fahrettin; Elitok, Ali; Bilge, Ahmet Kaya; Mercanoglu, Fehmi; Oflaz, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Fifty patients with coronary artery disease, except left anterior descending artery (LAD), who showed no cardiac symptoms and 45 control subjects underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD, carotid artery intima-media thickness by high-resolution ultrasound. In addition, transthoracic second harmonic Doppler echocardiography was used to measure CFR. Results All of the parameters were found to be correlated with each other. CFR correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = 0.232, P < 0.05) and with carotid IMT (r = -0.403, P < 0.001). Carotid IMT correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = -0.211, P < 0.05). Conclusion Transthoracic CFR correlated with well-established noninvasive predictors of atherosclerosis and we suggest that it can be used as a surrogate for coronary atherosclerosis.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  17. Emerging role of IL-17 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The IL-23-IL-17 axis is emerging as a critical regulatory system that bridges the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in various stages of atherogenesis remains poorly understood and is only beginning to be elucidated. While IL-17 is a predominantly proinflammatory cytokine, it has a pleiotropic function and it has been implicated both as an instigator in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders as well as being protective in certain inflammatory disease models. Therefore, it is not surprising that the current literature is conflicting on the role of IL-17 during atherosclerotic lesion development. Various approaches have been used by several groups to discern the involvement of IL-17 in atherosclerosis. While one study found that IL-17 is protective against atherosclerosis, several other recent studies have suggested that IL-17 plays a proatherogenic role. Thus, the function of IL-17 remains controversial and awaits more direct studies to address the issue. In this review, we will highlight all the latest studies involving IL-17 and atherosclerosis, including both clinical and experimental research.

  18. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) does not slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Adnan N; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2012-09-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown to suppress growth factor-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells in animal models. We hypothesized that MMF might modify the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in SLE. We examined the effect of MMF on atherosclerosis as measured by changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) or coronary artery calcium (CAC) over 2 years. CAC and carotid IMT were measured at baseline and 2 years later in a cohort of 187 patients with SLE. The cohort was 91% women, 59% Caucasian, and 35% African-American, with a mean age of 45 ± 11 years. Of these, 12.5% (n = 25) received MMF during follow-up. The daily dose ranged from 500 to 3,000 mg/day, and duration ranged from 84 days to the entire 2 years. We divided MMF users into three groups: low exposure (<1,500 mg average daily dose), high exposure (≥1,500 average daily dose), and any exposure of MMF (<1,500 or ≥1,500 average daily dose) for 2 years. The mean CAC increased in all four groups: no MMF: 1.17-1.28, low MMF: 1.02-1.13, high MMF: 1.44-1.61, and any MMF: 1.21-1.34 log-Agatston units. Compared to no MMF, there was no statistically different change between the three groups (p = 0.99, 0.87, and 0.91). Similarly, mean carotid IMT increased in all four groups: no MMF: 0.58-0.66, low MMF: 0.55-0.60, high MMF: 0.56-0.71, and any MMF: 0.56-0.66. We then adjusted for statin use, lupus nephritis, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and age during the 2-year follow-up. The association between MMF exposure and change in CAC or carotid IMT was not statistically significant (p = 0.63 for CAC, and p = 0.085 for carotid IMT). There was no evidence that MMF slowed or decreased the progression of atherosclerosis as measured by carotid IMT or CAC. Because the number of patients taking MMF was only twenty-five, larger studies for longer time periods are needed to explore any

  19. Association of Colony Forming Units with Coronary Artery and Abdominal Aortic Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Susan; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Larson, Martin G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; McCabe, Elizabeth L.; Martin, Roderick P.; Klein, Rachael J.; Hashmi, Basma; Hoffmann, Udo; Fox, Caroline S.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain bone marrow-derived cell populations, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have been reported to possess angiogenic activity. Experimental data suggest that depletion of these angiogenic cell populations may promote atherogenesis, but limited data are available regarding their relation to subclinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans. Methods and Results We studied 889 participants of the Framingham Heart Study who were free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease (mean age, 65 years; 55% women). Participants underwent EPC phenotyping using an early outgrowth colony forming unit (CFU) assay and cell surface markers. Participants also underwent non-contrast multidetector computed tomography to assess the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as reflected by burden of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). In this study sample, we examined the association of EPC-related phenotypes with both CAC and AAC. Across decreasing tertiles of CFU, there was a progressive increase in median CAC and AAC scores. In multivariable analyses adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, each standard deviation increase in CFU was associated with an approximately 16% decrease in CAC (P=0.02) and 17% decrease in AAC (P=0.03). In contrast, neither CD34+/KDR+ nor CD34+ variation were associated with significant differences in coronary or aortic calcification. Conclusion In this large, community-based sample of men and women, lower CFU number was associated with a higher burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries and aorta. Decreased angiogenic potential could contribute to the development of atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:20823386

  20. Progress in coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Silverton, P

    1986-10-01

    Angioplasty offers an alternative to bypass grafting for an increasing number of patients with coronary artery disease. Improvements in catheter design and manufacture have been responsible for an enlargement of the indications which now include patients with multiple vessel coronary artery disease and those with acute evolving myocardial infarction. The application of laser technology may assist in the reopening of chronically occluded arteries.

  1. Sugar-based amphiphilic nanoparticles arrest atherosclerosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; York, Adam W.; Zablocki, Kyle R.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Prud’homme, Robert K.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the build-up of occlusive, lipid-rich plaques in arterial walls, is a focal trigger of chronic coronary, intracranial, and peripheral arterial diseases, which together account for the leading causes of death worldwide. Although the directed treatment of atherosclerotic plaques remains elusive, macrophages are a natural target for new interventions because they are recruited to lipid-rich lesions, actively internalize modified lipids, and convert to foam cells with diseased phenotypes. In this work, we present a nanomedicine platform to counteract plaque development based on two building blocks: first, at the single macrophage level, sugar-based amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) were designed to competitively block oxidized lipid uptake via scavenger receptors on macrophages; second, for sustained lesion-level intervention, AMs were fabricated into serum-stable core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) to rapidly associate with plaques and inhibit disease progression in vivo. An AM library was designed and fabricated into NP compositions that showed high binding and down-regulation of both MSR1 and CD36 scavenger receptors, yielding minimal accumulation of oxidized lipids. When intravenously administered to a mouse model of cardiovascular disease, these AM NPs showed a pronounced increase in lesion association compared with the control nanoparticles, causing a significant reduction in neointimal hyperplasia, lipid burden, cholesterol clefts, and overall plaque occlusion. Thus, synthetic macromolecules configured as NPs are not only effectively mobilized to lipid-rich lesions but can also be deployed to counteract atheroinflammatory vascular diseases, highlighting the promise of nanomedicines for hyperlipidemic and metabolic syndromes. PMID:25691739

  2. Pathophysiology of coronary collaterals.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Michael; Seiler, Christian

    2014-02-01

    While the existence of structural adaptation of coronary anastomoses is undisputed, the potential of coronary collaterals to be capable of functional adaptation has been questioned. For many years, collateral vessels were thought to be rigid tubes allowing only limited blood flow governed by the pressure gradient across them. This concept was consistent with the notion that although collaterals could provide adequate blood flow to maintain resting levels, they would be unable to increase blood flow sufficiently in situations of increased myocardial oxygen demand. However, more recent studies have demonstrated the capability of the collateral circulation to deliver sufficient blood flow even during exertion or pharmacologic stress. Moreover, it has been shown that increases in collateral flow could be attributed directly to collateral vasomotion. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of the coronary collateral circulation, ie the functional adapation of coronary collaterals to acute alterations in the coronary circulation.

  3. Pathophysiology of Coronary Collaterals#

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Michael; Seiler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While the existence of structural adaptation of coronary anastomoses is undisputed, the potential of coronary collaterals to be capable of functional adaptation has been questioned. For many years, collateral vessels were thought to be rigid tubes allowing only limited blood flow governed by the pressure gradient across them. This concept was consistent with the notion that although collaterals could provide adequate blood flow to maintain resting levels, they would be unable to increase blood flow sufficiently in situations of increased myocardial oxygen demand. However, more recent studies have demonstrated the capability of the collateral circulation to deliver sufficient blood flow even during exertion or pharmacologic stress. Moreover, it has been shown that increases in collateral flow could be attributed directly to collateral vasomotion. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of the coronary collateral circulation, ie the functional adapation of coronary collaterals to acute alterations in the coronary circulation. PMID:23701025

  4. Multicenter Epidemiological Studies of Atherosclerosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading course of death and disability. Conventional cardiac risk factors do not fully explain the level of cardiovascular risk, incidence of coronary artery disease, and coronary events. Risk stratification and therapy based solely on these conventional risk factors may overlook a population who would benefit from lifestyle and risk factor modification. Thus, research has recently focused on improving risk assessment with new tools in an effort to better identify subjects at highest risk and in need of aggressive management. Cardiovascular imaging, both in coronary and extracoronary arterial beds, has proven to be very helpful in this regard. In this article, we review the current literature from multicenter epidemiology studies on the utility of noninvasive imaging modalities for risk stratification in the context of conventional risk factor evaluation. PMID:20805734

  5. The role of urotensin II and atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with slow coronary flow

    PubMed Central

    Şatıroğlu, Ömer; Emre Durakoğlugil, Murtaza; Çetin, Mustafa; Çiçek, Yüksel; Erdoğan, Turan; Duman, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Slow coronary flow (SCF) is an angiographic finding characterized with delayed opacification of epicardial coronary arteries without obstructive coronary disease. Urotensin II (UII) is an important vascular peptide, which has an important role in hypertension, coronary artery disease, and vascular remodeling in addition to potent vasoconstrictor effect. Objectives We investigated UII levels, hypertension, and other atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with SCF, a variety of coronary artery disease. Methods We enrolled 14 patients with SCF and 29 subjects with normal coronary arteries without SCF. We compared the UII levels and the atherosclerotic risk factors between patients with SCF and control subjects with normal coronary flow. Results UII concentrations were significantly higher in patients with SCF compared to controls (711.0 ± 19.4 vs. 701.5 ± 27.2 ng/mL, p = 0.006). We detected a positive correlation between SCF and age (r = 0.476, p = 0.001), BMI (r = 0.404, p = .002), UII concentrations (r = 0.422, p = 0.006), and hypertension (r = 0.594, p = 0.001). Conclusion We identified increased UII levels in patients with SCF. We think that UII concentrations may be informative on SCF pathogenesis due to relationship with inflammation, atherosclerosis, and vascular remodeling. PMID:28180005

  6. Coronary plaque imaging by coronary computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the useful noninvasive imaging modality alternative to the invasive coronary angiography for detecting coronary artery stenoses in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). With the development of technical aspects of coronary CTA, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes by coronary CTA. In this review we discuss the coronary plaque morphology estimated by CTA beyond coronary angiography including the comparison to the currently available other imaging modalities used to examine morphological characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaque. Furthermore, this review underlies the value of a combined assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion in patients with CAD, and adds to an increasing body of evidence suggesting an added diagnostic value when combining both modalities. We hope that an integrated, multi-modality imaging approach will become the gold standard for noninvasive evaluation of coronary plaque morphology and outcome data in clinical practice. PMID:24876919

  7. Preserved Coronary Flow Reserve Effectively Excludes High-Risk Coronary Artery Disease on Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Naya, Masanao; Murthy, Venkatesh L.; Taqueti, Viviany R.; Foster, Courtney R.; Klein, Josh; Garber, Mariya; Dorbala, Sharmila; Hainer, Jon; Blankstein, Ron; Resnic, Frederick; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has limited sensitivity for the detection of high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). We tested the hypothesis that a normal coronary flow reserve (CFR) would be helpful for excluding the presence of high-risk CAD on angiography. Methods We studied 290 consecutive patients undergoing 82Rb PET within 180 d of invasive coronary angiography. High-risk CAD on angiography was defined as 2-vessel disease (≥70% stenosis), including the proximal left anterior descending artery; 3-vessel disease; or left main CAD (≥50% stenosis). Patients with prior Q wave myocardial infarction, elevated troponin levels between studies, prior coronary artery bypass grafting, a left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40%, or severe valvular heart disease were excluded. Results Fifty-five patients (19%) had high-risk CAD on angiography. As expected, the trade-off between the sensitivity and the specificity of the CFR for identifying high-risk CAD varied substantially depending on the cutoff selected. In multivariable analysis, a binary CFR of less than or equal to 1.93 provided incremental diagnostic information for the identification of high-risk CAD beyond the model with the Duke clinical risk score (>25%), percentage of left ventricular ischemia (>10%), transient ischemic dilation index (>1.07), and change in the left ventricular ejection fraction during stress (<2) (P = 0.0009). In patients with normal or slightly to moderately abnormal results on perfusion scans (<10% of left ventricular mass) during stress (n = 136), a preserved CFR (>1.93) excluded high-risk CAD with a high sensitivity (86%) and a high negative predictive value (97%). Conclusion A normal CFR has a high negative predictive value for excluding high-risk CAD on angiography. Although an abnormal CFR increases the probability of significant obstructive CAD, it cannot reliably distinguish significant epicardial stenosis from nonobstructive, diffuse atherosclerosis or microvascular

  8. LDL biochemical modifications: a link between atherosclerosis and aging

    PubMed Central

    Alique, Matilde; Luna, Carlos; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an aging disease in which increasing age is a risk factor. Modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a well-known risk marker for cardiovascular disease. High-plasma LDL concentrations and modifications, such as oxidation, glycosylation, carbamylation and glycoxidation, have been shown to be proatherogenic experimentally in vitro and in vivo. Atherosclerosis results from alterations to LDL in the arterial wall by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence suggests that common risk factors for atherosclerosis raise the likelihood that free ROS are produced from endothelial cells and other cells. Furthermore, oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of endothelial senescence. Thus, endothelial damage and cellular senescence are well-established markers for atherosclerosis. This review examines LDL modifications and discusses the mechanisms of the pathology of atherosclerosis due to aging, including endothelial damage and oxidative stress, and the link between aging and atherosclerosis. PMID:26637360

  9. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only recently beginning to emerge. Here, we review the available literature, characterizing the origin and function of known vascular DC subsets and their important role contributing to the balance of immune activation and immune tolerance governing vascular homeostasis under healthy conditions. We then discuss how homeostatic DC functions are disrupted during atherogenesis, leading to atherosclerosis. The effectiveness of DC-based “atherosclerosis vaccine” therapies in the treatment of atherosclerosis is also reviewed. We further provide suggestions for distinguishing DCs from macrophages and discuss important future directions for the field. PMID:23552284

  10. Abandoning the mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Barton, R

    1975-12-01

    Mentally ill people have been avoided and abandoned by their families and public authorities for hundreds of years. Present day abandonment includes the deployment of professionals from patients to paper; the destruction of availability and effectiveness of institutional facilities; the obfuscation of mental illness by captious, sematic criticism; the aspirations of paramedical and paraprofessional groups; and the subordination of the primary purpose of institutions and physicians to other objectives. The nature of authority is discussed and the need for the treatment of mentally ill people to be based on the art and science of medicine, rather than the pretension and advocacy of the gullible, unqualified or unscrupulous, is noted.

  11. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso) Flavonoids and Their Potential Benefits in Human Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis: an Overview.

    PubMed

    Cappello, A R; Dolce, V; Iacopetta, D; Martello, M; Fiorillo, M; Curcio, R; Muto, L; Dhanyalayam, D

    2016-01-01

    Elevated serum cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL levels are often associated with an increased incidence of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The most effective therapeutic strategy against these diseases is based on statins administration, nevertheless some patients, especially those with metabolic syndrome fail to achieve their recommended LDL targets with statin therapy, moreover, it may induce many serious side effects. Several scientific studies have highlighted a strong correlation between diets rich in flavonoids and cardiovascular risk reduction. In particular, Citrus bergamia Risso, also known as bergamot, has shown a significant degree of hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant/radical scavenging activities. In addition, this fruit has attracted considerable attention due to its peculiar flavonoid composition, since it contains some flavanones that can act as natural statins. Hence, the study of bergamot flavonoids as metabolic regulators offers a great opportunity for screening and discovery of new therapeutic agents. Cholesterol metabolism, flavonoid composition and potential therapeutic use of C. bergamia Risso will be discussed in the following review.

  12. Double jeopardy: multi-modality imaging of monozygotic "twin cap" atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Murray, Scott W; Cooper, Robert M; Appleby, Clare; McCann, Caroline; Binukrishnan, Sukumaran; Radu, Maria D; Stables, Rodney H

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of asymptomatic but potentially vulnerable atherosclerosis is not yet a major focus for clinical Cardiologists. We have illustrated the contemporary investigation and treatment of such disease using a clinical case that involved monozygotic twins. One twin (T1) had unfortunately suffered a cardiac arrest whilst jogging and survived only due to bystander CPR and prompt defibrillation. His identical twin brother (T2), on subsequent investigation, harbours a compositionally identical lesion in a proximal coronary vessel that has not yet ruptured or provoked a clinical event. Following the presentation of both non-invasive and invasive images, we discuss the need for active suspicion and intensive treatment for those people with a 'genetic' risk of future myocardial infarction.

  13. Life Psychosocial Stresses and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Babak; Meshkini, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Kolsoum; Alikhani, Zahra; Haysom, Mal; Rasouli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is hypothesized that the impacts of life events accumulate and can trigger and promote atherosclerosis in susceptible individuals. In the current study, the correlation of total life stressors during 1 year was investigated relative to coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: The study population consisted of 148 males and 152 females aged 35–76 years. The subjects were classified as CAD cases and controls according to the results of coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was scored on the basis of the number and the extent of lesions at coronary arteries. The stressful events of life were assessed using Holmes-Rahe Questionnaire and was presented as total psychological stress scores per year (TPSS). Results: The frequency of cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension was more prevalent in CAD cases than control subjects. The levels of TPSS were increased in patients with CAD compared to the controls (160.3 ± 71.3 vs. 139.8 ± 66.5, P = 0.020). TPSS was also associated positively with the levels of uric acid, erythrocytes counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, aspirin consumption, and negatively with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apo-AI. In logistic regression analysis, TPSS correlated with the occurrence of CAD by the odds ratio of 1.773 (1.073–2.930), P = 0.025, but the association was weakened after adjustment for classical risk factors, especially hypertension. TPSS exhibited significant association with the severity of CAD [F (3,274) = 2.6, P = 0.051]. Conclusions: The results suggest that TPSS are associated with the occurrence and severity of CAD significantly, but the association is not independent. PMID:27833720

  14. Function of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Xiaolei; Yan, Jinchuan; Li, Guohong

    2015-02-01

    CD147, a member of the immunoglobulin super family, is a well-known potent inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases. Studies show that CD147 is upregulated in inflammatory diseases. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Further understanding of the functions of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis may provide a new strategy for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discuss how CD147 contributes to atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

  15. A new algorithm for the management of stable coronary artery disease incorporating CT coronary angiography and fractional flow reserve: how we can improve outcomes and reduce costs.

    PubMed

    Harper, Richard W; Ko, Brian S

    2011-02-21

    Computed tomography coronary angiography is the most reliable diagnostic test for coronary atherosclerosis. Stress testing should be reserved for diagnosis of myocardial ischaemia. Revascularisation, either by stenting or bypass grafts, is commonly performed in patients with stable coronary artery disease but is a double-edged sword. In the presence of ischaemia, revascularisation improves outcomes; in its absence, outcomes are worsened. In current practice, the decision of whether to revascularise is mainly made on the basis of the angiographic appearance of the coronary lesion in question. Physiological assessment of coronary lesions by the use of a pressure wire and measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) often shows that lesions thought to be sufficiently severe to warrant stenting or bypass do not cause ischaemia. A recent randomised study has shown that using FFR measurements to guide coronary stenting resulted in a lower use of stents, decreased costs and superior outcomes at 2 years, compared with traditional angiographic assessment alone. We believe that changes to the methods of health reimbursement are needed in both the public and private health systems, to facilitate greater use of FFR measurement.

  16. Ritonavir binds to and downregulates estrogen receptors: Molecular mechanism of promoting early atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Jin; Wang, Ying; Su, Ke; Liu, Min; Hu, Peng-Chao; Ma, Tian; Li, Jia-Xi; Wei, Lei; Zheng, Zhongliang; Yang, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Estrogenic actions are closely related to cardiovascular disease. Ritonavir (RTV), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor, induces atherosclerosis in an estrogen-related manner. However, how RTV induce pathological phenotypes through estrogen pathway remains unclear. In this study, we found that RTV increases thickness of coronary artery walls of Sprague Dawley rats and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) levels. In addition, RTV could induce foam cell formation, downregulate both estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ expression, upregulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression, and all of them could be partially blocked by 17β-estradiol (E2), suggesting RTV acts as an antagonist for E2. Computational modeling shows a similar interaction with ERα between RTV and 2-aryl indoles, which are highly subtype-selective ligands for ERα. We also found that RTV directly bound to ERα and selectively inhibited the nuclear localization of ERα, and residue Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain (LBD) was essential for the interaction with RTV. In addition, RTV did not change the secondary structure of ERα-LBD like E2, which explained how ERα lost the capacity of nuclear translocation under the treatment of RTV. All of the evidences suggest that ritonavir acts as an antagonist for 17β-estradiol in regulating α subtype estrogen receptor function and early events of atherosclerosis. - Graphical abstract: RTV directly binds to ERα and Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain is essential for the interaction. - Highlights: • RTV increases the thickness of rat coronary artery wall and foam cell formation. • RTV downregulates the expression of ERα and ERβ. • RTV inhibits ERα promoter activity. • RTV directly binds to ERα and the key amino acid is Leu536. • RTV inhibits the nuclear translocation of ERα and GPER.

  17. SRY gene transferred by extracellular vesicles accelerates atherosclerosis by promotion of leucocyte adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jin; Guan, Weiwei; Tan, Xiaorong; Chen, Caiyu; Li, Liangpeng; Wang, Na; Zou, Xue; Zhou, Faying; Wang, Jialiang; Pei, Fang; Chen, Xinjian; Luo, Hao; Wang, Xinquan; He, Duofen; Zhou, Lin; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-08-01

    We set out to investigate whether and how SRY (sex-determining region, Y) DNAs in plasma EVs (extracellular vesicles) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PCR and gene sequencing found the SRY gene fragment in plasma EVs from male, but not female, patients; EVs from male patients with CAD (coronary artery disease) had a higher SRY GCN (gene copy number) than healthy subjects. Additional studies found that leucocytes, the major source of plasma EVs, had higher SRY GCN and mRNA and protein expression in male CAD patients than controls. After incubation with EVs from SRY-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, monocytes (THP-1) and HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells), which do not endogenously express SRY protein, were found to express newly synthesized SRY protein. This resulted in an increase in the adherence factors CD11-a in THP-1 cells and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) in HUVECs. EMSA showed that SRY protein increased the promoter activity of CD11-a in THP-1 cells and ICAM-1 in HUVECs. There was an increase in THP-1 cells adherent to HUVECs after incubation with SRY-EVs. SRY DNAs transferred from EVs have pathophysiological significance in vivo; injection of SRY EVs into ApoE-/- (apolipoprotein-knockout) mice accelerated atherosclerosis. The SRY gene in plasma EVs transferred to vascular endothelial cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; this mechanism provides a new approach to the understanding of inheritable CAD in men.

  18. High-density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration and Subclinical Atherosclerosis of the Carotid Arteries in Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Maryam; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Abbott, Robert D.; Okamura, Tomonori; Takashima, Naoyuki; Torii, Sayuki; Saito, Yoshino; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Miyagawa, Naoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kadota, Aya; Sekikawa, Akira; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    Objective The association of high-density lipoprotein particle (HDL-P) with atherosclerosis may be stronger than that of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Whether associations persist in populations at low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. This study examines the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaque counts among Japanese men, who characteristically have higher HDL-C levels and a lower CHD burden than those in men of Western populations. Methods We cross-sectionally examined a community-based sample of 870 Japanese men aged 40-79 years, free of known clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and not on lipid-lowering medication. Participants were randomly selected among Japanese living in Kusatsu City in Shiga, Japan. Results Both HDL-P and HDL-C were inversely and independently associated with cIMT in models adjusted for conventional CHD risk factors, including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and diabetes. HDL-P maintained an association with cIMT after further adjustment for HDL-C (P<0.01), whereas the association of HDL-C with cIMT was noticeably absent after inclusion of HDL-P in the model. In plaque counts of the carotid arteries, HDL-P was significantly associated with a reduction in plaque count, whereas HDL-C was not. Conclusion HDL-P, in comparison to HDL-C, is more strongly associated with measures of carotid atherosclerosis in a cross-sectional study of Japanese men. Findings demonstrate that, HDL-P is a strong correlate of subclinical atherosclerosis even in a population at low risk for CHD. PMID:25687270

  19. Atherosclerosis susceptibility differences among progenitors of recombinant inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Paigen, B; Ishida, B Y; Verstuyft, J; Winters, R B; Albee, D

    1990-01-01

    Female mice of 16 inbred mouse strains were fed an atherogenic diet for 14 weeks and were then evaluated for atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta. Strains C57BL/6, C57BR/cd, C57L, and SM were very susceptible to atherosclerosis, with lesion area/aortic cross-sections in the range of 4500 to 8000 microns 2. Strains C58 and SWR were intermediate in susceptibility, with lesion area/sections in the range of 1670 to 1690 microns 2. Strains 129, AKR, DBA/2, and BALB/c had only small lesions in the range of 20 to 350 microns 2/section; strains C3H, NZB, CBA, HRS, SJL, and A had no lesions after 14 weeks. Lesion formation in five strains was compared at several time points. Strain C57BL/6 mice developed lesions by 7 weeks, and these continued to grow until all mice had large atheromatous plaques in the aorta and coronary arteries. Strains AKR and DBA/2 also had fatty streak lesions as early as 7 or 8 weeks, but these lesions had not progressed in size by 14 weeks. Strains BALB/c and C3H, which were both resistant to lesion formation at 14 weeks, diverged from each other as time progressed. By 1 year, BALB/c mice had large lesions, but C3H mice had none. Most of the inbred strains chosen for evaluation are the progenitors of recombinant inbred sets of strains, a genetic tool that greatly facilitates the analysis of strain differences. This survey indicates seven additional recombinant inbred sets of strains whose progenitors differ in atherosclerosis susceptibility: BXD, AKXL, SWXJ, NX8, 129XB, NXSM, and B6NXAKRN. An analysis of these recombinant inbred strains may reveal additional mouse genes affecting atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  20. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and new opportunities for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Scott, J

    2002-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common disease in the industrialised world and by 2020 is predicted to be the number 1 cause of death worldwide. It is a disease of the intima and media of small to medium sized arteries that develop slowly over many years. A number of risk factors for atherosclerosis have been identified, some of these are reversible and some are not. Most prominent amongst these is an elevated level of plasma cholesterol. The lowering of cholesterol reduces the risk of heart attacks, strokes and all forms of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Nonetheless, 70% of patients go on to get symptomatic disease. The disease process sets off an inflammatory response involving the vascular endothelium and both T and B cells of the immune system. Adhesion molecules are induced and proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors are produced by cells that orchestrate the atherosclerotic process. Narrowing the lumen of the artery leads to ischaemic symptoms. Within lesions under the influence of proteolytic enzymes released from activated macrophages (or foam cells--the hallmark of atherosclerosis) the centre of the plaque becomes liquefied to take on it's characteristic "gruel" like appearance. The shoulders of such plaque weaken and it becomes prone to rupture. Plaque rupture may lead to catastrophic thrombosis of coronary or cerebral arteries. The large amounts of tissue factor produced by macrophages make this a particularly likely event. On ulcerated plaques adherent platelets and thrombus create showers of emboli leading to ischaemic attacks. Like the effective treatment of LDL and it's role in the prevention of ischaemic attacks there has been a move to develop new drugs that raise HDL. The discovery of the role of a new class of ABC transporter, defective in Tangiers disease, responsible for cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells including the macrophage has created great excitement around ABC1 as a drug target. New areas, new possible targets and new genetic

  1. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  2. [Nonthyroidal illness (NTI)].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masami

    2012-11-01

    Thyroxine (T4), a major secretory product of thyroid gland, needs to be converted to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) by iodothyronine deiodinases to exert its biological effect. Nonthyroidal illness, also known as low T3 syndrome, is associated with low serum T3 concentrations, which are inversely correlated to the severity of the illness. The patients with nonthyroidal illness do not show compensatory rise in serum TSH concentrations, and sometimes develop low serum T4 and TSH concentrations. It has been postulated that decreased extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3 is a responsible mechanism underlying low T3 syndrome. The roles of three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, D3) in the pathophysiology of nonthyroidal illness are discussed.

  3. Caregivers and Serious Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... or those we choose to call family. Caregiver Responsibilities When a family member has a serious illness , ... transportation; do housework; handle your loved one’s former responsibilities, such as child care; and provide help with ...

  4. Help for Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... call, or go the website of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255). Trained crisis ... improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. Learn more about clinical trials on the ...

  5. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... is present. For More Information Share Chronic Illness & Mental Health Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... For more information, see the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) booklet on Depression at http://www.nimh. ...

  6. Imaging arterial cells, atherosclerosis, and restenosis by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Simianu, Vlad; Locker, Matthew J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-02-01

    By integrating sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope platform, multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of arteries and atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated. CARS signals arising from CH II-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a carotid artery. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are rich in CH II bonds in their cross-linking residues. The extracellular matrix organization was further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. The system is capable of identifying different atherosclerotic lesion stages with sub-cellular resolution. The stages of atherosclerosis, such as macrophage infiltration, lipid-laden foam cell accumulation, extracellular lipid distribution, fibrous tissue deposition, plaque establishment, and formation of other complicated lesions could be viewed by our multimodal CARS microscope. Collagen percentages in the region adjacent to coronary artery stents were resolved. High correlation between NLO and histology imaging evidenced the validity of the NLO imaging. The capability of imaging significant components of an arterial wall and distinctive stages of atherosclerosis in a label-free manner suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor the onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  7. Near Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) Molecular Imaging of Oxidized LDL with an Autoantibody in Experimental Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Ramzi Y; Woollard, Kevin J.; Hyde, Gareth D.; Boyle, Joseph J; Bicknell, Colin; Chang, Shang-Hung; Malik, Talat H; Hara, Tetsuya; Mauskapf, Adam; Granger, David W; Johnson, Jason L.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Matthews, Paul M; Jaffer, Farouc A; Haskard, Dorian O

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to develop a quantitative antibody-based near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) approach for the imaging of oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis. LO1, a well- characterized monoclonal autoantibody that reacts with malondialdehyde-conjugated LDL, was labeled with a NIRF dye to yield LO1-750. LO1-750 specifically identified necrotic core in ex vivo human coronary lesions. Injection of LO1-750 into high fat (HF) fed atherosclerotic Ldlr−/− mice led to specific focal localization within the aortic arch and its branches, as detected by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) combined with micro-computed tomography (CT). Ex vivo confocal microscopy confirmed LO1-750 subendothelial localization of LO1-750 at sites of atherosclerosis, in the vicinity of macrophages. When compared with a NIRF reporter of MMP activity (MMPSense-645-FAST), both probes produced statistically significant increases in NIRF signal in the Ldlr−/− model in relation to duration of HF diet. Upon withdrawing the HF diet, the reduction in oxLDL accumulation, as demonstrated with LO1-750, was less marked than the effect seen on MMP activity. In the rabbit, in vivo injected LO1-750 localization was successfully imaged ex vivo in aortic lesions with a customised intra-arterial NIRF detection catheter. A partially humanized chimeric LO1-Fab-Cys localized similarly to the parent antibody in murine atheroma showing promise for future translation. PMID:26911995

  8. Combining OCT and a fluorescence intensity imaging method for atherosclerosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shanshan; Saidi, Arya; Jing, Joe; Liu, Gangjun; Yin, Jiechen; Narula, Jagat; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (like myocardial infarction) is caused by atherosclerosis. It cause over 30% of all deaths in North America and are the most common cause of death in European men under 65 years of age and the second most common cause in women. To diagnose this atherosclerosis before it gets rupture is the most effect way to increase the chance of survival for patients who suffer from this disease. The crucial tusk is how to find out vulnerable plaques. In resent years optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a very useful tool for intravascular imaging, since it has high axial and transverse resolution. OCT can tell the detail structure inside the plaque like the thickness of plaque cap which is an important factor to identify vulnerable plaques. But we still need to find out the biochemical characteristics that is unique for vulnerable plaques (like inflammation). Fluorescence molecular imaging is a standard way to exam the biochemical property of biological samples. So we integrate these two techniques together into one probe. Our probe is comprised of a double-clad fiber (DCF) and a grin lens, and rotates with a micro mirror in front. The single-mode inner core of the DCF transmits both OCT and fluorescence excitation light, and the multimode inner cladding is used to detect fluorescence signal. In vitro result shows that this is a possible way for more accurate diagnose of vulnerable plaques.

  9. Post-translational modifications in rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis: Focus on citrullination and carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Pecani, Arbi; Conti, Fabrizio; Mancini, Riccardo; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease known to be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. The role of inflammation and immunity in atherosclerotic process offers possible explanations for the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with RA. The immune response to citrullinated peptides has been extensively studied in RA; antibodies directed to citrullinated peptides are now a cornerstone for RA diagnosis. However, few studies have investigated the response to citrullinated peptides and the development of atherosclerotic plaque. Antibodies to carbamylated proteins can be detected before the clinical onset of RA, suggesting a potential predictive role for these antibodies; on the other hand, carbamylation of lipoproteins has been described in patients with cardiovascular disease. This review examines the role of citrullination and carbamylation, two post-translational protein modifications that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of both RA and atherosclerosis, expanding the similarities between these two diseases. Further investigation on the role of the immune response to modified proteins may contribute to a better comprehension of cardiovascular disease in patients with RA.

  10. Genetics of Lipid Traits and Relationship to Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Tanya E.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of plasma lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis, varying degrees of evidence surround the causal associations of lipoproteins with coronary artery disease (CAD). These causal contributions can be assessed by employing genetic variants as unbiased proxies for lipid levels. A relatively large number of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) variants strongly associate with CAD, confirming the causal impact of this lipoprotein on atherosclerosis. Although not as firmly established, genetic evidence supporting a causal role of triglycerides (TG) in CAD is growing. Conversely, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) variants not associated with LDL-C or TG have not yet been shown to be convincingly associated with CAD, raising questions about the causality of HDL-C in atherosclerosis. Finally, genetic variants at the LPA locus associated with lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] are decisively linked to CAD, indicating a causal role for Lp(a). Translational investigation of CAD-associated lipid variants may identify novel regulatory pathways with therapeutic potential to alter CAD risk. PMID:23881580

  11. Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amit V; Emdin, Connor A; Drake, Isabel; Natarajan, Pradeep; Bick, Alexander G; Cook, Nancy R; Chasman, Daniel I; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Rader, Daniel J; Fuster, Valentin; Boerwinkle, Eric; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ridker, Paul M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-12-15

    Background Both genetic and lifestyle factors contribute to individual-level risk of coronary artery disease. The extent to which increased genetic risk can be offset by a healthy lifestyle is unknown. Methods Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts - 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS), and 22,389 in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) - and in 4260 participants in the cross-sectional BioImage Study for whom genotype and covariate data were available. We also determined adherence to a healthy lifestyle among the participants using a scoring system consisting of four factors: no current smoking, no obesity, regular physical activity, and a healthy diet. Results The relative risk of incident coronary events was 91% higher among participants at high genetic risk (top quintile of polygenic scores) than among those at low genetic risk (bottom quintile of polygenic scores) (hazard ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 2.09). A favorable lifestyle (defined as at least three of the four healthy lifestyle factors) was associated with a substantially lower risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (defined as no or only one healthy lifestyle factor), regardless of the genetic risk category. Among participants at high genetic risk, a favorable lifestyle was associated with a 46% lower relative risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.63). This finding corresponded to a reduction in the standardized 10-year incidence of coronary events from 10.7% for an unfavorable lifestyle to 5.1% for a favorable lifestyle in ARIC, from 4.6% to 2.0% in WGHS, and from 8.2% to 5.3% in MDCS. In the BioImage Study, a favorable lifestyle was associated with significantly less coronary-artery calcification within each genetic risk

  12. The Association of Elevated HDL Levels With Carotid Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Women With Untreated Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidi, Helen; Pavlidis, George; Trivilou, Paraskevi; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Tzortzis, Stavros; Xenogiannis, Iosif; Schoinas, Antonios; Lekakis, John

    2015-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a negative risk factor, is positively associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease. We investigated the association between high HDL-C levels and target organ damage (TOD) in never treated women with hypertension. We measured HDL-C levels in 117 women followed by estimation of TODs, that is, pulse wave velocity, microalbuminuria, left ventricular mass index, coronary flow reserve, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Women were divided into 2 groups (HDLH and HDLL), regarding HDL-C quartiles (upper quartile vs the first 3 lower quartiles). In HDLH group : HDL ≥70 mg/dL), cIMT was nonindependently, negatively related to HDL-C (ρ = -.42, P < .05). Using receiver -operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis in the HDLH group, we concluded that the cutoff value of HDL ≥76.5 mg/dL moderately predicted the absence of carotid atherosclerosis (area under the curve: 0.77, P = .02; confidence interval: 0.57-0.97; sensitivity 73% and specificity 67%). Increased HDL-C may predict the absence of carotid atherosclerosis in middle-age women with untreated essential hypertension and consequently contribute to total cardiovascular risk estimation and treatment planning.

  13. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) seem resistant to atherosclerosis despite highly elevated plasma lipids during hibernation and active state.

    PubMed

    Arinell, Karin; Sahdo, Berolla; Evans, Alina L; Arnemo, Jon M; Baandrup, Ulrik; Fröbert, Ole

    2012-06-01

    Hibernation is an extreme physiological challenge for the brown bear (Ursus arctos) in which metabolism is based mainly on lipids. The study objective was to compare plasma lipids in hibernating and active free-ranging brown bears and relate them to arterial histopathology. Blood was drawn from seven immobilized free-ranging brown bears (three females, 2-3 years old) during hibernation in February and from the same bears while active in June and analyzed by enzymatic and automated hematology methods within 48 hours of sampling. Left anterior descending coronary arteries and aortic arches from 12 bears (six females, 1.5-12 years old) killed in hunting were examined by histopathology. Total plasma cholesterol decreased from hibernation to the active period (11.08 ± 1.04 mmol/L vs. 7.89 ± 1.96 mmol/L, P= 0.0028) as did triglyceride (3.16 ± 0.62 mmol/L vs. 1.44 ± 0.27 mmol/L, P= 0.00012) and LDL cholesterol (4.30 ± 0.71 mmol/L vs. 2.02 ± 1.03 mmol/L, P= 0.0075), whereas HDL cholesterol was unchanged. No atherosclerosis, fatty streaks, foam cell infiltration, or inflammation were seen in any arterial samples. Brown bears tolerate elevated cholesterol levels, obesity, physical inactivity, and circulatory slow flow during hibernation without signs of -atherosclerosis. This species might serve as a reverse translational model for atherosclerosis resistance.

  14. Oxidized high-density lipoprotein accelerates atherosclerosis progression by inducing the imbalance between treg and teff in LDLR knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ru, Ding; Zhiqing, He; Lin, Zhu; Feng, Wu; Feng, Zhang; Jiayou, Zhang; Yusheng, Ren; Min, Fan; Chun, Liang; Zonggui, Wu

    2015-05-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction has been widely reported in clinic, and oxidation of HDL (ox-HDL) was shown to be one of the most common modifications in vivo and participate in the progression of atherosclerosis. But the behind mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, we firstly analyzed and found strong relationship between serum ox-HDL levels and risk factors of coronary artery diseases in clinic, then the effects of ox-HDL in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis in LDLR knockout mice were investigated by infusion of ox-HDL dissolved in chitosan hydrogel before the formation of lesions in vivo. Several new evidence were shown: (i) the serum levels of ox-HDL peaked early before the formation of lesions in LDLR mice fed with high fat diet similar to oxidative low density lipoprotein, (ii) the formation of atherosclerotic lesions could be accelerated by infusion of ox-HDL, (iii) the pro-atherosclerotic effects of ox-HDL were accompanied by imbalanced levels of effector and regulatory T cells and relative gene expressions, which implied that imbalance of teff and treg might contribute to the pro-atherosclerosis effects of ox-HDL.

  15. Sex Steroids Block the Initiation of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Naftolin, Frederick; Mehr, Holly; Fadiel, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in men and women. This so-called "hardening of the arteries" results from advanced atherogenesis, the accumulation and death of subendothelial fat-laden macrophages (vascular plaque). The macrophages are attracted as the result of signals from injured vessels recruiting and activating cells to quell the injury by inflammation. Among the recruited cells are circulating monocytes that may be captured by the formation of neural cell adhesion molecule (nCAM) tethers between the monocytes and vascular endothelium; the tethers are dependent on electrostatic binding between distal segments of apposed nCAM molecules. The capture of monocytes is followed by their entry into the subendothelial area as macrophages, many of which will remain and become the fat-laden foam cells in vascular plaque. Neural cell adhesion molecules are subject to sialylation that blocks their electrostatic binding. We showed that estradiol-induced nCAM sialylases are present in vascular endothelial cells and tested whether sex steroid pretreatment of human vascular endothelium could inhibit the capture of monocytes. Using in vitro techniques, pretreatment of human arterial endothelial cells with estradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and dihydrotestosterone all induced sialylation of endothelial cells and, in a dose-response manner, reduced the capture of monocytes. Steroid hormones are protective against atherogenesis and its sequellae. Sex steroid depletion is associated with atherosclerosis. Based on this knowledge plus our results using sex steroid pretreatment of endothelial cells, we propose that the blockade of the initial step in atherogenesis by sex steroid-induced nCAM sialylation may be crucial to hormonal prevention of atherosclerosis.

  16. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure-induced atherosclerosis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongmei; Fang, Guoqiang; Greenberg, Harly; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the USA and is recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Identification of atherosclerosis risk factor attributable to OSA may provide opportunity to develop preventive measures for cardiovascular risk reduction. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a prominent feature of OSA pathophysiology and may be a major mechanism linking OSA to arteriosclerosis. Animal studies demonstrated that CIH exposure facilitated high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced atherosclerosis, accelerated the progression of existing atherosclerosis, and induced atherosclerotic lesions in the absence of other atherosclerosis risk factors, demonstrating that CIH is an independent causal factor of atherosclerosis. Comparative studies revealed major differences between CIH-induced and the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis. Systemically, CIH was a much weaker inducer of atherosclerosis. CIH and HCD differentially activated inflammatory pathways. Histologically, CIH-induced atherosclerotic plaques had no clear necrotic core, contained a large number of CD31+ endothelial cells, and had mainly elastin deposition, whereas HCD-induced plaques had typical necrotic cores and fibrous caps, contained few endothelial cells, and had mainly collagen deposition. Metabolically, CIH caused mild, but HCD caused more severe dyslipidemia. Mechanistically, CIH did not, but HCD did, cause macrophage foam cell formation. NF-κB p50 gene deletion augmented CIH-induced, but not HCD-induced atherosclerosis. These differences reflect the intrinsic differences between the two types of atherosclerosis in terms of pathological nature and underlying mechanisms and support the notion that CIH-induced atherosclerosis is a new paradigm that differs from the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis.

  17. Statins and atherosclerosis: the role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Storino Farina, Marcelo; Rojano Rada, Jairo; Molina Garrido, Antony; Martínez, Xiomara; Pulgar, Alfredo; Paniagua, Roxanna; Garrido, Jorge

    2015-11-26

    Atherosclerosis is an immune-inflammatory disease, in which pathophysiological mechanisms include inflammation patterns and epigenetic changes that alter gene expression of several inflammatory and non-inflammatory mediators. Epigenetics is offering explanations on how diet, environmental factors and lifestyle can influence the onset and progression of the disease, and how these alterations can be transmitted to the following generations without any changes in DNA sequences. Statins, through their pleiotropic effects, provide a useful tool in controlling the progression of plaques and their subsequent impact.

  18. Imaging and Nanomedicine in Inflammatory Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Willem J. M.; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineering provides unique opportunities to better understand and manage atherosclerotic disease. The field is entering a new era that merges the latest biological insights into inflammatory disease processes with targeted imaging and nanomedicine. Preclinical cardiovascular molecular imaging allows the in vivo study of targeted nanotherapeutics specifically directed toward immune system components that drive atherosclerotic plaque development and complication. The first multicenter trials highlight the potential contribution of multimodality imaging to more efficient drug development. This review describes how the integration of engineering, nanotechnology, and cardiovascular immunology may yield precision diagnostics and efficient therapeutics for atherosclerosis and its ischemic complications. PMID:24898749

  19. Non-invasive coronary angiography with multi-detector computed tomography: comparison to conventional X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Stillman, Arthur E; Halliburton, Sandy S; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Painter, Tracy; White, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    Selective coronary angiography introduced clinical coronary imaging in the late 1950s. The angiographic identification of high-grade coronary lesions in patients with acute and chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) led to the development of surgical and percutaneous coronary revascularization. However, the fact that CAD remains the major cause of death in North America and Europe demonstrates the need for novel, complementary diagnostic strategies. These are driven by the need to characterize both increasingly advanced disease stages but also early, asymptomatic disease development. Complex revascularization techniques for patients with advanced disease stages will initiate a growing demand for 3-dimensional coronary imaging and integration of imaging modalities with new mechanical therapeutic devices. An emerging focus is atherosclerosis imaging with the goal to identify subclinical disease stages as the basis for pharmacological intervention aimed at disease stabilization or reversal. Non-invasive coronary imaging with coronary multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) allows both assessment of luminal stenosis and subclinical disease of the arterial wall. Its complementary role in the assessment of early and advanced stages of CAD is increasingly recognized.

  20. Clearance of chylomicron remnants in normolipidaemic patients with coronary artery disease: case control study over three years.

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, M. S.; Grosskopf, I.; Rassin, T.; Miller, H.; Charach, G.; Rotmensch, H. H.; Liron, M.; Rubinstein, A.; Iaina, A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that subjects who clear chylomicron remnants slowly from plasma may be at higher risk of coronary artery disease than indicated by their fasting plasma lipid concentrations. DESIGN--Case control study over three years. SETTING--An 800 bed general municipal hospital. SUBJECTS--85 normolipidaemic patients with coronary artery disease selected prospectively and matched with 85 normolipidaemic subjects with normal coronary arteries on angiography. INTERVENTIONS--All subjects were given a vitamin A fat loading test which specifically labels intestinal lipoproteins with retinyl palmitate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Postprandial lipoprotein metabolism. RESULTS--The area below the chylomicron remnant retinyl palmitate curve was significantly increased in the coronary artery disease group as compared with the controls (mean 23.4 (SD 15.0) v 15.3 (8.9) mumol/l.h; 95% confidence interval of difference 4.37 to 11.82). CONCLUSION--Normolipidaemic patients with coronary artery disease had significantly higher concentrations of chylomicron remnants in plasma than normolipidaemic subjects with normal coronary vessels. This may explain the mechanism underlying the susceptibility to atherosclerosis of coronary artery disease patients with normal fasting lipid values. As diet and drugs can ameliorate the accumulation of postprandial lipoproteins in plasma, the concentration of chylomicron remnants should be measured in patients at high risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:8616304

  1. Prediction of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in patients with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and low HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Corrado, Egle; Coppola, Giuseppe; Muratori, Ida; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2008-10-01

    Low HDL-cholesterol concentrations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and recent evidences suggest that HDL may aggravate the atherosclerotic process promoting inflammation: HDL are anti-inflammatory in the absence of inflammation but can become proinflammatory in the presence of atherosclerosis. Yet, no data is available on the cardiovascular outcome in subjects with low HDL-cholesterol and early stages of atherosclerosis. Therefore, we included in a prospective 5-year follow-up study 150 subjects with low HDL-cholesterol concentrations and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid colour doppler, evaluating at baseline all the established traditional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. male gender, older age, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, family history of coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia), as well as levels of two markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and fibrinogen). At the end of the follow-up we registered vascular events in the 21% of patients and we found that lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations were associated with ischemic stroke (p=.0164), peripheral arterial disease (p=.0248) and the presence of any clinical event (p=.0105). By multivariate analysis we searched, among all baseline parameters, for independent variables associated with the events and we found a predictive role for elevated fibrinogen concentrations (OR 6.3, 95% CI 2.0-19.6, p=.0016), family history of coronary artery disease (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.7-12.8, p=.0045) and lower HDL-cholesterol levels (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9, p=.0278). These findings further suggest a synergistic role of low-HDL and inflammation on the atherosclerotic disease progression from subclinical lesions to clinical events. Yet, their therapeutical implications remain to be established in future studies.

  2. Effect of a multimodality natural medicine program on carotid atherosclerosis in older subjects: a pilot trial of Maharishi Vedic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fields, Jeremy Z; Walton, Kenneth G; Schneider, Robert H; Nidich, Sanford; Pomerantz, Rhoda; Suchdev, Parmi; Castillo-Richmond, Amparo; Payne, Kathleen; Clark, Elizabeth T; Rainforth, Maxwell

    2002-04-15

    Although the onset and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD) involve multiple risk factors, few intervention studies have attempted to modify these factors simultaneously. This pilot study tested the effect of a multimodality intervention involving dietary, exercise, herbal food supplement, and stress reduction approaches from a traditional system of natural medicine, Maharishi Vedic Medicine (MVM). The primary outcome measure was carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a noninvasive measure of peripheral atherosclerosis and surrogate measure of coronary atherosclerosis. Comparison groups included modern medicine (conventional dietary, exercise, and multivitamin approaches) and usual care (no added intervention). Of 57 healthy seniors (mean age 74 years) randomized to the 3 treatment groups, 46 completed IMT post-testing. Carotid IMT was determined by B-mode ultrasound before and after 1 year of treatment. IMT decreased in a larger fraction of MVM subjects (16 of 20) than in the modern (5 of 9) and usual care (7 of 14) groups combined (i.e., 12 of 23; odds ratio 3.7, p = 0.05). For subjects with multiple CHD risk factors ("high-risk" subjects, n = 15), IMT decreased more in the MVM (-0.32 +/- 0.23 mm, mean +/- SD) than in the usual care (+0.022 +/- 0.085; p = 0.009) or modern (-0.082 +/- 0.095, p = 0.10) groups. Within-group reductions in IMT were significant for all MVM subjects (-0.15 +/- 0.21, n = 20, p = 0.004) and for high-risk MVM subjects (n = 6, p = 0.01). These results show that this multimodality traditional approach can attenuate atherosclerosis in older subjects, particularly those with marked CHD risk.

  3. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  4. Coronary artery fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital coronary artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. Coronary arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. Coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067

  5. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  6. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    MedlinePlus

    ... to open coronary arteries that are narrowed or blocked by the buildup of atherosclerotic plaque. PCI may ... that will highlight the blockage. To open a blocked artery, your doctor will insert another catheter over ...

  7. Coronary artery spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  8. High-Dose B-Vitamin Supplementation and Progression of Subclinical Atherosclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Howard N.; Mack, Wendy J.; Dustin, Laurie; Mahrer, Peter R.; Azen, Stanley P.; Detrano, Robert; Selhub, Jacob; Alaupovic, Petar; Liu, Chao-ran; Liu, Ci-hua; Hwang, Juliana; Wilcox, Alison G.; Selzer, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), it remains unclear whether homocysteine is a cause or a marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. We determined whether reduction of tHcy levels with B-vitamin supplementation reduces subclinical atherosclerosis progression. Methods In this double-blind clinical trial, 506 participants 40–89 years of age with an initial tHcy >8.5 μmol/L without diabetes and CVD were randomized to high-dose B-vitamin supplementation (folic acid 5 mg + vitamin B12 0.4 mg + vitamin B6 50 mg) or matching placebo for 3.1 years. Subclinical atherosclerosis progression across 3 vascular beds was assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography to measure carotid artery intima-media thickness (primary outcome) and multidetector spiral computed tomography to measure aortic and coronary artery calcium (secondary outcome). Results Although the overall carotid artery intima-media thickness progression rate was lower with B-vitamin supplementation than with placebo, statistically significant between-group differences were not found (p=0.31). However, among subjects with baseline tHcy≥9.1 μmol/L, those randomized to B-vitamin supplementation had a statistically significant lower average rate of carotid artery intima-media thickness progression compared with placebo (p=0.02); among subjects with a baseline tHcy <9.1 μmol/L there was no significant treatment effect (p-value for treatment interaction=0.02). B-vitamin supplementation had no effect on progression of aortic or coronary artery calcification overall or within subgroups. Conclusion High-dose B-vitamin supplementation significantly reduces progression of early stage subclinical atherosclerosis (carotid artery intima-media thickness) in well-nourished healthy B-vitamin “replete” individuals at low-risk for CVD with a fasting tHcy >9.1 μmol/L. PMID:19118243

  9. Coronary Artery Fistula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Figure 1A; oblique, Figure 1B), the left circumflex artery was identified by its black central lumen and noted to arise normally from the left main...but the mid left circumflex coronary artery was less well seen because of volume averaging with the left atrium and pulmonary venous confluence which...Figures 1C-D. Select oblique conventional x-ray views (C, early phase; D, late phase) from a coronary catheterization study following injection of

  10. Illness perception of nursing students regarding myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Grankvist, Gunne; Brink, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Health interventions aimed at secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) are important. Patients' illness perceptions influence adherence behaviors and actions. Providing adequate infomation about the disease and lifestyle interventions is an important task for health care professionals. Therefore, a question of interest is how health care professionals perceive myocardial infarction themselves. The aim with the present study was to investigate how nursing students at a Swedish university perceived MI and to determine whether their illness perceptions changed during their six-term program of education. Illness perception was measured using the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) in a sample of 196 students enrolled in terms 2, 4, and 6 of the nursing program. A quasi-experimental design was used. Illness perceptions among nursing students were also compared to illness perceptions in a group of patients with coronary heart disease. The belief that it is possible to control MI through medical treatment became stronger during the course of nursing education. Nursing students were found to view the consequences of MI as serious, but also as medically treatable and responsive to lifestyle changes.

  11. The inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm and coronary artery disease. Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Monte, I; Capodanno, D; Licciardi, S; Ferraro, C; Giannone, M T; Grasso, S; Nicolosi, E

    2006-04-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is defined as an unusually thickened aneurysmatic wall, encircled by a wide dense perianeurysmal and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis with adjacent tissues adhesion, and is now considered as an extreme shape of the common phlogistic process involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Latest studies demonstrated that inflammation plays an important role in coronary disease and in other atherosclerosis manifestations. We introduce the clinical case of a patient with IAAA who developed an acute myocardial infarction 6 months after the surgical procedure on the aorta. Through a literature review about IAAA we stress the clinical usefulness of the inflammatory markers as independent predictors in management of patients with coronary disease and we present the hypothesis, related to the introduced case, of an advanced coronary disease, aggravated or clinically revealed after the cytokine storm related to important localized inflammatory engagements or great vascular surgery treatments.

  12. Noninvasive Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression: Status of Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sandfort, Veit; Lima, Joao A.C.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The process of coronary artery disease progression is infrequently visualized. Intravascular ultrasound has been used to gain important insights but is invasive and therefore limited to high risk patients. For low to moderate risk patients, noninvasive methods may be useful to quantitatively monitor plaque progression or regression, and to understand and personalize atherosclerosis therapy. This review discusses the potential for coronary CT angiography (CCTA) to evaluate the extent and subtypes of coronary plaque. CT technology is evolving and image quality of the method approaches the level required for plaque progression monitoring. Methods to quantify plaque on CT angiography are reviewed as well as a discussion of their use in clinical trials. Limitations of CCTA compared to competing modalities include limited evaluation of plaque subcomponents and incomplete knowledge of the value of the method especially in patients with low to moderate cardiovascular risk. PMID:26156016

  13. Relationship between Calcium Score and Myocardial Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Fabio Paiva Rossini; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco; dos Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet M. Damas; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Half the patients with coronary artery disease present with sudden death - or acute infarction as first symptom, making early diagnosis pivotal. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is frequently used in the assessment of these patients, but it does not detect the disease without flow restriction, exposes the patient to high levels of radiation and is costly. On the other hand, with less radiological exposure, calcium score is directly correlated to the presence and extension of coronary atherosclerosis, and also to the risk of cardiovascular events. Even though calcium score is a tried-and-true method for stratification of asymptomatic patients, its use is still reduced in this context, since current guidelines are contradictory to its use on symptomatic diseases. The aim of this review is to identify, on patients under investigation for coronary artery disease, the main evidence of the use of calcium score associated with functional evaluation and scintigraphy. PMID:27437867

  14. Modulation of atherosclerosis by N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reviewed literature regarding the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on risk factors for atherosclerosis in human subjects. Dietary intervention with long chain n-3 PUFA decreased some risk factor (s) for atherosclerosis in most human studies reviewed. These benefits resulted ...

  15. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  16. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells.

  17. Mechanisms that regulate macrophage burden in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) relevant to atherosclerosis include monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs). A decade ago, studies on macrophage behavior in atherosclerotic lesions were often limited to quantification of total macrophage area in cross-sections of plaques. While technological advances are still needed to examine plaque MP populations in an increasingly dynamic and informative manner, innovative methods to interrogate the biology of MPs in atherosclerotic plaques developed in the last few years point to a number of mechanisms that regulate the accumulation and function of MPs within plaques. Here, I review the evolution of atherosclerotic plaques with respect to changes in the MP compartment from the initiation of plaque to its progression and regression, discussing the roles that recruitment, proliferation, and retention of MPs play at these different disease stages. Additional work in the future will be needed to better distinguish macrophages and DCs in plaque and to address some basic unknowns in the field, including just how cholesterol drives accumulation of macrophages in lesions to build plaques in the first place and how macrophages as major effectors of innate immunity work together with components of the adaptive immune response to drive atherosclerosis. Answers to these questions are sought with the goal in mind of reversing disease where it exists and preventing its development where it does not. PMID:24855200

  18. Quantum dot mediated imaging of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayagopal, Ashwath; Su, Yan Ru; Blakemore, John L.; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2009-04-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis is associated with leukocyte infiltration within lesions. We describe a technique for the ex vivo imaging of cellular recruitment in atherogenesis which utilizes quantum dots (QD) to color-code different cell types within lesion areas. Spectrally distinct QD were coated with the cell-penetrating peptide maurocalcine to fluorescently-label immunomagnetically isolated monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes. QD-maurocalcine bioconjugates labeled both cell types with a high efficiency, preserved cell viability, and di